Last updated: July 15, 2021. - Fortean Notes

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Last updated: July 15, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1811 to 1815


1811:


[1811 /] 1810 Dec. 25 / Formosa / I / 1811 / Greece / I. [I; 319. Two different earthquakes were noted upon a single note with "Dec. 25" mistakenly copied as their date. Milne gives "1810" as the only date for an earthquake in Formosa. Two class I earthquakes. Milne, 700.]


1811 Jan / Azores / Volcs continue to Aug at least. / Gent's Mag 81/2/375 / L.T., March 21-3-c. [I; 320. "Abstract of Foreign Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 81 pt. 2 (October 1811): 370-375, at 375. "Volcano in the Sea." London Times, March 21, 1811, p. 3 c. 3-4. The Sete Cidades volcano.]


1811 Jan 16 / [???] / [London Times], 3-c / Disap of house and land. [I; 321. "A lamentable occurrence took place in Port Royal Mountains, Jamaica...." London Times, January 16, 1811, p. 3 c. 3.]


1811 winter / Larvae / Saxony. ** [I; 322. Müller, Albert. "On the dispersal of non-migrating insects by atmospheric agencies." Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, 1871, 175-186, at 183.]


1811 Feb 1-9 / Violent submarine eruption off Azores. Again in June. / BA 54. [I; 323. Mallet, 90-91. See: 1811 June 13, (I; 343).]


1811 Feb 1, etc. / Azores / at Ginetes / 25, 45W; 37, 52' N / for several weeks been shockssubmarine volc Feb. 1 / Bells Weekly Messenger, March 24 / had been shocks here in July, 1809 / at least to 5th / at St. Michael's / vast column of sludge rising from the sea. [I; 324.1, 324.2. "Volcano in the Sea." Bell's Weekly Messenger, March 24, 1811, p. 95 c. 2.]


1811 Feb. 18 / Small q / Rome / BA '11. [I; 325. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1811 Feb, 18 / Olmutz / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 326. Greg, 64.]


1811 March 1 / Konleghowsk (Tschernigoff), Russia / metite, weighing 15 pounds / Gents Mag 81-2-181. [I; 327. "Abstract of Foreign Occurences." Gentleman's Magazine, 81 pt. 2 (August 1811): 177-182, at 180-181.]


1811 March 12 / Kuleschovka, Poltava, Russia / Metite / (F). [I; 328. Fletcher, 99. This is the Kuleschovka meteorite. Greg, 64.]


1811 March 18 / China / III. [I; 329. A class III earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1811 March 25 / Comet / Gents Mag 81/2/280. [I; 330. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 81 pt. 2 (September 1811): 280-282, at 280. Comet C/1811 F1.]


1811 March 26 / First great comet of century. [I; 331. Comet C/1811 F1.]


1811 March 26 / The comet appeared. [I; 332. Honoré Flaugergues discovered comet C/1811 F1 on March 25, 1811.]  


1811 / Comet coincided with great heat and fruitful vintage. / Flammarion, Pop Astro, p. 528. [I; 333. Flammarion, Camille. Popular Astronomy. Revised ed. New York: D. Appleton, 1907, 528. Comet C/1811 F1.]  


1811 spring / Case of Mary Reynolds / Harper's New Monthly Magazine, May, 1860 / One Sunday, spring of 1811, Mary, ab 19 years old, after for a year having been subject to occasional attacks of "fits", she had an attack of unusual severity. She was found insensible. When she recovered she was blind and deaf, and continued so 5 or 6 weeks. Hearing returned suddenly and entirely; seeing returned gradually. Ab 3 months later she was found in a state of sleep so profound that it was impossible to awaken her. After some hours, she awoke and had lost all recollection. Knew neither father nor brother nor mother, sisters. She was ignorant of the commonest details of everyday life. Had no consciousness of having lived previous to the moment of awakening. Her mental condition was that of a new born infant. She used a few words, but showed that they had no meaning to her. But unlike an infant she rapidly learned to adjust to a new world. So she continued about 5 weeks, when one morning she awoke in her natural state or first state. She had no recollection of the state during the 5 weeks. All knowledge of her 19 years returned to her. A few weeks later, she lapsed, after another profound sleep into the second state, taking up the second life, where it had been interrupted by her return. / These alternations continued 15 or 16 years, and then the second state remained for the rest of her life. All transitions were during sleeps. First state said [to] be sedate, almost melancholy, mentally rather slow2nd = gay, given to versification said to been of merit. The two handwritings differ "wholly". / Resemblance to amnesia casesonce she went to visit her brother, and there changedfound herself in strange surroundings that she could not account for until saw her brother, who was known to her in both states. [A; 26.1 to 26.9. Plumer, William S. "Mary Reynolds: A Case of Double Consciousness." Harper's New Monthly Magazine, 20 (May 1860): 807-812.]


1811 spring / Mary Reynolds / Religio-Phil Jour., Jan 11-6-1, 1879 / (YRA) / published a letter from Daniel Lott and a copy of an account of Mary by Rev. Timothy Alden, who knew herafter arriving at adult ageviolent convulsions and blindness and deafness. No periodical regularity in her transitionsusually some foreknowledge of the change to other character. [A; 27.1, 27.2. Lott, Daniel. "A Parallel Case to the Watseka Wonder." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 25 (no. 19; January 11, 1879): 6, (c. 1-2).]


1811 spring / See Fancherthat 5 different chrs possessed her. [A; 28.]


[1811 May /] 1810 May / Wild dog of Ennerdale appeared suddenly and the destruction began. Often killed seven or eight sheep a night, bit into the jugular vein and drank the blood. / Chambers' Journal 81-470 / Hunters organized. If reported in the daytime plowmen unyoked their horses and rode bare-backed. Said that milking, cutting of hay, feeding of horses neglected for these fruitless hunts. In July a fund was raised to buy a good pack of hounds. There were two or three hunts a week, but the animal always eluded. Once when a hunt went past a church, the whole congregation ran out to join. The vicar threw off his surplice and joined. There were long hunts ending 15 or 20 miles away and nothing run down. On 12th of September, it or a dog was seen to enter a cornfield. This animal was shot, wounded, chased by dogs and killed. [A; 22.1, 22.2. 22.3, 22.4. "The Wild-dog of Ennerdale." Chambers's Journal, s. 6 v. 7 (June 25, 1904): 470-472. Bradley, Arthur Granville. Highways and Byways in the Lake District. London: Macmillan, 1901, 142-146. Dickinson, William. Cumbriana, or Fragments of  Cumbrian Life. 1st edition. London: Whitttaker, 1875, 178-190. 2d edition. London: Whittaker, 1876, 200-212. “The following is a copy of a printed handbill....” Cumberland Pacquet, August 27, 1811, p. 2 c. 4. “The following is copy of printed handbill, circulated in this town last week, which has occasioned a good deal of merriment, though it is a serious subject to many individuals:—'Whereas a dog has for some time past, been ranging at large in the parishes of Ennerdale, Lamplugh, &c. to the great injury of the farmers, by destroying sheep.—Any person or persons who kill the said dog, and deliver him at Ennerdale Bridge, shall receive a reward of ten guineas.'” “The great ferocious dog....” London Globe, September 21, 1811, p. 4 c. 2. “The Great Dog.” Cumberland Pacquet, September 17, 1811, p. 2 c. 4. “This formidable animal (which, in the course of his depredations for several weeks past, is supposed to have destroyed sheep upon the mountains of Ennerdale, to the amount of two hundred pounds) was shot on Friday last!—after having crossed the river End [sic, Ehen] about mile below Ennerdale Bridge; and being pursued in a circuitous direction for three hours, by the hounds of Mr. Westray, of Eskat [sic, Eskett].—The chase was well followed up, by almost the whole of the inhabitants of Ennerdale and Lamplugh, who, on the cry of the hounds, immediately assembled[.]—This destructive animal, which is between a mastiff and a greyhound; measured, from the head to the tail end, five feet eight inches, and weighed six stones!—On the accomplishment of this necessary business, (which had been repeatedly, but ineffectually, attempted before) the worthy Nimrods repaired to Ennerdale-Bridge, where they poured out large libations to Bacchus, cheered by the huzzahs and plaudits of the surrounding neighbourhood.” Dickinson and others give the date as 1810, but the newspaper accounts are from 1811, (handbills offering a reward in August, and its being shot on September 13, 1811).]


1811 May 12 / Bonsall Peak of Derbyshire / whirl and fall of chunks of ice / LT, May 25. in BD 20th? / wrong / D-176. [I; 334. (1811 May 20 or 25). The note copies information from page 176 of The Book of the Damned. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 53 (1811):  pt. 2, 1-170, at 54, c.v. "May 12." Russell, Francis Albert Rollo. On Hail. London: Edward Stanford, 1893, 7-8. "On the 12th instant...." London Times, May 25, 1811, p. 2 c. 4. "This was attended with a most tremendous hail-storm: stones and lumps of ice were measured from nine to twelve inches in circumference."]


1811 May 15 / Geneva and Paris / 8:30 p.m. / met and train like an S / Bib. Brit. 47/105, 203, 309. [I; 335. Pictet. "Note sur l'Apparition d'un Métèore Lumineux." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts, (1811): 105-109; at 106. "Lettre du Prof. P. Prevost au Prof. Pictet sur le Métèore du 15 mai." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts, (1811): 110-111. Pictet. "Note sur le Métèore Lumineux du 15 mai." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts, (1811): 203-205. "Lettre au Prof. Pictet, l'un des Rédacteurs de ce Recueil, sur le Métèore du 15 mai." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts, (1811): 309-312. Greg, 64.]


