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Last updated: January 24, 2017.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1841 to 1845


1841:


[1841 /] 1845 // Manna in province of Van, Asia Minor, was L. esculenta. / Gardeners' Chronicle, July 11, 1846. [II; 811. "Manna fallen from Heaven." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1846 no. 28 (July 11): 463. "It appears from the researches of Professor Miquel that the 'manna' which fell in the province of Van, in Asia Minor, in 1845, consisted of fragments of Lichen esculentus. These must have been torn from their woods by a storm, and transplanted through the air to the places where they fell.Bot. Zeit." "Kurse Notizen." Botanische Zeitung, 4 (1846): 416. The date of the phenomenon is given as 1841, in this article. See: 1841 Jan 24 and 26, (II; 244).]


1841 Jan 2 / See Jan 1, 1842. [II; 242.]


1841 Jan 24 / q. / Carmarthen / p. 147 / See Oct 30, 1868. [II; 243. Spurrell, William. Carmarthen and Its Neighbourhood: Notes Topographical and Historical. 2nd edition. Carmarthen: William Spurrell, 1879, 147. "1841. Jan. 24. Shock of an earthquake felt at Carmarthen." See: 1868 Oct 30, (III; 1603).]


1841 Jan 24 and 26 / Fall of manna widely in Asia Minor / La Sci Pour Tous 1-128. [II; 244.  Lecouturier. "Substances Organiques Tombées de l'Atmosphere." La Science Pour Tous, 1 (no. 16; March 27, 1856): 127-128.]


1841 [Jan 24 and 26] / Gelat like Wilna / Asia Minor / (D-48). ** [II; 245. The note copies information from page 48 of The Book of the Damned. Tyzenhauz, Konstanty. "Note sur une substance tombée de l'atmosphere." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 452-454. The fall took place at Smorgon, Belorussia; and, the substance was discovered on the ground following a thunderstorm with heavy rain, starting April 3 and lasting all night.]


1841 Jan 25 / 5:40 a.m. / shock  and rumbling sound / NY and N.J. / Niles Nat Reg 59-352. [II; 246. "Earthquake." Niles' Weekly Register, 59 (January 30, 1841): 352.]


1841 Jan 28 / Lat 75° 48 S / Long 168° 33 E / Mt Erebus, active volc, discovered by Sir James C. Ross. / A. J. Sci 2/7/328. [II; 247. Ross, James Clark. "Notice of, and citations from a Voyage of Discovery and Research in the Southern and Antarctic Regions, during the years 1839-43." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 7 ( 1849): 313-329, at 328. The Erebus volcano.]


1841 Jan. 31 / qs at Carmarthen / B Assoc '54/301. [II; 248. Mallet, 301. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 36 (1843-1844): 72-86, at 76.]


1841 Feb 9 or 11 / Assam / q and met / B Assoc '54 / See BA '60. [II; 249. Mallet, 301. Greg, 78. Hannay. "Memoranda of Earthquakes and other remarkable occurrences in Upper Assam, from January 1839 to September 1843." Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 12 (1843): 907-909, at 907. The earthquake was either February 9 or 11, 1841; and, the meteor was in February, 1841, but without any date given by Hannay. quoted in Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society, 1845-142; later two are also same refs. for 1840 March 4, eclipse and q in Assam, (II; 161).]


1841 Feb-March / Black substance found (after qs at Comrie?) / BA 54, p. 289. [II; 250. Mallet, 289-290. "On the following day a strange black scum was found on the ground. A similar phenomenon had been remarked several times before on Loch Earn, and occurred again in February and March 1841."]


1841 Feb 14 / Comrie / 247 shocks recorded bet Oct 3, 1839—Feb 14, 1841. / Edin N P. J 32/107. [II; 251. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Foreign countries, and in Britain." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 32 (1841-1842): 106-127, at 107-109.]


1841 Feb 17 to April // Nothing in Sydney Morning Herald. [II; 252.]


1841 Feb 17 / Vernet (Pyrénées Orientales) / Salmon-colored dust / C.R. 13/62. [II; 253. Dufrénoy. "Rapport sur la nature de la substance pulvérulente tombée au Vernet (Pyrénées-Orientales, le 17 février 1841." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 62-63.]


1841 Feb 17, 18, 19 / Oily matter at Genes, Genoa, etc. / (D-63) / (72) / CR, vol. 12. ** [II; 254. The note copies information from pages 63 and 72 of The Book of the Damned. "M. Matteucci envoie un échantillon...." Comptes Rendus, 12 (1841): 499. "M. Arago met sous les yeux de l'Académie...." Comptes Rendus, 12 (1841): 577. Dufrénoy. "Rapport sur la nature de la substance pulvérulente tombée au Vernet (Pyrénées-Orientales, le 17 février 1841." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 62-63. Dufrénoy analyzed the salmon-coloured matter in rain that fell at Vernet, France, on February 17, 1841. Canobbio. "Description et analyse d'une eau de pluie rouge tombée à Gênes en fèvrier 1841." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 215-219. The red matter fell with rain on the night of February 17, at intervals on the 18th, and on the morning of the 19th; and, Canobbio also records slight earthquakes at 5 p.m. and 11 p.m., on the 18th. Fort notes: "BD. Butterlike substance, ac. to Dr. William Gregory, from Vesuvius of eruption of.  Academy Science 1833-119. 1830, deposited on stones around crater `a mass of the consistency of butter and of a bright orange color.' This from the Phil. Mag." (SF-V; 322). Arago, Dominique François Jean. Oeuvres complètes de François Arago. Paris, 1857, v.12, 469-70. Arago does not indicate this material as being resinous nor as being of sand; however, he does give an analysis of it as a mixture of talc, quartz, carbonate of lime, serpentine, bituminous matter, and organic matter containing seeds from different plants.]


1841 Feb. 18 / q and fall of discolored rain / Edin New [Phil] Jour 35/148 / (?) [II; 255. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Foreign countries, and in Britain." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 35 (1843): 137-159, at 148-149. Canobbio. "Description et analyse d'une eau de pluie rouge tombée à Gênes en fèvrier 1841." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 215-219.]


1841 Feb 18 / 17-18-19 // repeat q and repeat red rains / Star and shock / slight, at 5 p.m. / another at 11 p.m. and 3 showers of red rain / (B Assoc 1854/302) / Red rain fell, evening of 17th; at different times, 18th; and 8 a.m., 19th. / oily matter / decomposed seeds and sand / (Ec. Mag 68/437) / CR 13-216. [II; 256.1, 256.2. Mallet, 302. Canobbio. "Description et analyse d'une eau de pluie rouge tombée à Gênes en fèvrier 1841." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 215-219.  Dunkin, Edwin. "Colored rain and snow." Eclectic Magazine, 68, (n.s. v. 5; April 1867): 435-440, at 437. Fournet, Joseph Jean Baptiste Xavier. "Sur les Pluies de Terre Observées Depuis Quel-ques Années dans le Bassin du Rhone." Mémoires de l'Académie des sciences, belles-lettres et arts de Lyon. Classe des Sciences, s. 2 v. 13 (1863): 185-245, at 214.]


1841 Feb 19 / At Bagnone, 8 miles from Pont-Tremoli, rain of mud. / C.R. 12/789 / Genoa and Parma. [II; 257. "Lettre de M. Wartmann à M. Arago...." Comptes Rendus, 12 (1841): 789-791, at 789.]


1841 Feb 21-22 / Foggia, Italy / q. / II / [Medium] / BA '11. [II; 258. Milne, 706.]


1841 Feb. 23-25 / (Rain and q) / 3 days and nights of incessant rain with a violent gale / on 26th, q which continued daily / B.A. '54-302. [II; 259. Mallet, 302. The rains and quake occurred at Zante.]


1841 Feb 25 / (Fr) / Chanteloup / N. France / "A stone or some substance but very doubtful." / BA '60. [II; 260. Greg, 78.]


1841 Feb 25 / Met / Parma / also Cherbourg and Chanteloup / BA 60-78. [II; 261. Greg, 78-79.]


1841 Feb. 25 / 3 p.m. / Meteorite fell on a house in Chanteloup (Coutances). / CR 12/790 // CR 12/514 / At Boix-aux-Roux, Commune of Chanteloup, ac. to several witnesses, fell on roof of a building and set it on fire. [II; 262. "M. Verusmor écrit de Cherbourg à M. Arago...." Comptes Rendus, 12 (1841): 514. "Lettre de M. Wartmann à M. Arago...." Comptes Rendus, 12 (1841): 789-791, at 790.]


[1841 Feb. 25 /] 1840 Feb. 25 / Met set fire. / Met set fire to roof of a wine press at Bois-aux-Roux (Chanteloup). / C.R. 112-514. (This 1841?) [II; 160. "M. Verusmor écrit de Cherbourg à M. Arago...." Comptes Rendus, 12 (1841): 514.]


1841 Feb 25 / 27 / March 8 // Meteors / Parma / BA 60-78. [II; 263. Greg, 78.]


1841 Feb 26 / Violent q , Zante, ab 7 p.m., preceded by 3 days and nights of incessant rain. / BA 54. [II; 264. Mallet, 302.]


1841 Feb. 27 / 4:40 a.m. / Met / Parma / greater than apparent size of moon / See Feb 25. [II; 265.]


1841 Feb. 27 / Rat / Times, Mar 3/6/e.  [A; 146. "Horrible Attack Upon a Child by a Rat." London Times, March 3, 1841. p. 6 c. 5. "About 10 o'clock on the night of Saturday, the 27th ult., Mrs. Boatwright, of 9, Little-Carlisle-street, Lisson-grove, on entering her house, after an absence of about 15 minutes, was greatly alarmed by the screaming of her infant, which she had left alone and asleep in its cradle. On going forward towards the bed she was horror struck to find her child literally covered with blood, which was flowing in copious streams from frightful lacerations on the faces and hands, which were torn and mutilated in a shocking manner...."]


1841 March 1-31 / Jour. des Debats / nothing. [II; 266.]


1841 March 8 / (det) / 9:30 p.m. / Guastalla (Parma) / Met 4 times size of Jupiter / Loud explosion. / See Feb 25. [II; 267. See: 1841 Feb 25 / 27 / March 8, (II; 263).]


1841 March 15 / Princeton and New Haven / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 268. Greg, 78-79.]


1841 March 20 / q. / Italy / Lipari Islands / BA '11. [II; 269. Milne, 706.]


1841 March 21 or 22 / Detonating fireball / St. Menchould, France / BA '60-78. [II; 270. Greg, 78.]


1841 March 21-22 / night / Detonating meteor at Commercy and Sainte-Menould (Meuse) / See Feb 25; and C.R., Ap. 12, 1841, p. 662. [II; 271. "M. Clesse écrit relativement à un météore lumineux...." Comptes Rendus, 12 (1841): 662. See: 1841 Feb 25, (II; 261).]


[1841 March 21-22 /] 1840 March 21-22 / night / Loudly detonating met / Sainte-Menould (Meuse) / CR 12-662. [II; 164. "M. Clesse écrit relativement à un météore lumineux...." Comptes Rendus, 12 (1841): 662.]


1841 March 22 / Auro. / Aurora Arch, 8:45 p.m., passed midway bet Aldebaran and Alph. Orionis, north of Castor and a little south of Ursa Major and ab 5° N of Arcturus. At 9—bet Cast. and Pol. and a little N of Arcturus. 9:15—S of C and Pol, and southern edge just covered Arcturus. / (T.Y. Book '42-271). / Timbs Y. Book. [II; 272.1, 272.2. "Aurora Borealis." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1842, 270-271.]


1841 March 22 / q / Coblentz / "A bluish meteor was observed during the previous night over the volcanic mountains near Brohl.; and on the same night, a ball of fire of unusual size was seen at Troyes, in France." / Y. Book, '42-247. [II; 273. "Earthquakes." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1842, 246-247, at 247, c.v. Coblentz.]


1841 March 22-24 / Qs on 22, along Rhine—23-24, magnetic perturbations, Italy, Belgium, Canada. "Meteors were observed at several places." / BA '54. [II; 274. Mallet, 303.]


1841 Mar 22-24 / Q met / Shock in Germany. Magnetic perturbations, probably earth-wide. "Meteors were observed at several places." / B.A. '54-302. [II; 275. Mallet, 303.]


1841 Mar. 22 / Grüneberg, Silesia / met / BA '60 / (F). [II; 276. This is a meteorite, "met", (not an earthquake, "q"). Fletcher, 101. This is the Grüneberg meteorite. Greg, 78.]


1841 March 24 / 10:05 p.m. / Geneva / met 8 or 10 times size of Venus / See Feb 25 / Ref. [II; 277. Greg, 78.]


1841 March 30 / 9:02 p.m. / Geneva / met as if from Gemini—about 1/4 or 1/5 size moon / Ref—Feb. 25. [II; 278. Greg, 78. See: 1841 Feb 25, (II; 261).]


1841 spring / S.S. President vanished, N.Y. to Liverpool. [A; 147. The President was the world's largest ship, as a luxury passenger liner, but suffered from slow speeds. It was last seen struggling in a gale on its second day out from New York, (having departed on March 11th).]


1841 April 8— / Venus / Greatest brilliancy. [II; 279.]


1841 Ap. 17 / Op Mars / (A l). [II; 280.]


1841 Ap 18 / From 8 p.m., at Vidalia, Louisiana, 60 meteors in 2 ¼ hours from Virgo. / Am. J. Sci 42/397. [II; 281. "Meteors of April 18-20, 1841." American Journal of Science, 42 (1841-1842): 397-398. "Stated Meeting, May 21." Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 2 (May & June, 1841): 58-70, at 67-68.]


1841 Ap 19, 20 / Many mets / America / BA 47-15. [II; 282. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


1841 Ap. 20 / [LT], 5-c / q / Zante. [II; 283. "Zante." London Times, April 20, 1841, p. 5 c. 3. "The despatch written by Sir Howard Douglas on the 6th November last, which has lately been ordered by the House of Commons to be printed, states, in reference to the dreadful earthquake which took place in Zante on the 30th of October, 1840, that the material injury which that island had sustained in consequence could not be rated at less than 300,000l. sterling."]


1841 April 21 / See Comrie, Jan 8, 1840. [II; 284. See: 1840 Jan 8, (II; 150).]


1841 Ap. 29 / No Sydney Morning Herald nearer than May 8. [II; 285.]


1841 Ap. 29 / 20 inches of rain / South Head, N. S. Wales / Sydney Morning Herald, Feb 26, 1873. [II; 286. "The Late Heavy Rains." Sydney Morning Herald, February 26, 1873, p. 5 c. 2-4.]


1841 May 4 / Shower of fish / Buchen (Baden) / Annals and Mag of Nat Hist 10-3-5. [II; 287. (Gudger, E.W. "More Rains of Fishes." Annals and Magazine of Natural History, s. 10 v. 3 (1929): 1-26, at 5.) Kilian. "Der Fischregen bei Buchen." Jahresbericht des Mannheimer Vereins für Naturkunde, 8 (1841): 20-24.]


1841 May 13 / Brussels / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 288. Greg, 78.]


1841 May 14 / Venus Inf conjunction Sun / (A l). [II; 289/]


1841 May 16 / d'Essone / met / CR 13-91 / 11 p.m. [II; 290. Delavaux. "Météore lumineux observé le 16 mai dans les environs d'Essonne." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 91.]


1841 May 16 / Montargis and Essonne / E to W / slow meteor / BA 60. [II; 291. Greg, 79.]


1841 May 18 / Armenia / great q / [BA] '11. [II; 292. Milne, 706.]


1841 / about // Fishes—streets of Salisbury / Phil Jour(?) 37/382. [II; 293. Warren, George B. "Extract from a Letter from Rev. George B. Warren, to Dr. Davy, relative to a Sooty Deposit on the Surface of the Sea, off the Coast of Devon." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 37 (1844): 381-382, at 382. "About three years since, I observed a magnificent water-spout cross from Torbay to the immediate neighburhood of Sidmouth, and being very near the spot where it struck the land, I was enabled to observe that the column of fine spray raised by the vortex, reached fully the height of seven hundred feet, being at least an hundred feet above the top of the cliff. The column was travelling at the time a little north of east, and as the newspapers announced the fall of some small fish in a heavy shower of rain about half an hour afterwards in the streets of Salisbury, they were, no doubt, the small fry swept up with the surface water, and which were kept suspended in the air as long s the vortex lasted."]


1841 May 30 / "Waterspout" fell at Orange (Provence), France. / Timbs' 1842-275. [II; 294. "Water-Spout." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1842, 275. "Paris Letter." Literary Gazette, 1841 (July 10, 1841): 444. Gasparin, Aug. "Trombe observée dans le midi de la France." Comptes Rendus, 12 (1841): 1117-1118.]


1841 June / Fishes and frgs / Boston, Eng and elsewhere. [A; 148.]


1841 June / Tutbury, Staffordshire / frogs / NQ 8/6/191. [II; 295. "A Shower of Frogs." Notes and Queries, s. 8 v. 6 (September 8, 1894): 189-191, at 191.]


1841 June 1 / q. / Jamaica / preceded by heavy rains / BA 54. [II; 296. Mallet, 305.]


1841 June 8-9 / Italy (Abruzzi) / q / 10, Tarante, etc., Italy / 14-15, Azores / BA '11. [II; 297. Milne, 706.]


1841 June 8-9 / Abruzzi, Italy / 10—Chieti, Italy / 14 and 15—Azores / q's / BA '11. [II; 298. Milne, 706.]


1841 June 9 / 8:35 p.m. / bolide, reddish white, at Saint Rambert / C.R. 13-903. [II; 299. Sauvanau. "Sur le bolide du 9 juin." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 903.]


1841 June 9 / 8 p.m. / bolides of Angers and Toulouse / C.R. 13-229. [II; 300. "Extrait d'une lettre de M. Petit à M. Arago...." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 229-231. Greg, 79.]


1841 June 12 and July 4 / Stones / Repeat in 1842 but Toulon and Spain / but see June 4. [II; 301. See: 1842 June 4, (II; 462).]


1841 June 12 / bet 1 and 2 p.m. / Metites of Chateau Renard, in the Loiret / Timbs' 1842-271. [II; 302. "Meteors in France." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1842, 271. This is the Château-Renard meteorite.]


1841 June 12 / (F) / Trig, Chat-R / Loiret, France / weighed 75 lbs / at 1:30 p.m. / BA 60. [II; 303. Fletcher, 101. Greg, 79. This is the Château-Renard meteorite.]


1841 June 12 / See June 12, 1850. / Paris / Stone in Japan. [II; 304. See: 1850 June 12, (II; 1412).]


1841 June 12 and July 2 / Montargis, in depart adjoining Loiret / See Sept 6. [II; 305. See: 1841 Sept 6, (II; 369).]


1841 June 12 / See June 12, 1840. / July 17? [II; 306. See: 1840 (June 12), (II; 188), and, 1840 July 17, (II; 192).]


1841 (June 12) / July 12, C.R. of / A member of the Acad says that the fall of an aerolite near Beaune was a pure fabrication. / not same as Chat-R—See CR 12-1191. [II; 307. Morren. "Sur un météore observé à Angers, le 9 juin." Comptes Rendus, 12 (1841): 1191. See: 1841 June 12, (II; 303).]


1841 June 12 / 1:30 p.m. / aerolite of Chat. Ren / C.R. 13-88 // Commune of Triguères / 14-1048. [II; 308. Longueman. "Relation de la chute de l'aérolithe du 12 juin." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 88.   The Château-Renard meteorite. "M. d'Hombres-Firmas écrit d'Alais...." Comptes Rendus, 14 (1842): 1048. Delavaux. "Note sur un aérolithe tombé le 12 juin dans les environs de Château-Renard." Comptes Rendus, 12 (1841): 1190-1191.]


1841 June 14-15 / q / Azores / BA 54. [II; 309. Mallet, 305.]


1841 June 14-15 / Azores / qs / II [Medium] / BA '11. [II; 310. Milne, 706.]


1841 June 20 / Venus / Greatest brilliancy. [II; 311.]


1841 June 23 and before / Notable sunspots / LT, July 17-6-d. [II; 312. "Changes in the Solar Spots." London Times, July 17, 1841, p. 6 c. 4. "We lately noticed that two pretty large clusters of spots were traversing the sun's disc, and that a third cluster had appeared on the morning of the 23d ult. On the morning of the 27th one of the two former clusters had entirely disappeared, though it had scarcely arrived at the middle of the disc. It consisted of one pretty large and five smaller spots. This change must have taken place during Friday or Saturday, the 25th and 26th ult. Some of the smaller spots in the third cluster have also since disappeared. The large spot connected with the other cluster, which appeared with a compact dark nucleus, and which was reckoned to be nearly the size of the earth, has since that time been divided into two parts, with a bright space between them, and they are both included within one regular penumbra. These changes, accomplished in so short a time, in masses of matter larger than the whole extent of the terraqueous globe, indicate that vast changes are constantly going forward, either in the solid body of the sun, or in his luminous atmosphere, and that powerful agents, far surpassing what we can now conceive, are in incessant operation to produce so astonishing effects. Perhaps the overwhelming of America by the Atlantic Ocean, or the violent disruption of Africa from the continent of Asia, would not exhibit phenomena more wonderful than the sudden disappearance of some of the large solar spots.—Correspondent of the Dundee Advertiser."]


1841 June 29, 30 / Shocks and sounds / France / BA 54. [II; 313. Mallet, 306.]


1841 June 29-30 / night / in Uckermark / Rain of fishes / Jour Amer Museum Nat. Hist 21-616. [II; 314. Gudger, Eugene Willis. "Rain of Fishes." American Museum Journal, 21 (1921): 607-619, at 616. "Herr August theilte den Bericht mit über einen Fischregen...." Sitzungsberichte der Gesellschaft Naturforschender Freunde zu Berlin: 1839-1859. Berlin: R. Friedländer und Sohn, 1912, 33-34.]


1841 June 29 / 10 a.m. / first concussion, dept of l'Indre / 30, 11:30 a.m., a stronger concussion / July 4-5 / C.R. 13-232. [II; 315. "Extrait d'une Lettre communiquee pas M. Gilbert...." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 232-233.]


1841 June 30 / Concussion / 11:25 a.m. / and sound / Le Blanc (sur Indre) / CR 13/80. [II; 316. "Tremblement de terre de la nuit du dimanche 4 au lundi 5 juillet 1841." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 80-83, at 80.]


1841 June 30 / Fish in Boston / Eng? / D-175. [II; 317. The note copies information from page 175 of The Book of the Damned. Buist, George. "Showers of fish." Living Age, 52 (1857): 186. "...On the 30th of June, 1841, a fish measuring ten inches in length, with others of smaller size, fell at Boston...." Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 163.]


1841 July 1 / (Cu[t]) / Town of Bayazid that disappeared—or "was swallowed up" in a quake. "The account requires confirmation.["] / B Assoc 54/306. [II; 318. Mallet, 306.]


1841 July 2, 23, 25, 26, 30, 31 / Shocks / Comrie / 23, 25, 26, really severe / 30, violent / BA 54. [II; 319. Mallet, 309.]


1841 July 2-3 / Loud detonations heard at Montargis. / (See May 16.) / A - 1 / Considered very mysterious / no known cannon and the sky was clear. The next day was learned that at Chateau-Renard, had fallen from the sky, a round black stone weighing 45 kilogrammes. / J. des Deb 9-2-3. [II; 320.1, 320.2. "On écrit de Montargis, le 5 juillet." Journal des Debats, July 9, 1841, p. 2 c. 3. See: 1841 June 12, (II; 303).]


1841 July 3 / 3 p.m. / at Navalcarnero, near Madrid / An insupportable heat. / J. des Deb 13-3-2-+ / At 4, a tremendous tempest and a rain of stones. Said that the surrounding country was white as snow with the stones. It may be that they were hailstones. [II; 321. "On écrit de Navalcarnero...." Journal des Débats, July 13, 1841, p. 3 c. 2.]


1841 July 4-5 / Indre / violent detonation and strong concussion / 3, from ab midnight to 4 a.m. / CR 13-232. [II; 322. "Extrait d'une Lettre communiquee pas M. Gilbert...." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 232-233.]


1841 July 4? / Montargis / See substance, July, 1849. [II; 323. See: 1849 July, (II; 1301).]


1841 July 4-5 / Violent th. storms reported from Tours, other places. / Jour des Debats 8-3-3. [II; 324. "On écrit de Tours, le 6 juillet." Journal des Debats, July 8, 1841, p. 3 c. 3. Two strong shocks of an earthquake were accompanied by thunderstorms and rain.]


1841 July 4-5 / q. / Paris / (BA 54) / C.R. 13/28, 80, 149, 232 / [London] Times, July 12-5-c. [II; 325. Mallet, 307-308. "M. A. Gros écrit de Paris...." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 28. "Tremblement de terre de la nuit du dimanche 4 au lundi 5 juillet 1841." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 80-83, at 80. "M. Canuet écrit qu'il a ressenti à Gonesse...." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 149. "Extrait d'une Lettre communiquee pas M. Gilbert...." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 232-233. "The Late Earthquake in France." London Times, July 12, 1841, p. 5 c. 3. "The same paper, under date Montargis the 5th inst., states, that a noise was heard in that town similar to that produced by the explosion of cannon, but as there was no artillery there, every one was inquiring what could have produced it. It was afterwards ascertained that a stone had fallen from the clouds at Chateau Renard, half a league from Montargis. This stone was round and of a dark colour, and weighed 95lb."]


1841 July 4 / Fireball / Blois and Brussels / BA '60 / ab midnight 4-5, the q in France. [II; 326. Greg, 79.]


1841 July 4-5 / q's and stone / (France) / night / Edin New Ph J. 36/368 / At 12:25, 3 shocks at Blois—at 1 a.m., a globe of fire burst in the air—great red clouds and 2 explosions at Paris, Tours, and Nevers, at 12:45. / shock at Orleans at 4 a.m. / at Pontlevoy at 12:30 and 3:40 a.m. / Explosion heard at Montargis, and it is said that half a league from Montargis a stone fell from the sky. "This stone was round and of a dark colour, and weighed 95 lb." / See a series before 1819? / C.R. 13/28, 80. [II; 327.1 to 327.4[???]. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 36 (1843-1844): 362-376, at 368-370. "M. A. Gros écrit de Paris...." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 28. "Tremblement de terre de la nuit du dimanche 4 au lundi 5 juillet 1841." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 80-83.]


1841 July 4-5 / At Nevers during q, clouds on the horizon were reddish and charged with electricity. / J. des Deb 9-2-3. [II; 328. "La secousse du tremblement de terre...." Journal des Débats, July 9, 1841, p. 2 c. 3.]


1841 July 4 / night, and early 5th / qs and storms / large part of France / Morning Chronicle, 12th, p. 5. [II; 329. "Earthquake." London Morning Chronicle, July 12, 1841, p. 5 c. 3.]


1841 July 5 / 7 p.m. / Violent th. storm in Paris and shock felt / J. des Debat 6-2-4. [II; 330. "L'orage qui a éclaté sur Paris hier...." Journal des Debats, July 6, 1841, p. 2 c. 4.]


1841 July 5 / q / large part of central France / Orleans, the weather lowering and the atmosphere seemed charged with electricity. / BA 54. [II; 331. Mallet, 307-308.]


1841 July 7 / evening / Explosion / powder mill near Faversham, Kent / Sheffield Patriot, July 13. [II; 332. (Sheffield Patriot, July 13, 1841).]


[1841 July 7. Wrong date. See: 1841 Sept 16, (II; 333).]


