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Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1891


1891:


1891 / The sleeper of Wilkesbarre / See Jan 19, 1892. [B; 1117. See: 1892 Jan 19, (B; 1234).]


1891 / Lum obj near Oakland, Cal. / See Feb. 14, 1892. [B; 1118. See: 1892 Feb. 14, (B; 1265).]


1891 / Mrs. Annie Abbott, of Georgia (The Little Georgia Magnet) / In Nov., 1891, performed in Alhambra Music Hall, London. / See A.C. Holms' Facts of Psychic Science, p. 279. / Weighed ab 98 pounds. A man easily lift hernext moment, six men, 3 on each side grasping her bent arms, could not lift her. When she stood on a chair, the six men could not, when the chair was removed, prevent her descending to the floor. By touching a boy, she could transfer to him the force, so that he could not be lifted. / See Light, 1891, pp. 133, 611. [B; 1119.1, 1119.2, 1119.3. Holms, Archibald Campbell. The Facts of Psychic Science and Philosophy. Jamaica, N.Y.: Occult Press, 1927, 279. "Notes By the Way." Light, 11 (no. 533; March 21, 1891): 133-134. Wyld, George. "The Lady Magnet." Light, 11 (no. 571; December 19, 1891): 611-612. "Annie Abbott" was the stage name of Dixie Annie Haygood.]


1891 / Georgia Magnet / For list, see Lulu Hurst, Aug., 1883. [B; 1120. See: 1883 Aug, (B; 520).]


1891 / Steve Haven, sleepwalker, near Fowlerville, Mich. / See Nov 18, 1892. [B; 1121. See: 1892 Nov. 18, (C; 77).]


1891 / House in Peterborough / "New tenants disturbed / See Dec, 1891-Jan 10, 1892. [B; 1122. See: 1891 / ab. last of Oct, (B; 1173); 1891 Dec, etc., (B; 1176); and, 1892 Jan 10, (B; 1213).


1891 / Have Glb-Dem, Spook-stuff, Jan-Dec. [B; 1123.]


1891 / NY Times Index / n.g. / Do year at least Gen. Notes. [VII; 44.]


1891 Jan 2 / Meteor / Kärnten, etc. / Met Zeit 1891-39. [VII; 45. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 8 (1891): 24-40, at 38-39.]


1891 Jan 2 / q / N. California / severest since 1868 / Nature 43-231. [VII; 46. “Notes.” Nature, 43 (January 8, 1891): 230-232, at 231.]


1891 Jan 2 / q. / N. California / BA '11. [VII; 47. A class I earthquake. Milne, 736.]


1891 Jan 4 / (Ch)-28+ / Elliptic body / St. Charles, Mo. / Sid. Mess., Feb., 1891. [VII; 48. "Interesting Phenomeon." Sidereal Messenger, 10 (February 1891): 103. "On the evening of Jan. 4, at 6 o'clock, at an altitude of 35° or 40° southeast of Polaris, a very luminous object was seen. Those who observed  it claim that it looked like the tail of a comet, though much brighter, and of a reddish hue. Though Professor Charroppin did not see the object, he thinks, from the description of others, that it was elliptical in shape, with major axis vertical, and probably occupying 40' or 50' of arc; that it was stationary and continued for five minutes, and then disappeared."]


1891 Jan 6 / Tidal Wave / People of Funchal, Madeira, astonished ab. 4 p.m. by ap. of a great wave in a calm sea. / Nature 52/569. [VII; 49. Johnson, James Yate. “Abnormal Atlantic Waves.” Nature, 52 (October 10, 1895): 569.]


1891 Jan 7 / (It) / q and phe / See 1805. [VII; 50.  Refer to: 1805 July 26, (I; 146). Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 394-395.]


[1891 Jan. 7. Wrong date. See: 1891 Jan. 16, (VII; 51).]


1891 Jan 8 / Rusk, Texas / 2 shockschimneys thrown to ground / Nature 43-254. [VII; 52. “Notes.” Nature, 43 (January 15, 1891): 254-256, at 254.]