1811 May 18 / Comet at Jamaica / midway between Orion and Gemini / Gent's Mag. 81/2-79. [I; 336. "Abstract of Foreign Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 81 pt. 2 (July 1811): 73-80, at 79.]


1811 May 19 / Sheffield / Hail from 1 to 5 inches circumference / Rollo Russell, Hail, p. 8. [I; 337. Russell, Francis Albert Rollo. On Hail. London: Edward Stanford, 1893, 8.]


1811 May 24 / Op. Mars / (Al). [I; 338. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1811, 52.]


1811 May 30-Aug 11 / (See if noted.) / Great q's / China / BA '11. [I; 339. Neither Fort nor Mallet note any earthquakes in China during this time period. Hoang, Pierre. Catalogue des Tremblements de Terre Signalés en Chine d'après des Sources Chinoises. Shanghai: Imprimerie de la Mission Catholique, 1909, pt. 1, 53. Hoang notes several earthquakes in Shantung province on May 30, June 23 to 25, ("plus jours"), June 28, July 4, and August 11, (in 1811). A class II earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1811 June 8 (?) / Ice / Birmingham / (D 176) / N. [I; 340. The note copies information from page 176 of The Book of the Damned. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849; at 179. "A hailstone, measuring 8.5 inches in diameter and coboidal, fell near to Birmingham on the 8th June 1811; it resembled a congeries of masses about the size of pigeons' eggs, agglutinated together." On the same date, large hail fell in the United States. "Abstract of Foreign Occurences." Gentleman's Magazine, 81 pt. 2 (August 1811): 177-182, at 181. "In a severe thunder-storm at Alexandria and other places in the United States, on the 8th of June, the hail-stones were of prodigious size, many of them are said to have weighed 14 ounces!"]


1811 June / Volc / Kloet / Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [I; 341. Backer, 880. The Kelut volcano.]


1811 June 10etc. / Volc. / Azores / had been also in Jan / An Reg 1812-485 / was in sea near island of St. Michael's / etc. / q. / Caraccas. [I; 342. Tillard, S. "A Narrative of the Eruption of a Volcano in the Sea off the Island of St. Michael." Annual Register, 1812 (v. 54), 485-488. Tillard, S. "A Narrative of the Eruption of a Volcano in the Sea off the Island of St. Michael." Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 102 (1812): 152-158. Mallet, 95. The next earthquake at Caraccas, after 1809, was on December 18, 1811. The Sete Cidades volcano.]


1811 June 13 / Again off coast of Azores violent submarine / See Feb. 1-9 / BA 54. [I; 343. Mallet, 91. See: 1811 Feb 1-9, (I; 323).]


1811 July / Gelat / Germany / D-50. [I; 344. The note copies information from page 50 of The Book of the Damned: "...fall of a gelatinous substance, after the explosion of a meteorite, near Heidelberg, July, 1811...." Chladni, Ernst Florens Friedrich. "A new catalogue of the fall of stones,iron, dust, and soft substances, dry or moist, in chronological order." Annals of Philosophy, n.s., 12 (1826): 83-96, at 93-94. Chladni, Ernst Florens Friedrich. "Nouveau Catalogue des chutes de pierres ou de fer; de poussières ou de substances molles, sèches ou humides, suivant l'ordre chronologique."Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 31 (1826): 253-269, at 267. Scherb, Martin. "Problematische Materie einer leuchtenden Kugel." Annalen der Physik, 66 (1820): 329-330. Greg, 64.]


1811 July 4 and Aug 5 / Eruptions reported from N. of Norway. Said been doubtful. / BA 54. [I; 345. Mallet, 92.]


1811 July 8 / Metite / (F) / village of Berlanguillas, bet. Aranda and Roa, Spain / Bib. Brit 48/162 / BA '77-149. [I; 346. Fletcher, 99.  This is the Berlanguillas meteorite. Greg, 64. Doursenne, Jean-Marie-Pierre-François. "Détails sur la chute d'une pierre Météorique en Espagne." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts, 48 (1811): 162-164. Glaisher, James, et al. "Report on Observations of Lumiunous Meteors during the Year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 149.]


1811 July 15 / Italy / Modena / q / BA '11. [I; 347. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1811 Aug 10 / Meteors so great not equalled until 1857 in Germany / BA 57-153. [I; 348. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1856-57. Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1857, 131-153, at 153.]


1811 Aug 29 / [London Times]. 3-b / Sept 3-4-b / 5-4-1 / 12-3-b / July 6-3-b / Comet / Oct 2-4-b / 10-3-e / 24-2-e. / [I; 349. "The Kingston Gazette, of the 18th May...." London Times, July 6, 1811, p. 3 c. 2. "This morning, between 3 and 4 o'clock...." London Times, August 29, 1811, p. 3 c. 2. "The Comet." London Times, September 3, 1811, p. 4 c. 2. "Comet." London Times, September 5, 1811, p. 4. c. 1. "The Comet now visible...." London Times, September 12, 1811, p. 3. c. 2. "The Comet, it is estimated...." London Times, October 2, 1811, p. 4 c. 2. "The following specimen of the marvellous...." London Times, October 10, 1811, p. 3 c. 5. "The Comet...." London Times, October 24, 1811, p. 2 c. 5. "The Comet was nearest the earth yesterday: its distance was then about 108 millions of English miles." Comet C/1811 F1.]


1811 Sept 10 and Dec 16 and between the two dates / Many meteors seen / Edin New Phil Jour 31/301 / Quakes at Charleston, S.C. [I; 350. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (April-October 1841) 259-309; at 301.]


1811 Sept 11 / Tornado / Charleston, S.C. / Finley's Report. [I; 351. Finley, 3.]


1811 Oct / Etna / Bib, Univ. 11/191. [I; 354. Moricand, Stephano. "Notice sur une Éruption Récente de l'Etna." Bibliothèque Universelle des Sciences, Belles-Lettres, et Arts, Sciences et Arts, 11(1819): 191-199. The Etna volcano.]


1811 Oct 4 / Austria / I. [I; 352. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1811 Oct 5 / Philippines / III. [I; 353. A class III earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1811 Oct 25 / [London Times], 3-d / Comrie / q. [I; 355. "About one o'clock on Sunday afternoon, a smart shock of an earthquake was felt at Comrie, Perthshire, accompanied with a considerable noise." London Times, October 25, 1811, p. 3 c. 4.]


1811 Nov. 9 / [London Times], 3-e / Met / London. [I; 356. "On Thursday night...." London Times, November 9, 1811, p. 3. c. 5.]


1811 Nov 18 / Same as Jan 8, 1812. [I; 357. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (July 1841): 92-12, at 115. "Oxfordshire and neighbouring counties, accompanied by deep rumbling noise, similar to that of a distant discharge of heavy ordnance."]


1811 Nov. 22 / Fireball / New Orleans / BA 60. [I; 358. Greg, 64.]


1811 Nov 23 / Metite / Panganoor / In BA 60 says "Iron-fall? Contains iron and nickel." [I; 359. Greg, 64. The Panganoor aerolite became  a "doubtful stonefall," by 1867, as it was "not iron." Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 415. Abbott, James. "An Account of a remarkable Aerolite, which fell at the village of Manicgaon, near Eidulabad in Khandeesh." Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 13 (1844): 880-886, at 885. "Meteoric stone containing Iron and Nickel, fell at Panganoor in 1811."]


[1811 Nov 30 /] 1811 Dec. 3 / [London Times], 2-d / q. / Portsmouth / Portsea / Gosport. [I; 360. "Saturday morning...." London Times, December 3, 1811, p. 2. c. 4. Mallet, 93. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 53 (1811): pt. 2, 1-170, at 135. The quake occurred on November 30, (and was reported in the Times, on December 3, 1811). "Earthquakes." The Scots Magazine and Edinburgh Literary Miscellany, 74 (1812): 71.]


1811 Dec 16 / 2 a.m. / Qs begin, New Madrid Mission, on Mississippi, 65 miles below mouth of Ohio. / Smithsonian Rept 58/422 / Lasted till 1813. [I; 361. Dudley, Timothy. "The Earthquake of 1811 at New Madrid, Missouri." Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution, 1858, 421-424; at 421-422. Dudley mentions the severest shocks as occurring on February 8th, 1812, (none later). Mallet, 93. Mallet says the disturbance "lasted until 1813." Mitchill, Samuel Latham. "A Detailed Narrative of the Earthquakes which occurred on the 16th day of December, 1811...." Transactions of the Literary And Philosophical Society of New-York, 1 (1815): 281-307. Milne, 700.]


1812:


[1812-1814 / Dec 2. Wrong date. See: 1813 Dec 2, (A; 31).]


1812 / Shocks at Bald Mt., No. Car. / N Y Times, 1874, March 21-1-4 / (N.M.). [I; 362. "A Volcano in North Carolina." New York Times, March 21, 1874, p. 1. c. 4. "One of the oldest citizens, however, says that the shock was not more severe than it was in 1812. We have no reliable information of the emition either of fire or smoke." The story that a volcano had erupted in North Carolina was also recalled in a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to John Adams, on July 9, 1819. Tompkins, Daniel Augustus. History of Mecklenburg County and the City of Charlotte. Charlotte, NC: Observer Printing House, 1903, v. 2, 12. "I deem it to be a very unjustifiable quiz, like that of the volcano, so minutely related to us having broken out in North Carolina, some half dozen years ago, in that part of the country, and perhaps in that very county of Mecklenburg, for I do not remember its precise locality." Tompkins notes: "The story was of a volcano in Buncombe county."]