1841 July 8 / fishes and frogs / Times 15-6-d—from the Sheffield Patriot—at Derby—torrents of rain "mixed with half-melted ice" and hundreds of small fishes from 1/2 to 2 inches long, but one of them weighing 3 ounces—some with spikes on backs, commonly called "suttlebacks"—many picked up alive—and frogs from size of a horse bean to that of a garden bean—many came down alive but most of them were killed by fall on pavement. [II; 334.1, 334.2. "Extraordinary Phenomenon at Derby." London Times, July 15, 1841, p. 6 c. 4. "On Thursday week, during a heavy thunder storm, the rain poured down in torrents mixed with half-melted ice, which battered against the windows in large patches; but, incredible as it may appear, hundreds of small fishes and frogs in great abundance descended with the torrents of rain. The fish were from half an inch to two inches long, and a few considerably larger, one weighing three ounces; some of the fish have very hard pointed spikes on their backs, and are commonly called suttle-backs. Many were picked up alive. The frogs were from the size of a horse-bean to that of a garden-bean; numbers of them came down alive,and jumped away as fast as they could, but the bulk were killed by the fall on hard pavement. We have seen some alive to-day, which appear to enjoy themselves, in a glass with water and leaves in it. Respecting the cause of this curious phenomenon it is most likely a whirlwind has been the agent which has transported these animals from their own element to terra firma, and this is in some degree confirmed by the circumstance of many shrubberies being severely injured in this neighbourhood by the same storm.—Sheffield Patriot." ("Extraordinary Phenomenon at Derby." Sheffield Patriot, July 13, 1841, p. 6 c. 1.) ]


1841 July 8 / Frogs at Derby / "mostly killed by the fall on the hard pavement" / Timbs'. [II; 335. "Shower of Fish and Frogs." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1842, 204.]


1841 July / Writer in Derbyshire Courier, 10th, says had seen some of the little frgs alive in a glass of water and leaves. [II; 336. "Extraordinary Phenomenon, Derby." Derbyshire Courier, July 10, 1841, p. 3 c. 5.]


1841 July 8 / Naples / 10—Naples / 13—Vienna / qs / BA 54. [II; 337. Mallet, 308.]


1841 July 13 / Austria / q. / I [light] / BA '11. [II; 338. Milne, 706.]


1841 July 15 / Denmark / Met - q / BA '54. [II; 339. Mallet, 309. Mallet does not mention any meteor, only "a vibration in the air like that produced by a discharge of artillery."]


1841 July 14 / Marseilles / 17, at Cette / "Extraordinary movements of the sea were observed." / BA 54. [II; 340. Mallet, 307.]


1841 July 15 / bet 4 and 5 p.m. / Denmark and earthquake and "a vibration in the air like that produced by a discharge of artillery. / BA 54. [II; 341. Mallet, 309.]


1841 July 15 / Morning Chronicle of 1841 / Yarn from Woodstock. A large tree been cut down. Taken 7 or 8 horses to move / Was seen suddenly to roll up a hill. / See June 20, 1902. [A; 149. "Love of the Marvellous.—Woodstock." London Morning Chronicle, July 15, 1841, p. 4 c. 1. See: (1902 June 20).]


1841 July 16 / qs / [16]—Naples / 1—Savoy / 18—Baden // 20—Parma / 22—Leghorn / BA 54. [II; 342. Mallet, 309.]


[1841 July 16 /] 1841 July 26 / 2 large clusters of sunspots reach center of sun on 26th. / Derby Mercury, 14th. [II; 350. "Two pretty large clusters of spots...." Derby Mercury, July 14, 1841, p. 4 c. 2. "They made their appearance about five or six days ago, and will arrive about the middle of the disc on Friday, the 26th current." The date of  the "26th" does not occur on a Friday, in July; thus, the date apparently was on July 16, (which was the next Friday).]


1841 July 17 / Milan / a stonefall, ac to Quetelet / BA 60. [II; 343. Greg, 79.]


1841 July 18 / Between Orleans and Roeun—torrential rains, roads under water / L.T., July 26-3-f. [II; 344. "The Weather in France." London Times, July 26, 1841, p. 3 c. 3. "At 9 o'clock in the morning the high road from Orleans to Rouen was completely covered with water, which forced a passage into the plain of St. Hildevert, and converted a magnificent tract of country covered with abundant crops of corn into a morass."]


1841 July 18 / Hurricane disaster, Strasburg, but sky bright and the upper clouds motionless. / L.T., July 26-3-f. [II; 345. "The Weather in France." London Times, July 26, 1841, p. 3 c. 3. "What was very remarkable during the storm was, that the sky was perfectly bright, and the upper clouds quite still, which proved that this violent commotion in the air was confined to the lower regions of the atmosphere."]


1841 July 20 / Geneva / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 346. Greg, 79.]


1841 July 22 / q / Marseilles and Leghorn / L.T., Aug 3-5-d. [II; 347. "Extract of a letter from Leghorn...." London Times, August 3, 1841, p. 5 c. 4. "The earthquake felt at Marseilles on the 22d was not confined to that city. A slight shock or two was felt here in Leghorn, to the no little alarm of the inhabitants."]


1841 July 22 / Th. stone / L.T., Aug. 2-7-4—from Chelmsford Chronicle—"During the thunderstorm on the 22nd instant, a 'fireball' was seen to fall on a field at Eldo, near Bury, adjoining the gardens of the Mount. It has somewhat the appearance of coal, with marks of ore on the fractured surface, smells strongly of sulphur, and  when entire was nearly the size of a man's head." Said that the track it had burned through leaves of trees was distinctly traceable. [II; 348.1, 348.2. "During the thunder-storm on the 22d...." London Times, August 2, 1841, p. 7 c. 4. "A straight track of the electric fluid is distinctly traceable across four fields from the spot where the ball was found, commencing with an oak tree, the branches of which were shattered, passing through a plantation, where the leaves were singed, breaking down the corn, and turning up and scorching some tares over which it passed."]


1841 July 25 / Sir George Duncan Gibb, not far from a canal in Montreal, saw a multitude of small frogs. It was his impression they had fallen in a recent shower, and though he had crossed a body of water it was "a considerable distance away". But in his book "Odd Showers", written under is pseudonym "Carribber", he supposes that he had fallen into the "popular error" of thinking they had so fallen. [II; 349. Gibb, George Duncan. Odd Showers. London: Kerby, 1870, 5-7.]


[1841 July 26. Wrong date. See: 1841 July 16, (II; 350).]


1841 July 28, 29 / Many mets at Parma / BA 47-15. [II; 351. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


1841 July 30 / Strong shocks at Comrie, etc., 2 p.m. During week before had been 30 minor shocks. / LT, Aug 11-3-c. [II; 352. "Earthquakes in Scotland." London Times, August 11, 1841, p. 3 c. 3. "Comrie.—We have been much alarmed during the whole of last week by earthquakes. No fewer than 30 shocks were felt; but on Friday, between 2 and 3 o'clock in the afternoon, a tremendous one took place, which brought the whole of the inhabitants of the village to the street, and put a stop to all work for some time."]


1841 July 30 / q in Perthshire / Comrie q's so slight, or were sounds, that this and Oct 23, ' 39, the only ones listed by Milne in Catalogue of Destructive Earthquakes. [II; 353. Milne, 706.]


1841 Aug 7 / 10:30 p.m. / shocks / pain, Seville, Cadiz, etc. / L.T. 19-7-c. [II; 354. "A shock of an earthquake was felt at Seville...." London Times, August 19, 1841, p. 7 c. 3.]


1841 Aug 9-10 / Many mets / BA 47-15. [II; 355. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


1841 Aug 10 / Th. pebbles / L/T/. Oct 27-3-d / At Iwan, Hungary, in a rainstorm. Millions of little stones, size of millet seed to hazelnut, friable substance fell in a rainstorm. No wind but fell at considerable angle. Blackish outside—inside partly gray-brown, partly blackish blue, mixed with a yellow substance and a reddish substance, and shiny, metallic substances. They were cold and temperature of the air lowered with them. [II; 356. "Shower of Meteoric Stones in Hungary." London Times, October 27, 1841, p. 3 c. 4. "Between 8 and 9 o'clock, when the shower beforementioned took place. Curious enough, notwithstanding the air was quiet, the stones fell at a considerable angle, which shows some other power must have been working on them as well as their gravity." "Nachträgliches in Betreff des angeblichen Meteorsteinregens von Iwan." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, 130 (1841): 442-443. The meteoric origin of these stones was considered doubtful, after a microscopic inspection by Ehrenberg, so they were considered to have fallen, but to have been from some terrestrial origin. Brezina, Aristides. "The Arrangement of Collections of Meteorites."Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 43 (April 1904): 211-247, at 218. Brezina identifies their origin, thus: "Ivan, Oedenburg, Hungary. Limonite pebbles which fell August 10, 1841, in accumulations of hundreds of tons, being raised by a cyclone from the exiccated grounds of Lake Neusiedel." The southern part of Lake Neusiedl, on the Austria-Hungary border, is about a dozen miles north of Iván, Hungary.]  


1841 Aug 10 / BA '60 / said not meteoric—"simply pea-iron ore." [II; 357. Greg, 79.]


[1841 Aug 11-12. Wrong date. See: 1840 Nov 11-12, (II; 358).]


1841 Aug 11 / [LT], 3-c / q / Scotland. [II; 359. "Earthquakes in Scotland." London Times, August 11, 1841, p. 3 c. 3.]


1841 Aug 14 / [LT], 5-f / Singular Lightning at Sheffield. [II; 360. "Singular Lightning." London Times, August 14, 1841, p. 5 c. 6. "On Saturday last, about 4 o'clock, no lightning having been seen before or after at Shefford, a single flash struck a tree in Mr. Johnson's field, and broke the branches off, throwing them to a great distance. Some premises 50 yards off were found to be full of smoke, but no damage was discovered.—Bedford Mercury."]


1841 Aug 18 / Paris and Rheims / large met / BA 60. [II; 361. Greg, 79.]


1841 Aug 18 / At Binsall, no wind—hay suddenly whirled upwar[d]—same phe this day at Tausley / Sheffield Patriot, Aug 24. [II; 362. (Sheffield Patriot, August 24, 1841).]


1841 Aug 20 / Corfu / fireball / BA 60. [II; 363. Greg, 79.]


1841 Aug. 31 / Perm and other places in Russia / Bet 1 and 2 a.m., sounds and concussions. At daybreak, sky covered with vivid red lights, but later came intense darkness. / BA 54. [II; 364. Mallet, 311. Mallet gives the date as September 1, ("Probably O.S.").]


1841 Sept / Great aurora. [II; 365.]


1841 Sept 1 / d. fog and q / On eastern slope of the Oural, and other places in Russia / Russian time? / At dawn sky reddish and sparkling—turning to an orange-yellow color—this after—sounds like distant thunder; said been subterranean—then the q bet 1 and 2 a.m.—then at dawn the sky. [II; 366.1, 366.2.]


1841 Sept 1 / (It?) / phe and q / See 1805. [II; 367. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448., at 357.) See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1841 Sept 2 / Cent. Amer. / great q. / [BA] '11. [II; 368. Milne, 707.]


1841 Sept 6 / Stat / Vendee. / See Nov 5. / (See June 12.) / In 1880, M. Daubrée in C.R., 91-30, tells of a stone that fell at St. Christophe-la-Chartreuse, Commune de Roche-Servières, Vendée. / BA '80-52, Dr Walter Flight says that this fall had never before been recorded. [II; 369. (Comptes Rendus 91-30)Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1879-80." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1880, 39-55, at 52. This is the St. Christophe-la-Chartreuse meteorite.]


1841 Sept 6 / (France) / right date / ? / Vendée / Stone / BA 80-52 / See Nov. 5. [II; 370. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1879-80." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1880, 39-55, at 52. This is the St. Christophe-la-Chartreuse meteorite.]


1841 Sept 8 / Met and train / C.R. 13/637. [II; 371. "Météores lumineux." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 637.]


1841 Sept 9 / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 372. Greg, 79.]


1841 Sept 10 / Monmouthshire / q/. "followed by a loud explosion / Roper, p. 35. [II; 373. (Roper, 35).]


1841 Sept 10 / at Calcutta / Ab. 2 a.m.—for 10 or 12 minutes, at Calcutta, myriads of meteors. Light from them so intense smallest print could have been read. . BA 50-121. [II; 374. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 121.]


1841 Sept 10 / Nothing in Friend of India (Calcutta). [II; 375.]


1841 Sept. 12 / See Comrie, Jan 8, 1840. [II; 376. See: 1840 Jan 8, (II; 150).]


1841 before Sept. 16 / St. th. / Chiswick, Eng / (D-168). [A; 150. The note copies information from page 168 of The Book of the Damned. "Singular Occurrence in Chiswick." London Times, September 16, 1841, p. 6 c. 6. Windows at the home of Mrs. Churton, at Sutton Courthouse, Sutton Lane, Chiswick, were broken "by some unknown agent." The mansion was detached and surrounded by high walls. No other building was near it. Two constables, assisted by members of the household, guarded the house, but the windows continued to be broken "at the front as well as the back of the house."]  


[1841 Sept 16 /] 1841 Oct 7 / (D-176) / "On Thursday (7th) forenoon during a heavy thunder shower, a considerable number of small fishes fell from the clouds at Town-hill, about a mile north-east from Dunfermline. They were in general from 2 to 3½ inches in length, and although they must have fallen from a considerable height many of them were alive after they fell, and jumping among the grass. / L.T., Oct 12. [II; 381.1, 381.2. The note copies information from page 176 of The Book of the Damned. "A Shower of Fishes." London Times, October 12, 1841, p. 6 c. 5. "Remarkable Occurrence." Fifeshire Journal (Kirkcaldy, Scotland), September 30, 1841, p. 3 c. 3. The fall occurred on September 16, 1841, (not on October "7th," which Fort added into his quote).]


[1841 Sept 16 /] 1841 July 7 / (ver) / Timbs', 1845-204 / Considerable number of fishes [fell] at the Townhill, ab a mile northeast of Dunfermline. [II; 333. "Shower of Fish and Frogs." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1842, 204. "On the preceding day, also, during a heavy thunder-shower, a considerable number of small fishes fell from the clouds, at the Town-hill, about a mile north-east of Dumfermline: they were generally from two to three and a half inches in length." This fall at the Town-hill occurred on September 16, 1841, (not on July 7th, "the preceding day").]


1841 Sept 20 / Geneva, etc. / bright fireball / BA 60. [II; 377. Greg, 79.]


1841 Sept 21 / [LT],6-b / q / Comrie. [II; 378. "Crieff." London Times, September 21, 1841, p. 6 c. 2. "This place was again visited with two severe shocks of earthquake. The first occurred on the night of Friday last, about a quarter before 12 o'clock. The tremour was considerable, and the sound that accompanied it was louder and longer continued than any we remember. The second shock occurred on Saturday morning about half-past 2 o'clock. It was very smart, but the sound was not so loud nor so long continued as the first. It was also felt severely at the same time at Comrie and westward.—Glascow Courier."]


1841 Sept 28 / Paris / W to E / fireball / BA 60. [II; 379. Greg, 79.]


1841 Sept 29 / Bayonne / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 380. Greg, 79.]


[1841 Oct 7. Wrong date. See: 1841 Sept 16, (II; 381).]


1841 Oct 8 / Met almost size moon / BA 60 / slow. [II; 382. Greg, 79. At Dijon, "like a rocket."]


1841 Oct 9. / 40 mets in one hour, moving S.W. / Huntingdon, Florida / BA 47-15. [II; 383. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


1841 Oct 9 / at Parma / A very slight shock of earthquake / 24th, BA '54-313. [II; 384. Mallet, 312-313. Mallet records Parma on the 9th, (but not on the 24th), and a magnetic perturbation at Parma on the 25th.]


1841 Oct 15 / Sanguinetto (Verona), Italy / Shocks and dull explosions and a "kind of hissing noise which seemed to pass rapidly through the air"—numerous streaks like trains of meteors—other flashes like lightning. / q at 2:30 a.m., 2:45, 3:30 / severest of all at 4 a.m. / B Assoc 54-312. [II; 385.1, 385.2. Mallet, 312-313. Milne, 707.]


1841 Oct 15 / Loc mets / bet 2:30 and 4 a.m. / 4 shocks at Verona, ac to M. Quetelet. Each ac by subterranean sound in air, and by long trains of fire in sky like those of meteors. / C.R. 17-623. [II; 386. Perrey, Alexis. "Nouvelles recherches sur les tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, de 1801 à juin 1843." Comptes Rendus, 17 (1843): 608-625, at 623. Five shocks, (not "4"), were accompanied by atmospheric phenomena.]


1841 Oct. 15 and 16 / It / (It) / Verona / Luminous streamers in air and flashes and qs detonations / See 1805. [II; 387. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 358.) See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1841 Oct 23 / Hun / See Aug 10. / q / Cormorn, Hungary / BA '11. [II; 388. Milne, 707.]


1841 Oct 24 / Hot wind / 2:08 p.m. / Violent q / had been a "hot wind" all morning / BA 54/312. [II; 389. Mallet, 313. Milne, 707. At Cologne.]


1841 Oct 25-29 / at Parma / Magnetic perturbations and meteors; and on Oct 27 and 29, substance like that of Feb 17-19. / Bull Acad de Belgique 2-371. [II; 390. ( Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, 2-371.).]


1841 Oct. 27 / Rain mud / No more in C.R. [II; 391.]


1841 Oct 29 / Sanguinetto. / More shocks and wind and rain / See Oct 15. / BA 54. [II; 392. Mallet, 313.]


1841 Nov 5 / Bourbon-Vendee, France / metite / ac to BA 60-79 / See Sept 6. [II; 393. Greg, 79.]


1841 Nov 8 / Parma / Fireball / E to W  / BA 60. [II; 394. Greg, 79.]


1841 Nov 9 / Hereford / Large fireball / BA '60. [II; 395. Greg, 79. Lowe, 136.]


1841 Nov 10 / North America / Large met, seen many places / BA '60. [II; 396. Greg, 79.]


1841 Nov. 12 / 10 p.m. / in Aoste / extraordinary meteor / Bib. Univ., N.S., 36-196. [II; 397. Carrel, G. "Sur un Météore Lumineux vu dans le Duché d'Aoste." Bibliothèque Universelle de Genéve, n.s., 36 (November 1841): 196.]


1841 Nov 12-13 / From 1:30 a.m. til daybreak, one observer in South Herefordshire saw 13 mets. / BA 52-187. [II; 398. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 187.]


1841 Nov. 12-13 / Many mets, some large, at Asturias / BA 47-15. [II; 399. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


1841 Nov. 12-13 / No ext. mets / Paris / C.R. 13-1035. [II; 400. "Il résulte de diverses communications...." Comptes Rendus , 13 (1841): 1035.]


1841 Nov 12-13 . Aurora and falling stars / CR 13/1035. [II; 401. "Météorologie." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 1035.]


1841 Nov 12-13 / No remarkable mets in France and Belgium / C.R. 15-930. [II; 402. "M. Arago annonce que, d'après les observations...." Comptes Rendus, 15 (1842): 930.]


1841 Nov 14 / Volc / Goentoer, Java / N.M. / C.R., 70-878. [II; 403. Backer, 881. The Guntur volcano.]


1841 Nov 15 / Langensalza / great det. / BA '60. [II; 404. Greg, 79.]


1841 Nov. 18-19 / q at height of "a terrible storm / S.W. coast of France / BA 54. [II; 405. Mallet, 314.]


1841 Nov 18 / A periodic aurora / Geneva / C.R. 13-1035. [II; 406. "M. Wartmann écrit de Genève que l'aurore boréale périodique...." Comptes Rendus, 13 (1841): 1035.]


1841 Nov. 20 / q at Dôle, Jura, where q's of Dec 2 / BA 54. [II; 407. Mallet, 314-315.]


1841 Dec 1 / Magnificent aurora at Seyssel, one of the places affected next day's q. / BA 54. [II; 408. Mallet, 314-315.]


1841 Dec 2 / At Lyons, the q during a storm / BA 54. [II; 409. Mallet, 314-315.]


1841 Dec 2 / Refs—Montieur, Dec 7, 8, 11. J. des Debats, Dec 7 and 8. [II; 410. (Montieur, December 7, 8, & 11, 1841.) "On écrit de Lyons, le 4 décembre." Journal des Débats, December 7, 1841, p. 1 c. 4. "On lit dans le Courrier de Lyon du 5 décembre." Journal des Débats, December 8, 1841, p. 1 c. 3.]


1841 Dec. 2. / Storms throughout France / B 54. [II; 411. Mallet, 314-315.]


1841 Dec 2 / Geneva / rained all day and air charged with electricity / BA 54. [II; 412. Mallet, 314-315.]


1841 Dec. 2 / ab 8 p.m. / Severe shocks / Rhone, Ain, Isère, Jura and Saone-et-Loire; in Savoy and Switz. Preceded by remarkably hot weather. / Nov. 30 and Dec 1, storm of very hot wind at Belley. [II; 413. Mallet, 314-315.]


1841 Dec 3 / to ab 8 p.m. / The shocks continue. / BA 54. [II; 414. Mallet, 314-315.]


1841 Dec 5 / Goldberg, Silesia / det. met. / BA, '60. [II; 415. Greg, 79.]


1841 Dec 9 / Savoy / shocks/ 10 —Belley / 14 —Savoy / BA 54. [II; 416. Mallet, 315.]


1841 Dec 16 / Oels / slow fireball / BA '60. [II; 417. Greg, 79.]


1841 Dec 21 / Met twice apparent size of moon / BA 50/90 / Scotland. [II; 418. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 90. Greg, 79. Lowe, 136. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 305.]


1841 Dec. 29 / St. Maixent, France / large fireball / BA '60. [II; 419. Greg, 79.]


1842:


1842 // Brilliant light at Comrie, one morning before daylight / E Mec 21/52. [II; 420. Lake, John J. "Earthquakes and Their Causes." English Mechanic, 21 (no. 523; August 2, 1875): 51-52, at 52.]


1842 Jan 1 / Magnetic perturbations at Brussels, and on 2nd at Parma. // 1839, Jan 2-3-Milan / at Parma, Milan and Prague // 1841, Jan 2 —Prague / 3, at Brussels /// Bull de l'Acad. de Belgique 1843-1-9. [II; 421. "Phénomènes divers." Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, 10 pt. 1 (1843): 9-10. ]


1842 Jan. 2 / Caucasia / great q. / [BA] '11. [II; 422. Milne, 707.]


1842 Jan 4 / Mayfield, Ohio / Afternoon / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 423. Finley, 3.]


1842 Jan to April / Volcs / Java / active / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [II; 424. Backer, 881. Backer notes eruptions at the Bromo cone of the Tengger Caldera and at the volcanoes Guntur and Semeru.]


1842 Jan 14-19 / Wurtemburg / qs and several with sounds like thunder / BA 54. [II; 425. Mallet, 317.]


1842 Jan 26 / Conj Saturn and Jupiter / Observatory 24/158. [II; 426. Johnson, Samuel Jenkins. "Planetary Conjunctions." Observatory, 24 (1901) 156-158, at 158.]


1842 Jan 29 / Eutin / Large Met / BA 69-282. [II; 427. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 282.]


1842 Feb 5 / Sub volc? / 5 a.m. / Vessel at 0° 57' S and 20° 47' W, rumbling sound and severe concussion. Another vessel, at 0° 30' S and 21° 55' W had similar experience. / C.R. 15-447 / There is given account by a captain of a third vessel, at the same time, off the Cape Verde islands—sound and his vessel violently shaken—again 50 minutes later, and then 4 hours later, and a final at noon, when position was 0° 44' S and 20° 16' W. / These are W of Greenwich, not Paris. / This is by M. Daussy, who refers to. / See May 19, 1806. [II; 428.1, 428.2. 428.3. See: 1806 May 19, (I; 182). Daussy. "Nouvelles observations sur un volcan sous-marin dans l'océan Atlantique." Comptes Rendus, 15 (1842): 446-448, at 447. Mason, Thomas H. "A Submarine Volcano." United Service Magazine, 1842 pt. 1 (April, 1842): 577. "Shoals near the Equator, Atlantic." Nautical Magazine, 11 (August, 1842): 574. Mallet, 318.]


1842 Feb 7 / Aargau / large fireball / BA 60. [II; 429. Greg, 79.]


1842 Feb 9 / 7:45 p.m. / at Agen / meteor / C.R. 14-282. [II; 430. Saint-Amans. "Annonce d'un météore lumineux observé à 9 février au soir." Comptes Rendus, 14 (1842): 282.]


1842 Feb 9 / Paris, Toulouse, Agen / Fireball / BA '60. [II; 431. Greg, 79.]


1842 Feb. 17 / q—sound / at Falmouth / q. / The sound attracted attention and few persons felt vibrations. / Timbs'  Y.B. 1843/262 // 8:30 a.m. / LT 22-5-b. [II; 432. "Falmouth, Feb. 17—Earthquake." London Times, February 22, 1842, p. 5 c. 2. "Earthquakes in 1841." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1843, 261-265, at 262.]


1842 Feb 19 / N.W. India / great q / [BA] '11. [II; 433. Milne, 707.]


[1842 Feb 19 /] 1842 / (Dec ?/See) // Basilico, Switzerland / Fireball / BA '60. [II; 524. Greg, 79.]


 

[1842 Feb 20 /] 1842 Dec. 20 / Wirtermberg / Fireball / BA '60. [II; 526. Greg, 79.]


1842 Feb 24-25 / night / Red rain / R—May 16, '46 / 1841? [II; 434. At Greece. Fournet, Joseph Jean Baptiste Xavier. "Sur les Pluies de Terre Observées Depuis Quel-ques Années dans le Bassin du Rhone." Mémoires de l'Académie des sciences, belles-lettres et arts de Lyon. Classe des Sciences, s. 2 v. 13 (1863): 185-245, at 214. Refer to: 1846 May 16, (II; 962).]


1842 Feb 25 / Band of light—to moon's diameter shone from moon. Seen in Derby and South Lambert. / Nature 28/54. [II; 435. Pooley, C. "Remarkable Lunar Phenomenon observed at Weston-super-Mare, August 21, 1861." Nature, 28 (May 17, 1883): 54-55. Lowe, Edward Joseph. A Treatise on Atmospheric Phenomena. London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1846, 367. See: 1861 Aug 21, (III; 170).]


1842 March 4 / 6 a.m. / Tuscaloosa, Ala / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 436. Finley, 3.]


1842 March 13, 24 / Nothing in Sydney Herald. [II; 437.]


1842 March 13 / Q's and dust / Colored rain fell in Greece ab one hour. Same night were earthquakes. / CR 15-583 / See March 27. [II; 438. Dufrénoy. "Examen chinique et microscopique d'une poudre recueille à Amphissa, en Grèce, après une pluie lente et douce." Comptes Rendus, 15 (September 19, 1842): 580-584, at 583.]


1842 March 18 / Parma / Fireball / BA '60. [II; 439. Greg, 80.]


1842 March 24-25 / night / Reddish powder fell at Amphissa, Greece. / C.R. 14/617 / (Verified) // Throughout Greece / C.R. 15-580. [II; 440. Dufrénoy. "Examen chinique et microscopique d'une poudre recueille à Amphissa, en Grèce, après une pluie lente et douce." Comptes Rendus, 15 (1842): 580-584, at 583.]


1842 March 24-25 / Red rain / Amphissa, Greece / C.R. 14/617 / 15/580—brick-red. [II; 441. "M. Bouros écrit d'Athènes, relativement à une pluie colorée...." Comptes Rendus, 14 (1842): 617-618.  Dufrénoy. "Examen chinique et microscopique d'une poudre recueille à Amphissa, en Grèce, après une pluie lente et douce." Comptes Rendus, 15 (1842): 580-584.]


1842 March 30 / 1:30 a.m. / Canton de Vaud, Switz. / q and loud sound / BA 54. [II; 442. Mallet, 320.]


1842 Ap. 11 / Charka, India / Met train in Scorpio, ab. 4 a.m. / 10 or 20 degrees long / BA 50-122. [II; 443. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 121-122. Greg, 60.]


1842 Ap. 11 / morning / Meteoric cloud, 10 or 12 degrees long—visible 20 minutes / Charka, India / B Assoc 1852-238 / In Scorpio. [II; 444. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, 178-239, at 238. In this account, Charka, (between Jabalpur and Allahabad), is misspelled as Churla.]