1891 Jan 9 / elec phe in a house / Phil Ledger of / That cor to Boston Transcript had written upon phe on his home. On morning of Dec. 16 heard snapping sounds from the room in which his daughter slept (3 a.m.). Learned they had been occurring at intervals for some time. The sounds were accompanied by small blue-white sparks. There was not electric wiring in the house nor passing over it. [B; 1124.1, 1124.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 9, 1891.)]


1891 Jan 11 / Lescarbault's new staror Saturn / (3) / Knowledge 23/134 / I think rings invisible Sept., 1891. [VII; 53. Denning, William Frederick. “Search for an Intra-Mercurial Planet.” Knowledge, o.s., 23 (June 1, 1900): 134. Lescarbault, Edmond Modeste. “Observation d'une étoile d'un éclat comparable à celui de Régulus et située dans la même constellation.” Comptes Rendus, 112 (1891): 152-153.  Lescarbault observed this object with the naked eye, about 1 A.M.; and, not finding any bright star in his sky charts, he deduced that it was a new star. “Ce n'est que par estime que j'attribue à l'étoile, soit nouvelle, soit temporaire, qui est peut-être une étoile dont l'intensité et l'éclat auraient presque subitement prodigieusement augmenté....” “M. Flammarion fait observer....” Comptes Rendus, 112 (1891): 260. “M. Flammarion fait observer que l'astre signalé le 11 janvier par M. Lescarbault dans la constellation du Lion, comme une étoile nouvelle, n'est autre que Saturne.” Saturn would have had a magnitude of 0.84 and been near Sigma Leonis, (compared to Regulus, or Alpha Leonis, having a magnitude of 1.35); and, Saturn's rings would have been visible with the aid of a telescope.]


[1891 Jan 11 /] 1911 Jan 19 / Lescarbault's new star / See New Lands, p. 36. [IX; 1892. The note copies information from page 36 of New Lands. See: 1891 Jan 11, (VII; 53).]


1891 Jan 12 / It Sound / near Verona / Rombi / See 1816. [VII; 54. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 42. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1891 Jan 15 / It Sounds / Verona / frequent rombi / See 1816. [VII; 55. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 42. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1891 Jan 15 / 4, 5, 7 a.m. / Violent shocks. / Algeria / Nature 43-356. [VII; 56. “Notes.” Nature, 43 (February 12, 1891): 354-356, at 356.]


1891 Jan 15 / q. / Algeria / Magnetic perturbations registered at Parc St. Maur, France. / Bull Astronomique 1891-168. [VII; 57. "Revue des Publications Astronomiques." Bulletin Astronomique, 8 (18910): 161-184, at 168.  Moureaux, Théodule. "Variation magnétique pendant le tremblement de terre du 15 janvier 1891 en Algérie." Comptes Rendus,112 (1891): 259.]


1891 Jan 15 / 4 h., local time / Great q / Algeria / BA '11. [VII; 58. A class III earthquake. Milne, 736.]


1891 Jan 15-27th at least / q's / Algeria / La Nat. 36-175. [VII; 59. “Les Tremblements de Terre de Janvier 1891.” La Nature, 1891 pt. 1 (no. 924; February 14): 175-176. A small earthquake also occurred on February 1, 1895, according to this article.]


1891 Jan 15 / Algeria / 17Mexico / 19France / 20Switzerland / q's / La Nat 36-175. [VII; 60. “Les Tremblements de Terre de Janvier 1891.” La Nature, 1891 pt. 1 (no. 924; February 14): 175-176.]


[1891 Jan. 16 /] 1891 Jan. 7 / Trib, 3-3 / q / New Hampshire. [VII; 51. "Earthquake in New Hampshire." New York Tribune, January 17, 1891, p. 3 c. 3.]