1812 Jan 6 / Q, New Madridtook place after a long series of very heavy rains such as had never been known there before. / Am. J. Sci. 3/20 / See Dec. 16, 1811. [I; 363. Bringier, L. "Notices of the Geology...." American Journal of Science, 3 (1821): 15-46; at 20, "...took place after a long succession of very heavy rains, such as had never been seen before in that country." MacFarlane, James. "The earthquake at New Madrid, Mo., in 1811, probably not an earthquake." Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 32 (1883): 247-248. "American Association for the Advancement of Science." Science, s. 1 v. 2 (September 7, 1883): 314-339, at 324, c.v. "The 'earthquake' at New Madrid, Mo., in 1811, probably not an earthquake." MacFarlane argued that the phenomena were due to subsidences, such as caused by sinkholes and landslips, and that "earthquakes do not occur so far from the seashore."]


1812 Jan 17 / Sudermanie / shocks / cloudless sky but a thick fog / C.R. 17-617. [I; 365. Perrey, Alexis. "Nouvelles recherches sur les tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, de 1801 à juin 1843." Comptes Rendus, 17 (September 25, 1843): 608-625, at 617.]


1812 Jan 18 / Shock and sound like discharging cannon / Edin N. 31/115 / Oxfordshire and neighboring. [I; 364. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (July 1841): 92-122; at 115.]


1812 Jan 27 / (q) / [London Times], 3-d / Oxfordshire / Telsworth / Islip / Blechingdon / Radley / Wolvercott. [I; 366. "On Saturday...." London Times, January 27, 1812, p. 3 c. 4.]


1812 Jan 28 / Carlsruhe / Fireball / BA, 60. [I; 367. Greg, 64.]


1812 Jan 30 / Louisville / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 368. Greg, 64.]


1812 Feb 8 / Severest of New Madrid q's / Smithsonian Rept. 58/422. [I; 369. Dudley, Timothy. "The Earthquake of 1811 at New Madrid, Missouri." Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution, 1858, 421-424; at 422.]


1812 Feb. 9 / "Moodus" sounds / East Haddam, Conn. / Am J. Sci 39/339 / (2 explosions). [I; 370. "Earthquake in Connecticut." American Journal of Science, 39 (1840): 335-342, at 339.]


[1812 March 19. Wrong date. See: 1812 March 22, (I; 371). Milne lists a moderate earthquake in France, on this date. Milne, 700.]


[1812 March 22 /] 1812 March 19 / Italy, Rome / I. [I; 371. A class II earthquake. Milne, 700. The correct date for this earthquake is "March 22," (not "March 19").]


1812 March 22 / Rome / 3 a.m. / q and sound like thunder / BA 54. [I; 372. Mallet, 97.]


1812 March 22 and etc. / Caraccas / q / Not a drop of rain had fallen for 5 months. / (BA 54). [I; 373. Mallet, 97.]


1812 March 26 / 4 p.m. / Great q. / Caraccas / Gents Mag 82/1/581 / Holy Thursday / crowds worshipping / also La Guayra in ruins. [I; 374. "Abstract of Foreign Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 82 pt.1 (June 1812): 578-581, at 581.]


1812 March 26 / q / Caraccas / Quar Jour Royal Inst 2-400 / For 5 months no rain had fallen. 20,000 perished in Venezuela. Q's continued days. / As late as October a violent shock. [I; 375. Faxar, Palacio. "An Account of the Earthquake of Caraccas." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 2 (1817): 400-403.]


1812 March 26 / In following Dec, not ceased. / An Reg. 1813-508 / BA '11. [I; 376. "Account of the late Earthquake at the Caraccas." Annual Register, 55 (1813): 508. Milne, 700.]


1812 Ap. / No q's in BA '11. [I; 378. Milne, 700. Tho Milne does not list any destructive earthquake in April of 1812, the class III earthquake in Venezuela and Colombia is recorded for March 26th, 1812.]


1812 April 5 / Especially violent at Caraccas. / See March 26. [I; 377. Mallet, 98.]


1812 Ap. 10 / (Stones) / Dordogne / Perigueux / globe of fire seemed size of moon to the south of P. / Bib Brit 50/62 / ab. 8 p.m. / and Toulouse / Detonations heard and stones fell / See p. 159. / BA '60 / Great fall / L'Année Sci 4/19. [I; 379. "Mélanges." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts, 50 (1812): 62-67. "L'aérolithe de Montrejeau." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 4 (1860): 16-21, at 19.  Greg, 64. Fletcher, 99. This is the Toulouse (Grenade) meteorite.]


1812 Ap 13 or 15 / (F) = 15th / Erxleben, Saxony / 4 p.m. / Stone, 4 1/2 pounds, fell / BA '60. [I; 380. Fletcher, 99. Greg, 64. This is the Erxleben meteorite.]


1812 Ap. 26 / Several thousand meteoric stones in Normandy / Mag Nat Hist 7-302 /  ? / This near [?] Jonzac. [I; 381. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 301-302. Clarke gives the date as 1812, but Fort may be questioning if this may be near the meteorite fall at Jonzac on June 13, 1819. "Notices des Séances...." Bibliothèque Universelle des Sciences, Belles-Lettres, et Arts, Sciences et Arts, 15 (1820): 307-311, at 311. Jonzac is not near Normandy; it is close to La Rochelle and the Bay of Biscay.]


1812 Ap. 30 / Eruption / St. Vincents / European Magazine 62-66 / Also at Martinique at M. continued into June. [I; 385. "Foreign Intelligence." European Magazine, and London Review. , 62 (July 1812): 65-66, at 66. The Soufrière St. Vincent volcano.]


1812 (May 1) / [London Times]. June 23-3-d / 24-3-d / 26-3-d / 30-3-c / Volc. / St. Vincent's / See q-drought, Venezuela, U.S. Col., March 22. See if rains. [I; 382. "London, Tuesday, June 23, 1812." London Times, June 23, 1812, p. 3 c. 4. "Extract of a letter from St. Vincent...." London Times, June 24 p. 3 c. 4. "Volcano at St. Vincent's." London Times, June 26, 1812, p. 3. c. 4. "Description of the Eruption of the Soufriere Mountain...." London Times, June 30, 1812, p. 3 c. 3-4. The Soufrière St. Vincent volcano.]


1812 May 1 / Ac to Schomburgk, ashes fell 500 to 600 miles to the east (windward) of Barbadoes / Not learn till the 6th that it was an eruption upon St. Vincent. [I; 383. Schomburgk, Robert Hermann. The History of Barbadoes. London: Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1848, 71-72. The Soufrière St. Vincent volcano.]


1812 May 1 / Schomburgk's Hist of Barbadoes, p. 69 / Black rain and detonations / meteors or globes or fire and a glare in the sky "resembling the Aurora Borealis" / large flocks of birds / "sand and ashes." [I; 384. Schomburgk, Robert Hermann. The History of Barbadoes. London: Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1848, 69-72.]


1812 May 1 / New / Zurcher says that May 1, 1812, detonations heard at Barbadoes and ashes fell. / Volc at St. Vincents / 106 [?]. [I; 386. Zurcher, Frédéric, & Margollé, Elie. Meteors, Aërolites, Storms, and Atmospheric Phenomena. New York: C. Scribner, 1876, 241-243. The Soufrière St. Vincent volcano.]


1812 May 1 / Distance phe / "The Phenomenon at Barbadoes" / Phil Mag 40/71 / About one o'clock in the morning "a very heavy and quick firing" was heard. The Governor hastened to take charge of the garrison, suspecting that a naval battle between French and English vessels was occurring. But in the morning the sun rose eclipsed by vast dusky blue clouds. Darkness increased. At 8 o'clock in the morning darkness was intense. A substance like "the dust of wood-ashes" fell from the sky, but in greater accumulations. Was like powdered rotten-stone. The inhabitants who ventured out carried lanterns. [I; 387.1, 387.2, 387.3. "The Late Phænomenon at Barbadoes." Philosophical Magazine, 40 (1812): 71-76.]


1812 May 1 / (2) / See Phil Mag., 40-66 / that it was St. Vincent volc / The writer of the letter preceding had no more knowledge of what it was all about than had the people of Montreal, Australia, etc. Being in a volcanic region, he hoped it was from a West Indian volcano and not of unknowable origin. [I; 388.1, 388.2. "Description of the Eruption of Souffrier Mountain...." Philosophical Magazine, 40 (1812): 67-71. The Soufrière St. Vincent volcano.]


1812 May 1 / Neath / Gloucestershire / shock and sound like heavy artillery / Edin N31/115. [I; 389. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 115. Milne, 700.]


1812 May 1 / Distant from phe / 6:20 p.m. / Gloucestershire / noise like thunder and q. / BA 54-98 / Gentleman's Mag. 82/1/479. [I; 390. Mallet, 98; Mallet cites the Gentleman's  Magazine as his source, but says "noise like thunder." "Country News." Gentleman's Magazine, 82 pt.1 (May 1812): 479-480, at 479. In the Gentleman's Magazine, it is described as "the report of a large piece of ordnance."]