1842 Ap 21 - 22 / (Rain one place) / 21st—ab 10:30 p.m., M. Bodson, at Noisfontaine, drops of water falling with force. He learned that they had been falling for several hours from a cloudless sky. / On 22nd—he was there again and water still falling. / CR 14-664. [A; 151. Bodson. "Note sur de la pluie observée par un ciel complétement serein." Comptes Rendus, 14 (1842): 663-4.]


1842 Ap. 26 / (Hun) / Milena, Warasdin, Crotia, Hungary / Metite / F. [II; 445. Fletcher, 101. This is the Milena meteorite. Greg, 80.]


1842 Ap. 26 / (Hun) / near Agram / 3 p.m. / stone / L.T., June 23-10-e. [II; 446. "Meteoric Stone." London Times, June 23, 1842, p. 10 c. 5. "The Agram (Croatia) Zeitung mentions the falling of a meteoric stone, in the adjoining district, on the 26th of April, at 3 o'clock p.m. The fall was accompanied by a great storm of thunder, and a noise in the air which lasted 15 minutes. The stone had sunk about 1 foot into the earth. but when removed from the field it weighed only a little more than 2lb. because the persons whofirst hastened to the spot had broken off pieces to keep as curiosities. The stone is brittle; the fracture is granulated and ash-gray, interspersed with reddish yellow points. Another stone fell on the same day, about 2 miles from the first. It was broken and the pieces carried off, so that only a bit about the size of a plummet has been preserved.—Prussian State Gazette."]


1842 May 7 / q. / 5:20 p.m. / L.T., July 2-6-c / For two weeks had been a "particularly lurid tinge of the sky before night. / Hayti / Then on 7th, the q.—town of Cape Haytien destroyed. / 23-8-f —5 minutes later, sea rose 5 or 6 feet. To the S.E., sky intensely black. "Clouds of smoke rolled overhead." / had been an unusual drought. [II; 447.1, 447.2. "The Earthquake at Hayti." London Times, July 2, 1842, p. 6 c. 3. John Daly wrote: "I had prognosticated a severe earthquake a week before, when walking out with Messrs, Breffit, Thompson, Fearon, and Maunder. The reasons I stated were the long-continued drought, the great heat, and a particular lurid tinge of the sky before night." "The Earthquake at St. Domingo." London Times, July 23, 1842, p. 8 c. 6. "Clouds of smoke rolled over our heads."]


1842 May 7 / Destructive  q. / Hayti / BA 1911-54. [II; 448. Milne, 707.]


1842 May 7 / q. / St. Domingo / preceded by great heat and heavy clouds / Niles Nat Reg, June 4, 1842. [II; 449. "Earthquake at St. Domingo." Niles' Weekly Register, 62 (June 4, 1842): 210.]


1842 May 8 / q - phe / 5:15 p.m. / L.T., July 1-6-a / West Indies, near St Nicholas Mole—ship felt sharp shock—Capt saw clouds of dust arising from the land. At 6:30 p.m.—a dense cloud of black smoke rising from the sea in the horizon as if from a volcano. [II; 450.1, 450.2. "The Earthquake in the West Indies." London Times, July 1, 1842, p. 6 c. 1.]


1842 May 11 / Stat - Water / (Geneva) / C.R. 15/290 / ac Dr. Wartmann. / At 10:03 a.m.—not a cloud in the sky—no wind—for ab. 6 minutes fell vertically large drops of warm water. / At 3 p.m., under the same conditions, again fell warm water in large drops ab 3/4 minute—stopped 1/2 minute—fell abundantly one min—stopped few seconds—again 2 mts. [II; 451.1, 451.2.  Wartmann, Louis François. "Observations de pluie par un temps sererin." Comptes Rendus, 15 (1842): 290-291.]


[1842 May 11] / (Ch) / whirl / (+) / May 11, 1842 / in Liverpool / "not a breath of air" / clotheslines upon a common / They were  seized upward. Smoke from chimneys indicated that above the surface there was a southward wind—the clothes were carried northward and "have never since been heard of, at least, by the owner." Annals of Electricity 8/499 / This within 50 days of each other. [II; 452.1, 452.2. "Whirlwind in Liverpool." Annals of Electricity, 8 (1842): 499. See: 1842 June 30, (II; 467).]


1842 May 11 / Liverpool / whirl and clotheslines / Annals of Electricity 8/499 / See May 11, 1848 (?). [II; 453. "Whirlwind in Liverpool." Annals of Electricity, 8 (1842): 499. See: 1847 May 11, (II; 1114).]


1842 May 11 / Cupar / Levitation / See Ap 25 or 18, 1869. [II; 454.]


1842 [May 11] / Cupar / whirl and explosion / See Ap., 1918. [II; 455.]


1842 May 11 / Cupar / See May 11, 1847. [II; 456. See: 1847 May 11, (II; 1114).]


1842 May 17 and 18 / Odorous dry fog at Paris / C.R. 14-840 / N.M. [II; 457. "M. Lerond adresse...." Comptes Rendus, 14 (1842): 840. "M. Lerond adresse une Note relative à un brouillard sec et odorant qu'il a observé à Paris le 17 et le 18 mai."]


1842 / ab. June 1 // Sweet stuff in hailstones /  France / D-63 / (Nimes) /// Royal . ** [II; 458. The note copies information from page 63 of The Book of the Damned. Ducros. "Observation d'une pluie acide." Journal de Pharmacie et de Chimie, s. 3, 7 (April 1845): 273-7. The date is said to be in May or the beginning of June.).]


1842 June 3 / Detonation / Montpelier and Toulouse / fireball size of sun / N.E to S.W. / BA '60. [II; 459. Greg, 80.]


1842 June 3 / Detonating meteor, 9 p.m., at Mende (Lozère) / CR 14-918 / Seemed greater than the sun. With it a sudden violent gust of wind. [II; 460. Mondesir, P. de. "Sur un meteore lumineux observe le 3 juin à Mende (Lozère)." Comptes Rendus, 14 (1842): 918).]


1842 June 3 / Fr / Montpelier and Toulouse / 9:15 p.m. / met size of sun / detonation / BA 60-80. [II; 461. Greg, 80-81.]


1842 June 4 / Fr / (F) / Aumières (de la Lozère) / Metite / BA '60. [II; 462. Fletcher, 101. Greg, 80. This is the Aumières meteorite.]


1842 June 3 and 4 / Shocks / Berne / 3 - meteor, Parma and S of France / 4th, magnetic perturbations at Brussels / or 4th and 5th, at Munich and Prague / BA 54. [II; 463. Mallet, 322.]


1842 June 12 / (F[r]) / Met. det. / Toulon / BA '60. [II; 464. Greg, 80.]


[1842 June 15 /] 1842 June 30 / Cupar / [typescript]:


London Times, July 5, 1842:

June 30, 1842—the town of Cupar—the common: a public place, upon which women were hanging their wash out on lines—conspicuousness—parallel white lines against a green background. It is said that the day was very clear; that there was not a cloud in the sky. A loud and sharp report was heard overhead. Whether something exploded up there or not, whether something like an enormous vacuum-cleaner was suddenly opened or not, it is said that this report was so loud that cattle in the fields ran about and for some time cowered in terror. Something pounced and snatcher clothes from clothelines. Some fell to the ground, but others went on up and disappeared. The preposterous" circumstance that at first evaded us became more and more definite, giving us more and more of the appearance of positiveness; that is seizure that had so little radius of disturbance that it seems unthinkable as a wind of any kind. It is said that a woman, holding a blanket, felt the blanket shooting upward; that so powerful was the force that, in fear of being carried [page cut off here].


[II; 467. A typescript note. "Singular Phenomenon." London Times, July 5, 1842, p. 5 c. 6. "Wednesday forenoon a phenomenon of most rare and extraordinary character was observed in the immediate neighbourhood of Cupar. About half-past 12 o'clock, whilst the sky was clear, and the air, as it had been throughout the morning, perfectly calm, a girl employed in tramping clothes in a tub in the piece of ground above the town, called the common, heard a loud and sharp report over head, succeeded by a gust of wind of most extraordinary vehemence, and of only a few moments' duration. On looking round she observed the whole of the clothes, sheets, &c., lying within a line of a certain breadth, stretching across the green, driven almost perpendicularly into the air. Some heavy wet sheets, blankets, and other articles of a like nature, after being carried to a great height, fell, some in the adjoining gardens, and some on the high road, at several hundred yards' distance; another portion of the articles, however, consisting of a quantity of curtains, and a number of smaller articles, were carried upwards to an immense height, so as to be lost to the eye, and gradually disappeared altogether from sight in a south-eastern direction, and have not yet been heard of. At the moment of the report which preceded the wind, the cattle in the neighbouring meadow were observed running about in an affrighted state, and for some time afterwards they continued cowering together in evident terror. The violence of the wind was such that a woman, who at the time was holding a blanket, found herself unable to retain her hold, and relinquished it in the fear of being carried up along with it! It is remarkable that, while even the heaviest articles were stripped off a belt, as it were, running across the green, and while the loops of several sheets which were pinned down were snapped, light articles lying loose on both sides of the belt were never moved from their position.—Fife Herald." ("Singular Phenomenon." Fife Herald, June 16, 1842, p. 3.) See: Fort's Lo!, (part 1, chapter 4).]


1842 June 17 / [LT]. 6-f / Singular discovery. [A; 152. "Singular Discovery." London Times, June 17, 1842, p. 6 c. 6. Within a rough elm log, sawyers found "five pieces of oak, about two inches thick by four inches wide, and each piece about one foot in length," which had been overgrown by the elm.]


1842 June 21 / q and sky / q at Cartmel, Eng / dark red clouds in sky—"rumbling sound underground." / bet 10 and 11 p.m. / LT, June 29-5-d. [II; 465. "Shock of Earthquake." London Times, June 29, 1842, p. 5 c. 4. "On Tuesday evening the shock of an earthquake was distinctly felt at Cartmel. A considerable change had taken place in the atmosphere, the temperature of which suddenly fell 15 degrees; the air was filled with clouds of a dark red, and rain was thought to be approaching. Between 10 and 11 o'clock at night a strange rumbling noise was heard underground, which made several houses shake, after which the noise died away, and was not repeated.—Carlisle Patriot. The Westmoreland Gazette has a similar paragraph."]


1842 June 30 / See June 12, 1919. [II; 466.]


[1842 June 30. Wrong date. See: 1842 June 15, (II; 467).]


1842 July / Decomposed half devoured body found in woods—no one missing in the neighborhood. Times, July 6, 1842/9/d. [A; 153. "Strange Discovery." London Times, July 6, 1842, p. 9 c. 4. The body was in an "advanced state of decomposition, and from the havoc the vermin had made upon it, the body presented a frightful spectacle." This article says nothing about "half devoured."]


1842 July 4 / Logrono, Spain / 7 lb stone fell. / Phil Mag 4/8/460. [II; 468. Greg, Robert Philips. "Observations on Meteorolites...." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 8 (1854): 329-342, 449-463, at 460.]


1842 or 1843 / July // Frgs / Lyston Hall, Suffolk / In Symon's 21/123. cor writes of shower of frgs in enormous numbers—gardeners swept up and carried away in wheelbarrows. [II; 469. "A Shower of Snails." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 21 (September 1886): 123.]  


1842 July 8 / Eclipse of sun / Bib. Univ., N.S., 35-160. [II; 470. "Éclipse de Soleil du 8 Juillet 1842." Bibliothèque Universelle de Genéve, n.s., 35 (September 1841): 160.]


1842 July 8 / Marseilles / lights on moon during eclipse of sun / Loomis, Treatise on Astr., p. 174. [II; 471. Loomis, Elias. A Treatise on Astronomy. New York: Harper, 1866, 174. "A similar phenomenon was seen by M. Vals, of Marseilles, during the eclipse of July 8, 1842." "Vals" is Jean Elias Benjamin Valz.]


1842 July 10 / ab noon / Dunblane, 18 miles from Comrie / q / LT, July 13-10-a. [II; 472. "Another Earthquake in Scotland." London Times, July 13, 1842, p. 10 c. 1. "A pretty smart shock of an earthuake was felt last Sunday, about midday, by the congregation assembled in the cathedral church of Dunblane, which is about 18 miles from Comrie."]


1842 July 11 / 9:10 p.m. / Fireball / Paris / BA '60. [II; 473. Greg, 80-81.]


1842 July 12 / 4:20 p.m. / Calamatta and Sparta, Greece / q "preceded by a loud aerial noise", / BA '54-323. [II; 474. Mallet, 323.]


1842 July 21 / Birkenhead, opposite Liverpool / Whirl / An. Register 2/126 / LT, July 26. [II; 475. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 84 (1842): pt. 2, 1-199, at 69, cv. "Whirlwind." "Whirlwind." London Times, July 26, 1842, p. 6 c. 6.]


1842 or 43 / July // Frogs / Lyston Hall, Suffolk / Sym Met Mag (L) 21/123. [II; 476. "A Shower of Snails." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 21 (September 1886): 123. "I am afraid I can give you no further particulars about the shower of frogs (at Lyston Hall, Suffolk). It was in the July of 1842 or 1843. They came down in a very heavy shower of rain...." "The gardeners were called to sweep up the frogs, and carried them away in wheelbarrows, and said they were all (the way) down the avenue."]


1842 July 29 / Essex, Eng / Whirl rather like Cupar. [II; 477. "Extraordinary Whirlwind." London Evening Chronicle, August 8, 1842, p. 4 c. 6. "The London papers gave the following account...." Essex Standard, August 12, 1842, p. 2 c. 3. The similarity between the Cupar phenomenon and the whirlwind in Essex was the limited area effected, (ie. the laundry raised high above Cupar's Common ground, and the destruction of "this unaccountable visitation should be confined to one farm, the occupants of neighbouring farms having heard nothing of it till the following day." See: 1842 June 15, (II; 467).]


1842 July 31 / Fireball / Hamburg ' BA 60. [II; 478. Greg, 80.]


1842 Aug 5 / See Sept 5 / Harrowgate / Yorkshire / Stonefall recorded as "very doubtful. / B Assoc 1860/80. [II; 479. Greg, 80-81.. Magill, John. "To the Editor of the Belfast Commercial Chronicle." Belfast Commercial Chronicle, August 10, 1842, p. 3 c. 1. Magill, John. "Meteoric Stone." Waterford Mail, August 17, 1842, p. 1 c. 5.  See: 1842 Sept 5, (II; 489).]


1842 Aug 5 / Fireball / Silesia / 8:20 p.m. / N.W. to S.E. / BA 60. [II; 480. Greg, 80-81.]


1842 Aug 9-10 / Perseids / Parma - myriads / great numbers, Germany and Belgium / In several parts of France, not remarkable; in other parts, many. / BA 47-15. [II; 481. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


1842 Aug 10 / Armagh / Met. / Proc Roy. Irish Acad 2/332. [II; 482. "Dr. Robinson gave a brief account of Meteors observed at Armagh on the 10th of August, 1842...." Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, 2 (1840-1844): 332-333.]


1842 Aug 12 / 9 p.m. / Aosta / Meteor motionless "dizaine" seconds. / Bib. Univ., N.S., 42-396. [II; 483. Carrel, G. "Sur un Météore Lumineux Observé dans le Duché d'Aoste." Bibliothèque Universelle de Genéve, n.s., 42 (December 1842): 396.]


1842 Aug 12 / Great meteor at Grand Lemps (Isère) / C.R. 15-451 / 9 p.m. [II; 484. Bourdot. "Sur un météore lumineux observé au Grand-Lemps (Isère), le 12 août 1842." Comptes Rendus, 15 (1842): 451-452. Greg, 80-81.]


1842 Aug 19 / bet. 7 and 9 p.m. / Pitlochry / 3 shocks and sounds / LT, Sept 1-3-c. [II; 485. "Pitlochry.—Earthquake." London Times, September 1, 1842, p. 3 c. 3. "Between the hours of 7 and 9 o'clock on the evening of Friday the 19th inst., three shocks of this unwelcome visitor were distinctly felt here."]


1842 Aug 22 / bet 6 and 7 / Bangor, N. Wales, etc. / booming sound and q. LT, Aug 25-3-f. [II; 486. "Shock of an Earthquake." London Times, August 25, 1842, p. 3 c. 6. "On Monday last, between 6 and 7 o'clock, the shock of an earthquake was sensibly felt in the neighbourhood of Bangor, North Wales. The Lucy, schooner of Port Madoc, and the Gratitude brig, of Pwllheli, were proceeding over Carnarven Bar, when the crews heard a booming noise, which they at first thought was thunder. The shock, however, that followed completely dispelled the illusion, for it shook the vessels from stem to stern, as though they had struck the ground, although there was plenty of water. At Llanddwyn some boys were playing on the cliffs when they felt the ground completely shaken under them. The sky at the time was clear, and without clouds, and the weather less sultry thanit has since been. The earthquake was felt at the same hour in every part of the county of Anglesey, but from what information has come to hand it appears that the south eastern portion of the island was chiefly visited." The spellings of Pwllheli and Anglesey have been corrected.]


1842 Aug 27 / (psychic) / S. Herefordshire / Man saw glow near a hedge—thought it reflection from some meteor. / BA 52/187. [II; 487. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 187.]


1842 Sept 3 / Parma / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 488. Greg, 80.]


1842 Sept 5 / See Aug 5 / Harrowgate / huge stone—1/2 ton—in th. storm / Mechanics Mag 37/272. [II; 489. "Meteoric Stone." Mechanics' Magazine, Museum, Register, Journal, and Gazette, 37 (no. 996, September 10, 1842): 272. See: 1842 Aug 5, (II; 479).]


1842 Sept 6 / [LT], 7-e / Waterspout. [II; 490. (London Times, September 6, 1842, 7-e ).]


1842 Sept 9 / (Hun) / q / Groos-Kanischa / BA '11. [II; 491. Milne, 707.]


1842 Sept. 25 / (Pax) / ext. magnetic disturbances noted at Greenwich Ob. / Annals of Electricity 8/112. [II; 493. Airy, George Biddell. "Magnetic Phenomena." Annals of Electricity, 8 (1842): 112-118.]


1842 Sept 25 / evening / St. Louis / brilliant meteor detonating like discharges of artillery / Niles Nat. Reg. 63-96. [II; 494. "Meteor." Niles' Weekly Register, 63 (October 8, 1842): 96. "A remarkably brilliant meteor passed over the city of St. Louis on Sunday evening, the 25th ult. About five minutes after its explosion, which was observed, a sound was heard like two rapid discharges of very heavy artillery."]


1842 Sept 30 / Parma / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 495. Greg, 80.]


1842 Oct 2 / bet 6 and 7 p.m. / at Dinan, in Depart. Calvados / Shock and sound like thunderclap, but it came distinctly from the ground. / BA-54. [II; 496. Mallet, 324.]


[1842 Oct 2 /] 1842 Oct 6-7 / night / Shock / Dinan (Calvados) / BA 54-324 / "Accompanied by a hollow sound, which some persons took for a clap of thunder; but the sky was perfectly free of clouds, and the noise came distinctly from beneath upwards." [II; 499. Mallet, 324. The date was the night of "Oct 2"; and the time was "between 6 & 7."]


1842 Oct 4 / Reported by Mr Glaisher of the Cambridge Ob—a bright streak of light in Orion and a center about bright as Jupiter, a center from which were coming quick, flickering waves of light, lasting 10 seconds. The waving ceased and there was a bright star in the center. It faded and in 2 minutes disappeared. / Timbs'  Year Book 1843/279. [II; 497.1, 497.2. "Astronomical puzzle." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1843, 278-279. Lowe, 136.]


1842 Oct 4 / Cambridge / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 498. Greg, 80.]


[1842 Oct 6-7. Wrong date. See: 1842 Oct 2, II; 499).]


1842 Oct 12 / Meteor / Isère / 13th, on Rhone, q and loud noise / BA 54/324. [II; 500. Mallet, 324-325.]


1842 Oct 18 / Hamburg / Fireball / BA '60. [II; 501. Greg, 80.]


1842 Oct 23 / Det met heard all over Silesia / BA 60-80. [II; 502. Greg, 80-81.]


1842 Oct 25 / Spout / Scotland / LT, Nov 24-4-6. [II; 503. "A waterspout was seen in this neighbourhood...." London Times, November 24, 1842, p. 4 c. 6.]


1842 Oct 28 / 7 p.m. / Comet in Draco / A J. Sci 44/211. [II; 504. "Discovery of a Comet." American Journal of Science, 44 (1843): 211. Comet C/1842 U1.]


1842 Nov. 4 / 12:30 p.m. / Shock around mouth of Ohio. Two hours later another, with sound like thunder. / Niles Nat. Register, Nov. 26. [II; 505. "Earthquake—below the mouth of Ohio." Niles' Weekly Register, 63 (November 26, 1842): 208.]


1842 Nov 8 or 9 / No fall of black matter in Canada recorded, but 9th in Italy. [II; 506.]


1842 Nov. 8 or 9 / Montreal. etc. / Terrible shocks and explosions like salvos of artillery. In Rept BA, 1845 (Trans) p. 20, date given as 9th. [II; 507. Edmonds, Richard, Jr. "On Remarkable Lunar Periodicities in Earthquakes, extraordinary Oscillations of the Sea, and great Atmospherical Changes." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1845, Notices and Abstracts, 20-22. Edmonds only remarks on the agitation of the St. Lawrence River, (not upon the sound accompanying the earthquake).]


1842 Nov 8 / evening / Montreal, Canada, etc. / q "accompanied by explosions like salvos of artillery. Ac to another account, was on the 9th. / BA '54/324. [II; 508. Mallet, 325.]


1842 Nov. 9 / (+) (X) / 10:15 a.m. / Distinct shock on southern side of Etna. "The next day a kind of volcanic dust covered the roofs, plants, &c., in Naples, Pozzuoli, Ischia and all the south-western part of the kingdom." / BA 1854. [II; 509.1, 509.2. Mallet, 325.]


1842 Nov. 9 / q / Canada / Montreal, etc. / BA 45/21. [II; 510. Edmonds, Richard, Jr. "On Remarkable Lunar Periodicities in Earthquakes, extraordinary Oscillations of the Sea, and great Atmospherical Changes." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1845, Notices and Abstracts, 20-22.]


1842 Nov 9 / q Canada, this day / Etna / Nothing said in Le Moniteur Univ, which is Gaz de France Nun Nat and Cour. France, of fall of dust before Nov. 27. [II; 511. (Le Moniteur Universel, November, 1842.)]


1842 Nov 9— / See Nov. 17. [A; 155. See: 1842 Nov. 17, (II; 514).]


1842 Nov. 10 / 18 / Dec 1, about / Dec 8 / 9 // Myst fires / Montierender and Boulancourt / An. de Chim 3/7/254 // Letter from Justice of Peace of M to M. Arago / Myst fires inexplicable after investigations by the authorities—Nov 18 the first—young girl saw a strong light pass and strike the window glass—the next day this house on fire. On the 10th a great flame from the roof of a barn—on the 12th this barn on fire. Dec 5, bet 5 and 6 a.m., a luminous globe in the sky. On 8th of Feb. (?) 1843, globe of fire seeming go out from a chimney—on 9th a barn on fire. Also early in Dec globe or fire / C.R. 16/206. [A; 157.1, 157.2, 157.3. "Sur des incendies qui paraissent dus à des chutes d'aérolithe." Annales de chimie et de physique. s. 3 v. 7 (1843): 253-255. Reprinted as: "Sur des incendies qui paraissent dus à des chutes d'aérolithe." Comptes Rendus, 16 (1843): 206-208. Fort gives a date of "Dec 5" in this note, but the letter only indicates the first days of December; and, the "Dec 8 / 9" dates should most probably be February, (within four or five months since these fires began). Boulancourt is about ten kilometers east of Montier-en-Der, France.]


1842 Nov. 11 / q / Calcutta / A writer says he felt electrified 13 minutes after. / (N.M.) / LT 1843, Jan 12-3-f. [II; 512. "Earthquake." London Times, January 12, 1843, p. 3 c. 6.]


1842 Nov 13 / (Fr) / Nantes / q and 2 explosions / BA '54. [II; 513. Mallet, 325.]


1842 Nov. 17 / (+) / Etna / L.T., Dec 26-2-f / Writing on Dec 11th, cor says that as long before as the 17th of Nov, Etna exhibited extraordinary symptoms. The smoke became denser and projected farther. No eruption noted till 27th. [II; 514. "The Late Eruption of Mount Etna." London Times, December 26, 1842, p. 2 c. 6.]


1842 Nov. 27, etc. / Etna / BA 54 / noted for Dec 9. [II; 515. Mallet, 326.]


1842 Nov. 27 / 11 p.m. / eruption of Etna ac to Le Moniteur Universal, Dec 17. [II; 516. (Le Moniteur Universal, Dec 17, 1842.)]


1842 Nov. 27 / 11 p.m. / Etna / Athenaeum 1842-1116. [II; 517. "Mount Etna." Athenæum, 1842, (no. 791; December 24): 1116.]


1842 Nov. 30 / Edin N.P.J.—47-55 / near Ahmedabad / stone like Feb 15, 1848 / "This fragment presented so exactly the appearance of the foregoing aërolite from Dharwar that it might have been taken for a portion of it; presenting the same dark vitrified surface, the grayish-white siliceous interior, with the brilliant metallic particles diffused through it." [II; 518.1, 518.2. Giraud, Herbert. "An Account of Two Aërolites, and a Mass of Meteoric Iron, recently found in Western India." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 47 (1849): 53-57, at 55. This is the Myhee Caunta meteorite. Greg, 80. See: 1848 Feb. 15, (II; 1200).]


1842 Dec 2-11 / Etna active / C.R. 16-93. [II; 519. "M. de Rivaz, membre de l'Académie des Sciences de Naples, adresse...." Comptes Rendus, 16 (1843): 92-93.]


1842 Dec 4/ Algiers / q / I [Light] / BA '11. [II; 520. Milne, 707.]


1842 Dec. 5 / 6:30 a.m. / Epinal, Vosges, Langres / Large fireball and great detonations. In July, 1851, small meteoric iron found near Epinal, the fragments perhaps of this fireball. / BA 60-80 / CR 15-1119. [II; 521. Greg, 80-81. Vuillemain. "Sur la chute d'un aérolithe qui a eu lieu le 5 décembre dans les environs de Langres." Comptes Rendus, 15 (1842): 1118-1119.]


1842 Dec 5 / 6:30 a.m. / Metite of Langres / C.R., 15-1118 / Sky clear at Epinal. [II; 522. Vuillemain. "Sur la chute d'un aérolithe qui a eu lieu le 5 décembre dans les environs de Langres." Comptes Rendus, 15 (1842): 1118-1119.]


1842 Dec 5 / 5:30 a.m. / Det met like gunfire at Epinal / Mass of meteoric iron found there, July 7, 1851. / C.R. 35-289 / Said that cinders had beeen found at time of the fall. [II; 523. Guery. "Note sur une masse de fer météorique trouvée près d'Épinal, le 7 juillet 1851." Comptes Rendus, 35 (1852): 289-291.]


[1842 / (Dec?/See). Wrong date. See: 1842 Feb 19, (II; 524).]


1842 Dec 12 / Dorch lame girl / London. [A; 159.]


1842 Dec 18 / -- 15h // Venus Inf Conjunction Sun / (A l). [II; 525.]


[1842 Dec. 20. Wrong date. See: 1842 Feb 20, (II; 526).]


1842 Dec 27 to Feb 13, 1843 / 4 qs in Calabria / L.T., April 4, 1843-4-e. [II; 527. "A letter, dated Milan the 24th ult., published in the Manheim journal...." London Times, April 4, 1843, p. 4 c. 5.]


1842 Dec (last) / Stones / Clavaux / fell on children "without injuring them to the slightest degree". [A;  

160.]