1891 Jan 17 / Ghost attack / Glb-Dem, 11-6, from Hamilton Spectator / Like choked negro story of 1888at Foxboro, 6 miles from Belleville, OntMichael King, a quarryman, on railroad track met a woman in white. She grasped him by the hand. Hand swelled up so he could not work. Later he was walking along this track with a friend, Daniel Macauley. They parted, and a moment later Mc. heard a scream from him. Ran back to K, who was lying on the track as if dead. Prints on his neck and his face blackened. He was brought to his home, where with tongue swollen so he could not talk. [B: 1125.1, 1125.2, 1125.3. (Hamilton Spectator, ca. January, 1891.) “Spooks and Spirits.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 17, 1891, p. 11 c. 6-7. "A Canadian Spook." Madison Daily Leader, (South Dakota), February 27, 1891, p. 4 c. 4. See: 1888 March 14, (B; 884).]


1891 Jan 20 / ab. 3:30 a.m. / Great meteor, Turin, etc. / An hour later, by a singular coincidence, a q. in same places. / L Astro 1891-154 / L'An. Sci 35-10. [VII; 61. Denza, Francesco. "Bolide remarquable." Astronomie, 10 (1891): 153-154. "Météorites et bolides." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 35 (1891): 10-11.]


1891 Jan 20 / (+) / (Can't say stone fell) / 3:30 a.m. / A great bolide in Italy, in provinces of Novare, Coni and Turin. Loud detonations were heard. Padre Denza writes that by a singular coincidence, or with no relation between the two events, in these parts of Italy there was an earthquake one hour later. / (Cosmos, N.S., 18-251) / This q is described on p. 252. Loud sounds were heard. At 5:30 a.m. a third concussion. / In La Nat 36-175, said that 4 a.m. concussion in Switzerland after a tempest and much lightning. [VII; 62.1, 62.2, 62.3. Denza, Francesco. “Un bolide.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 18 (February 7, 1891): 251. Denza, Francesco. “Tremblements de terre du 20 janvier.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 18 (February 7, 1891): 252. “Les Tremblements de Terre de Janvier 1891.” La Nature, 1891 pt. 1 (no. 924; February 14): 175-176, at 175.]


1891 Jan 23 / Med and Dayb. of / Ghostly sounds in railway station, at Chollerford, near Newcastle. Had been for several years. [B; 1126. (Medium and Daybreak, January 23, 1891; not online.) "A Haunted Railway Station." Shields Daily Gazette, January 10, 1891, p. 3 c. 4.]


1891 Jan 24 / Hallucination / Pub Ledger of / James Largee, who had been a watchman in the Merrimac Mills, Lowell, Mass, had resigned. Night of the 16th, 11 p.m., on 5th floor of one of the mills, he saw figures of a man and a woman facing each other. The man held a smoking revolver in his hand. He fired several shots at the woman. Largee rushed forward but grasped at vacancy. [B: 1127.1, 1127.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 24, 1891.) "Witnessed a Ghost Tragedy." Savannah Morning News, January 25, 1891, p. 12 c. 7. "James Largee, who has been a watchman in the Merrimac Mills for the past five years, has resigned because, as he says, the mill is haunted." "He was in the carding room in the fifth story of No 1 mill about 11 o'clock last Friday night, when he saw the figures of a man and a woman facing each other. The man held a smoking revolver in his hand. As Largee approached the man the latter fired several shots at the female figure. Largee rushed to protect the woman, but grasped only thin air. He tried to seize the man but again found nothing." "Both figures then disappeared, but Largee says he saw them again twice afterward."]


[1891 Jan 24] / 1891 Jan 26 / Fish in Nashville / explained that in a fire hose that firemen played in air / M.W.R 1891/13. [VII; 63. “Winds.” Monthly Weather Review, 19 (no. 1; January 1891): 12-13. “Referring to a reported fall of fish at Nashville, Tenn., during a storm of the 26th, the observer at that place states that on the morning of that date a fire occurred, and, as the pumps of the water works were out of order, the water in the reservoir was low. Small fish in the bottom of the reservoir were brought through the pipes to the city. The firemen observing them passing through the hose while washing their engine threw a stream into the air and the fish were scattered about the street. Persons seeing them concluded that they had descended with the snow which was falling at the time.” “Fish From the Clouds.” Daily Tobacco Leaf-Chronicle, (Clarksville, Tennessee), January 27, 1891, p. 1 c. 7. “Nashville, Jan. 27.A singular phenomenon was observed in connection with the heavy fall of snow which occurred in this city Saturday morning [January 24]. Large quantities of small fish came down with the snow, and in many localities the ground was literally covered with them. The largest were nearly two inches in length. As such a downpour from the heavens has heretofore been unheard of, it has created much comment even among scientific men.”]