1812 May 2 / Nantes, France / I. [I; 391. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1812 May 10 /  Mercury / infer. conj / (Al). [I; 392. Inferior conjunction of Mercury. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1812, 52.]


1812 May 13 / Germany, near Cologne / I. [I; 393. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1812 May 24 / Venus / Gr Elong / (Al). [I; 394. Greatest elongation of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1812, 52.]


1812 June 12 / N.Y. Sun, 1911, Nov. 19-5-4 / Margaret Lyall, of Denniland, 3 miles from Montrose (Scotland?), fell asleep June 12 and did not wake up for 2 days. Again on July 1 and slept till Aug 8. [A; 29. "Remarkable Sleepers." New York Sun, November 19, 1911, sect. 3 p. 5 c. 4. Brewster, James. "Account of the Remarkable Case of Margaret Lyall, who Continued in a State of Sleep Nearly Six Weeks." Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 8 (1818): 249-257. Brewster, James. "Account of the Remarkable Case of Margaret Lyall, who Continued in a State of Sleep Nearly Six Weeks." Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, 1 (April, 1817): 61-64, (a reprint of the former article). Margaret Lyall, (21 years-old), worked as a servant at Dunninald, in Craig, Angus, Scotland, (south of Montrose). She first slept, (following a nosebleed), from June 27th until June 30th, 1815. On the morning of July 1st, she was again found in a profound state of sleep, which continued until August 8th. Twice afterwards, on September 27th and on October 11th, she was found in a profound sleep, which lasted about 50 hours. On all of these occasions, she was brought to her father's house, nearby, until she had recovered. On September 21st, 1816, she committed suicide, after showing signs of great depression and possibly symptoms that had preceded her profound sleeps.]


1812 June 18 / Oxfordshire and around / q and sound like gunfire / Gent's Mag 82/1/80. [I; 395. "Country News." Gentleman's Magazine, 82 pt.1 (January 1812): 79-81, at 80. "It was accompanied with a deep rumbling noise, similar to a discharge of heavy ordnance. In some places this noise was heard for upwards of ten minutes."]


1812 June 23 or 24 / Tidal wave /Marseilles / BA 54. [I; 396. Mallet, 98. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 54 (1812): 1-186, at 88, (as June 24).]


1812 July 5 / 8 a.m. / q in mist and rain at E. Haddam / BA 54. [I; 397. Mallet, 99.]


1812 July 5 / "Moodus" soundsE. Haddam, Conn. / Am. J. Sci 39/330 / one explosion. [I; 398. "Earthquake in Connecticut, &c." American Journal of Science, 39 (1840): 335-342, at 339.]


1812 July 6 / [London Times]. 2-e / Vesuvius. [I; 399. "Naples, June 15." London Times, July 6, 1812, p. 2. c. 5.]


1812 July 17 / Germany / I. [I; 400. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1812 Aug. 1 / 11 h. / Venus / Infer conjunction / (Al). [I; 401. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1812, 88.]


1812 Aug 5 / Chantonnay, Vendée, France / Metite / (F). [I; 402. Fletcher, 99. This is the Chantonnay meteorite. Greg, 64.]


1812 Sept 5-6 / Borodino, near Moscow, Russia / Metite / (F). [I; 403. Fletcher, 99. The Borodino meteorite fell two days before the Battle of Borodino, (on September 5), was picked up by a Russian sentry. http://www.meteorites.ru/menu/description-e/borodino-e.html ]


1812 Sept 11 / Florence / Sept 15 / Naples / q's / BA '11. [I; 404. Two class I earthquakes. Milne, 700.]


1812 Sept. 13 / Segovia / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 405. Greg, 64.]


1812 Sept 15 / Ischia and Naples., Italy / I. [I; 406. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700. Fort notes the wrong location for this date, copying "Florence," when the correct locations were Ischia and Naples. See: 1812 Sept 11, (I; 404).]


1812 Sept 22 / [London Times]. 3-d / q / Shenton and Hoverington. [I; 407. "A slight shock of an earthquake...." London Times, September 22, 1812, p. 3 c. 4.]


1812 Oct 8 / California / III. [I; 408. A class II to III earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1812 Oct 21 / California / II. [I; 409. A class II earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1812 Oct. 25 / Treviso, Italy / I. [I; 410. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1812 Oct. 27 / A fresh eruption at Etna / Gents Mag 82/1/77. [I; 411. "Abstract of Foreign Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 82 pt.1 (January 1812): 76-79, at 77. The Etna volcano.]


1812 Oct 28 / Soldiers / C 209. [A; 30. "Leeds.Extraordinary phenomena." Edinburgh Annual Register, 5 pt. 2 (1812): 124-127.]


1812 November / The extreme cold wave that destroyed Napoleon's army in retreat from Moscow. [I; 412.]


1812 Nov / q nd phe / Audubon's account of the New Madrid q as he saw and felt in Kentucky / Science, N.S., 21-748 / He was jogging along on horseback when he saw "a sudden and strange darkness rising from the western horizon." He had gone about a mile when he heard what he thought was the distant rumbling of a violent tornado. Then came severe shocks, "The fearful convulsion, however, lasted only a few minutes, and the heavens again brightened as quickly as they had become obscured."— Continued shocks almost every day. / Began Dec 16, 1811. [I; 413.1, 413.2, 413.3. Fuller, M.L. "Audubon's Account of the New Madrid Earthquake." Science, n.s., 21 (May 12, 1905): 748-749.]


1812 Nov. 11 / Jamaica, B.W.I. / II. [I; 414. A class II earthquake. Milne, 700.]


[1812 Nov. 12 /] 1813 Nov. 12 / qs / Jamaica / "Three tremendous concussions. / Gent's Mag 83/1/80. [I; 463. "Abstract of Foreign Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 83 pt. 1 (January 1813): 75-80, at 80.]


1812 Nov. 15 / Carlsruhe and Vienna / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 415. Greg, 64.]


1812 Nov. 25 / [London Times], 3-c / q at Cannonore / Eng? [I; 416. "Extract of a letter from Calcutta, of March 13." London Times, November 25, 1812, p. 3 c. 3. "An earthquake was experienced at Cannanore about the 17th of last month. It was said in one of the Madras papers, that it was a severe gust of wind, by which the mess-room there was thrown down, and Lieut. Pearson killed; but I since understand, that the accident was occasioned by an earthquake, attended by violent wind. Almost every house in Cannanore is more or less injured, the walls of many being rent, and some of them unroofed."

"Letters from Cannanore, dated the 13th Ult.mention that a heavy gale...." Madras Courier, March 3, 1912, p. 1 c. 2. "Madras." Madras Courier, March 3, 1812, p. 10 c. 4. "A shock of an Earthquake...." Madras Courier, March 3, 1812, p. 10 c. 3.  The fatal wind was reported as having occurred on February 13; the lieutenant's death, (on the same day), was noted on February 18; an earthquake at Dinapore was reported on February 12; an earthquake at Calcutta was noted early on February 17, 1812; but, no earthquake was reported to coincide with this "violent squall of wind." Cannanore, (or, now, Kannur) is in the state of Kerala, India. Mallet does not record an earthquake in India, in February of 1812.]


1812 Dec 7 / Japan / III. [I; 417. A class III earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1812 Dec 8 / Alaska / III / California / I. [I; 418. A class III earthquake, (Alaska), and a class I earthquake, (California). Milne, 700.]


1812 Dec 21 / California / I. [I; 419. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1813:


1813 Jan 27 / Brünn / det met / BA 67/415. [I; 420. Greg, 64. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 415.]


1813 Feb 1 and 2 / Roumania / I. [I; 421. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1813 March 8 / Stonefall / ac to Baumhauer / BA '60. [I; 422. Greg, 65.]


1813 March 14 / Fall was at Idria, Carniola, ac to Q. J. Roy. Inst. 27-431. [I; 423. "Earthy Powder which fell at Idria, in Carniola." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 27 (1829): 431.]


1813 March 14 / See March 14, 1823. [I; 424. See: 1823 March 14 - 15, (I; 1043).]


1813 March 14 / Story of frightened people in churches, etc. Date verified. / An Soc Met de France. 1903-73. [I; 425. Chauveau, Amyr Benjamin. "Notes sur les Chutes de Poussières." Annuaire de la Société Météorologique de France, 51 (May 1903): 69-82, at 73-75. "Meteorite." Edinburgh Encyclopaedia. "First American Edition." Philadelphia: Joseph and Edward Parker, 1832, v. 13, 126-158, at 151. "The alarmed inhabitants, conceiving that the end of the world was at hand, flocked to the churches."]


1813 March 14 / Cutro, Calabria / Stone fell. / Phil Mag., 4/8/459. [I; 426. Greg, Robert Philips. "Observations on Meteorolites...." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 8 (1854): 329-342, 449-463, at 459.]


1813 March 14 / Same story as March 14, 1818. [I; 427.]


[1813 March 14 /] 1818 March 14 / Same story as March 14, 1813. [I; 648.]