1842 Dec / Stones / London Times, Jan 13, 1843 / [typescript]:


London Times, Jan. 13, 1843:


That, according to the Courrier de l'Isere, in the last of December,


[Second page]


1842, two young girls were picking up leaves, near Clavaux (Livet), France, when they saw stones falling around them. Their extraordinary observation was that the stones struck them without injuring them. They ran home, and returned with their parents. The stones fell again, and it is said that the children were a field of attraction. According to the story, the children then had an experience that I liken to that of Cumpston's: they were pulled into something that was like a vortex, but their parents, unaffected, like Mrs. Cumpston, dragged them back. It looks as if there were a flow both ways, or an alternating current, here. The story was told bradcast, and many persons from neighboring towns went to the place, and, recognizing what seemed to be a necessary condition, or factor, took children with them. "All were witnesses of the same extraordinary phenomenon." We are told that one of the witnesses, "when holding the hand of one of the children," was struck upon the cheek by a stone the size of an egg, but from which he felt no pain, so slowly had it fallen. The appearing-point is said to have been only a few feet overhead.


[A; 161. A typescript note. "Aerolites." London Times, January 13, 1843, p. 3 c. 3.]


1842 end of Dec / (Stones) / Livet, near Claxaux—two girls picking up leaves—stones fell on them. Not injure them. Parents when joining hands with children felt selves drawn in field of attraction. Others one injured slightly from a falling stone. About 60 picked up. Nothing particular—of different colors—phe continued several days. At first in morning—then in afternoon—then no more. / LT, Jan 13-3-3-c-1843. [A; 162.1, 162.2. "Aerolites." London Times, January 13, 1843, p. 3 c. 3.]  


1843:


1843 // q's / Europe, etc. / Supplement, C.R. 20-1444. [II; 528. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les années 1843 et 1844." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1444-1452.]


1843 // All qs of Europe and adjacent parts of Africa and Asia / C.R. 18-393. [II; 529. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les année 1843." Comptes Rendus, 18 (1844): 393-403.]


1843 / early in //At sea off mouth of River Plate, crew of a vessel sickened by a fetid, oppressive atmosphere. / L.T., March 30-9-a. [II; 530. "Extraordinary Phenomenon." London Times, March 30, 1843, p. 9 c. 1. On a voyage from Valparaiso to Liverpool, near the River Plate, the captain and crew suffered from two days of exposure to this "unwholesome air"; the ill effects and breathing difficulties continued, even with "pure air," for the remainder of their voyage, and, for some of them, after their arrival in port. "Mephitic gas" discharged from under the sea, possibly by an earthquake or volcano, was blamed for exhalations, similar to those from Lake Avernus and the Dead Sea.]


1843 Jan 2 / Bruges / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 531. Greg, 80.]


1843 Jan. 4 / Volc / Goentoer, Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [II; 532. Backer, 881. The Guntur volcano.]


1843 Jan 4 / Cairo (Ill.) / q / BA '11. [II; 533. Milne, 707.]


1843 Jan 4 / 8:40 p.m. / New Madrid / q. / severest since 1811 / Also damage in St. Louis / N.Y. Herald, Jan 20-4-1. [II; 534. "Variety." New York Herald, January 20, 1843, p. 4 c. 1.]


1843 Jan 5, 18, Feb 17, Feb 18, March 15, Ap 14 / q's / Java / C.R. 70-878. [II; 535. Backer, 881. The article does not include any earthquake on February 17.]


1843 Jan 6-(11) / q - deluge / 12:30 a.m. / Singapore / q followed by a little rain / then torrents till 11th / CR 52-881. [II; 536. Castelnau, Francis de. "Pluie de poissons; tremblement de terre à Singapore." Comptes Rendus, 52 (1861): 880-882, at 881.]


1843 Jan 7 / [LT], 5-d / Feb 2-5-b // Etna. [II; 537. "Sicily." London Times, February 2, 1843, p. 5 c. 2. "Mount Etna." London Times, January 7, 1843, p. 5 c. 4.]


1843 Jan 10-Feb. 1, ab / Mauna Loa / Athenaeum 1844-68 / A. J. Sci / 2/27/411. [II; 538. "Volcanic Eruption at the Sandwich Islands." Athenaeum, 1844 (no. 847; January 20): 68. "Eruption of Mauna Loa, Hawaii." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 27 (1859): 410-415. The Mauna Loa volcano erupted from January 9 until April, 1843.]


1843 Jan 13 / One of the greatest gales in England. [II; 539.]


1843 Jan 16 - 17 / Myst bell ringing / as if pulled / servant ill / L.T., 1843, Jan 20/7/d. [A; 163."A Bit of Mystery.—Southampton, Jan. 18." London Times, January 20, 1843, p. 7 c. 4. "It first commenced ringing in a most unaccountable manner the day before yesterday, and the noise was repeated every 10 or 20 minutes for 8 or 10 hours."]


1843 Feb. 1 / Riegersdorf / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 540. Greg, 80.]


1843 Feb 5 / 8 p.m. / Nottinghamshire / met like a "large mass of fire" of a blood-red color / BA 50/90. [II; 541. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 90. Greg, 80-81. Lowe, 136. (Nottingham Journal, "Not. Jour." writes D.P. Thomson.) (Nottingham Journal not at BNA.) "Splendid Meteor." London Evening Mail, February 6, 1843, p. 6 c. 5.]


1843 Feb. 7 / Charleston, S.C. / ab 10 a.m. / 2 slight q's and sound / Bull Seis A 4-117. [II; 542. Taber, Stephen. "Seismic Activity in the Atlantic Coastal Plain near Charleston, South Carolina." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 4 (1914): 108-160, at 117.]


1843 Feb. 8 / 10:30 a.m. / q. / St. Thomas's / (L.T. Index) / also St. Kitts and Nevis, etc. / Martinique. [II; 543. "The West Indies." London Times, March 7, 1843, p. 5 c. 5-6. "Dreadful Earthquake in the West Indies." London Times, March 9, 1843, p. 7 c. 1-3. "The Earthquake in the West Indies." London Times, March 11, 1843, p. 7 c. 3. "The Late Earthquake in the West Indies." London Times, March 17, 1843, p. 7 c. 6. "The Earthquake in the West Indies." London Times, March 21, 1843, p. 5 c. 4.  "Dreadful Earthquake at Guadaloupe and Martinique." London Times, March 14, 1843, p. 5 c. 4-5. "The Earthquake at Guadaloupe." London Times, March 18, 1843, p. 5 c. 3. "The Earthquake at Guadaloupe." London Times, March 22, 1843, p. 6 c. 6.]


1843 Feb 8 / For the q, see Fielding Reid. [II; 544. Reid, Harry Fielding, and Stephen Taber. United States. Earthquake Investigation Commission. The Porto Rico Earthquake of 1918 with Descriptions of Earlier Earthquakes: Report of the Earthquake Investigation Commission. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1919, 54. Sainte-Claire Deville, Henri Etienne. "Observations sur le tremblement de terre éprouvé aux Antilles, le 8 février 1843." Comptes Rendus, 17 (1843): 1283-1288. Sainte-Claire Deville, Henri Etienne. Recherches sur les principaux phénomènes de météorologie et de physique terrestre aux Antilles. Paris, Gide, 1860. Poëy y Aguirre, Andrés. "Catalogue Chronologique des tremblements de terre ressentis dans les Indes-Occidentales, de 1530 à 1857." Annuaire de la Société météorologique de France, 5 (1857): 75-127, at 111-112.]


1843 Feb 8 / (q and comet) / Great q / West Indies / A.J.S. 44/419. [II; 545. "Great Earthquake in the West Indies, Feb. 8." American Journal of Science, 44 (1843): 419.]


1843 Feb 8 / Off Guadaloupe, column of black water rose from sea. Supposed submarine volc. / L.T., May 24-8-b. [II; 546. "The Late Earthquake." London Times, May 24, 1843, p. 8 c. 2. "...between the eastern point of Mariegalante and Guadaloupe, and in the mid-channel, a column of water, black in colour, and of large diameter, arose from the sea with great force. All around it, to a considerable distance, a quantity of vapour covered the sea. This appearance lasted about half an hour. M. Celron adds, that being well acquainted with waterspouts, he was certain that this was not one as the column was too vertical and did not touch the clouds. No doubt was entertained by him of its being the effect of a submarine volcano." Céloron de Blainville. "Sur un volcan qui a fait éruption entre la Guadaloupe et Marie-Galante." Comptes Rendus, 16 (1843): 1083-1084. Sainte-Claire Deville, Henri Etienne. Recherches sur les principaux phénomènes de météorologie et de physique terrestre aux Antilles. Paris, Gide, 1860, 43. Sainte-Claire Deville copies this account and notes such a  phenomenon might be caused by the combustion of hydrogen sulfide gases, such as those released in a volcanic eruption.]


1843 Feb 8 / q / Antigua / ab 10:45 a.m. / There was a deep purple haze. / A. Reg., '43-12. [II; 547. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 84 (1842): pt. 2, 1-187, at 12, cv. "Earthquake in the West Indies."]


1843 Feb 8 / A q. at Dominica, and soon after a "stupendous comet" visible at sunset and then above horizon several hours. Tail 25 or 30 degrees long. / L.T., Ap. 4-6-a. / See March. [II; 548. "The Comet." London Times, April 4, 1843, p. 6 c. 1. The Great Comet of 1843, (C/1843 D1), was the second brightest sungrazer known and belongs to a group of comets that Heinrich Carl Friedrich Kreutz, (editor of the Astronomische Nachrichten, from 1896 to 1907), believed were the remnants of a comet that had broken apart into several fragments that share similar orbits. Sekanina, Zdenek, and Paul W. Chodas. "Fragmentation Hierarchy of Bright Sungrazing Comets and the Birth and Orbital Evolution of the Kreutz System. I. Two-Superfragment Model." Astrophysical Journal, 607 (May 20, 2004): 620-639.]


1843 Feb. 8 / [newspaper clipping] / [Quake.] / Port of Spain Gazette, Sept 21, 1925. [II; 549. (Port of Spain Gazette, Sept 21, 1925).]


1843 Feb. 8 / Destructive q. / St Lucia, B.W.I. / BA 1911-55. [II; 550. Milne, 707. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 55.]


1843 Feb. 8 /Destructive q. / West Indies / BA 1911-53. [II; 551. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 53.]


1843 Feb. 8 / 5,000 persons killed in West Indies in this q. / BA 1911-42. [II; 552. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 42.]


1843 Feb 8 / [LT], 7-a / Met / Nottingham. [II; 553. "Splendid Meteor." London Times, February 8, 1843, p. 7 c. 1.]


1843 Feb 10, ab / N. Missouri / dense clouds of a dark substance resembling steel dust / N.Y. Herald, March 2-4-1. [II; 554. "Another Miraculous Shower." New York Herald, March 2, 1843, p. 4 c. 1. "Some of the papers in the upper part of Missouri, notice the fall of a dark substance, resembling steel dust, immediately after a heavy snow, three weeks ago. The light of the sun was obscured all day by dense clouds of this substance, and it is known to have extended to several counties."]


1843 Feb 14 / Several shocks / N. Orleans / NY Herald, Feb 28-4-1. [II; 555. "Earthquakes Again." New York Herald, March 1, 1843, p. 4 c. 1.]


1843 Feb 16 / 11 p.m. / Shocks / Nashville, Tenn / NY Herald, Feb 28-4-1. [II; 556."Another Earthquake. New York Herald, February 28, 1843, p. 4 c. 1. An earthquake at Louisville, Kentucky, was reported at this time. The earthquakes at Nashville and at New Orleans were reported in another article. "Earthquakes Again." New York Herald, March 1, 1843, p. 4 c. 1.]


1843 Feb 17 / Many mets / Brussels / BA 47-15. [II; 557. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


[1843 Feb 19. Wrong date. See: 1845 Feb 19, (II; 558).]


1843 Feb 28 / Cor to Cape Town Mail of March 11, describes the comet as he saw it. Close to the sun, like 1st mag star—at 9 am. March 2, after sunset, it threw up a long train of light half way to the zenith. On 3rd, it was much higher in the heavens when the sun had set and visible ab 1/2 hour afterward—very brilliant—after it disappeared, the tail shot up obliquely toward the north. On 4th, brilliant but reduced to 1/4th first size—destitute of the long tail. [II; 5591, 559.2. (Cape Town Mail of March 11, 1843). Comet C/1843 D1. Charles Piazzi Smyth painted a "Daylight View over Table Bay Showing the Great Comet of 1843": http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/15560.html ]


1843 [Feb 28] / See Dec 22, etc., 1880. / Also that Southern Comet that disappeared. [II; 560.]


1843 Feb. 28 / Ac to the New Bedford Mercury, copied in the N.Y. Daily Tribune, March 10 / Comet near the sun, visible all day 28th without glasses, brilliancy almost equal to that of Venus—tail about 3 degrees long, very near eastern limb of sun. [II; 561. "The Comet of 1843." New York Daily Tribune, March 10, 1843, p. 1 c. 2. Comet C/1843 D1.]


1843 Feb 28 / Comet seen in broad daylight, numerous places in New England. / Am J. Sci 44/412. [II; 562. "Notice of the Great Comet of 1843." American Journal of Science, 44 (1843): 412-417. Comet C/1843 D1.]


1843 Feb 28 / (Comet) / "size of Venus" / Brilliant body near the sun, by [m]any persons in New England. / Am J. Sci 44/412 / And yet when, March 7, the beam seen, nucleus doubtful. [II; 563. "Notice of the Great Comet of 1843." American Journal of Science, 44 (1843): 412-417, at 413-414.]


1843 March 1 / Comet first seen in Tasmania / Tasmanian Jour of Sci 2-155 / disap on 7th of April. [II; 564. "The Comet." Tasmanian Journal of Natural Science, Agriculture, Statistics, &c., 2 (1843): 155-156.]


1843 March 1 / Dust / At Valencia, Spain, heavy gale. An immense red mass upon the horizon. It advanced slowly and cast a fine red-colored dust. / Athenaeum 1843-268. [II; 565. "Meteorology." Athenaeum, 1843 (no. 803; March 18): 268.]


1843 March 1 / [LT], 6-d / Ghst / Sunderland / See Jan 20-7-d. [A; 164. "A Ghost Story." London Times, March 1, 1843, p. 6 c. 4. A sailor had twice seen his sister's ghost, (at sea and on the Wear), which promised to visit him again; and, rumours attracted a large crowd to a churchyard at Sunderland with hopes of seeing her ghost coming out of her grave. See another "ghost" story: 1843 Jan 16 - 17, (A; 163).]  


1843 March 2 / Tail of comet seen, Lat 6.33.N; 79.3E, from ship John Barry. At sunset on 4th, the nucleus seen. Then greater altitude next night. / Bombay Monthly Times, April, 1843. [II; 566. (Bombay Monthly Times, April, 1843. @ LOC & BL).]


1843 March 2 / Comet first seen in Sydney, N.S.W., 7 p.m. / Sydney Morning Herald, March 7. [II; 567. "The Comet." Sydney Morning Herald, March 7, 1843, p. 3 c. 2.]


1843 March 5-6 / Beam / ac. to a writer from Brown University / Tail of comet—as soon as dark, a slender beam of light from the horizon, [(]or near it ) at a point 10 or 15 degrees south of west. N.Y. Daily Tribune 14-4-1 —observed till 8 p.m. end had then passed below horizon. No nucleus had been seen, and writer's belief it was too near sun—so he thinks reports of the comet nucleus in daytime just been unfounded. [II; 568.1, 568.2. "The Comet." New York Daily Tribune. March 14, 1843, p. 4 c. 1-2.]  


1843 March 6 / at Serampore, India / ac to Friend of India, March 9 and 16 / Evening, after sunset, long beam, seemed auroral—next night, the nucleus seen—nucleus in Eridanus on 7th—tail 36 degrees long. If produced, would meet Sirius. A line from Canopus to Sirius and another to nucleus of the comet made a right angle. [II; 569.1, 569.2. "The Comet." Friend of India, March 8, 1843, p. 149. "The Comet." Friend of India, March 16, 1843, pp. 166-167.]


1843 March 6 / Evening, at Calcutta, comet tail at first like a streak of smoke from a steamer, illumined by the sun; and, after sunset, like a sun column, but then seen as a comet tail. / Calcutta Jour. Nat. Hist 4-128. [II; 570. Earle, Willis. "From the same." Calcutta Journal of Natural History, 4, no. 13 (April 1843): 128-129.]


1843 March 6-9 / Report by Lieut. Maury, of the Hydrographical Office / N.Y. Daily Tribune 13-4-1 / In daytime, every point of space within 15 degrees of the sun was examined but no nucleus could be found. At sunset, the tail visible, point "toward[s] the sun" (or self away).  On evening of 8th, tail was a faint nebulous arch reaching away beyond Sirius in the East, resting on Epsilon of the Great Dog. Nothing in eastern sky in morning. [II; 571.1, 571.2, 571.3. Maury, Matthew Fontaine. "The Strange Light." New York Daily Tribune, March 13, 1843, p. 4 c. 1-2.]


1843 March 6-9, and 11 / (Al) / Maury thought that the comet was approaching the sun—so he explained invisibility of the nucleus; that lost to sight in rays of sun. / But ac to Cape Town Observer, the comet was leaving the sun. // [II; 572. Matthew Fontaine Maury. ]  


1843 March 6-9, 11 / (A2) / my idea that "nucleus" was a fixed star that waned but sent out a "train". But—does the sun move west of a fixed point in "shell" so leave it behind? 4 minutes to the east every day? [II; 573.]


1843 March. / [newspaper clipping] / [Great Comet.] / Port of Spain Gazette [7th March, 1843]. [II; 574. (Port of Spain Gazette [7th March, 1843]).]


1843 March 7 (?) / Near Guadaloupe, W.I., column of black water, and vapor from the sea / had been great q in Guad., Feb. 8 / Athenaeum 1843-574. [II; 575. "Earthquakes." Athenaeum, 1843 (no. 816; June 17): 574.]


1843 March 8 / Banks of Essequibe river 4° 11' N. Lat. / Account in Athenaeum 1843-529, by the explorer [Robert Hermann] Schomburgk, of the comet as he saw it—saw tail, but in forest could not see the horizon. On 9th, saw the nucleus 12° above horizon—tail to Eridanus. [II; 576. "Foreign Correspondence." Athenaeum, 1843 (no. 814; June 3): 529-530.]


1843 March 10 / ab 1 a.m. / q / Jersey and Guernsey / LT 18-5-c. [II; 577. "Earthquake." London Times, March 18, 1843, p. 5 c. 3.]


1843 March 10 / ab 12:30 a.m. / q / Manche / (Fr.) / Timbs 1844/277. [II; 578. "Earthquakes in 1843." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1844, 276-278, at 277. "Earthquakes...." Athenæum, 1843 (no. 804; March 25): 293.]


1843 March / Comet / See The New World Extra Series No 65, The Comet / (P.P. 6391.+) / On 13th, at Yale College, as reported in a letter in the New Haven Palladium, the nucleus near 55 Ceti / setting / Setting ab 7:40 p.m., 55 Ceti or Baten [Kaitos] / Cor, U.S. Gazette, says 25' of Zeta Ceti. / what date? / That in a powerful refractor no disc discernable / He says that moving eastwards ab 3 1/2 degrees a day, and southward ab 1/3 degree per day. [II; 579.1, 579.2. "An Account of the Great Comet of 1843." New World, (Extra Series, no. 65; March 1843): 28-31, at 29-30. "The nucleus was about 25' south of the star Zeta Ceti, of the third magnitude, and was of equal brightness with that star; the tail extended from it to the feet of Orion," (page 29); "We had a fair opportunity, on Saturday evening, the 13th, of observing the nucleus or head of the comet, it being 7 o'clock considerably elevated above the horizon, and close to the well known star Baten [Kaitos] of the Whale (55 ceti). At this time, its right ascension was 1 hour 43 minutes, and its declination 11 1-4 degrees, nearly—setting about twenty minutes before 8 o'clock," (page 30).]  http://hdl.handle.net/2027/inu.30000083763635?urlappend=%3Bseq=805


1843 March 10 / ab 8:20 p.m. / Lancashire—N.E. of Manchester, especially Rochdale. / one before / Aug 20, 1835 / June 11, '39 / LT, March 16-6-b. [II; 580. "Earthquake in Lancashire." London Times, March 16, 1843, p. 6 c. 2.]


1843 March 11 / Lieut Maury's report up to [March 11] / Trib 15-1-1 / Search for the Comet and in vain —but each evening the magnificent "tail". [II; 581. Maury, Matthew Fontaine. "The Strange Light." New York Daily Tribune, March 13, 1843, p. 4 c. 1-2.]


1843 March / More obs on the comet / Clerke, Hist. Astro/103. [II; 582. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1st ed., (1885), 134-137; 4th ed., (1902), 103-105.]


1843 March-April / The Comet / See Again. / Streak seen March 4—in Jamaica / LT, Ap. 22-3-f / See "Beams". / not satisfactory nucleus ever seen. [II; 583. "The Comet." London Times, April 22, 1843, p. 3 c. 5.]


1843 March 2 / Comet at Rio / LT, May 15-6-b / for Persia—See Times, June 10-5-b. [II; 584. "The Comet." London Times, May 15, 1843, p. 6 c. 2. "Extract of a letter from Tabriz, in Persia...." London Times, June 10, 1843, p. 5 c. 2.]


1843 March / Get prediction of "comet". / See if came back. [II; 585.]


1843 March / The comet / They tried to say the comet of Sept, 1882, was this, but see periods they gave to it. [II; 586. The "Fragmentation Hierarchy of Major Sungrazers (Two-Superfragment Model)" given by Sekanina and Chodas links C/1843 D1 with C/1880 C1 and C/1887 B1, but as separate fragments of Superfragment 1; whereas, C/1882 R1 belongs to the group from Superfragment 2. Sekanina, Zdenek, and Paul W. Chodas. "Fragmentation Hierarchy of Bright Sungrazing Comets and the Birth and Orbital Evolution of the Kreutz System. I. Two-Superfragment Model." Astrophysical Journal, 607 (May 20, 2004): 620-639, Figure 2, at 629. See: 1843 March, (II; 589).]


1843 March / Mr. Glaisher's denial that the beam was the comet's tail / thinks unusual zodiacal light / Mag of Sci 5-14. [II; 587. "'The Comet?' Luminous Phenomenon in the South Western Sky." Magazine of Science, 5 (1843-1844): 13-14. "Mr. Glaisher writes from the Cambridge observatory, March 29: 'The brilliant train which has for the last few nights attracted so much attention, is doubtless only caused by the unusual brightness of the zodiacal light. This may be attributed both to the state of the atmosphere, and to the approximation of the sun to the constellation Aries. That the atmosphere is in a peculiar state is proved by the circumstance that Venus was seen with the naked eye at noon, on the continent last week." Forster, Thomas Ignatius Maria. "The Comet, and Its Complication with Other Remarkable Phenomena." London Morning Post, April 4, 1843, p. 5 c. 2. "While observing the tail of this extraordinary body on the night of the 20th inst., when it issued from the mist of the horizon, very near to the star (Gamma) γ Eridani, I perceived it to be sheathed, as it were, with a broader and somewhat conical envelope of pale and very faint light, extending, near its base, as far as the head of the Whale; and on the other side involving the Hare; so that, mistaking the whole effect for one identical phenomenon, I at first considered it as an unusual variety of the Zodiacal Light. What this light was, I cannot even guess; but another phenomenon presently appeared in the west, of a still more brilliant and attractive nature; it was a bright Aurora, of a sub conical form, rising obliquely from the horizon, and extending to the horns of Taurus, involving both Aldebaran and also the Pleiades in its broad arched superstructure. As this luminous appearauce has been repeated on several occasions since, though with much less brilliancy, it is highly worthy of being accurately registered by meteorologists and astronomers. The complication of such remarkable appearances together, affords, at least, a very striking example of the coincidence of three several phenomena existing probably in very different regions of space; and leads me to go further, and to say that it furnishes me with additional proofs of an hypothesis that I have always maintained, that there is a decided connection between comets and atmospherical phenomena, and that Kepler was right in his plausible conjecture as to the infiuence of these celestial bodies on our earth." Herschel, John Frederick William. "The Comet." London Times, March 25, 1843, p. 7 c. 1. Herschel questions Forster's "assimilating two phenomena so utterly unlike" as the comet's tail and the zodiacal light. "The zodiacal light, then, on every occasion when I have seen the comet, has been thus superbly displayed. occupying its usual place among the stars, and having all its usual characters, while the comet in no part of the extent of its tail so much as touched upon the region occupied by it." Glaisher's observation of a "brilliant train" was not the only one on that night. "The Comet." Literary Gazette, 1843 (April 8, 1843): 223. "We see by the Kelso Mail, on the 29th of March, at 9h 35m P.M. mean time, at Markerstoun (Sir T. Brisbane's observatory), after an unsuccessful search for the comet, a meteoric light was seen....The magnetic disturbance, from 6h 30m P.M. until midnight, was considerable: time of greatest disturbance, from 9h20m to 10h P.M." Broun, John Allan. "Observations in Magnetism and Meteorology, Made at Makerstoun in Scotland...." Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 17 pt. 2 (1861): i-305, at 61. "An auroral light was seen about 9h to NNW., assuming the form of a segment of a circle, which became rather bright about 9h 50m, the light being homogeneous; at 10h 50m the light was more spotted, but no pencils were visible. At 10h 25m a meteoric light was seen, at first rather faint, proceeding from a point 1° to the south of Zeta Orionis (which was then just seen to about WSW. above the surrounding trees), passing between Castor and Pollux, and lost in a nebula in the back of Leo Minor. It became gradually brighter till about 10h 35m, when its brightness perhaps equalled the most vivid pencils of an aurora, and gradually diminished in intensity and length till altogether lost about 10h 55m. The breadth at Orion was about 1°, this being the brightest portion of the meteor, but increasing gradually upwards, filling the space between Castor and Pollux; the greatest length seen might be about 100.° There was no appearance of corruscations. This meteor, undoubtedly connected with the aurora, was singular in every way, whether we regard its form, position, isolation, or duration." "The Aurora had disappeared at 12h." As neither the comet nor the zodiacal light would probably be the cause of magnetic disturbances at Makerstoun, an auroral beam might explain the phenomena observed at Makerstoun, and by Glaisher and Forster. See: 1843 March 18, (II; 602).]


1843 March / Mr. Glaisher's denial that the beam was the comet's tail / thinks unusual zodiacal light / Mag of Sci 5-14. [II; 587. "'The Comet?' Luminous Phenomenon in the South Western Sky." Magazine of Science, 5 (1843-1844): 13-14. "Mr. Glaisher writes from the Cambridge observatory, March 29: 'The brilliant train which has for the last few nights attracted so much attention, is doubtless only caused by the unusual brightness of the zodiacal light. This may be attributed both to the state of the atmosphere, and to the approximation of the sun to the constellation Aries. That the atmosphere is in a peculiar state is proved by the circumstance that Venus was seen with the naked eye at noon, on the continent last week."]


1843 Feb, March / Comet / element in Am J. Sci 44/415 / Perihelion passage / Feb 27.240348 M / Phil time / See Eng pubs. [II; 588. "Notice of the Great Comet of 1843." American Journal of Science, 44 (1843): 412-417, at 415. The perihelion time and other orbital elements computed by Sears Cook Walker and Ezra Otis Kendall differ considerably from modern ones; in 1843, Walker wrote: "These elements do not agree with those of any comet on record; it must therefore be new." See: 1843 March, (II; 589).]