[1813 March 14 /] 1818 March 14 / (+) / Volc elsewhere / 2:30 p.m. / Clouds gathered, though little wind, and began to shut off sunlight, giving the sun the appearance of fireat 4 p.m., total obscurity and the people crowded to church to pray. The the sky looked fiery and detonations, or thunder was heard, and brilliant lights or lightning were seen. Great drops of red liquid began to fall. About nightfall this fall and the sounds and lights or th. and lightning ceased. / Said that this fall not only in Calabria but in the Abbruzes. Full particulars of Chemic Analysis. / Jour de. Physique 86/205. [I; 646.1, 646.2, 646.3. Sementini, Luigi; (Gaultier de Gaultier, translator). "Analyse d'une terre rouge tombée avec la pluie dans le royaune de Naples et dans les deux Calabres." Journal de Physique, de Chimie, d'Histoire Naturelle et des Arts, s. 2 v. 86 (1818): 205-209. This article gives the date of the fall as "14 mars 1818"; but, the original article by Sementini in the Giornale di Fisica gives the date as "14 Marzo 1813." Sementini, Luigi. "Analyse d'une terre rouge tombée avec la pluie dans le royaune de Naples et dans les deux Calabres." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 8 (1818): 206-209. This translation gives the date as "14 de mars 1813." Sementini, Luigi. "Di una terra rossa caduta insieme alla pioggia nel Regno di Napoli, e nelle Calabrie." Giornale di Fisica, Chimica, Storia Naturale, Medicina ed Arti, s. 2 v. 1 (1818): 28-32.]


[1813 March 14 /] 1818 March 14 / Story confirmed for this date / Q. Jour. Roy Inst. 1818. [I; 647. "Rain of Earthy Matter." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 5 (1818): 370-371.]


[1813 March 14 /] 1818 Mar. 14 / Naples / carbonaceous substance / (D-75). ** [I; 649. The note copies information from page 75 of The Book of the Damned. "Red Rain." American Journal of Science, 1 (1818-1819): 309-10. There is no mention of sand falling with the substance in this article. The date is given as "March 14, 1818," but the analysis is identical with the original article by Sementini in the Giornale di Fisica..., (which describes the substance as "polvere rossa," being a red powder or dust).]


1813 March 14 / Red powder at Carniola. "Boiling water separated a yellow vegetable gummy matter." / Mag. Nat. Hist 7-304. [I; 428. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 303-304. "Analyse d'une Poussière tombée le 14 mars 1813, à Idria en Carniole." Annales des Mines, s. 2 v. 5 (1829): 282-283.]


1813 March 14 / Idria, in Carniola / abundant fall of red snow / C.R. 15/583. [I; 429. Dufrénoy. "Examen chinique et microscopique d'une poudre recueille à Amphissa, en Grèce, après une pluie lente et douce." Comptes Rendus, 15 (September 19, 1842): 580-584, at 583-584. Vauquelin, Louis Nicolas. "Analyse d'une poussière tombée, le 14 mars 1813, à Idria en Carniole."  Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 39 (1828): 438-442.]


1813 March 14 / This dust analyzed and chemist astonished at high percentage (24%) of organic matter, and of "titane" 3.75% (look this up). A very rare metal upon this earth. / An. Soc. Met de France. 1903-74. [I; 430. Chauveau, Amyr Benjamin. "Notes sur les Chutes de Poussières." Annuaire de la Société Météorologique de France, 51 (May 1903): 69-82, at 74. "Titane" mentioned in this article was the name used for titanium.]


1813 March 14 / Gerace, Calabria / ab. 2:15 p.. / Sun obscuredsky color of fire. Deeper darkness and frightened people crowding into the cathedral. Deep sounds in the sky and a rain of bloodnevertheless said that the substance was pale yellow. / Bib Brit 55/356. [I; 431. Sementini, Luigi. "Relatione del Fenomeno, etc." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts, 55 (April 1814): 356-359. For other accounts: "Correspondance." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts, 54 (October 1813): 179-183.]


1813 March 14-15 / night of / Red rainCalabria / yellow snow and hailTuscany / D-29 / Brownish-yellow snowBologna / Q. Jour Roy Inst 7/189 /Strong in veg or animal matter. [I; 432. The note copies information from page 29 of The Book of the Damned. "A very remarkable phenomenon...." Annals of Philosophy, 9 (1817): 84-85. "Shower of red earth in Italy." Annals of Philosophy, 11 (1818): 466-467. "Shower of red earth in Italy." Blackwood's Magazine, 3 (June,  1818): 338-339. "On Coloured Snow and Rain." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 7 (1819): 189-190. Fournet, Joseph Jean Baptiste Xavier. "Sur les Pluies de Terre Observées Depuis Quel-ques Années dans le Bassin du Rhone." Mémoires de l'Académie des sciences, belles-lettres et arts de Lyon. Classe des Sciences, s. 2 v. 13 (1863): 185-245, at 214.]


1813 March 21 / 6:20 a.m. / Shock at Exmouth / Gent's Mag 83/1/278. [I; 433. "Country News." Gentleman's Magazine, 83 pt. 1 (March 1813): 278-279, at 278.]


1813 March 21 / ab. 10 p.m. / Met. / New Haven / size of moon / A.J.S. 13/36. [I; 434. Dwight, S.E. "Notice of a Meteoric Fire Ball." American Journal of Science, 13 (1827): 35-37.]


1813 March 30 / q. / Peru / II [Great] / BA 1911-46. [I; 435. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 46.]


[1813 March 30 /] 1806 March 30  Great earthquake in Peru. BA 1911-46. [I; 177. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 46.]


[1813 Ap. 3. Wrong date. See: 1814 Ap. 3, (I; 436).]


1813 Ap. 20 / 9:45 p.m. / W by N to E by S. at New Haven, Conn / great detonating meteor / Niles' Weekly Register, Sept 25. [I; 437. "Meteor." Niles' Weekly Register, 5 (September 25, 1813): 64. The original note says "10:15 p.m."; but, it was "...about 15 minutes before 10 o'clock," or 9:45 P.M.]


1813 May to Dec / Vesuvius. [I; 438. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1813 May 30 / Peru / I or II. [I; 439. A class I or class II earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1813 July 28 / Great rain and violent q / Jamaica / C.R. 16-1290 / BA 54. [I; 440. Perrey, Alexis. "Note historique sur les tremblements de terre des Antilles." Comptes Rendus, 16 (1843): 1283-1303, at 1290. Mallet, 101.]


1813 July 30 / Op Mars / (Al). [I; 441. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1813, 76.]


1813 July 31 / Tottenham / starlit night / flashes of light alo[?] t. storm in Hastings and in France / Timbs Y.B. 1853-272. [I; 442. "Sheet Lightning." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1853, 271-272.]


1813 July 31 / A new star in Capricornus reported from Cincinnati. / Niles' Weekly Register, Aug. 21 / Issue Aug 28, correspondent writes that was the planet Mars then in opposition. / Capricorn in zodiac? [I; 443. Stubbs, Robert. "Cincinnati, July 31." Niles' Weekly Register, 4 (August 21, 1813): 403. "The New Star." Niles' Weekly Register, 4 (August 28, 1813): 424.]


1813 August / Icicles / Near the pass of Maya in the Pyrenees, masses of ice size of hen's egg—of transparent—on them were "icicles about the length and thickness of the prong of a common silver fork." / Edin Phil Jour 9/195. [I; 447. Stewart, R.S. "Remarkable Hail-shower." Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, 9 (1823): 194-195.]


1813 August / Vesuvius active / 26th, gigantic column of flame / also following night. / See Dec. / Q J R. Inst 2-28. [I; 448. Granville, Augustus Bozzi. "A Report on a Memoir by Signor Monticelli...." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 2 (1817): 25-34, at 28. See: 1813 Dec 25, 26, (I; 467).]


1813 Aug 6, 7 / Illyria and "Carinthie" / tremendous rainstorm and qs / C.R. 17-619. [I; 444. Perrey, Alexis. "Nouvelles recherches sur les tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, de 1801 à juin 1843." Comptes Rendus, 17 (September 25, 1843): 608-625, at 619.]


1813 Aug 7 / 1 a.m. / Laybach / q and heavy rain / BA 54. [I; 445. Mallet, 101.]


1813 Aug 7 / q and rain / Laybach / shocks / "Heavy rain fell at the moment of the shocks." / BA '54. [I; 445.1. Mallet, 101.]


1813 Aug 22 / 2 shocks at Irkutsk / B Assoc '54/101. [I; 446. Mallet, 101.]


1813 Aug 27-29 / Extraordinary spots on the sun noted in English and American papers. / Gent's Mag. 1815/1/639. [I; 449. "Abstract of Foreign Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 85 pt. 1 (1815): 639. This oblique piece of British propaganda is copied from the London Times. "Extraordinary Phenomenon in the Sun." London Times, June 21, 1815, p. 3 c. 4. This article alludes to images of a man, skeleton, and flags seen upon the Sun's disc, between August 27 and 29, 1813; but, Captain John Hayes and the crew of HMS Majestic were undoubtedly more busily engaged with their capture of the Spanish schooner Euphemia, at Boston Bay, on the 27th, and during their return to Halifax, Nova Scotia, to watch this alleged illusion. See: 1815 June 21, (I; 528).]


1813 Aug or Sept / Malpas, Chesire / Metite / BA '60. [I; 450. Greg, 65. "Fall of Stones from the Atmosphere, near Chester." Annals of Philosophy, 2 (November 1813): 396-397. "Last week, having occasion to go to Malpas (a village 15 miles from Chester), I witnessed a very singular phenomenon. About one o'clock in the day, from the great heat and the calmness of the air, I apprehended a thunder-storm, and supposed my apprehensions were going to be realised, when I beheld a bright cloud, out of which fell some large stones, which were soft and intensely hot at first, but afterwards acquired considerable hardness." This account of this fall was taken from a provincial newspaper, according to a letter on September 15. "To the Editor of the Chester Courant." Chester Courant, August 17, 1813, p. 3 c. 4. "To the Editor of the Chester Courant." Chester Courant, August 31, 1813, p. 4 c.1-2.]