1843 March / M.M. Laugier and Mauvais, of Paris, agreed: they determined that the comet would return in 35 years. Clausen—6 or 7 years. Prof. Hubbard, of Washington—553 years. / Clerke, His Astro, 103 / Clerke—perihelion—9:47 p.m., Feb 27, 1843. [II; 589. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1st ed., (1885), 134-137; 4th ed., (1902), 103-105. "Periods of the utmost variety were by different computators assigned to the body, which arrived at perihelion, February 27, 1843, at 9:47 P.M. Professor Hubbard of Washington found that it required 533 years to complete a revolution; MM. Laugier and Mauvais of Paris considered the true term to be 35; Clausen looked for its return at the end of between six and seven. A recent discussion by Professor Kreutz of all the available data gives a probable period of 512 years for this body, and precludes its hypothetical identity with the comet of 1668, known as the 'Spina' of Cassini." Sekanina, Zdenek, and Paul W. Chodas. "A New Orbit Determination for Bright Sungrazing Comet of 1843." Astrophysical Journal, 687 (2008): 1415-1422 at 1415. "Closely inspecting Kreutz's classical work, we conclude that his result of 512 yr for the orbital period, which has been endlessly quoted in the literature and employed in studies of the sungrazer system's evolution, is not realistic. We derive improved sets of orbital elements based on the best astrometric observations available from 1843, using new comparison star positions from the Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues. We find that the 1843 osculating value of the orbital period was most probably between 600 and 800 yr and that the observations are consistent with a forced value of 742 yr, in which case comet C/1843 D1 could be a major (and possibly the most massive) fragment of X/1106 C1, the celebrated sungrazer of 1106."]


1843 March 14 / Oporto / "Splendid comet appeared at sunset, in west, and disap[peared] in west. Venus? / LT, March 22-5-e. [II; 590. Harris, Quarles. "The Comet." London Times, March 22, 1843, p. 5 c. 6. "I yesterday received a letter from Oporto, dated the 14th inst., which mentions that a splendid comet becomes visible there at sunset, appearing in the west, and that it disappears in the west at night."]


1843 March 16 / Paris? / Galignani's Mess[enger] / light in sky supposed to be tail of enormous new comet / no nucleus seen / 7 p.m. [II; 591. (Galignani's Messenger, 1843.)]


1843 March 17 / "Comet or supposed comet" / See Timbs, 1844. / At 10:30 that evening / LT 25-7-a / Ireland bet 12 and 1. [II; 592. "The Comet." London Times, March 25, 1843, p. 7 c. 1. "The Great Comet of 1843." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1844, 279-281.]


1843 March 23 / [LT], 6-c / Tail of a com. seen variously in Orion, Lepus, Cetus. [II; 593. Herschel, John Frederick William. "Progress of the Comet." London Times, March 23, 1843, p. 6 c. 2.]


1843 March 31 / [LT[, 5-e / Beam in sky—several nebulous bodies that might be a comet. [II; 594. Airy, G.B., and, J. Glaisher. "The Comet." London Times, March 31, 1843, p. 5 c. 5.]


1843 March 14 / q and "rushing sound" in Vermont / 9:05 p.m. / N.Y. Daily Tribune 24-2-3. [II; 595. "Earthquake in Vermont." New York Tribune, March  24, 1843, p. 2 c. 3. "At Johnson, 36 miles north east of Burlington, there was heard first a rushing noise, like the approach of a heavy storm, and then occurred a deep stillness followed by a heavy rumblimg from the east, which sensibly jarred the stove and furniture in the house."]


1843 / before March 15 / "A strange yellow liquid that adhered to the fingers when touched and dyed the ground where it fell." / Lit. Gazette 1843-389 / India. [II; 596. "Mofussil Rain." Literary Gazette, 1843 (June 10, 1843): 389. "A strange yellow liquid has rained lately at Futtehpore, Sicree. The matter adhered to the finger when touched, and dyed the ground where it fell.—Ibid." The brief article thus cites the Indian Journal from an article above it. Fatehpur Sikri is in the state of Uttar Pradesh, India.]


1843 March 16 /bet 11 and 12 p.m. / q. / St. Louis / accompanied by a "rushing noise" / N.Y. Trib., 20-3-1. [II; 597. "Another Earthquake." New York Tribune, March 20, 1843, p. 3 c. 1.]


1843 Mar 17 / 8:20 a.m. / q / Manchester and Rochdale / Lloyd's 19-2-5 // Ab 1 a.m. / Liverpool / 19-8-2. [II; 598/ (1843 March Lloyd's 19-2-5; abt. 1 a.m. / Liverpool / 19-8-2.)]


1843 Mar. 17 / q / Lancashire / Cumberland / Dumfries / Isle of Man / Belfast and Jersey / Guernsey / Trans Roy Irish Acad 28-293 / In Manchester, Morn. Post, Oct. 9, 1863 / See 1816. [II; 599. O'Reilly, Joseph Patrick. "Cataloque of the Earthquakes Having Occurred in Great Britain and Ireland during Historical Times." Transactions of the Royal Irish Academy, 28 (1880-1886): 285-316, at 293. "Earthquakes in Manchester." London Morning Post, October 9, 1863, p. 8 c. 3. See: 1816 March 17, (I; 566).]


1843 March 17 / 1:20 a.m. / Sounds like explosions and qs / Westmoreland / L.T., March 21, etc. [II; 600. "The Earthquake in Westmoreland." London Times, March 21, 1843, p. 5 c. 4. "After the shock the darkness still continued, and there was a yellowish blaze in the elements, accompanied by a strong rush of wind."]


1843 March 17 // q and sky / Manchester, etc. / ab 1 a.m. / q / Liverpool / LT 18-5-b / 2 cols—LT 20-7-b. / March 21-5-d—in Westmoreland, ab 1:20. "a yellowish blaze in the elements". Supposed powder mills had blown up. Said ac to one witness had been slight shock. / At Manchester, taken for report of distant cannon / at Liverpool—dimness of moon noted—at Manchester "dim and flimy". [sic] Noise like of an explosion—sound and vibration—Isle of Man, ab 12:45. [II; 601.1, 601.2. "Earthquake at Liverpool." London Times, March 18, 1843, p. 5 c. 2. "Earthquake in Lancashire and Cheshire." London Times, March 20, 1843, p. 7 c. 2-3. "One circumstance we may notice, which may or may not be connected with the earthquake. About an hour previous, we observed that the moon which was full at 6 o'clock on Thursday morning, although shining unclouded, presented a dim and filmy appearance, as though a thin veil of cloud were drawn over her whole disc." "The Earthquake in Westmoreland." London Times, March 21, 1843, p. 5 c. 4. (No information, in these articles, regarding the Isle of Man.)]  


1843 March 18 / Mr. Forster, astronomer of Bruges, is quoted in The Magazine of Science, 5-13—that the light that had been appearing on horizon, an hour after sunset, did not belong to a comet. "It is a zodiacal light." Said that from the Cambridge Observatory, Mr. Glaisher had written, expressing this opinion. [II; 602.1, 602.2. "'The Comet?' Luminous Phenomenon in the South Western Sky." Magazine of Science, 5 (1843-1844): 13-14. Forster, who had claimed to have discovered a comet in 1819, (though C/1819 N1, or Comet Tralles, had been reported two days earlier), is misquoted by Fort, ("It is the zodiacal light"). Forster further states: "I have not the smallest doubt but that his phenomenon is that of the zodiacal light." For Forster's claim to have discovered a comet: "En 1819, le juillet à 11 heures, j'eus le plaisir de découvrir une comète dans le nord. Cette comète ètait observée la mème nuit à l'observatoire royal de Greenwich." Forster, Thomas Ignatius Maria. Recueil de ma vie, mes ouvrages et mes pensées: opuscule philosophique. 2nd ed. Brussels: Ve A. Stapleaux, 1836, 19.]


1843 March 20 / Hamburg / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 603. Greg, 80.]


1843 March 25 / Bishopville, S. Car. / Metite. / (F). [II; 604. Fletcher, 101. This is the Bishopville meteorite. Greg, 80.]


1843 March 27 / bet 3 and 4 a.m. / Meteor of great size, from S to N, passed over, illuminating Savannah. / Niles Nat. Reg, April 8. [II; 605. "Meteor." Niles' Weekly Register, 64 (April 8, 1843): 96. "A meteor of great size and intense brilliance passed over Savannah on the morning of the 27th ult., between 3 and 4 o'clock, travelling from south to north and illuminating the whole city."]


1843 March 28 / Fr / (Meurthe) Luéville / q / BA '11. [II; 606. Milne, 707.]


1843 March 31 / 3 large brilliant meteors passed over Detroit. One exploded with sounds like cannon fire. / Niles Nat. Register, Ap. 15. [II; 607. "Meteor." Niles' Weekly Register, 64 (April 15, 1843): 112. "The Detroit Advertiser of the 3d says: 'Three large and brilliant meteors passed over our city on Friday night. One of them exploded with a great sound resembling the discharge of a heavy cannon.'"]


1843 Ap 1 / Great q / Bombay,etc. / BA '11. [II; 608. Milne, 707.]


1843 Ap. 1 / q and loud sound like thunder / Deccan, India / At 4:30 a.m. / Bombay Monthly Times, April, p. 55. [II; 609. (Bombay Monthly Times, April, 1843, p. 55.)]


1843 Ap. 6 / q. / Belg / Ciel et T 8/38. [II; 610. Lancaster, Albert Benoît Marie. "Les Tremblements de terre en Belgique." Ciel et Terre, 8 (March 16, 1887): 25-43, at 38.]


1843 Ap. 6 / 2 a.m. / shocks in Holland / L.T. 14-4-e. [II; 611. Milne, 707. "Earthquake in Holland." London Times, April 14, 1843, p. 4 c. 5.]


1843 Ap. 14 / Clermont, France / Fireball / W to E / quick / BA '60. [II; 612. Greg, 80.]


1843 April 29-30 / midnight / Perth / 1/4 hour, "alarming noise", "unnatural kind of screaming" in the sky // 22 miles from Comrie / Said been an uncommonly numerous flight of wild geese / L.T., May 2, 1843. [II; 613. "A Midnight Flight." London Times, May 2, 1843, p. 6 c. 4.]


1843 May 4 / France / large fireball / light = to sun's / BA 60. [II; 614. Greg, 80.]


1843 May 4 / 2 a.m. / Beauregard (Upper Saône) / Cylindrical luminous body in the sky. Detonations / L.T., 13-7-a. [II; 615. "Meteorological Phenomena." London Times, May 13, 1843, p. 7 c. 1. "The Commerce likewise publishes a letter from Beauregard, in the Upper Saône, stating, that at 2 o'clock in the morning of the 4th inst., a luminous body of about three feet in diameter, and of cylindrical form, was perceived within a space of about te leagues, and caused much terror amongst the population. It moved with fearful rapidity, shone like the sun, emitted sometimes fiery detonations, and at other times produced a hollow sound like a mass falling to pieces, and threw out flames of fire in the direction of from north to south."]


1843 May 6 / Aurora Eng / Meteors followed. / L.T. 9-6-a / At Brussels / 13-7-a. [II; 616. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, May 9, 1843, p. 6 c. 1. "Meteorological Phenomena." London Times, May 13, 1843, p. 7 c. 1.]


1843 May 6 / Great aurora / C.R. 16/ 1091, 1171. [II; 617. "Aurore boréale." Comptes Rendus, 16 (1843): 1092-1093. "Sur l'aurore boréale du 6 mai." Comptes Rendus, 16 (1843): 1171-1172.]


1843 May 6 / England / Aurora at 11:30, having receding to horizon / Capella at vertex / LT, May 9-6-a. [II; 618. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, May 9, 1843, p. 6 c. 1.]


1843 May 6 / (Leo) / Aurora or luminous patch in Leo / England / Timbs'  44/282. [II; 619. "Splendid Aurora Borealis." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1844, 282. Herschel, John Frederick William. "Aurora Borealis." Athenaeum, 1843 (no. 811; May 13): 465.]


1843 May 6 . Brussels / elliptical, luminous cloud in south—aurora in north / LT, 1843, May 13-7-a. [II; 620. "Meteorological Phenomena." London Times, May 13, 1843, p. 7 c. 1. "It was then 12 minutes past 11 o'clock [P.M.]. In the centre of the sky, which was perfectly serene, was seen a species of whitish cloud of elliptical form, situate in the meridian, at an elevation of about 60 degrees. The cloud varied at each moment in splendour and in size; its abrupt variations were fatigueing to the eye, and passed alternately from the feeble light of the Milky-way to the brilliancy of a white cloud, which nearly effaced the light of the brightest stars placed in its direction. The phenomenon was produced by that lind of luminous cloud which generally accompanies the most intense aurora borealis...."]


1843 May 17-21 / At Turin, enormous "tourbillons de graines". / C.R. 17-127. [II; 621. Gaultier de Claubry, Charles Emmanuel Simon. "Observations diverses recueillies en Italie." Comptes Rendus, 17 (1843): 127-130.]


1843 June / One of the largest sunspots ever seen / Timbs Y.B. 1872/260. [II; 622. "Vast Sun Spots." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1872, 260.]


1843 -June- / Epidemic influenza / U.S. / Religio-Phil Jour, June 24, 1893, p. 1. [A; 165. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, June 24, 1893, p. 1).]


1843 / ab 1st of June // Eastbourne / storm St. Elmo's / brilliant illumination of a mill / L.T., June 3-6-e. [II; 623. "Singular Phenomenon." London Times, June 3, 1843, p. 6 c. 5. "A short time since a very remarkable appearance of the electric fluid took place at Mr. Hurst's mill, Eastbourne. The attendants, warned by the appearance of the sky of an approaching storm, hastened to take in the sails. Before, however, this work was completed, the wind blew violently, with heavy showers of sleet, and on a sudden the sweeps of the mill became brilliantly illuminated with a blue lambent fire, which continued flitting about the frame-work for nearly 10 minutes, at the end of which it gradually disappeared. Doubtlessly the phenomenon was produced by a quantity of the electric fluid, which settled on the mill; and there being no conductor to carry it away, it remained till it was absorbed by the atmosphere."]


1843 June 2 / (F) / Utrecht / 8 p.m. / 2 stars fell. / BA 60-80 / See May, 1827. / CR 16-1312 / There said be similar BA. [II; 624. Fletcher, 101. Greg, 80. Quetelet. "Sur deux aérolithes tombés le 2 juin, près d'Utrecht." Comptes Rendus, 16 (1843): 1311-1312. Baumhauer, Eduard Hendrik von. "Ueber den muthmasslichen Ursprung der Meteorsteine, nebst einer Analyse des Meteorsteins, welcher am 2. Juni 1843 in der Provinz Utercht gefallen ist." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, s. 2 v. 66 (1845): 465-503. Van Rees, Richard. "Zwei Meteorsteinfälle in Holland, ein neuer und ein älterer." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, s. 2 v. 59 (1843): 348-350. See: 1827 May 22, (I; 1321).]


1843 June / One of the largest of sunspots in minimum period / A. J. Sci 3/1/275 / Sc Am 24/272. [II; 625. Kirkwood, Daniel. "On the Great Sun-spot of June, 1843." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 1 (1871): 275-276. "The Great Sun Spot of June, 1843." Scientific American, n.s., 24 (April 29, 1871): 272.]


1843 June 6 / Op Mars / (A l). [II; 626.]


1843 June 9 / [LT], 5-c / 13-8-e / Flood in Wales. [II; 627. "Destructive Flood." London Times, June 9, 1843, p. 5 c. 3. "Tremendous Flood." London Times, June 13, 1843, p. 8 c. 5.]


1843 June 15 / A Flying Machine reported? / Lit Gazette 1843/421. [II; 628. "The Flying Machine...." Literary Gazette, 1843, (June 24, 1843): 421-422. "The Flying Machine, it is currently reported, was heard to clap its wings during the evening of Thursday, the 15th; but some of the neighbours say the noise was made by a large bat, and others by a pigeon, with a curious lose paper about it, from the cup at Ascot. The latter may have descended from the manufactured pigeon of Archytas, which flew so beautifully. Not to mention Icarus, as a pre-example of flight by artificial means, a contemporary has pointed out Regiomontanus' Iron-fly, which could fly; and surely we can do as much with iron now as they could then. We shall see, as Mr. Henson announces a flight early in autumn from Hyde Park." William Samuel Henson was granted British Patent No. 9478 for his invention but failed to demonstrate that this aircraft, (powered by a steam engine), could carry passengers and freight any significant distances, (or, to actually fly). "Henson's Aerial Steam Carriage." Magazine of Science, 5 (1843-1844): 10-11.]


1843 June 20 / [LT], 5-d / Atmospheric phe. [II; 629. "Atmospheric Phenomenon." London Times, June 20, 1843, p. 5 c. 4. A solar halo.]


1843 June 19 / On a vessel ab 50 miles from Southwold in a heavy gale a pigeon sought refuge upon a pilot boat. On a wing feather was stamped in Roman characters ONOKNEEROR. / Liverpool Journal, July 1. [A; 166. (Liverpool Journal, July 1, 1843.)]


1843 June 21 / [LT], 7-d / Myst case. [A; 167. "Mysterious Circumstance." London Times, June 21, 1843, p. 7 c. 4.]


1843 June 21 / Parma / BA 60 / Fireball. [II; 630. Greg, 80.]


1843 June 22 / Utrecht / Fireball / BA 60 / See June 2. [II; 631. Greg, 80.]


1843 June 23 / California / q / BA '11. [II; 632. Milne, 707.]


1843 June 24 / Nothing in Liverpool Courier nor Liverpool Journal. [II; 633. Fort probably searched for a local account of the "pebbles and small eels" that fell in a thunderstorm, but found nothing while searching in 1843, (rather than in 1844).]


[1843 June 24. Wrong date; see: 1844 June 24, (II; 634).]


1843 June 29 / Manegaum, Khandeish, India / Metite / (F) / See July 26. [II; 635. Fletcher, 101. This is the Manegaum meteorite. "The date usually assigned to this fall, viz. the 16th of July, is erroneous. The true day of the fall is given, in the Mahratta account of it, as the third day of the month Asarh sudi, on Thursday. I am indebted to General Cunningham for the identification of this date with the 29th of June, 1843." Maskelynne, Nevil Story. "On the Mineral Constituents of Meteorites." Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 160 (1870): 189-214, at 211.]


[1843 June 29 /]1843 July 26 / date of Kandeish stonefall in BA 60 / 3:30 p.m. [II; 647. Greg, 80. The Manegaon meteorite fell on June 29, 1843. See: 1843 June 29, (II; 635).]


[1843 June 29 /] 1843 July 26 / See June 29. / Metite / Manegaon (Khandeish), East Indies / Oldham's Catalog of Meteorites. [II; 648. (Oldham, Thomas. Catalogue of the meteorites in the Museum of the Geological Survey of India. Calcutta. Calcutta: Geological Survey of India, 1866.).  The Manegaon meteorite fell on June 29, 1843. See: 1843 June 29, (II; 635).]


[1843 June 29 /] 1843 July / Aerolite fell near Eidulabad (Khandeish), India. / Trans Bombay Geog Soc 9/206. [II; 650. Buist, George. "Notices of the most remarkable Meteors in India of the fall of which accounts have been published." Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 9 (1849-1850): 197-230, at 206-208. Buist's article reprints the articles in the Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, which only identifies the date of the fall as in July. Abbott, James. "An Account of a remarkable Aerolite, which fell at the village of Manicgaon, near Eidulabad in Khandeesh." Piddington, Henry. "A Chemical Examination of the above Aerolite, and Remarks." Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 13 (1844): 880-886. The Manegaon meteorite fell on June 29, 1843. See: 1843 June 29, (II; 635).]


1843 June 29 / [LT], 7-b / Escape of a wolf at Coventry. [A; 168. "Escape of a Wolf." London Times, June 29, 1843, p. 7 c. 2.]


1843 / 1st July // from end of June, 1842, to /// Ab/ 30 shocks at Comrie / none on Perthshire / B Assoc 1843/120. [II; 636. "Report of the Committee appointed by the British Association in 1842, for registering the Shocks of Earthquakes, and making such Meteorological Observations as may appear to them desirable." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1843, 120-127, at 120.]


1843 July 4 / Efont Alps / by Dr. Gerling, of Marburg / [O]n moon—"a splendid bright point with light like a fixed star / Observatory 11/335 / See July 15, 1888. [II; 637. Holden, Edward Singleton. "Regarding Sir William Herschel's Observations of Volcanoes in the Moon." Observatory, 11 (1888): 334-335, at 335. "On 1843, July 4th, at 9¼ ʰ, Dr. Gerling of Marburg, observed a 'splendid bright point, with a light like a fixed star, except that a trace of definite shape was still to be perceived. It was in the southern prolongation of the lunar Alps, and its distance from the crater Autolycus was estimated as equal to that of Autolycus from Cassini. On the following evening a small round isolated conical mountain was found in this spot, which presented no especial features...." Gerling, Christian Ludwig. "Schreiben des Herrn Prof. Gerling an den Herausgeber." Astronomische Nachrichten, 22, no. 526 (1845): 356-358, at 357-358. "1843 Juli 4 fand ich Abends um 9¼ Uhr auf dem Mond in der Lichtgränze einen ausgezeichnet hellen Punkt, welcher fixstern-ähnlich leuchtete, doch so, dass noch eine Spur von Form wahrzunehmen war. Er lag am südlichen Abhang des Alpengebirgs und schätzte ich seine Entfernung von Autolycus gleich der des letzteren Punkts von Cassini.—Am folgenden Abend fand ich an dieser Stelle einen kleinen isolirten rundlich kegelförmigen Berg, welcher nichts Auffallendes darbot." ("Efont Alps"??? Possibly "Montes Alpes"???)]


1843 July 5 / The storm raged [o]ver almost all Great Britain, and "tidal waves" in Cornwall and in Scotland. / E.J Lowe, Treatise on Atmospheric Phe., p. 213. [II; 638. Lowe, Edward Joseph. A Treatise on Atmospheric Phenomena. London : Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1846, 213-215.]


1843 July 5 and Oct 30 / Agitation of sea / Plymouth and Penzance / See May 3, '09. [II; 639. See: (May 3, (not 1809).)]


1843 July 5 / At Mount's Bay (Cornwall?), ab. noon, sudden high wave, said been like that at Lisbon in time of the q. Then disturbance for several hours. / L.T., July 24-8-a / There were clouds, and in morning sounds of a distant th. storm had been heard. [II; 640. "Penzance.—Remarkable Phenomenon." London Times, July 24, 1843, p. 8 c. 1. Edmond, R., Jr. "Extraordinary Movement of the Sea in Mountsbay." Literary Gazette, 1843 (July 15, 1843): 464. Mount's Bay is the biggest bay in Cornwall.]


1843 July 6 / St Lawrence River / obj in sky or mirage / See Col. with Objs. [II; 641. "Mirage." Tablet, August 12, 1843, p. 12 c. 3. "The master of the American brig William Ash reports the following singular optical delusion:—'Brig William Ash, July 6, 1843, 15 min. past eight p.m.—Being at anchor off the Pilgrims, River St. Lawrence, to wait the tide, fine weather and light wind, I was called to by our pilot, William Russell, saying there was a ship sailing in the air. When looking in the air, in the direction pointed out, I distinctly saw the appearance of a full-rigged ship, under full sail, passing very swiftly over the land, in a S.S.W. direction. I watched it with the spy-glass, until to my view it vanished into smoke. It was witnessed also by the pilot's apprentice, Dennis Glen.—Wm. Morrish, Master.'" The Pilgrims would be a group of small islands, also known as Îles Les Pèlerins, near the village of Saint-André-de-Kamouraska, Quebec.]  


1843 July 7,8 / Many mets / Parma / BA 47-15 / 10-12, 30 in one hour, at Trezzo, Lombardy / 21, 22, 23, 26, 29, 30 , many, Parma. [II; 642. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


1843 July 10 / N.Y. Herald / Long continued drought in N.Y. region. [II; 643. [A; 490. "The Weather and the Crops." New York Herald, July 10, 1843, p. 4 c. 5.]


1843 July 19 / N.Y. Herald - last page / scarcely any rain in Conn. for 6 weeks. [II; 644. "The Drought." New York Herald, July 19, 1843, p. 4 c. 1.]


1843 July 25 / q. / Temeswar, Hungary / BA 11. [II; 645. Milne, 707.]


1843 July 25 / (Hun) / q / Temeswar / BA '11. [II; 646. Milne, 707.]


[1843 July 26. Wrong date. See: 1843 June 29, (II; 647).]


[1843 July 26. Wrong date. See: 1843 June 29, (II; 648).]


1843 July 31 / Ext. high tide / Thames / L.T., Aug 2-8-a. [II; 649. "Extraordinary High Tide." London Times, August 2, 1843, p. 8 c. 1.]


[1843 July. Wrong date. See: 1843 June 29, (II; 650).]


1843 Aug 4 / Prince Ed. Island / devastating th. storm and hail, some square-shaped and 4 to 6 inches in circumference / N.Y. Herald, Sept 1-1-6. [II; 651. "Thunder and Hail Storm at P.E. Island." New York Herald, September 1, 1843, p. 1 c. 6.]


1843 Aug 5 / Storm and flood / Delaware Co Inst of Sci 1844-52. [II; 652. The Report of the Delaware County Institute of Science was originally published as a book, in 1844, (52 pages in length); and, Fort may have simply copied its publication information, (the date of publication and 52 pages in length), onto this note. Owing to the few remaining copies of this book, it was reprinted. "The Flood of 1843." Proceedings of the Delaware County Institute of Science, 6,  nos. 1 & 2 (October 1910 &  January 1911): 1-46, 54-86.]


1843 Aug 5 / Great rainstorm in flood / N.Y.? / Delaware  Co. / Fassig, p. 170, part 2. [II; 653. Fassig, Oliver Lanard, ed. Bibliography of Meteorology. Part II: Moisture. Washington: Signal Office, 1889, 169-170. Fassig only lists the publication information of the Report of a Committee of the Delaware County Institute of Science on the Great Rain Storm and Flood.... Chester, PA: Delaware County Institute of Science, 1844.]


1843 Aug 6 / Westphalia / met. det. / BA 60 / 1:30 a.m. [II; 654. Greg,  80-81.]


1843 Aug 9 / great storm / A lightning storm / no rain? / Nature, Sept 7, 1893 / E.J. Lowe. [II; 655. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "Drought and Heat at Shirenewton Hall in 1893." Nature, 48 (Sept 7, 1893): 436-437.]


1843 Aug. 9 / Th storm / Leisure Hour 23/509. [II; 656. "Thunderstorm of 9th August, 1843." Leisure Hour, 23 (1874): 509-511.]


1843 Aug 10 / Violent shock at Dornstchen / same day a trombe at Bagneres de Luchon / C.R. 18-397. [II; 657. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les année 1843." Comptes Rendus, 18 (1844): 393-403, at 396-397.]


1843 Aug 12 / bet 7 and 8 a.m. / Shock and low rumbling sound / Burlington, N.J. / Niles Nat. Reg., Aug. 19. [II; 658. "Earthquake." Niles' Weekly Register, 64 (August 19, 1843): 400.]


1843 Aug 18 / night / Ohio and Tenn and Ky. / q and loud noise / also N. Jersey / Niles Nat. Register, Sept 9. [II; 659. "An Earthquake was experienced...." Niles' Weekly Register, 65 (September 9, 1843): 32.]


1843 Aug 21 / Stourbridge / frgs / L.T. 25-3-f / They were seen to fall and were in immense numbers. [II; 660. "Fall of Frogs." London Times, August 25, 1843, p. 3 c. 6.]