[1813 Aug or Sept /] 1815 summer / Stones / Malpas / near Chester / An. Phil., Nov. 1813 / See some years before. / Look this up. [I; 530. "Fall of Stones from the Atmosphere, near Chester." Annals of Philosophy, 2 (November 1813): 396-397.]


1813 Sept to Oct / q's / China / I. [I; 451. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1813 Sept 2 / Fireball / Berne / BA 60. [I; 452. Greg, 65.]


1813 Sept 10 / Met-ite / Adare, Limerick, Ireland / L.T., Nov. 14, 1886 / (F). An de Chimie 2/31/260 / 9 a.m. / (ab. 9 a.m. / Gent's Mag. 83/2/390). [I; 453. "Meteors and Meteorites." London Times, November 14, 1886, p. 4 c. 2-6. Fletcher, 99. This is the Limerick meteorite. Greg, 65. Chladni, Ernst Florens Friedrich. "Nouveau Catalogue des chutes de pierres ou de fer; de poussières ou de substances molles, sèches ou humides, suivant l'ordre chronologique."Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 31 (1826): 253-269, at 260. "Ireland." Gentleman's Magazine, 83 pt. 2 (October 1813): 390, at "Sept. 10." The Limerick meteorite is "stated to have fallen from a thunder cloud."]


1813 Sept 21 / 8:40 a.m. / Forli, Italy / q—"The sun appeared with a pale colour." BA 54. [I; 454. Mallet, 102. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1813 Sept 22 / 1:45 a.m. / shocks / Grisons. / during th. storm / BA '54. [I; 455. Mallet, 102.]


1813 Sept 24 / evening / shock / W. to E. / Stamford, etc., England / Gent's Mag, 83/2/391 / LT, Oct 4-3-d. [I; 456. "Country News." Gentleman's Magazine, 83 pt. 2 (October 1813): 390-391, at 391. "A shock of an earthquake...." London Times, October 4, 1813, p. 3. c. 4.]


[1813 Sept 24 /] 1813 Oct 4 / [London Times], 3-d / Stamford, etc. / q's. [I; 457. "A shock of an earthquake...." London Times, October 4, 1813, p. 3. c. 4.]


1813 Oct 20 / Swabia / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 458. Greg, 65.]


1813 Nov. 8 / England—a light considered auroral. In the evening, many shooting stars. / Mag Pop. Sci 3/61. [I; 459. "The November-Asteroids." Magazine of Popular Science, 3 (1837): 56-62, at 61.]


1813 Nov. 8 / Woodfort / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 460. Greg, 65.]


1813 Nov. 10 / Sunderland / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 461. Greg, 65.]


1813 Nov. 10 / Bishopwearmouth / Stream of light in sky / Annals of Phil. 1813-456. [I; 462. Renney, Robert. "Account of a luminous Meteor see at Sunderland." Annals of Philosophy, 2 (December 1813): 456-457.]


[1813 Nov. 12. Wrong date. See: 1812 Nov. 12, (I; 463).]


1813 Dec / Epirus / great q and th. storm / BA 54. [I; 465. Mallet, 102.]


1813 Dec / q's in Greece / BA '11. [I; 466. A class II earthquake. Milne, 700.]


[1813 Dec 2 /] 1812-[18]14 / Dec 2 / Mystery of War of 1812. [A; 31. Newspaper clipping. ("Mystery of War of 1812." Unidentified source, via the "Premier Syndicate": "The mystery of the 'blue lights,' which appeared on the shores of New London harbor, Conn., on the night of December 2, when Commodore Decatur planned to run the British blockade, has never been solved." Decatur planned to sail with his squadron from New London on the night of December 12th, (1813); but, "blue lights" were seen along the shore on Groton Heights and toward New London light, and Decatur believed that British agents were alerting the British ships of his preparations to escape their blockade. Another attempt on January 9th, (1814), was also thwarted, when "blue lights" were again seen. Decatur and others believed traitors and spies were responsible for the "blue lights." Bacon, Edward Woolsey. "New London and the War of 1812." Records and Papers of the New London County Historical Society, 1 (1890): 94-109, at 102 and 104. On December 20th, 1813, Decatur wrote to the Secretary of the Navy William Jones: "In the course of the evening two blue lights were burnt on both points of the harbor's mouth, as signals and otherwise instantaneous information of our movements. Great but unsuccessful exertions have been made to detect those who communicate with the enemy by signal."  In the Connecticut Gazette of January 12th, 1814: "On Sunday night, about 10 o'clock, blue lights were again exhibited on both sides of the river, and were answered by all the British ships. At this time a sloop was passing called the Trumbull. The lights were distinctly seen by a number of military and naval officers." Two of Decatur's ships, the United States and the Macedonian, remained in New London until the end of the war. “Blue Lights!” Pittsfield Sun, (Massachusetts), March 24, 1814, p. 2 c. 4. “From the N. Y. National Advocate, March 15.” “We have conversed with a gentleman who left New-London on Saturday last he informed us, that on Thursday evening preceding there was, at that place, a considerable storm of snow and rain; and the appearance of the weather being favorable for our squadron to put to sea, Commodore Decatur issued an order, requiring all his officers on shore to repair, without delay, on board their respective vessels.Shortly after Blue Lights were thrown up, like rockets, from Long-Point, and distinctly seen by the officers at Fort Trumbull, and by the officers and men on board the look, out boats.The gentleman from whom we received this information plainly saw the Lights, and states, that they were answered by three heavy guns from the ships of the enemy, at interval of about ten minutes; that he was further informed, by an officer from Fort Trumbull, that the lights were continued during the whole night.” “Reminiscence of the Last WarBlue Lights.” United States Gazette, (Philadelphia), December 26, 1832, p. 1 c. 6. “To the editor of the Boston Atlas.” National Gazette, (Philadelphia), December 22, 1832, p. 2 c. 4. “In your paper of Saturday last you made some remarks on the far-famed blue lights of Connecticut.” “The writer being at Valparaiso some eleven or twelve years ago, and had the honor of dining more than once with Commodore Hardy, in company with Captain Ridgely of the Constellation. The conversation of course sometimes turned on the occurrences of the last war. Commodore Hardy took occasion to declare that he never heard or knew any thing of the blue lights until he read of them in the American papers. Capt. Ridgely repeated this conversation on all proper occasions.Comment is unnecessary.” “Com. Hardy commanded the English squadron off New London at that time, and had there been any such contrivance to acquaint him with the contemplated escape of Decatur, he could not have been ignorant of it.”]


1813 Dec. 13 / Aerolite—Viborg, in Finland / No nickel in it / A. J. Sci 6/397. (F) / For another see June 13, 1822 / Oct 21, 1901. [I; 464. "Composition of Meteoric Stones." American Journal of Science, 6 (1823): 397. Fletcher, 99. This is the Luotolaks meteorite. Greg, 65. See: 1822 June 13, (I; 954), and, 1901 Oct 21, (VII: 917 & 918).]


1813 Dec 25, 26 / Great eruption / Vesuvius / Q J. Roy Inst 2-29. [I; 467. Granville, Augustus Bozzi. "A Report on a Memoir by Signor Monticelli...." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 2 (1817): 25-34, at 29-32.]


1813 Dec 28 / 4 p.m. / q / East Haddam / during rain / BA 54. [I; 468. Mallet, 102. "The weather was wet."]


1813 Dec 28 / one explosion / Moodus sounds like explosions. / East Haddam, Conn. / Am. J. Sci 39/339. [I; 469. "Earthquake in Connecticut, &c." American Journal of Science, 39 (1840): 335-342, at 339.]


1814:


1814 / Madras, India / Metite / (F). [I; 470. Fletcher, 99. This is the Gurram Konda meteorite.]


1814 / Auroras / G. and Britain / Am J. Sci 14-96. [I; 471. "Notice of the late Aurora Borealis...." American Journal of Science, 14 (1828): 91-98, at 96.]


1814 / Frogs / near Amiens, France / M.W.R. 45/221. [I; 472. McAtee, Waldo L. "Showers of Organic Matter." Monthly Weather Review, 45 (May 1917): 217-224, at 221. "In August, 1814, after several weeks of drought and heat, a storm broke one Sunday about 3:30 p.m., upon the village of Fremon, a quarter league from Amiens. This storm was preceded by bursts of wind so violent that they shook the church and frightened the congregation. While traversing the space separating the church from presbytery, we were soaked, but what surprised me was to be struck on my person and my clothing by small frogs.... On arriving at the presbytery, we found the floor of one of the rooms in which a window facing the storm had been left open covered with water and frogs."]


1814 / Dry fog / extreme darkness / London and Dublin / Chambers' Jour 9-308. [I; 473. "Dry Fogs." Chambers' Edinburgh Journal, n.s., 9 (1848): 307-310, at 308.]


1814 Jan 12 / q / China / I. [I; 474. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1814 Jan 15 / [London Times], 2-e / Vesuvius. [I; 475. "Naples, Dec. 26." London Times, January 15, 1814, p. 2 c. 5.]