1843 Aug 21 / frgs / Birmingham Journal, 26th. / That at Stourbridge, fall of little frogs "during the evening and early part of one night. Persons in the streets felt them dropping in the dark, during the storm. Said that they were innumerable. All of small size. / Stourbridge, Worcestershire / See LT, Aug 25-3-f. / 11 miles from Birmingham. [II; 661.1, 661.2. "Fall of Frogs." London Times, August 25, 1843, p. 3 c. 6. "Fall of Frogs." Birmingham Journal, August 26, 1843, p. 5 c. 5. "Singular Fall of Frogs." Worcestershire Chronicle, August 23, 1843, p. 3 c. 3. "Every newspaper published in the district visited by the terrific storms of the past week furnish ample records of the destruction occasioned by the 'sulphurous fire, vaunt courier of oak cleaving thunder bolt,' and of the mighty rushing torrents which devastated the valleys, bearing before them every obstruction; but none that have met our view have noticed a most extraordinary phenomenon which accompanied the heavy fall of rain that fell on Monday night, namely, an innumerable quantity of frogs of small size. Thousands of them must have fallen during the evening and early part of Monday night. They were to be seen in immmense numbers in the town of Stourbridge and its neighbourhood, far removed from any place in which they could have been bred. On the Monday evening a man and boy were passing in the storm from Brettal-lane to Stourbridge, when the latter called the attention of the former to the fact of one falling on his shoulders, which caused them to be more observant, and they afterwards noticed several which fell upon them. A large number fell in Foster-street, Mount-street, the Birmingham-road, and on all the land adjoining, and they were seen jumping about so thickly that nine were counted in a space of less than a yard square, on a hard road in an elevated situation. On Monday evening, and on Tuesday morning, when the day broke, the numbers were almost incredible. Similar phenomena have been observed before in different places, as in India, where small fish have been seen to fall with the rain; and, if we mistake not, there are several instances on record in our own country in which fish and frogs are mentioned. The circumstance may be accounted for on the supposition that a pool or other water containing the diminutive frogs has been within the influence of the storm, when the water and its contents have been carried up in similar manner to that in which we sometimes see dust or hay carried up in a spiral form by what is termed a whirlwind. But be this as it may, the circumstance of such an immense number of frogs being found in such a locality, coupled with the fact that they were seen to fall, prove beyond dispute, let them come from whatsoever they may, that they came in the rain." Lear, in Shakespeare's King Lear, (Act 3, Scene 2): "You sulfurous and thought-executing fires, Vaunt-couriers of oak-cleaving thunderbolts, Singe my white head."]


1843 Aug 30 / 2 to 3 a.m. / London / Great glare in sky but moved about. / LT—Sept 1-6-f. [II; 662. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, September 1, 1843, p. 6 c. 6.]


1843 Sept 2, etc. / At Zegna, Croatia, the q's / CR 18-397. [II; 663. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les année 1843." Comptes Rendus, 18 (1844): 393-403, at 397.]


1843 Sept 10 / bet 5 and 6 p.m. / At Arnaville (Meurthe), "trombe d'eau" / CR 18-397. [II; 664. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les année 1843." Comptes Rendus, 18 (1844): 393-403, at 397.]


1843 Sept 11-14 / First q's / Ragussa / C.R. 18-397. [II; 665. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les année 1843." Comptes Rendus, 18 (1844): 393-403, at 397.]


1843 Sept 14—Oct / q phe / (14-16) / qs / Ragussa, etc. / Subterranean sounds and whistling sounds as if of flights of birds in the air. / Large luminous body moved from east to west at 2 a.m., of 16th, visible 2 minutes. Other qs to 26th. / C.R. 18-398 / Then qs on 3rd of Oct. / On 7th—violent dry fogs affecting sun and moon. [II; 666.1, 666.2. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les année 1843." Comptes Rendus, 18 (1844): 393-403, at 397-400.]


1843 Sept 14 / 4:57 p.m. / The violent q at Ragussa. From then until 10 o'clock of the 15th, a horizontal cloud that was described as a beam extended from southeast to south, not moving. Said that the inhabitants were not frightened by the same q. more than by this cloud, or beam-like cloud. [II; 667.1, 667.2.]


1843 Sept 14, etc. / Other places. Meteor at Cattaro, Lesina, Ragussa. Q's in Ragussa, Dalmatia (on the Bay of Ragussa), particularly in Herzegovania. Dalmatia is East of Adriatic. In C.R., it is spelled Raguse. At island of Curzola. At Spalato and Slano. // (+) This is Ragusa, Dalmatia, Austria, where q. was in 1667. [II; 668.1, 668.2. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les année 1843." Comptes Rendus, 18 (1844): 393-403, at 398-399.]


1843 Sept 16 / q's of Ragussa on in 1844 / See C.R., 20-1445. [II; 669. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les années 1843 et 1844." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1444-1452.]


1843 Sept 16 / Klein-Wenden, Erfurt, Prussia / Metite / (F) // Near Nordhausen / A. J. Sci 2/3/142. [II; 670. Fletcher, 101. This is the Klein-Wenden meteorite. Greg, 80. "Fall of Meteorites." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 3 (1847): 142-143.]


1843 Sept 16 / Nordhausen / 5:15 p.m. [II; 671.]


1843 Sept 17 / Hamburg / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 672. Greg, 80.]


1843 Sept 18 / [LT], 3-f / Vesuvius reported. [II; 673. "Mount Vesuvius...." London Times, September 18, 1843, p. 3 c. 6.]


[1843 Sep 20 /] 1848 Sept 20 / Large sunspot visible before sunset to naked eye / M. Notices 8-14. [II; 1233. "Solar Spots." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 8 (November 12, 1847): 14-15.]


1843 Sept 22 / Hamburg / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 674. Greg, 80.]


1843 Sept 24 / morning / Stoughton and Easton, Mass / Sound like of a heavy explosion and then a rumbling. Houses shaken and doors jarred open. / Niles Nat. Register, Nov 4, p. 147. [II; 675. "Earthquake." Niles' Weekly Register, 65 (November 4, 1843): 147.]


1843 Sept 26 / (It) / Ragusa  (Italy) / q / (BA '11). [II; 676. Milne, 707.]


1843 September / q and torrents / Smyrna / repeated q's / "The mischief has been occasioned principally by the torrents of rain which have accompanied these convulsions." / Timbs 1846/270. [II; 677. "Earthquakes." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 270-271.]


1843 Sept 27 / Sunspots of Sept and Oct / On 27th, bet. 4 and 5 p.m., 3 fresh spots broke out—not visible the next day. / M. Notices 8-14. [II; 678. "Solar Spots." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 8 (November 12, 1847): 14-15.]


1843 Oct 2 / Pont de Bouvoisin / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 679. Greg, 80.]


1843 Oct 2 / q. / Russia / Odessa, etc. / BA '11. [II; 680. Milne, 707.]


1843 Oct 5 / Volc / Lemongang / Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [II; 681. Backer, 881. The Lamongan volcano.]


1843 Oct 16 / Fireball / England / BA 60. [II; 682. Greg, 80.]


1843 Oct 18 / Asia Minor, near Rhodes / great q / [BA] '11. [II; 683. Milne, 707.]


1843 Oct 18 / Buffalo almost destroyed by hurricane. / BA 45/21. /// 63 / 8 / 18. [II; 684. Edmonds, Richard, Jr. "On Remarkable Lunar Periodicities in Earthquakes, extraordinary Oscillations of the Sea, and great Atmospherical Changes." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1845, Notices and Abstracts, 20-22, at 21.]


1843 Oct 24 / N.Y. Herald 27-4-1 / 7:50 a.m. / Town of Canton, and other places in Mass. / Explosive sound that rumb[led] for a minute, ground quaking. [II; 685. "Earthquake in Massachusetts." New York Herald, October 27, 1843, p. 4 c. 1.]


1843 Oct 25-26 / (It) / Italy / q or det met / See 1805. [II; 686. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 360.) See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1843 Oct 25-27 / q's / Tuscany, Italy / 26th, Asia Minor / BA '11. [II; 687. Milne, 707.]

 

1843 Oct 30 / Stonefall / Russia—Stanitzka, on the Don / BA 60. [II; 688. Greg, 81.]


1843 Nov 11 / 5 p.m. / Danube / white cloud and loud report / BA 60-80. [II; 689. Greg, 81.]


1843 Nov 11 / [LT], 6-b / 20-3-d / 25-5-e /Dec 1-4-e / Superstitions / Chepstow, Plymouth, Galway / Dec 9-6-f / 25-2-f. [A; 169. "Superstition." London Times, November 10, p. 6 c. 2. "Extraordinary Superstition at Plymouth." London Times, December 1, 1843, p. 4 c. 5. (London Times, November 20-3-d  [Extraordinary Superstition at Plymouth]/ 25-5-e [Gross Superstition in Galway 25n5e] / Superstitions / Chepstow, Plymouth, Galway / Dec 9-6-f / 25-2-f.).

"Gross Superstition at Roscrea." 27F5F 1843

"Scottish Savage Superstition." 4M6B 1843

"Ireland, Gross Superstition. Cheering the Devil in Tipperary." 22APR7a 1843

"Superstition--Something of the Marvellous in Rossshire." 5S3F 1843.]


1843 Nov 12-14 / Mets at Philadelphia not remarkable. / BA 47-15. [II; 690. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


1843 Nov 18 / Nottingham / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 691. Greg, 80.]


1843 Nov. 25 / Volc / Goentoer, Java / C.R. 70-878 / N.M. [II; 692. Backer, 881. The Lamongan volcano.]


1843 (Dec) / Etna / Le Moniteur / p. 2570 // P.P. 9431. [II; 693. ( Le Moniteur / p. 2570). "P.P. 9431" was the shelfmark for Le Moniteur at the Library of the British Museum.]


1843 Dec 5 / [LT], 7-e / 20-5-c / 21-6-e / 23-4-f / 25-3-d / Etna. [II; 694. "Eruption of Etna." London Times, December 5, 1843, p. 7 c. 5. "Eruption of Mount Ætna." London Times, December 21, 1843, p. 6 c. 5. "Eruption of Mount Etna." London Times, December 23, 1843, p. 4 c. 6. "The Eruption of Mount Etna." London Times, December 25, 1843, p. 3 c. 4. "The Late Eruption of Mount Etna." London Times, December 20, 1843, p. 5 c. 3.]  


1843 Dec. 8 / (It) / Parma / Aurora / Comptes Rendus 18/54. [II; 695. Colla, Antonio. "Sur une aurore boréale observée le 8 décembre 1843 à Parme." Comptes Rendus, 18 (1844): 54-56.]


1843 Dec 11 / 5 p.m. / Met as if from Ursa Minor / C.R. 17-1339 / BA '60-80 / Commercy (Meuse). [II; 696. "M. Clesse transmet quelques détails...." Comptes Rendus, 17 (1843): 1339. Greg, 81. Clesse identifies the meteor from Ursa Minor, (not Ursa Major).]


1843 Dec. 21 / q - phe / Ab. 10 p.m., parts of France and Switzerland, shocks and a light in the sky illuminating all things as if by daylight. / C.R. 18-402. [II; 697. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les année 1843." Comptes Rendus, 18 (1844): 393-403.]


1843 Dec 21 / Switzerland / great met / sounds heard in the Vosges. / BA 60. [II; 698. Greg, 81.]


1843 Dec. 21 / Fr / Als. Vosges / Zurich, Berne, 10 p.m. / Alsace / det. met. / BA 60. [II; 699. Greg, 81.]


1843 Dec. 21 / Fr / q-met / Colmar and Vosges / Alsace nearest Switzerland / 2 violent detonations. Town in Switzerland in a dense fog suddenly illumined as if by the sun. To persons at a distance from Fribourg, seemed as if town on fire. / 2 [detonations] within few seconds. / LT, Jan 9-6-e.  

[II; 700. "Atmospheric Phenomenon." London Times, January 9, 1844, p. 6 c. 5.]


1843 Dec. 22 / 3:50 p.m. / Guernsey / q. [II; 701.]


1843 Dec 22 / (or 29?) // Channel Islands / q - L.T., Jan 15-3-f, said that at Island of Sark the shock was "tremendously awful", but that men in mines neither heard sounds not felt vibrations. [II; 702. "The Late Earthquake in the Channel Islands." London Times, January 15, 1844, p. 3 c. 6. The earthquake occurred on December 22, 1843.]


[1843 Dec 22 /] 1843 Dec 29 / (or 22?) / q. Guernsey / In Timb[s] Y.B.—1844-277, said was felt at Sark, too, and was evidently subterranean—then quote Times as to Sark. [II; 704. "Earthquakes in 1843." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1844, 276-278, at 277.  The Year-Book gives the date of the earthquake as December 29, 1844; but, it was reported the previous week. "Earthquake in the Channel Islands—Further Particulars." Dublin Freeman's Journal, January 3, 1844, p. 3 c. 1.]


1843 Dec 28, 29 / many mets at Nice. / BA 47-15. [II; 703. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


[1843 Dec 29. Wrong date. See: 1843 Dec 22, (II; 704).]


1844:


1844 // Fatesch, Russia / Stones with hail / Symons Met / See 1809, 1815, 1833, 1844. [II; 705. Schwedoff, Theodore. "On the Origin of Hail." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 17 (November 1882): 146-152, at 151. See: 1809 (I; 256); 1815, (I; 517); and, 1833, (I; 1761).]


1844 // q's // q's in Europe and adjac. parts of Africa and Asia / C.R. 20-1444. [II; 706. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les années 1843 et 1844." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1444-1452.]


1844 / Island of Oesel, in the Baltic / Sounds from a cemetery vault that frightened horses tethered nearby, so that several died, Coffins here disturbed. / See Dale Owen's Footfalls. [A; 170. Owen, Robert Dale, 1801-1877. Footfalls on the Boundary of Another World. Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott, 1889, 260-272. Oesel is now known as the Saaremaa, the largest island of Estonia.]


[1844. Wrong date. See: 1844 Oct 8, (II; 713).]


1844 (Jan) / Cerro Cosina, Guanaxuato, Mexico. / Metite / (F). [II; 707. Fletcher, 101. This is the Cerro Cosina meteorite.]


1844 Jan / Corrientes, Brazil / Metite / BA 1860, [II; 708. Greg, 81.]


1844 Jan 1 / [LT, 6-c / Feb 9-5-e / Etna. [II; 709. "The Eruption of Mount Etna." London Times, January 1, 1844, p. 6 c. 3. "Mount Etna." London Times, February 9, 1844, p. 5 c. 5.]


1844 Jan 13, 15 / Feb 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 18, 19, 26 / March 2, 15, 16 // q's / Ragussa / See 1843, Sept 16. [II; 710. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les années 1843 et 1844." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1444-1452, at 1445-1447. See: 1843 Sept 16, (II; 669).]


1844 Jan 14 / 12:30 p.m. and 1:05  / Comrie, qs and very loud sound / at Aberfeldy, ab 1:30 and 2:30 p.m. / LT—Jan 27-3-d. [II; 711. "Earthquake in Perthshire." London Times, January 27, 1844, p. 3 c. 4.]


1844 Jan 14— / Meteor, St Lucia / (19, 30, 31, and Feb 3 / q. / Dominica) / Niles Nat. Register, March 16. [II; 712. "Earthquake." Niles' Weekly Register, 66 (March 16, 1844): 48.]


1844 Jan 16 / [LT], 5-f / Spon Comb. [A; 171. "Spontaenous Combustion." London Times, January 16, 1844, p. 5 c. 6.]


1844 Jan. 20 / Naples / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 714. Greg, 81.]


1844 Jan 28 / bet 2 and 7 p.m. / Quakes in Trenton and other places in N. Jersey. In one place a crack in the earth several hundred yards long. / Niles Nat. Reg., Feb. 3. [II; 715. "Earthquake." Niles' Weekly Register, 65 (February 3, 1844): 368.]


1844 Feb. 8 / Parma / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 716. Greg, 81.]


1844 Feb 17 / ab. 7 p.m. / Meteor at Paris / N.M. / C.R. 20-522. [II; 717. "M. Boutigny écrit relativement...." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 522.]


1844 Feb. 18 / Parma / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 718. Greg, 81.]


1844 Feb. 20 / noon / BA 60 / Hanover / in snowstorm, detonation—but no meteor seen. [II; 719. Greg, 81. "Possibly a clap of thunder only."]


1844 March 25 / [LT], 7-d / Ghost at Ramsey. [A; 172. "A Ghost Story." London Times, March 25, 1844 p. 7 c. 4.]


1844 Ap. 3 / Siena and Naples / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 720. Greg, 81.]


1844 Ap. 6 / Niles Nat Reg. / Explosive sounds in mountain / No. Car. / that occasionally for 16 years, smoke and glares been seen there / Niles Nat. Register of Ap. 6. [II; 721. "The Burning Mountain." Niles' Weekly Register, 66 (April 6, 1844): 83-84.]


1844 Ap. 6 / [LT], 6-a / Strange story. [A; 173. "A Strange Story." London Times, April 6, 1844, p. 6 c. 1.]


1844 Ap. 11 / Edinburgh / Fireball / N. to S. / BA 60. [II; 722. Greg,  82.]


1844 Ap. 20 / [LT], 5-e / Superstitions. [A; 174. "Singular Superstition." London Times, April 20, 1844, p. 5 c. 5.]


1844 Ap. 26 / Along the river Towy, Carmarthen, dense swarm of black flies, ab a mile in length. See July 16. / "Caused [some] consternation in the minds of the superstitious." Said had occurred in year 1843—see LT, May 3-6-f. [II; 723. "Extraordinary Circumstance." London Times, May 3, 1844, p. 6. c. 6. "It is asserted that the same phenomenon occurred last year...."]


1844 Ap 29 / Killeter, Tyrone, Ireland / Met / (F). [II; 724. Fletcher, 101. This is the Killeter meteorite. Greg, 82.]


1844 May 7-20 / 23-29 / and in June // Rains and probably the severest floods of eastern Kansas / M.W.R.34-579. [II; 725. Jennings, T.B. "Notes on the Climate of Kansas." Monthly Weather Review, 34 (December 1906): 579- 580, at 579.]


1844 May 11 / Hamburg / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 726. Greg, 82.]


1844 May 12 / Milan / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 727. Greg, 82.]


1844 May 12 / Persia / great q. / III / BA 11. [II; 728. Milne, 707.]


1844 May 31 / Oc. Moon—the well known appearance of 2 seeming moons / Y.B. '45-280. [II; 729. "Total Eclipse of the Moon." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1845, 280.]


1844 June 3-4 / Fr / Poitiers / q / BA '11. [II; 730. Milne, 707.]


1844 June 11 / 6 a.m. / Near Schemakha, Russia, near Black Sea, volcano burst out of a mountain, cast out burning naptha, also muddy water for 3/4 hour. / Athenaeum 1845-229. [II; 731. "Volcanic Eruption." Athenaeum, 1844, (no. 905; March 1): 229. Schemakha, Russia, is now identified as Shamakhi, Azerbaijan; and, this was probably an eruption of a mud volcano.]


1844 June 12 / 7:30 p.m. / Yaxley, Huntingdonshire / severe q—L.T. 18-6-e. /// 33 1 / 26. [II; 732. "Earthquake in Huntingdonshire." London Times, June 18, 1844, p. 6 c. 5.]


1844 June 24 / (N) / Appearance near sun / C.R. 18/1168. [II; 733. "Phénomène atmosphérique observé(Comptes Rendus 18/1168.).]


[1844 June 24 /] 1843 June 24 / Living / Severe th. storm / Liverpool / fall of pebbles and small eels / BA 45/21 / See Literary Gazette, 1843-420. [II; 634. Edmonds, Richard. "On Remarkable Lunar Periodicities in Earthquakes, extraordinary Oscillations of the Sea, and great Atmospherical Changes." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1845, Notices and Abstracts, 20-22. "June 23.—An unusually severe and protracted thunderstorm this evening throughout Cornwall and in Dumfries-shire, and on the following morning at Boston and Liverpool, at which latter place 'pebbles and small eels descended in the streets.'" "Rain of Eels and Pebbles." Literary Gazette, 1844 (June 29, 1844): 420. "The Liverpool Courier states that, during the heavy rain which fell there on Monday, various-coloured pebbles and small eels descended, and were picked up in the streets." "Shower of Pebbles and Eels." London Morning Chronicle, June 27, 1844, p. 5 c. 2. "The eels were about two inches and a half in length."]


1844 June 24 / Frgs / Leeds Mercury, June 29 / afternoon / At Selby, during th storm, little frgs fell in and around Selby. People caught some in their hats. They were very lively. [II; 734. "Shower of Frogs at Selby." Leeds Mercury, June 29, 1844, p. 5 c. 3.]


1844 June / Zoologist 1/2/677 / Selby / Shower frogs / Wm. Andrews, Book of Oddities, p. 30 / between Donc[aster and York] / N.Q. 8/6/104 / bet. Doncaster and York. [II; 735. Newman, Edward. "Anecdote of a Shower of Frogs at Selby." Zoologist, 2 (1844): 677-678. "Shower of Frogs at Selby." Leeds Mercury, June 29, 1844, p. 5 c. 3. Andrews, William. The Book of Oddities. London: Simpkin, Marshall, 1882, 30-31. Wallace, R. Hedger. "A Shower of Frogs." Notes and Queries, s. 8 v. 6 (August 11, 1894): 104-105.]


1844 June 24 / In Leeds Mercury, June 29, reports from York, Leeds, Huddersfield, Doncaster, and other places of terrific th. storm, afternoon of this day. Large pieces of ice fell at Doncaster. Lightning struck in many places. At. Leeds, there was heavy rain in some parts of town and no rain in others. [II; 736.1, 736.2. "Destructive Thunder Storm." Leeds Mercury, June 29, 1844, p. 5 c. 3. "The crops of corn, of various descriptions, in the neighbourhood of Hatfield, Woodhouse, have sustained much injury by the falling of hail-stones, or rather large pieces of ice."]


1844 June 27 / Floods / High mark reached, St. Louis / not exceeded at least to June 8, 1903 / See Trib of. [II; 737. "The Mississippi River...." New York Tribune, June 27, 1844, p. 4 c. 3. "The water, yesterday, had reached within a few inches of the highest point attained this spring, and nearly to the hight attained in the freshets of 1823 and '26."]


1844 July 10 / Hamburg / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 738. Greg, 82.]


1844 July 16 (/) / Flies / See Ap. 26. / LT, 20th, from Kelso Mail—that on Tuesday morning, between 5 and 6, at Berwick, a thick mist was seen. A shower of rain fell and the constituents of this mist were seen to be "a body of flies so numerous as actually to blacken the flags where they lay, and so small individually as to admit of examination only by a microscope.["] [II; 739.1, 739.2. "Berwick." London Times, July 20, 1844, p. 6 c. 6.]


1844 July 17 / [LT], 8-e / Sea Story. [A; 175. "A Strange Story." London Times, July 17, 1844, p. 8 c. 5.]


1844 July 20 / Large meteor exploded. / Nuremberg and Parma / BA 47-15. [II; 740. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


1844 July 20 / 9 p.m. / det met / Italy / Germany / Belgium / BA 60-82. [II; 741. Greg, 82.]


1844 July 23 / Venus Inf Conjunction Sun. [II; 742.]


1844 Aug / Times Index for ladybirds. [II; 743. No articles regarding ladybirds were found in Palmer's Index for 1844.]


1844 Aug 9, 10 / Many mets / Belgium / BA 47-15. [II; 744. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


1844 Aug 16 / Darmstadt and Frankfurt / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 745. Greg, 82.]


1844 Aug / lb's / Brighton / D. News, Aug 16, 1847. [II; 746. "Extraordinary Flight of Insects." London Daily News, August 16, 1847, p. 3 c. 5. See: 1847 Aug 13, (II; 197). There is no reference to ladybirds in this article for 1844, however Fort may have been searching for similar phenomena in other years.]


1844 Aug 29-30 / night / Demerara / q. / N.Y. Herald, Oct 25-1-6 / Ab. 3:30, morning of 30th, the q, which was disastrous. Had been preceded by a violent th. storm. [II; 747. "The Earthquake at Demerara." New York Herald, October 25, 1844, p. 1 c. 6. Demerara was the former Dutch colony that is now part of Guyana.]


1844 Aug 30 / Tobago and Dominica shaken. / NY Herald, Nov 5-2-4. [II; 748. "Tobago and Dominica." New York Herald, November 5, 1844, p. 2 c. 4.]


1844 Sept. 4 / Bombay / very large meteor / E to W / BA 60. [II; 749. Greg, 82.]


1844 Sept 5 / Overall, Silesia / very large fireball / E to W / BA 60. [II; 750. Greg, 82-83.]


1844 Sept 4 / from Aug. 25, 1843, to— // 37 shocks at Comrie noted / B Assoc 1844/86 / That scarce a day without hearing either the rumbling in the earth or the "moaning in the air". Statement of Lady Moncrieff, of Comrie. [II; 751.Milne, David. "Report of the Committee for registering Earthquake Shocks in Scotland." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1844, 85-90. "I met yesterday and today a very intelligent person (Lady Moncrieff) who felt both of these shocks. The first she felt in Comrie House, situated within three-quarters of a mile of the hill, from which all the shocks in Perthshire appear to emanate. The noise and concussion produced by this shock alarmed her so much that she fell from her seat on the floor, and it was a few seconds before she recovered. She was residing in Comrie House for some months last autumn, and she states that scarcely a day passed without her hearing either the rumbling noise in the earth or the moaning in the air, produced by this mysterious agent, the nature of which we are so anxious to discover."]


1844 Sept 10, 20 / Fireball / Belgium / BA 60. [II; 752. Greg, 82-83.]


1844 Sept 10 / Ab. 9 p.m., in the Vosges, great meteor. / C.R. 19-1035. [II; 753. Nickles. "Observation d'un bolide dans la soirée du 10 septembre." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1035-1036.]


1844 Sept 10 / evening / Bolide / Belgium / C.R. 19-1036. [II; 754. Nickles. "Observation d'un bolide dans la soirée du 10 septembre." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1035-1036.]


1844 Sept 15 / 4:30 p.m. / Witrtemburg / det met / BA 60-100 / in sunshine. [II; 755. Greg, 101.]


1844 Sept 19 / night. / Livingston Co., N.Y. / Sound like that of an explosion and reverbrations almost a minute and q. / Niles Nat Reg., Sept 28. [II; 756. "Earthquakes." Niles' Weekly Register, 66 (September 28, 1844): 63.]


1844 Sept 19 and Oct 22 / 33 days apart / Shocks / Rochester, N.Y. / Timbs '54/268. [II; 757. "Earthquakes in 1853." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1854, 267-271, at 268.]


1844 Sept 19 / Whirlwind near Toulouse / C.R. 19/851. [II; 758. Chambon. "Mémoire sur les principaux ravages d'une trombe dans une commune des environs de Toulouse (Escalquens), le 19 septembre 1844." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 851-853.]


1844 Sept 19 . Morning Chronicle of / Incendiary fires in Suffolk. [A; 176. "Incendiarism is reviving again in Suffolk...." London Morning Chronicle, September 19, 1844, p. 2. c. 4.]


1844 Sept 24 / Fireball / S. Italy / BA '60. [II; 759. Greg, 82.]


1844 Sept 30 / Lombardy / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 760. Greg, 82.]


1844 Oct. 2 / Cuba / Met. explosion / BA 60. [II; 761. Greg, 82.]


1844 Oct. 4 / Like a signal light / D-275 / See 42. [II; 762. The note copies information from page 275 of The Book of the Damned. "Astronomical puzzle." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1843, 278-279.]


1844 Oct 4 and 5 / Destructive Hurricane / Cuba / N.Y. Herald 22-3-6. [II; 764. "Severe Gale at Havana." New York Herald, October 22, 1844, p. 3 c. 6.]


1844 Oct 6 and 8 / Destructive gales / America / N.Y. Herald, Oct 22-2-4. [II; 765. "Hurricanes in October." New York Herald, October 22, 1844, p. 2 c. 4.]


1844 Oct 6 / III / [Great] / q / China / BA 11. [II; 766. Milne, 707.]


[1844 Oct 8 /] 1844 // Gelat / D-49. [II; 713. The note copies information from pages 49 and 50 of The Book of the Damned. Powell, Baden. "Report on observations of luminous meteors, 1854-55." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1855, Reports on the State of Science, 79-100, at 94. "1844, Oct. 8th, near Coblentz, a German gentleman (a friend of Mr. Greg's), accompanied by another person, late in the evening, after dark, walking in a dry ploughed field, saw a luminous body descend straight down close to them (not 20 yards off), and heard it distinctly strike the ground with a noise; they marked the spot, and returning early the next morning as nearly as possible where it seemed to fall, they found a gelatinous mass of a greyish colour so viscid as 'to tremble all over' when poked with a stick. It had no appearance of being organic. They, however, took no further care to preserve it."]


1844 Oct 8 / Gelat / Germany / (20) / D-49. [II; 766. The note copies information from pages 49 and 50 of The Book of the Damned. See: 1844 Oct 8, (II; 713).]


1844 Oct 8 / 7:30 pm / Vals, near Puy / bolide larger than Jupiter / C.R. 19-1036 / Slowly S.S.W. to N.N.E. [II; 767. Faton. "Observation d'une bolide, faite à Vals, près le Puy, le 8 octobre 1844." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1036. Greg, 82.]


1844 Oct 9 / Rhone rising. Heavy falls of rain. / Bridges swept away. Communication interrupted. / J. des Deb, Oct. 19-2-1. [II; 768. "Par suite des grandes pluies de ces derniers jours...." Journal des Debats, October 19, 1844, p. 2 c. 1.]


1844 Oct 10-13 / Floods at Nimes / J des Deb, Oct. 18. [II; 769. "On écrit de Nimes, le 13 octobre." Journal des Débats, October 18, 1844, p. 2 c. 3.]


1844 Oct / Plan / Only that happen to have the Australian note / and merely very odd. [II; 770.]


1844 Oct 10 / Bonn / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 771. Greg, 82.]


1844 Oct 12-14, etc.—to about 20th / (Australia) / Reported from Bathurst, N.S. Wales, torrential rains / swollen rivers—bridges swept away. / Sydney Morning Herald 22-3-1/ Herald 28th—on 17th, a sudden rush of waters down the Lachlan river, carried away a police barracks—swept thousands of sheep with it. // At Gundagai, a most awful visitation from the 10th. / Herald, 29th. [II; 772.1, 772.2. "Bathurst." Sydney Morning Herald, October 22, 1844, p. 3 c. 1-2. "Bathurst." Sydney Morning Herald, October 28, 1844, p. 3 c. 1. "Gundagai." Sydney Morning Herald, October 29, 1844, p. 4 c. 3-5.]


1844 Oct 13 / 3 sharp shocks / Piedmont, Italy / N.Y. Herald, Nov 24-1-2. [II; 773. "The Piedmontese Gazette of the 15th...." New York Herald, November 24, 1844, p. 1 c. 2.]


1844 Oct 14 / B.D.-176 / Eguilles / huge "hailstone" / One weighed 10 pounds. / LT, Nov 1-3-f / at Cette, ac to Flammarion / See Oct. 20. [II; 774. The note copies information from page 176 of The Book of the Damned. Flammarion, Camille. The Atmosphere. London: S. Low, Marston, Low, & Searle, 1873, 445. "...there fell hailstones weighing 11 lbs...." "Brobdignagian Hail-Stones." London Times, November 1, 1844, p. 3 c. 6. "Hail-stones of an incredible size fell in the little district of Eguilles, one of which weighed as many as ten pounds...." See: 1844 Oct 20, (II; 781), and, 1844 Oct 22, (A; 183).]


1844 Oct 15 / 1:12 a.m. / Great meteor, London—through Pegasus toward Lyra / LT, Oct 16-5-d. [II; 775. (London Times, October 16, 1844, 5-d.).]


1844 Oct 15 to Nov / In Italy. In Tuscany the most disastrous floods since the year 1740. 2 weeks continuous rain. / LT, Nov. 15-5-d. [II; 776. "A letter from Florence...." London Times, November 15, 1844, p. 5 c. 4. The letter was dated the "4th inst." and says the rains were "continuous for the last fortnight," (without any specific dates mentioned).]


1844 Oct 18 / night / Tremendous hurricane, Rochester and Buffalo. Most violent ever known there. Many lives lost in Buffalo. / N.Y. Herald 22-3-4. [II; 777. "Terrible Calamity." New York Herald, October 22, 1844, p. 3 c. 4.]


1844 Oct 18 / q—rain / q. / Peru / 10:30 p.m. / From time of first shock till sunrise, heavy rain fell. / B.A. 50-82. [II; 778. Hamilton, Mathie. "Brief Notices of Earthquakes in South America in 1844, 1845, 1846 and 1847." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, Notices and Abstracts, 82-83.]


1844 Oct 18 / Argentine / III / [Great] / q. / BA '11. [II; 779. Milne, 707.]


1844 Oct 20 / 20 inches of rain at South Head, N.S. Wales / Sydney Morning Herald, Feb 26, 1873. [II; 780. "The Late Heavy Rains." Sydney Morning Herald, February 26, 1873, p. 5 c. 2-4.]


1844 Oct 20 / Series / Storm at Aix—in the little district of Eguilles, nearby masses of ice had fallen, one of them weighing 10 pounds. / L.T., Nov 1-3-f. [II; 781. "Brobdignagian Hail-Stones." London Times, November 1, 1844, p. 3 c. 6.]


1844 Oct 20 / 12 N; 38 W. / "Thousands if not millions of grasshoppers." They were like the grasshoppers of the U.S. but "of a deeper red". 700 miles from land. Supposed carried by a hurricane. / N.Y. Herald, Nov 29-2-3. [II; 782. "Curious Phenomena at Sea." New York Herald, November 29, 1844, p. 2 c. 3.]


1844 Oct 20 / Another vessel 400 miles from this vessel was shaken. / N.Y. Herald, Nov 17-2-4. [II; 783. "Earthquake at Sea." New York Herald, November 17, 1844, p. 2 c. 4.]


1844 Oct 20 / At St Croix, severe shock, cracking walls of the sugar houses. / N.Y. Herald, Nov 9-2-2. [II; 784. "Earthquake at St. Croix." New York Herald, November 9, 1844, p. 2. c. 2.]


1844 Oct 20 / Off West Indian island of Saba, severe shock to a vessel / N.Y. Herald, Nov 9-2-4. [II; 785. "Seaquake." New York Herald, November 9, 1844, p. 2 c. 4.]


1844 Oct. 20 / N.Y. Herald, Nov 20-1-4 / Millerism survives. / In middle of November, the selectmen of Meredith, New Hampshire, to the Judge of Probate for guardians to be appointed to take care of businesses and farms of 10 Millerites who were still preparing. Selectmen of other towns acted similarly. [II; 786.1, 786.2. "Millerism." New York Herald, November 20, 1844, p. 1 c. 4.]


1844 Oct 21 / Metite of Layssac / N.M. / C.R. 19-1181. [II; 787. "Le Secrétaire écrira, au nom de l'Academie, à M. Boisse...." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1181. See: 1844 Nov. 20, (II; 800, 801).]


1844 Oct. 21 / (See July 4, '48.) / Favars, Aveyron, France / Met / (F) / See before. [II; 788. Fletcher, 101. This is the Favars meteorite. See: 1844 Nov. 20, (II; 800, 801), and, 1848 July 4, (II; 1223).]


1844 Oct 21 / 6:45 a.m. / Laysac, France / said doubt whether the stone found was meteoric / doubtful where it was / at the time of listing / BA 60-82. [II; 789. Greg, 82-83. See: 1844 Nov. 20, (II; 800, 801).]


1844 Oct 22 / N.Y. Herald, Oct 24-1-4 / Secretary of the Treasury acknowledges receipt of $5.00 from a Millerite whose conscience been troubling him. / Camps of them in Pa. In one several children died of exposure. [A; 177. "Millerism." New York Herald, October 22, 1844, p. 1 c. 4. (The report of children dying of exposure is not in this article.)]


1844 Oct 22 / N.Y. Herald, Oct 17-2-1 / "The last day is positively set down for the 22nd of this month, although possibly it may be on the 23rd" ac to the Millerites. / Hosts on their knees in chapels of N.Y. City. Mostly females. One of meetings man entered and was rough about taking his wife out of it to go home and return to the cooking—had[n't] had a home-cooked meal for 10 days. Some Millerites interferred and he threatened to lick all Millerites. / 20-2-4. [A; 178.1, 178.2. "Millerism and Mormonism." New York Herald, October 17, 1844, p. 2 c. 2. "The Millerites are now determined to have an end to the world at once, and from a number of documents issued by these amiable fanatics, which we have received, it seems that the 'last day' is positively set down for the twenty-second of this month, although possibly it may be on the twenty-third." "Millerism—Madness—Misery." New York Herald, October 20, 1844, p. 2 c. 4. The home-cooked meal story may be Fort's interpretation of the husband's protest that his wife had been attending prayer meetings and had not been at home to care for their infant children and her housework.]


1844 Oct 22 / 8 a.m. / Q. in Western part of the state of N.Y. on day some of the Millerites expecting he end of the world, though others expected on 23rd. / Niles Nat Reg., Nov.2. [A; 179. "An Earthquake..." Niles' Weekly Register, 67 (November 2, 1844): 144.]


[1844 Oct 22] / Thought effects? / Q. in Western New York Oct 22, 1844, the day some of the Millerites were expecting the end of the world, though others expected on Oct 23. / Niles Nat. Register, Nov 2, 1844. [A; 180. "An Earthquake..." Niles' Weekly Register, 67 (November 2, 1844): 144.]


1844 Oct 22 / Considering the phe, the Millerites had reason for thinking that though theworld did not come to an end, there were great disturbances in the period. [A; 181.]


1844 Oct 22 / Whirlwind ravaged village of Cette. / C.R. 19-1181 / See Jan 16, 1845. [A; 182. "L'Academie a décidé qu'il serait fait une enquête...." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1181. See: 1845 Jan. 16, (II; 812).]


1844 Oct 22 / (Series) / 4 p.m. / Cette / L.T. 30-4-1 / Said that an electric waterspout fell upon the town. A violent explosion was heard, and for two minutes there were crashing sounds in the air. Water fell from the sky and smashed in roofs. A dozen boats were sunk in the canal. The wind was violent. A house four stories high was crushed to the earth. [A; 183.1, 183.2, 183.3. "A Waterspout." London Times, October 30, 1844, p. 4 c. 1. Peltier. "Sur la nature électrique des trombes." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1210-1212.]


1844 Oct 22 / Still the floods in France. [A; 184.]


1844 Oct 22 / Millerite delusion survive in Providence, R.I. The leaders had resumed advertising meetings. / N.Y. Herald, Nov 17-1-4. [A; 185. "More Millerism." New York Herald, November 17, 1844, p. 1 c. 4.]


1844 Oct 22 / Whirlwind at Cette. 200 buildings damaged. / N.Y. Herald, Nov 24-1-4. [A; 186. "France." New York Herald, November 24, 1844, p. 1 c. 4.]


1844 Oct. 24 / See Oct 24, 1844. Read Times. No Eguilles. [A; 187. See: 1844 Oct 20, (II; 781).]


1844 Oct 24 / 8 a.m. / Shock at Batavia, NY, and other towns. / N.Y. Herald 27-1-3. [A; 188. "Earthquake." New York Herald, October 27, 1844, p. 1 c. 3.]


1844 Oct. 25 / Jackson Co., Mo. / 6:30 p.m. / Tornado. / Finley's Rept. [A; 189. Finley, 3.]


1844 Oct 25 / "Awful tornado Western Missouri. Loss of life and destruction of property. / NY Herald, Nov 12-1-3. [A; 190. "Tremendous Hurricane in Western Missouri." New York Herald, November 12, 1844, p. 1 c. 3.]


1844 Oct 25 / [LT]. 5-b / Sup. at Paisley. [A; 191. "A case was brought before Mr. Sheriff Campbell...." London Times, October 25, 1844, p. 5 c. 2.]


1844 Oct 27 / det / C.R. 19-1036 / 9:40 p.m. / Parcé-sur-Sarthe / Meteor seemed equal to the moon. / east to west / detonation like gunfire ab 4 minutes later / See Nov. 20. / also Angers / BA '60. [A; 192. Giraud. "Observation d'une bolide, faite à Parcé-sur-Sarthe, le 27 octobre 1844." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1036-1037. Petit, Frédéric. "Sur le bolide du 27 octobre 1844, et sur une conséquence remarquable qui paraît résulter de son apparition." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1103-1114. Petit calculates that this bolide was an "intra-stellar body," according to Greg, (tho Greg does define it as interstellar, moving between different stars with one being our Sun). Greg, 82-83. With Petit's extremely precise measurements, (for example, Petit produces the exact distance between the bolide and the meridian at Paris, when it was seen by Giraud, as 467,292 meters), Greg cautions: "Observations on meteor movements must always be too imperfect to be relied upon in these kind of calculations." For Petit's "Moon," see: 1846 March 21, (II; 935)]


[1844 Oct 27 /] 1844 Nov 27 / Parce-sur-Sarthe / BA 60 / E. to W. / Meteor size of moon. Loud detonations. [II; 803. Greg, 82-83.]


1844 Oct 29 / Jour des Deb. / Valley and fields of Southern France turned into lakes. Increasing inundations. [A; 193. "On lit dans le Sémaphore de Marseille du 25 octobre," and, "On lit dans le Courrier du Gard du 25 octobre." Journal des Débats, October 29, 1844, p. 2 c. 4. "On lit dans la Sentinelle des Pyrénées du 26 octobre," and, "On écrit de Toulouse, le 26 octobre." Journal des Débats, October 30, 1844, p. 2 c. 1.]


1844 Oct 31 / Flows / Nor Car / See 1829. [II; 790.]


(1844-45) // winter /// Carbonaceous / [Elizabethtown,]Essex Co., N.Y. / Am. J. Sci 2-28-276. * [II; 791. Shepard, Charles Upham. "On a Shooting Meteor, seen to fall at Charleston, South Carolina, on the evening of November 16th, 1857...." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 28 (1859): 270-276, at 276.]


1844 Nov. 1 / Phosphorescent rain / Paris.  **  [II; 792. Duplessy. "Sur une pluie phosphorescente observée à Paris le 1er novembre 1844." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1038-1039.]


1844 Nov. 2, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 / Meteors / Bombay / BA 60. [II; 793. Greg, 82.]


1844 Nov 13, 14 / Watchers for meteors disappointed. / N.Y. Herald 19-1-5. Applied by petition. [II; 794. "There were a great many disappointed watchers for the 'star shower,' on Wednesday night...." New York Herald, November 19, 1844, p. 1 c. 5. (No mention of a petition in this article.)]


1844 Nov 15 / Off coast of Long Island, submarine eruption suspected. Sea covered with dead fish. / N.Y. Herald, 23-1-6. [II; 795. "Remarkable Circumstance." New York Herald, November 23, 1844, p. 1 c. 6. "In returning along the South shore of Long Island, their attention was attracted to the beach, being literally strewed with the bodies of dead fish, just washed up by the sea. Black fish, cunners, lobsters, and crabs, and many other species which inhabot our shores at this season lay promiscuously on the sand."]


1844 Nov 20 / Laysac, etc. / 3 a.m. / N.E. to S.W. / Another met 1/2 diameter of moon. / BA 60-82. [II; 796. Greg, 82-83.]


1844 Nov 20 / 2 a.m. / Met reported from Laysac. Also, in depts of Tarn, l'Aveyron, and Lozère. / C.R. 20-887 / And tremendous detonation. An hour later it was followed by another, which was almost half the size of the moon, but with no explosive sound. [II; 797.1, 797.2. Boisse. "Sur deux météores observés aux environs de Layssac, l'un, dans la nuit du 19 au 20 novembre 1844; l'autre, le 16 janvier 1845." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 887-891.]


[II; 798. Pabst: "Void—due to T.T. typo / The Fortean, #20, p. 310, c. 1."  Thayer apparently assigned "798" to the second part of Note "II; 797."]


1844 Nov 20 / Meteor / 2 a.m. / E. to W. / "Great and numerous detonations"—Laysac, Aveyron, etc. / BA 60. [II; 799. Greg, 82-83.]


1844 Nov 20 / Laysac, Aveyron, etc. / E. to W. / 2 a.m. / Met brighter than moon. Great and numerous detonations. / BA '60-82. [II; 800. Greg, 82-83.]


1844 Nov. 20 / Great det met. Later another. / See C.R. / Laysac, France / BA 60-82 / See Oct 21, 27. [II; 801. Greg, 82. Another bolide, at 3 A.M., was about half the diameter of the moon. Boisse. "Sur deux météores observés aux environs de Layssac, l'un, dans la nuit du 19 au 20 novembre 1844; l'autre, le 16 janvier 1845." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 887-891. Greg, 82-83. See: 1844 Oct 21, (II; 787, 788, 789), and, 1844 Oct 27, (A; 192).]


1844 Nov. 20, etc. / Nothing in Sydney Morning Herald. [II; 802.]


1844 Nov 21, etc. / Stones / Ac to the Ross-shire Advertiser, in L.T., Dec 14-6-e / This night two large stones were thrown through window in ground floor of the parochial school house of Cline. A reward of 20 guineas was offered for information. In newspaper account it is said been revenge by somebody. But night of Dec. 1 stones smashed windows in a house at Rogart. On night of 5th a girl at Dunrobin was struck on head by stone said been thrown by someone unseen in the dark. / (In Sutherlandshire.) [A; 194.1, 194.2. "Outrages in Sutherlandshire." London Times, December 14, 1844, p. 6 c. 5.]


[1844 Nov 27. Wrong date. See: 1844 Oct 27, (II; 803).]


1844 Dec 6 / toward Midi / At Havre. A violent explosion in a chimney. There was no known cause of it. / J. des Debats 9-1-4. [II; 804. "On écrit du Havre, le 7 décembre." Journal des Débats, December 9, 1844, p. 1 c. 4.]


1844 Dec. 8 / Paris, etc. / met train / zenith to horizon / N.W. to S.E. / BA 60-82. [II; 805. Greg, 82.]


1844 Dec 9 / 5:20 p.m. / Meteor at Paris / C.R. 19/1320. [II; 806. "M. Virlet-D'Aoust écrit relativement à un météore lumineux...." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1320-1321.]


1844 Dec 9 / Hamburg / Large met / BA 69-282. [II; 807. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 282.]


1844 Dec 12 / 12:50 a.m. / Limoux / an enormous meteor / C.R. 20-320. [II; 808. "Sur un aérolithe observé à Limoux, le 12 décembre 1844." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 320-322. Greg, 82. Greg gives the date as December 11.]


1844 Dec 14 / [LT], 3-e / Singular Oc. at Exeter. [A; 195. "Singular Occurrence." London Times, December 14, 1844, p. 3 c. 5.]


1844 Dec 29 / Aurora / C.R. 20/106. [II; 809. "Extrait d'une Lettre de M. Coulvier-Gravier...." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 106.]


1845:


1845 or 46 // Hay objects by Herschel. [II; 810.]


[1845. Wrong date. See: 1841, (II; 811).]


1845 Jan. 16 / See Nov. 20. / 10 a.m. / Not seen at Layssac, but 10 a.m. detonation heard. And at Cette, met seen in full sunlight. /C.R. 20-890 / BA 60-82. [II; 812. Boisse. "Sur deux météores observés aux environs de Layssac, l'un, dans la nuit du 19 au 20 novembre 1844; l'autre, le 16 janvier 1845." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 887-891, at 890. Greg, 82.]


1845 Jan 16 / Laysac and Cette / 10 a.m. / "Fine bolide; daylight; great explosion and noise." / BA '60-82. [II; 813. Greg, 82.]


[1845 Jan 20 /] 1845 Jan 26 / Grüneberg, Silesia / N.W. to S.E. / remarkable meteor / BA 60. [II; 815. Greg, 82.]


1845 Jan. 25 / 3 p.m. / (Fr) / Louans (Indre et Loir) / stonefall / C.R. 92/984. [II; 814. Daubrée, Gabriel-Auguste. "Météorite tombée à Louans (Indre-et-Loire) le 25 janvier 1845 et dont la chute est restée inédire." Comptes Rendus, 92 (1881): 984-985.]


[1845 Jan 26. Wrong date. See: 1845 Jan 20, (II; 815).]


1845 Jan 27 / Hamburg / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 816. Greg, 82.]


1845 Jan 29 / [LT]. 4-a / Ghost in daylight / East Lothian. [A; 196. "A Ghost in Daylight." London Times, January 29, 1845, p. 4 c. 1.]


1845 Jan. 31 / Nottingham / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 817. Greg, 82.]


1845 Feb / Remarkable snowfalls / Vosges / Compt Rendus 20-1305. [II; 818. "Extrait d'une Lettre de M. Ed. Collord à M. Élie de Beaumont." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1305-1307.]


1845 Feb 10 / Sutton, Macclesfield / flash of lightning down a chimney / foggy—no storm / L.T. 17-5-a. [II; 819. "Mysterious Occurrence." London Times, February 17, 1845, p. 5 c. 1.]


1845 Feb 17 / Paris / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 820. Greg, 82.]


[1845 Feb 19 /] 1843 Feb 19 / See if this some other date. This ver. / C.R. 22-709 / That in New Grenada (I think U.S. Columbia), done the valley of Lagunella, swept a flood of mud. / (See if 1828.) / Supposed from the Ruiz Volcano. With it enormous blocks of ice from the mountains. Broke down and covered trees with mud. Many inhabitants perished. / See if 1845. [II; 558.1, 558.2. Acosta, Joaquin. "Relation de l'éruption boueuse sortie du volcan de Ruis et de la catastrophe de Lagunilla dans la république de la Nouvelle-Grenade." Comptes Rendus, 22 (1846): 709-710. The Nevado del Ruiz volcano.]


1845 Feb. 19/ Q and down the plain of the river Lagunilla (U.S. Columbia) poured a torrent of liquid clay, overwhelming villages. / Timbs' '46-271 / See if 1843. [II; 821."Houses and People Destroyed by Mud." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 271.The Nevado del Ruiz volcano.]


1845 Feb 21 / [LT]. 6-f / Remarkable Fatality. [A; 197. "Remarkable Fatality." London Times, February 21, 1845, p. 6 c. 6.]


1845 March 9 / Cambridge / unusual sunspot / LT, March 11-7-b. [II; 822. Ellis, Theodore F. "Astronomical Phenomenon." London Times, March 11, 1845, p. 7 c. 2.]


1845 March 9 / q in Scotland / q in Mexico / "A most singular appearance of the sun" noticed at Cambridge. / Timbs' Year Book 1846-132. [II; 823. "Lunar Periodicities." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 130-132, at 132. "Astronomical Phenomenon." Literary Gazette, 1845 (March 22, 1845): 186. Ellis, Theodore F. "Astronomical Phenomenon." London Times, March 11, 1845, p. 7 c. 2.]


1845 March 10 / Hamburg / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 824. Greg, 82.]


1845 March 26 / Huntingdon / ab. 9 p.m. / q and sound - phe at first thought from an explosion / LT, Ap 3-6-d. [II; 825. "Earthquake at Huntingdon." London Times, April 3, 1845, p. 6 c. 4.]


1845 March 29 / London / "Curious stationary meteor." / B.A. 60. [II; 826. Greg, 82.]


1845 Mar 29 (?) / (3) / Athenaeum, Ap. 5, 1845 / Cor writes that saw in a part of the sky familiar to him—obj in telescope looked like four stars with a nebula in the center. In about 2 minutes it disappeared or faded away. [II; 827. Goddard, J.T. "Curious Meteor." Athenaeum, 1845 (no. 910; April 5): 339.]


1845 March (?) / Cor saw comet similar to a small nebula—brought his telescope to bear upon it. Looked like four stars with an orange-colored mist in the center. It moved away and disappeared two minutes after he had begun telescopic examination. / Athenaeum / See Goddard. / Mag. of Sci 8/12. [II; 828.1, 828.2. Goddard, J.T. "Curious Meteor." Athenaeum, 1845 (no. 910; April 5): 339. Goddard, J.T. "Curious Meteor." Magazine of Science, 7 (1846): 13; (a copy of the Athenaeum article).]


1845 Ap. 7 / Mexico / great q / [BA] '11. [II; 829. Milne, 707.]


1845 Ap 19-25 / q / India / I [Light] / Cutch / Lakhpat / BA '11 / See June 19. [ II; 830. Milne, 707.]


[1845 Apr 24. Meteor. Highfield House. "Large as moon." Lowe, 136.]


1845 May 1 / 8:29 p.m. / Bolide at Dijon / C.R., 20-1452. [II; 831. Perrey, Alexis. "Note sur un bolide aperçu le 1er mai 1845." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1452. Greg, 82.]


1845 May 6 / Morning, before sunrise, appearance from tail of a comet, reported from Princeton College. / Niles Nat. Register, May 10. [II; 832. "Astronomical." Niles' Weekly Register, 68 (May 10, 1845): 160.]


1845 May 8 / "Vulcan" by Houzeau at Brussells. / C.R. 83-719. [II; 833. LeVerrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. "Examen des observations qu'on a présentées, à diverses époques, comme pouvant appartenir aux passages d'une planète intra-mercurielle devant le disque du Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 83 (September 18, 1876): 583-589, 621-624, 647-650, 719-723, at 719.]


[1845 May 8 /] 1845 // Brussells / (3) / Houzeau / A Vulcan / Cosmos, N S, 42/467 / (no more). [II; 881. "L'histoire de Vulcain." Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 42 (April 22, 1905): 466-467. Jean-Charles Houzeau did see a planet transit across the Sun's disc on May 8, 1845; but, if he had consulted an almanac, he might have recognized that planet was Mercury, (not Vulcan).]


1845 May 8 / Trans Merc. [II; 834. Transit of Mercury.]


1845 May 11, 12, 13 / S / D-209 / (N) / bodies / Naples / 114 / Capocci. [II; 835. The note copies information from page 209 of The Book of the Damned. Waldner, Henry. "On Luminous Matter in the Atmosphere." Nature, 5 (February 15, 1872): 304-305, at 304. The observation by Capocci and others were made from May 11 to 13, 1845, and were believed by Dawes to be seeds. Webb, Thomas William. Celestial Objects for Common Telescopes. 4th ed. London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1881, 45. Lowe, 138. LeVerrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. "Examen des observations qu'on a présentées, à diverses époques, comme pouvant appartenir aux passages d'une planète intra-mercurielle devant le disque du Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 83 (September 18, 1876): 583-9, 621-4, 647-50, 719-23, at 622. "Schreiben de Herrn Professors A. Erman an den Herausgeber."" Astronomische Nachrichten, 23 (1845): 355-360. Heis, Eduard. "Ueber Erscheinungen in der Atmosphäre nach Observationen von H. Waldner." Wochenschrift für Astronomie, Meteorologie und Geographie, n.s. v. 12 (1869): 95-96, 100-103.]


1845 May 17 / Lightning strikes two sisters—5 miles apart. / LT, May 20/8/a.  [A; 198. "Singular Occurrence." London Times, May 20, 1845, p. 8 c. 1.]


1845 June 13 / Remarkable hail / Liège / Bull. Ac. Sci Brux 12-pt. 2-14. [II; 836. Leclercq, D. "Sur une grêle extraordinaire, observée à Liége le 13 juin 1845." Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, 12 pt. 2 (1845): 14-15.]


1845 June 13 / 10:30 p.m. / Meteor in Seine-et-Oise / C.R. 20-1799. [II; 837. "Météorologie." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1799-1800.]