1814 Jan 21 / (Fr) / 7:35 a.m. / Alencon (Orne) / q / BA '54. [I; 476. Mallet, 103.]


1814 Jan 27 / Zurich / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 477. Greg, 65.]


1814 Jan 28 / [London Times]. 4-c / Knill Court / Harpton / Norton / Old Radnor / q. [I; 478. "We have heard that a convulsion of the earth...." London Times, January 28, 1814, p. 4. c. 3. "At Harpton, a severe storm of thunder and lightning was experienced the same night, and at the same time."]


1814 Feb 1 / (Ref) / Mayon Volc. / Philippines. / Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago / By M.S. Maso. [I; 479. Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


1814 Feb 1-19 / An Reg 1815/510 / Volc / Philippines / 5 towns destroyed / Mayon Volc. / been quiet 13 years / to 10th / Gent's Mag 84/2/641. [I; 480. "Volcano of Albay in the Indian Ocean." Annual Register, 57 (1815): 510-514. "Volcanic Eruption." Gentleman's Magazine, 84 pt. 2 (1814): 641-642.]


1814 Feb. 1 / q. / Peru / I. [I; 481. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1814 Feb. 2 / q. / Philippines (Albay) / I. [I; 482. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1814 Feb 12 / Shower of burnt paper, said from a burning Custom House 5 miles away. It descended from a point higher than the eye could trace. Symons Met 21/147. [I; 483. Wallis, Herbert Sowerby. "Remarkable Showers." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 21 (November 1886): 144-147, at 147.]


1814 Feb 15 / Bachmat, Ekaterinoslav, Russia. / Met. / (F) / BA '60. [I; 484. Fletcher, 99. This is the Bachmut meteorite. Greg, 65; as "Feb. 3."]


1814 March / Vesuvius never ceased from Dec 25, 1813 / Q J Roy Inst 2-33. [I; 485. Granville, Augustus Bozzi. "A Report on a Memoir by Signor Monticelli...." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 2 (1817): 25-34, at 33.]


1814 March 11 / 22h / Venus / Inf conjunction / (Al). [I; 486. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1814, 28.]


1814 Mar. 19 / Fr / La Chatre (Indre) / q preceded by 2 mets / B.A. 54. [I; 487. Mallet, 103.]


1814 Ap. 3 / q fog / q. / Leghorn and Pisa / 3:45 a.m. / "The light of the sun appeared dim during the day." / BA '54. [I; 488. Mallet, 103.]


[1814 Ap. 3 /] 1813 Ap. 3 / q-sun / 3:45 a.m. / "terrible noise" and shock / Leghorn and Pisa / "The light of the sun appeared dim during the day." / BA, 54. [I; 436. Mallet, 103.]


1814 Ap. 3 / Leghorn and Pisa, Italy / q. / I. [I; 489. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1814 Ap. 19 / Fireball / Berlin / [BA 60]. [I; 490. Greg, 65.]


1814 Ap. 28 / Innsbruck, Austria / q. / I. [I; 491. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1814 May 10 / Qs, and a little island appeared in the Sea of Azov. / At 2 p.m., a violent submarine eruption on the coast of Kamchatka. / BA, 54. [I; 492. Mallet, 104. A mud volcano may have been responsible for the "little island" in the Sea of Azov. One such island appeared on September 6, 1799, and was washed away. Reclus, Elisée. Asia. New York: Appleton, v. 1; Asiatic Russia: Caucasia, Aralo-Caspian Basin, Siberia, 1895, 55. “The mud volcanoes of the Taman peninsula seem to have been at one time far more active than at present. They run exactly in the line of the axis or continuation of the parallel ridges, and it was in the same line that a volcanic islet was erupted in 1799 near the town of Temrûk. This mud islet, which was about 1,330 feet in circumference, with an elevation of 13 feet above the sea, soon disappeared, but was replaced in 1814 by a second cone, which remained some time above the surface.”]


1814 June to July / q's / China / I. [I; 493. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1814 June 4 / Hail—13 to 15 inches in diameter in Ohio / Thomson, Met.—p. 180. [I; 494. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 180.]


1814 early in July / St. Lawrence River / fall of dust, etc. / Phil Mag 44/91. [I; 495. "Account of some singular atmospherical Phænomena in the River St. Lawrence in the Beginning of July 1814." Philosophical Magazine, 44 (1814): 91-93.]


1814 July 3 and 4 / night / St. Lawrence River, 20 miles from the Bay of Seven Islands—account by a British Officer of engineers of a great fall of ashes. Toward morning, "the whole atmosphere appeared red and fiery to a wonderful degree." Ashes appeared to be wood ashes. But a det met? ? Phil Mag 44/91. [I; 496.1, 496.2. "Account of some singular atmospherical Phænomena in the River St. Lawrence in the Beginning of July 1814." Philosophical Magazine, 44 (1814): 91-93. No mention is made of any noise nor light of any detonating meteor in this article. Talman, Charles Fitzhugh. "Dark Days and Forest Fires." Scientific American, n.s., 112 (March 6, 1915): 229.]


1814 July 3 or 4 / "Canada / Meteor; detonation; dustfall; or 4th of July? / BA '60-65. [I; 497. Greg, 65.]


1814 July / Editor of Phil Mag. 48/73 writes that a military officer had sent him an account of phe in the Gulf of St Lawrence. The sea was as black as ink and ashes falling upon ships and for 2 days sun could scarcely be seen. [I; 498. "Singular Phænomenon." Philosophical Magazine, 48 (1816): 73.]


1814 July 29 / Geneva / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 499. Greg, 65.]


1814 Aug / BO / letter Institut / at Fremon, near Amiens / frgs / L'Institut 2/354 / Cor told of [them] falling on his clothes. [I; 500. "Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 2 (no. 77; November 1, 1833): 353-354. "Enfin un dernier témoin oculaire d'un fait semblable est M. Duparque. Voici comment le raconte dans sa. lettre: "Au mois d'août 1814, après plusieurs semaines de sécheresse et de chaleur, un orage éclata un dimanche vers trois heures et demie du soir sur le village de Fremon à quatre lieues d'Amiens. Cet orage fut précédé de bourasques si violentes qu'elles ébranlèrent l'église et elfrayèrent les assistans. En traversant, le curé et moi, le clos qui sépare le presbytère de l'église, nous fûmes inondés, mais ce qui me surprit ce fut de recevoir sur ma figure et sur mes vêtemens de petites grenouilles... Un grand nombre de ces petits animaux s'évertuaient sur le sol. En arrivant au presbytère nous trouvâmes le plancher d'une des chambres couvert d'eau et de ces animaux , la fenêtre située dans la direction de l'orage était restée ouverte. Nous ne trouvâmes aucune grenouille dans une autre pièce dont les fenêtres cependant étaient restées ouvertes, mais donnaient dans une direction opposée."]


1814 Aug 3 / In Jour F. Inst 15/408, L. Blesson, Major of Engineers, Berlin, says shot off fireworks from summit of a mountain near Minden. "A number of small red flames were observed around us, below the summit which however speedily extinguishedto be succeeded however by others on the firing of the next rocket. [I; 501.1, 501.2. Blesson, Johann Ludwig Urban. "Observations on the Ignis Fatuus, or Will-with-the-Wisp, Falling Stars, and Thunder Storms." Journal of the Franklin Institute, 15 (1833): 408-412, at 410.]


1814 Aug 3 / Frankfort / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 502. Greg, 65.]


1814 Aug 9, 26 / Vesuvius active / Oct 9, 26, 28, Dec 25—terrific noises / Vesuvius, Phillips, p. 98. [I; 503. Phillips, John. Vesuvius. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1869, 98. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1814 Sept early / (F) / Alais (Sard.) / Loud explosions and a pit formed. / BA '54 / See Sept 15. / See March 15, '06. [I; 504. Mallet, 104.]


1814 Sept 3 / Great q / Irkutsk / BA '11. [I; 505. A class III earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1814 Sept. 5 / Metites / In several communes of Lot et Garonne, great number of stones. / Gent's Mag., 84-2-279. [I; 506. "Abstract of Foreign Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 84 pt. 2 (1814): 277-283, at 279.]


1814 Sept. 5 / See Aug., 1826. / Agen, Lot-et-Garonne, France / Met-ite / Bib Brit 57/80 / (F) / about noon. [I; 507. "Lettre de Mr. de St. Amans au Prof. Pictet, sur une nouvelle chute d'Uranolithes." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts, 57 (September 1814): 80-83. Fletcher, 99. This is the Agen meteorite. Greg, 65. See: 1826 August, (I; 1275).]