1845 June 13 / Villeneuve, St. Georges / Met = Moon / slow / N.N.E. to S.S.W. / BA 60. [II; 838. Greg, 82.]


(1845) June 18 / S / Malta, etc. / 141 / (D-261). [II; 839. The note copies information from page 261 of The Book of the Damned. Fort wrote that the Victoria was about "900 miles east of Adalia"; however, its position would be "west" of Adalia, (now identified as Antalya, Turkey). "Meteorological Phenomena." London Times, August 18, 1845 p. 6 c. 6. "(From the Malta Mail.)" "We mentioned in our paper of the 27th of June, that the brig Victoria, on her voyage from Newcastle to Malta, had met with an extraordinary occurrence at 9:30 p.m. on the 18th of the same month, when in latitude 36° 40' 56", and longitude 13° 44' 36". The circumstances were as follows:—Being becalmed at the time and without any appearance of bad weather, her top-gallant and royal masts suddenly went over the side, as though carried away by a sudden squall. Two hours after it came on to blow very hard from southward and eastward, and whilst the hands were aloft, taking a reef in the topsails, it suddenly again fell calm, and they complained of an overpowering stench of sulphur and an unbearable heat. At this moment three luminous bodies were seen to issue from the sea, at about the distance of half a mile from the vessel, which remained visible for about 10 minutes; soon after it came on to blow hard from the S.E., and the vessel then run into a current of air the very reverse to that just experienced." "We have now been favoured with a letter from Ainab, on Mount Lebanon, mentioning, that on the very same day, at about half an hour after sunset (which brings it to very nearly the same time), the heavens presented a most extraordinary and beautiful though awful spectacle; a fiery meteor, composed of two luminous bodies, each presenting an appearance of being at least five time larger than the moon, with streamers or appendages to each joining the two, and looking precisely like large flags blown out by a gentle breeze, appeared in the west, remaining visible for an hour, taking an easterly course, and gradually disappeared. The appendages appeared to shine from the reflected light of main bodies, which it was painful to look at for any time." "The moon had risen about half an hour before, and there was scarcely any wind." Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1848, 1-11, at 2 and 5. "Eighteenth Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science." Athenæum, 1848 (no. 1086; August 18): 831-846, at 833. "Luminous Meteors." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1849, 273-274. Lowe, 136. Greg, 83. Greg notes: "Sir W.S. Harris considers this was an electrical phenomenon." Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 30-31. Frederick Howlett's observations of a "meteor that resembled a bright but permanent flash of lightning," (including "a dull heavy report like that of a distant piece of ordnance"), near Adalia, on this date, were appended to Glaisher's report. Howlett, (not Hawlett), was a "most persevering observer" of sunspots, and this "meteor" was also seen at Philadelphia, (Alaşehir, Turkey).]


[1845 June 19 /] 1845 July 12 / Athenaeum of— In Lake Wogsdamm, near Darmstadt, during a thunderstorm, an island rose in the lake. No q felt. It rose as great discharge of lightning upon the lake. [II; 844. "Our Weekly Gossip." Athenæum, 1845 (no. 924; July 12): 692-693, at 692. "From Darmstadt, we have accounts of a remarkable phenomenon which has been witnessed in the neighbourhood of that capital during a thunderstorm,—and attributed, by these accounts, to the thunder itself. About five in the evening, it is stated, the electric fluid discharged itself, with a loud and long rumbling sound, on the vast Lake of Wogsdamm, near the city; and on the instant, there arose, in the midst of the waters a small reedy island, having nearly the form of a five-rayed star, and a diameter, at the widest part, of about twenty-two paces. No shock of earthquake was felt. The examination of the islet has shown that it adheres solidly to the bottom of the lake. The inhabitants of Darmstadt were pouring out to look at it." Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des Tremblements de Terre." Mémoires de lʹAcadémie des sciences, arts et belles-lettres de Dijon, 46 (1845-1846): 393-479, at 405. Perrey gives the date as June 19, 1845, at 5 P.M., and desComptes Rendusibes Wogsdamm as a large pond. As Darmstadt isn't located on a river or next to any large lakes, this may have simply been a large pond along the road leading to Mainz, on the outskirts of Darmstadt, in 1845.]


[1845 June 19 /] 1845 (July) / (q and rain) / Near Darmstadt, Lake of Wogsdamm, a th. storm ab 5 p.m. an electrical discharge, loud, long, rumbling sound and small island rose in the lake. This a phe of q's—but no quake was felt. / Timbs 1846/282. [II; 845. "Storms." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 282. The Year-Book only paraphrases the account given in the Athenaeum. See: 1845 June 19, (II; 844).]


1845 June 19 / II [Medium] / q / India / Lakhpat / BA 11 / See Ap 19. [II; 840. Milne, 708. See: 1845 Ap 19-25, (II; 830).]


1845 June 21 / 3 days after the B.D. object / at Erzeroum, Asia Minor / A heavy snowstorm, which lasted 3 days. "The greatest consternation prevailed among the inhabitants, who thought the world was coming to an end." BA 61. [II; 841. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 31.]


[1845 (July). Wrong date. See: 1845 June 19, (II; 844).]


1845 July 10-11 / q. / Italy (Basilicata) / BA '11. [II; 842. Milne, 708.]


1845 July 12 / Ac to American astronomer Mitchel—dark spot in polar white patch of Mars for several hours. / N.Y. Times, 1877, Nov. 25-4-4. [II; 843. "Visible Changes in Planets." New York Times, November 25, 1877, p. 4 c. 4.]


[1845 July 12 /] 1845 July 25 / Dark spot in polar snow of Mars / Cornhill Mag. 1877 / or NY Times, Nov 25/4/4. 1877. [II; 851. "A Mighty Sea-Wave." Cornhill Magazine, 36 (November, 1877): 601-612, at 612. "For instance, the American astronomer Mitchel says that on the night of July 12, 1845, the bright polar snows of Mars exhibited an appearance never noticed at any preceding or succeeding observation. In the very centre of the white surface appeared a dark spot, which retained its position during several hours. On the following evening not a trace of the spot could be seen." "Visible Changes in Planets." New York Times, November 25, 1877, p. 4 c. 4. Ormsby MacKnight Mitchel made his observation at the Cincinnati Observatory. The "Mountains of Mitchel" remain a mystery, where frozen carbon-dioxide, (not water ice), evaporates at different rates during the southern spring, with some darker areas of frost disappearing rapidly and with a brighter frost that persists longer when the polar ice cap recedes. Ormsby and other past astronomers thought of Martian ice and snow melting into its seas, whereas the gaseous release of carbon-dioxide frosts substantially increases the Martian atmosphere, (without any surface water involved in the formation and sublimation of the polar ice caps on Mars). In some areas, surface frost could form directly upon the ground, while other areas could involve precipitation during storms. Colaprete, Anthony, et al. "Albedo of the south pole on Mars determined by topographic forcing of atmosphere dynamics." Nature, 435 (May 12, 2005): 184-188. "In particular, the presence of a perennial cardon dioxide ice cap, the formation of a vast area of black 'slab ice' known as the Cryptic region and the asymmetric springtime retreat of the cap have eluded explanation."]  


[1845 July 12. Wrong date. See: 1845 June 19, (II; 844).]


1845 July 14 / Le Teilleul, Manche, France / Met / (F). [II; 846. Fletcher, 101. This is the Le Teilleul meteorite.]


1845 July 14 / Met / London / BA 60. [II; 847. Greg, 83.]


1845 July 16 / Belgium / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 848. Greg, 83.]


1845 July 23 / Barrisal, India / shocks / Athenaeum 1845-1109. [II; 849. "Earthquakes." Athenaeum, 1845 (no. 942; November 15): 1109. "...at Barrisal several distinct shocks had been felt on the 23rd of July."]


1845 July 25 / 9 p.m. / Between Prato and Florence—described by Prof. Cocchi. An enormous igneous body rushing northward overhead, terrifying horses. "Many times larger than the moon." / BA 61-37. [II; 850. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 37.]


[1845 July 25. Wrong date. See: 1845 July 12, (II; 851).]


1845 Aug 6 / India / Assam / q / I [light] / BA '11. [II; 852. Milne, 708.]  


1845 Aug 7 / Hail at Metz / Mem. Ac. Metz 27/116. [II; 853. Lucy, Ad. "Note sur des Grêlons Tombés à Metz." Mémoires de l'Académie Royale de Metz. 27 (1845-1846): 116, (with illustrations). "Le 7 aout 1845, à deux heures trente minutes du soir, il est tombé sur la ville de Metz une grêle dont le grêlons affectaient des formes aussi bizarres que variées. Ceux que j'ai recueillis intacts sur le gazon de mon jardin, présentaient généralment l'aspect d'une sphère déprimée avec des excroissances sur les dépressions; d'autres avaient la forme de poires, de gourdes, de massues, de balles qui porteraient sur toute leur circonférence la bavure résultante d'un moule mal joint."]  


1845 Aug 10 / London and Oxford / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 854. Greg, 83.]


1845 Aug 12 / [LT], 4-f / Meteor / London. [II; 855. "Splendid Meteor." London Times, August 12, 1845, p. 4 c. 6.]


1845 Aug 18 / [LT], 6-f / Meteorological phe. [II; 856. "Meteorological Phenomena." London Times, August 18, 1845 p. 6 c. 6. See: (1845) June 18, (II; 839).]


1845 Aug 19 / (Cu[t] / near Rouen / Whirlwind—flashes of lightning from it. Said that it burned objects caught in it. / Timbs Year Book 1846/278. [II; 857. "Whirlwinds." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 278-279.]


1845 Aug 19 / Leaves of trees and flowers in gardens in suburbs of Paris withered in electric storm. / C.R. 21/535. [II; 858. Cornay. "Sur quelques effets de l'ouragan du 19 août 1845, observés dans les environs de Paris." Comptes Rendus, 21 (1845): 534-535.]


1845 Aug 19 / Year Book of Facts, 1846, quoting M. Arago's account to the French Academy / At Rouen, a whirlwind. Effects called electric—in the destroyed buildings the bricks were burning hot and many articles were charred. Said the fire or the electricity of it was so brilliant that visible a great distance. However, a French  scientist, M. Pouillet, said that the phe was not electric. It is said that insurance companies desiring that opinion had recourse to him. [II; 859.1, 859.2. "Whirlwinds." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 278-279.]


1845 Aug 20 / Op Mars / (A l). [II; 860.]


1845 Aug 21 / 8 p.m. / Comrie / Remarkable shadow of a monument in story of Comrie / Athenaeum 1845-858. [II; 861. "Remarkable Aerial Phenomena Observed at Comrie, Perthshire." Athenæum, 1845 (no. 931; August 30): 858. "Immediately to the north of the village of Comrie there is a bold hill, called Dunmore, with a pillar of seventy or eighty feet in height built on its summit in memory of the late Lord Melville. The perfect image of this well-known hill and obelisk, as exact at least as the shadow usually representsthe substance, was observed distinctly projected on the noerthern sky, at least two miles beyond the original, which, owing to an intervening eminence, was itself not in view at all from the station. The image was that which the hill and monument present as viewed from the village, that is, from the south. Instead of being a shadow on a cloud, it seemed to be the shape of the thing represented moulded out of the cloud itself, and thus stuck up against the northern sky. The edges of the figure representing those of the pillar, though of course less substantial-looking than their granite originals, seemed as erect and well defined as the masonry itself, and so also where the harder features of the hill formed parts of the profile; while those portions in the original covered with wood had in the figure a serrated fringe, exactly as these portions themselves would show if looked at between the eye and sky. The figure continued visible, after it was first noticed (how long before it is of course impossible to say), for about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and was, during that time, seen and minutely examined by three individuals, so that there could be no illusion in the case.... On this occasion, the sun had been down for some time, and the moon had only lately risen, and was peeping through some holes in a thick screen of clouds that skirted the eastern horizon, and of course far from the line of the Dunmore and image, so that neither of these luminaries had any direct hand in the sketch."]


1845 Aug 21 / Tidal wave / 4 feet high / Halmstadt, Norway / Timbs'  '46-279. [II; 862. ("Halmstadt, in Norway...." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 279. "Halmstadt...." Athenæum, 1845 (no. 933; September 13): 910. "Halmstadt, in Norway, was, on the 21st ult., visited by a tremendous hurricane. The sea retired in an unusual manner from the coast, and returned in a few minutes with great violence. The waters of the Nisa rose all of a sudden four feet above their usual height, and then at once receded. A similar phenomenon was witnessed on that coast at the time of the earthquake at Lisbon, in 1755, and of that at Messina, in 1783."]


1845 Aug 23 / [LT]. 5-e / Sup. in Essex. [A; 199. "Superstition in the 19th Century." London Times, August 23, 1845, p. 5 c. 5.]


1845 Aug 22 / 12:30 p.m. / Severe shock / Assam / sound like thunder / later, small shocks / Friend of India, Sept. 11. [II; 863. "Earthquake in Assam." Friend of India, September 11, 1845, p. 584.]


1845 Aug 30 / Bright projection from snow cap of Mars / Cornhill Mag, 1877 / or NY Times, 1877, Nov. 25/4/4. [II; 864. "A Mighty Sea-Wave." Cornhill Magazine, 36 (November, 1877): 601-612, at 612. "Visible Changes in Planets." New York Times, November 25, 1877, p. 4 c. 4. See: 1845 July 12, (II; 851).]


1845 Aug 31 / Grenelle, France / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 865. Greg, 83.]


1845 Sept 1 / Det met / 2:20 a.m. / A. J. Sci., 49-408 / brilliant light and great met / Fayetteville, Nor. Car / tremendous report. [II; 866. "Remarkable Meteor at Fayetteville, N.C." American Journal of Science, 49 (1845): 408.]


1845 / ab. Sept 1 // Sounds / In Climate of N.S. Wales, p. 165, Mr H.C. Russell quotes a correspondent. Near Eyre's Creek, ab 9 a.m., "a report as if of a great gun. Next morning ab. same time again. [II; 867. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. Climate of New South Wales: Descriptive, Historical, and Tabular. Sydney: Charles Potter, 1877, 165. Russell paraphrases from Sturt's "Central Australia." Strut, Charles. Narrative of an Expedition into Central Australia. London: T and W. Boone, 1849, v. 2, 24-25. "When Mr. Browne and I were on our recent journey to the north, after having crossed the Stony Desert, being then between it and Eyre's Creek, about nine o'clock in the morning, we distinctly heard a report as of a great gun discharged, to the westward, at the distance of half a mile. On the following morning, nearly at the same hour, we again heard the sound; but it now came from a greater distance, and consequently was not so clear." See: 1829 Feb 7, (I; 1439), and, 1829 Feb 7, (I; 1372).]


1845 Sept 1 / Insect / N.Y. Herald, Nov 15-1-6 / Near Buffalo, Iowa, an unknown insect appeared—enormous numbers. At first the larvae—some farms covered several inches deep with them. In a few days climbed in crops and turned to small fly about half the size of a housefly and sucked wheat until withered. No one had ever seen such an insect before. [II; 868.1, 868.2. "Destruction of Wheat." New York Herald, November 15, 1845, p. 1 c. 6. Packard, A.S., Jr. The Hessian Fly. U.S. Entomological Commission: Bulletin No. 4. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1880. This unknown insect was probably the Hessian fly. "It appeared west of the Alleghanies in 1797, though in what state we are unable to learn, while Virginia was invaded in 1801, and North Carolina about the year 1840. Westward its progress brought it to Ohio in 1840, and three years later it was detected in Michigan. In 1844 it was destructive in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and the eastern border of Iowa, while it was common in the Middle Atlantic States, and became destructive in Northern Georgia in 1843."]


1845 Sept 2 // Sept 20, Athenaeum of, from Edinburgh Advertiser—at Orkney—great fall of black dust supposed from Hecla. Ath., Oct 18, says date was Sept 2. Says had been eruption there. [II; 869. "Supposed Volcanic Eruption." Athenæum, 1845 (no. 934; September 20): 926.]


1845 Sept 2 / noon / Hecla, and on into 1846 / Y.B. 1846/269. [II; 870. "Eruption of Mount Hecla." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 268-269.]


1845 Sept 2 and 3 / Dust / Orkneys / Am J. Sci 2/3/273. [II; 871. "Volcanic Dust of Hecla." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 3 (1847): 272-273.]


1845 Sept 3 / Great fall of dust "resembling Roman cement" all over the Orkneys. / An. and Mag. Nat Hist 16-286 / Attrib not to Hecla but to some other volc that had been threatening eruption in Iceland. / See Oct. 14. [II; 872. Clouston, C. "Shower of Dust at Orkney." Annals and Magazine of Natural History, 16 (October 1845): 286. See: 1845 Oct. 14, (II; 889).]


1845 Sept 6 / Rhine / Fireball ./ BA 60. [II; 873. Greg, 83.]


1845 Sept 7 / Calcutta / Fireball / BA 60 / N. to S. [II; 874. Greg, 83.]


1845 Sept 7 / Violent shock / Calcutta / Athenaeum 1845-1109. [II; 875. "Earthquakes." Athenaeum, 1845 (no. 942; November 15): 1109.]


[1845 Sept 7. Meteor. London. Lowe, 136.]


1845 Sept 8 / btw 2 and 3 a.m. / island of Grenada / a shock / on same day a heavy th. storm / N.Y. Herald, Oct 5-1-5. [II; 876. "Grenada." New York Herald, October 5, 1845, p. 1 c. 5.]


1845 Sept 15 / date of Hecla's first outburst, in Athenaeum, Nov 1, p. 1060. [II; 877. "Mount Hecla." Athenæum, 1845 (no. 940; November 1): 1060. The volcano Hecla began its eruption on September 2, 1845, (which lasted until the following April). See: 1845 Sept 2, (II; 870).]


1845 Sept 16 / (+) / [LT]. 4-f / Supposed volcano in Orkney / See Oct. 14. [II; 878. "Supposed Volcanic Eruption." London Times, September 16, 1845, p. 4 c. 6. See: 1845 Oct. 14, (II; 889).]


1845 Sept 20 / Jefferson Co., N.Y. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 879. Finley, 3.]


1845 Oct / (Nova) / Scarlet star in Orion found / An Sci Disc 1851/376 / (Cut). [II; 880. "Extracts from the Proceedings of the London Astrononomical Society." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1851, 376-377. John Russell Hind said, " In October, 1845, I found a highly colored crimson, or even scarlet, star in Orion, far the most deeply colored object I have yet seen. Its mean place for 1850 is, R.A. 4h. 52m. 45s., N.P.D.=-15° 2'."  Hind's discovery was not a nova in the Orion constellation; for, R Leporis, (otherwise known as Hind's Crimson Star), is a carbon star and a long-period variable star in the constellation of Lepus.]


1845 // Hecla / Le Moniteur / p. 2558 / P.P. 9431. [II; 882. (Le Moniteur, 1845, p. 2558 ) "P.P. 9431" was the shelfmark for Le Moniteur at the Library of the British Museum.]


1845 // autumn /// b. rain / Just before the disease in potatoes broke out, a black rain fell, and people attributed the disease to it. / Gardeners' Chronicle, June 1, 1850 / Was this Ireland? / See preceding Hecla. [II; 883. "In the autumn of 1845...." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1850 no. 22 (June 1): 339. "In the autumn of 1845, just before the prevalence of the disease in Potatoes, a shower of inky black rain fell in a wild and scantily inhabited district with which we are acquainted, and was believed to be the agent which carried the Potato murrain through the land. Unfortunaely none of the fluid was preserved, or some easier solution of the mystery might possibly have been detected." "A yellow rain fell on the 17th of last April, at 11 o'clock A.M., at the Mumbles, near Swansea, the sky being at the time bright and free from clouds. The spots of rain when fresh were of an ochre yellow, and the colour remained for many days, notwithstanding heavy rains, where the spots had fallen."]


1845 Oct / qs in Smyrna and great damage from torrential rains / Atheaeum 1845-1109. [II; 884. "Smyrna and some other parts of the East...."  Athenæum, 1845 (no. 942; November 15): 1109.]


1845 Oct 3 - Dec 14 / N.Y. Herald / Have. [II; 885.]


1845 Oct / Great drought / Arkansas / N.Y. Herald 31-1-5. [II; 886. "Varieties." New York Herald, October 31, 1845, p. 1 c. 5.]


1845 Oct 5 / Sounds / N.Y. Herald, 1-5 / In the neighborhood of the Lake Superior copper mines, in the Porcupine Mountains, a hill, near La Point, from which came sounds like discharges of artillery. [II; 887. "Thunder in the Copper Regions." New York Herald, October 5, 1845, p. 1 c. 5. Martin, Morgan Lewis. "Editor's Correspondence." Daily Union, (Washington, D.C.), August 25, 1845, p. 390 c. 4-6. "At times, it is said, a peculiar noise issues from the Porcupine mountains, and from the high hills on the main land, both east and west of La Pointe, some distance off.  It is said to resemble the distant discharge of ordnance, or thunder.  At one time, they said it was so loud and frequent, that they mistook it for signal guns fired from the brig Astor, which they thought might be in distress, and actually sent out a boat in search of her." "These sounds the Indians believe to be the voice of the spirit 'Manitou' who guards the deposites of mineral wealth embowelled beneath the hills, and to whom any attempt made to dig them up, and carry them off, would be highly offensive, and followed by some kind of punishment.  I have never yet heard of an Indian’s leading a white man to a locality of copper, or telling where he has found a piece when picked up!" "Some have supposed that the noise in question arises from volcanic action; but, as no vibration is felt in the earth, and no other proof exists of such being the case, we are led to believe that the noise is produced by the lashing of the waves of the lake after a storm, as they are driven forward into the grottoes, caves, &c. of the tall sandstone cliffs, formed at their bases by the disintegrating effects of water and ice.  Some distance east of La Pointe, about the Little Girl’s Point and Montreal river, as well as west of the same place, some fifteen or twenty miles, high red sandstone cliffs occur. At their bases, near the water’s edge, a great many curiously-shaped caves and grottoes appeared. In places, the sandstone had been so cut away, that only pillars remained standing at some ten or fifteen feet in the lake, from the top of which a high rude arch would extend to the main shore, and beneath which boats could  easily pass. This was particularly the case near where the islands are parted with going west up the southern shore of the lake.  Some caves, with small openings for mouths, run for a long distance back beneath the hills, expanding, likely, into large halls with high vaulted roofs, &c. After a storm, a heavy sea continues to roll into these grottoes and caverns, the waves lashing themselves against their sides and roofs—thus producing sounds resembling those heard at La Pointe, &c." "As the weather is generally calm after a storm, before the sea goes down, it is likely at such times these sounds are heard."]


1845 Oct, ab 12th / Destructive floods / Kansas / N.Y. Herald 25-1-2+. [II; 888. "Great Flood." New York Herald, October 25, 1845, p. 1 c. 2.]


1845 Oct. 14 / [LT], 7-e / 17-6-f / Nov. 27-4-e / 6-5-a / Hecla. [II; 889. "Eruption of Mount Hecla." London Times, October 14, 1845, p. 7 c. 5. "Eruption of Hecla." London Times, October 17, 1845, p. 6 c. 6. "Eruption of Mount Hecla." London Times, November 27, 1845, p. 4 c. 5. "The Eruption of Hecla." London Times, December 6, 1845, p. 5 c. 1.]


1845 Oct 18 or 11 / Sudden fall and rise of Lake Ontario / Niles National Register, Oct 25, p. 115. [II; 890. "Singular Phenomenon on Lake Ontario." Niles' Weekly Register, 69 (October 25, 1845): 115.]


1845 Oct 24 / q - III [Great] / China / BA '11. [II; 891. Milne, 708.]


1845 Oct 24 / Bonn / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 892. Greg, 83.]


1845 Oct 26 / 6 p.m. / q and sound like thunder / Long Island / Conn. / Niles' Nat Reg., Nov. 1. [II; 893.

"An Earthquake was felt at New York...." Niles' Weekly Register, 69 (November 1, 1845): 144.]


1845 Oct 26 / Q violent on Long Island Sound. Rumbling sounds in N.J. / N.Y. Herald, Nov 3-1-6. [II; 894. "The Earthquake in Newark." New York Herald, November 3, 1845, p. 1 c. 6.]


1845 Oct 26 / Q severer in Conn than in N.Y. On 23rd, at Greenfield Hill, Conn., the springs and wells went dry for hour and a half. / N.Y. Herald, 31-1-5. [II; 895. "Varieties." New York Herald, October 31, 1845, p. 1 c. 5.]


1845 Oct 31 / Milan / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 896. Greg, 83.]


1845 Nov, early / Almost incessant rains in Maine. / N.Y Herald 7-1-4. [II; 897. "Storm in Maine." New York Herald, November 7, 1845, p. 1 c. 4.]


1845 Nov, / Hecla increase[d] violence. / Athenaeum 1845-1204. [II; 898. "Mount Hecla." Athenaeum, 1845 (no. 946; December 13): 1204. "According to a letter from Copenhagen, of the 22nd ult., the eruption of Mount Hecla has become very formidable, at the date of the last accounts from Iceland. At a distance of two miles from the crater, the lava torrent was a mile in width, and from forty to fifty feet in depth."]


1845 Nov 2 / Milan / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 899. Greg, 83.]


1845 Nov. 2 / (?) / Comet if intense brightness on western horizon, night / Baltimore / N.Y. Herald 5-4-1 / Attracted considerable attention. [II; 900. "Baltimore, Nov. 4, 1845." New York Herald, November 5, 1845, p. 4. c. 1.]


1845 Nov 2 / Biela's Comet was discovered again at Cambridge Observatory, Dec 1. / Niles National Register 5-19-288. [II; 901. "Biela's Comet was discovered again by C. Challis...." Niles' Weekly Register, 69 (January 3, 1846): 288.]


1845 Nov 4 and Dec 9 / Bombay / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 902. Greg, 83.]


1845 Nov. 20 / Cramaux / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 903. Greg, 83.]


1845 Nov 25 / N.Y. Herald, 1-6 / Unprecedented drought in Virginia. [II; 904. "Varieties." New York Herald, November 25, 1845, p. 1 c. 6.]


1845 Dec 2 / Light at sea / Ryook Phyoo / (D-275).  ** [II; 905. The note copies information from page 275 of The Book of the Damned. "Extracts of letters from Captain Williams...." Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 5 (1843-1850): 627. "The appearance in question, seen between five and six o'clock in the evening of the 2nd of December 1845, was that of a large flame far out at sea, flickering several times for fifteen and twenty minutes, and suddenly ceasing. It was conjectured to have been either a large ship on fire, or a volcanic eruption; but no positive data exist for determining the question." "Ryook Phyoo," in British Aracan, is now identified as Kyaukpyu, Myanmar (Burma). No volcanic eruptions are known in this area at this time, and apparently no ships were reported lost.]


1845 Dec 2 / [LT], 3-c Berkshire / 4-5-e, Derbyshire / 26-6-c, Shropshire / 9-3-c / 10-6-d / 13-6-d / Incendiary fires. [A; 200. "Incendiarism in Berkshire." London Times, December 2, 1845, p. 3 c. 3. "Incendiarism in Derbyshire." London Times, December 4, 1845, p. 5 c. 5. "Incendiarism." London Times, December 26, 1845, p. 6 c. 3. "Incendiary Fires." London Times, December 9, 1845, p. 3 c. 3.

"Incendiary Fires." London Times, December 10, 1845, p. 6 c. 4. "Incendiary Fires." London Times, December 13, 1845, p. 6 c. 4.]


1845 Dec 3 / Great met / Paris / 6:10 a.m. / BA 60. [II; 906. Greg, 83.]


1845 Dec 3 / Met burst over Mentz with great smoke and noise. / BA 60. [II; 907. Greg, 83.]


1845 Dec 3 / Aurora / Swansea / BA, Vol 18/22. [II; 908. Jenkins, John. "Notices of Auroræ observed at Swansea." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1848, Notices and Abstracts, 22. Lowe reported a meteor, at Highfield House. "Increased in brightness when crossing Aurora." Lowe, 136.]


1845 Dec 19 / Venus and Jupiter close together / Astro Reg 1/189. [II; 909. Chambers, George Frederick. "Planetary Conjunctions." Astronomical Register, 1 (December 1863): 188-189.]


1845 Dec 19 / Venus and Saturn in same field of the telescope / Ast. Reg. 7-23. [II; 910. (Astronomical Register, 7-23; not here).]


1845 Dec 29 / Division of Biela's Comet. [II; 911.]


1845 Dec last / Devr / rats / L.T., 1846, Jan 3/6/e. [A; 201. "Horrible Circumstance." London Times, January 3, 1846, p. 6 c. 5.]

 
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