1814 Sept 8 / Augsburg / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 508. Greg, 65.]


1814 Sept 11 / Fireball toward S. / Glasgow / BA '60. [I; 509. Greg, 65.]


1814 Oct 27 / (It Piedmont) / (D-287) / Like brick dust / Oneglia, Piedmont / Leisure Hour 16/6 / N.Q. 4-9-327 / Ciet et Terre 5-174 / Eclectic Mag. 68-437 / Vesuvius active. / See Aug 6. [I; 510. The note copies information from page 287 of The Book of the Damned. Dunkin, Edwin. "Colored rain and snow." Leisure Hour, 16 (1867): 5-8. Dunkin, Edwin. "Colored rain and snow." Eclectic Magazine, 68, (n.s. v. 5; April 1867): 435-440, at 437. Piggott, John, Jr. "Black Rain." Notes and Queries, s. 4 v. 9 (April 20, 1872): 327. Piggott only notes this event from Dunkin's article in the Leisure Hour. "Quelques exemples de pluies de poussiìères et d'obscurissements du Soleil." Ciel et Terre, 5 (1884-1885): 173-174. Lavagna, F. "Osservazioni Sopra una pioggia di terra." Giornale di Fisica, Chimica, Storia Naturale, Medicina ed Arti, s. 2 v. 1 (1818): 32-36. Sementini, Luigi. "Analyse d'une terre rouge tombée avec la pluie dans le royaune de Naples et dans les deux Calabres."Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 8 (1818): 206-209, at 208-209. The fall at Onéglia occurred during the night before October 28th. Vesuvius was active thruout 1814, (from 1796 to 1822). Fournet, Joseph Jean Baptiste Xavier. "Sur les Pluies de Terre Observées Depuis Quel-ques Années dans le Bassin du Rhone." Mémoires de l'Académie des sciences, belles-lettres et arts de Lyon. Classe des Sciences, s. 2 v. 13 (1863): 185-245, at 214.]


1814 Nov. 5 / Chail, Allahabad, N.W. Prov, India / (F) / 4:30 p.m. / BA '60. [I; 512. Fletcher, 99. This is the Chail meteorite. Greg, 65.]


1814 Nov 6 / Lyons, etc., preceded by loud explosion. Much rain fell. / BA '54. [I; 511. Mallet, 105.]


1814 Nov 6 / France / Lyons, and from Macon to Vienne / q. / II. [I; 513. A class II earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1814 Nov. 24 / q / China / III. [I; 514. A class III earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1814 Dec. 2 /Peckham, near London / Annals of Phil 5/236 / Writer, walking in open part of the village, suddenly surr. by a great light—nearly equal to daylight, ab 20 to 11 p.m. / Others saw it—no meteor seen, no explosion heard. / Jabez Brown. [I; 515.1, 515.2. Wallis, John. "Notice of a remarkable Meteor which appeared on the 2d of  December, 1814." Annals of Philosophy, 5 (1815): 235-236; "...about 20 min. before 11...." Greg, 65.]


1815:


1815 / q's / Japan / China / [BA] '11. [I; 516. Milne, 700-701.]


1815 / Acad of Sci of St Petersburg received a case containing specimens of stones that fell during a hailstorm at Wilna, of which some hundreds weighed as much as a pound. / Symons Met 17/151 / See 1844. [I; 517. Schwedoff, Theodore. "On the Origin of Hail." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 17 (November 1882): 146-152, at 151. "In 1815 the Academy of Science of St. Petersburg received a case containing specimens of stones that fell during a hailstorm at Wilna, of which some hundreds weighed as much as a pound. It is not known what subsequently became of these stones, at least no traces of them are to be found in the museums of the Academy. Nor is better information to be obtained about the stony masses which accompanied showers of hail at Permj in 1809, at Fatesch in 1844, and at Nachraschinsk in 1833 (Russia)." See: 1844, (II; 705).]


1815 Jan 2 / Kaga, Japan / q. / III. [I; 518. A class III earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1815 Feb 18 / (F) / Metite fell at Dooralla, India. / several pages, BA 1850-118 / 16 or 18 miles from Umballah / ab. noon. [I; 519. Fletcher, 99. This is the Durala meteorite. Greg, 65. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 118-119.]


[1815 April /] 1815 May / volc / Great eruption, island of Sumbawa, about 550 miles from Batavia, Java. / Gent's Mag. 1815/2/558 / Tidal waves and, far at sea, pumice and trunks of trees. At places 250 miles away, darkness until noon. [I; 527. "Abstract of Foreign Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 85 pt. 2 (December 1815): 554-558, at 558. The news was taken from a letter dated May 29. 1815; but, the eruption of the Tambora volcano was in April. See: 1815 Ap. 2 - 17, (I; 520).]


1815 Ap. 2-17 / Volc / Java / C.R. 70-878 / N.M. [I; 520. Backer, 880. The eruptions at the Tambora volcano began in 1812 and culminated in the most powerful volcanic eruptions in recorded history, between April 5 and July 15, 1815.]


1815 Ap. 3 / Met trail for 1/4 hour in zenith / Eng / European Mag. 67/300 / (L). [I; 521. "To the Editor of the European Magazine." European Magazine, and London Review, 67 (1815): 300-301.]


1815 Ap. 5 / Sounds like gunfire heard in Java. / See Ap. 11. [I; 522. See: 1815 Ap. 11, (I; 523).]


1815 Ap. 11 / first heard on 5th / Sounds like gunfire heard in many places in Java. Thought to be cannonading and troops were called out. In one place people thought that a fort was being attacked and marched to its defense. Learned that a volc eruption on island of Sumbawa. / Quar Jour Roy Inst 1-248. [I; 523.1, 523.2. "Miscellaneous Observations on the Volcanic Eruptions at the Islands of Java and Sumbawa, with a particular Account of the Mud Volcano at Grobogan." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 1 (1816): 245-258, at 251-252. The Tambora volcano.]


1815 Ap. 30 / Florence / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 524. Greg, 65.]


[1815 May. Wrong date. See: 1815 April, (I; 527).]


1815 May 3 / Mexico / q / II. [I; 525. A class II earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1815 May 10 / fireball / Worcester / BA 1860. [I; 526. Greg, 65.]


[1815 June 21] / B / L.T. / Ext phe in sun / 1815 / June 21-3-d. [I; 528. "Extraordinary Phenomenon in the Sun." London Times, June 21, 1815, p. 3 c. 4. This item is also noted at "1813 Aug 27 - 29," (I; 449).]


1815 July / q / Formosa / III. [I; 529. A class III earthquake. Milne, 700.]


[1815 summer. Wrong date. See: 1813 Aug or Sept, (I; 530).]


1815 Aug 5-6 / q / China / I. [I; 531. A class I earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1815 Aug / Perseids / A. J. Sci 37-336. [I; 533. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Report on the Shooting Stars of August 9th and 10th, 1839, with other facts relating to the frequent occurrence of a meteoric display in August." American Journal of Science, 37 (1839): 325-338, at 336. "On the evening of the 10th of August, 1815, also, as I have been assured by a trustworthy observer, there must have appeared a very large number of shooting stars." Chlandi, Ernst Florens Friedrich. Ueber Feuer-Meteore und über die mit denselben herabgefallenen Massen. Vienna: J.G. Heubner, 1819, 89.]


1815 Aug 15 / Waterspout / near Huddersfield / Gent's Mag 85/2/175 / (1815). [I; 532. "Country News." Gentleman's Magazine, 85 pt. 2 (August 1815): 175, c.v. "Aug. 15."]


1815 Aug. 15 / Volc / Goentoes / Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [I; 534. Backer, 880. The Guntur volcano.]


1815 Sept / Eruption of salt mud in Java / An Reg 16-585. [I; 535. Goad, T.S. "Volcanic Eruptions of Mud and Salt in the Island of Java." Annual Register, 58 (1816): 585-587.]


1815 Sept / Hurricane / Am J. Sci 42-243. [I; 536. Darling, Noyes. "Notice of a Hurricane that passed over New England in September, 1815." American Journal of Science, 42 (1842): 243-252.]


1815 Sept 16 / Gottingen / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 537. Greg, 65.]


1815 Sept 29 / London / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 538. Greg, 65.]


[1815 Sept. latter part. Wrong date. See: 1815 Oct 1-3, (I; 539).]


[1815 Oct 1-3 /] 1815 Sept. latter part / Sea south of India covered with dust / Phil Mag., July, 1816. [I; 539. "Singular Phænomenon." Philosophical Magazine, 48 (1816): 73.]


1815 Oct. 3 / Chassigny, Haute Marne, France / Metite / (F). [I; 540. Fletcher, 99. This is the Chassigny meteorite. Greg, 65.]


[1815 Oct 3 /] 1855 Oct. 3 / Near Langres, stone fell. / C.R. 55/591. [II; 1878. Damour, A. "Note sur la pierre météoriques de Chassigny." Comptes Rendus, 55 (1862): 591-594. This is the Chassigny meteorite.]


1815 Oct. 12 / 21 h / Venus / Inf conjunction / (Al). [I; 541. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1815, 112.]


1815 Oct 14 / Formosa / q / III. [I; 542. A class III earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1815 Oct. 17 / Op. Mars / (Al). [I; 543. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1815, 112.]


1815 Oct 21 / q. / China / III. [I; 544. A class III earthquake. Milne, 700.]


1815 Nov. 4 / BO / (Stones rising) / Niles Weekly Register (Baltimore) of / Writes that ac to interviews with several persons, stones had been seen to rise in a field near Marbleton, rising 3 or 4 feet and moving horizontally from 30 to 60 feet, a few of them moving higher than tree tops. / This ac to N Y Courierthe phe in Ulster Co., N.Y. / Also copies from Albany Argus that facts substantially the same been stated to Editor of Argus. / Said that long time before been a similar occurrence at Albany. [A; 32.1, 32.2, 32.3. "Unprecendented phenomenon." Niles' Weekly Register, 9 (November 4, 1815): 171-172.]


1815 Nov 12 / Trans. Mercury / S. Op. 1. [I; 546. Transit of Mercury. (Scientific Opinion, v. 1.) Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1815, 124.]


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

1815 Nov 16 / China / q / III. [I; 545. A class III earthquake. Milne, 701.]

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