1891 Jan 28 / Trib, 1-6 / Mine explosion / Mt. Pleasant, Penn. [VII; 64. "Scores of Miners Killed." New York Tribune, January 28, 1891, p. 1 c. 6.]


1891 Jan 30 / Pollen / Pub. Ledger of / A few days before, at Deerfield, Me., surface of the snow spotted with multitudes of little black insects, first observed an hour after storm, They skipped about like fleas. [VII; 65. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 30, 1891.) "Curious Facts." Shenandoah Herald, (Woodstock, Virginia), March 6, 1891, p. 1 c. 6. (Deerfield, New Hampshire???)]


1891 Jan 31 / See Nova, 1892. / New red star in Auriga, announced by Dr Espin, of the Wolsingham Observatory. Not supposed to be a nova but a star that had been missing. No red star charted in this place. / E Mec 52/546. [VII; 66. "The New Variable Star in Auriga, and a New Red Star in Gemini." English Mechanic, 52 (no. 1352; February 20, 1891): 546.]


1891 Jan. 31 / Espin, in Eng Mec 52/546, thinks it a missing star that was cataloged by Birmingham. / (See Andromeda, Sept 7, 1890.) / See Nov. 19, 1891. [VII; 67. Packer, David Elijah. "The New Red Star in Auriga." English Mechanic, 52 (no. 1351; February 13, 1891): 526. Packer states that he had seen the star on November 21, 1890. "It would be well for observers, if a star does not appear in the charts, to refer to the catalogue (from which the charts have been plotted), as mistakes are in this, as in every other work, occasionally found, it is a marvel of care and correctness." "The New Variable Star in Auriga, and a New Red Star in Gemini." English Mechanic, 52 (no. 1352; February 20, 1891): 546. See: 1890 Sept 7-15, (VII; 16), and, 1891 Nov. 19, (VII; 227).]


1891 Feb 5 / (Ch 31) / 4:30 p.m. / Volc / John Bagster writes from Norwood to E Mec 52/526, that he is an amateur, He gives a technical description of his telescope. Says saw a round spot on sunchange eyepiece without affecting its form. Watched the small black disk 17 minutes and then sun behind larger clouds. [VII; 68.1, 68.2. Bagster, John. "The Intra-Mercurial Planet Seen Again." English Mechanic, 52 (no. 1351; February 13, 1891): 526. Noble, William. "A New Theory...." English Mechanic, 52 (no. 1352; February 20, 1891): 545-546. Noble suggests that it was a sunspot. Monck, William Henry Stanley. "An Intra-Mercurial Planet." English Mechanic, 52 (no. 1352; February 20, 1891): 546. Monck recounts February observations of a possible planet by Fritsch and others. See: 1802 Feb 7, (I; 43); 1820 Feb. 12, (I; 790); 1860 Jan. 29, (II; 2419); and, 1864 Feb 12, (II; 543).]


1891 Feb 6 / Pub. Ledger of / Meteoric stone resembling granite had fallen recently near mouth of the Pistol river, in Curry Co., Oregon, weighing ab. 400 pounds. [VII; 69. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 6, 1891.)]


[1891 Feb 6. Wrong date. See: 1892 Feb 6, (VII; 70).]


1891 Feb. 21 / Religio-Phil Jour. of, p. 1 / Boy aged 13, at Columbus, Ind., had been in a sleep for 30 days. Feb 9, had fallen asleep again. [B; 1128. "Topics of the Times." Religio-Philosophical Journal, n.s., 1 (no. 39;  February 21, 1891): 1. "Slept A Month." Indianapolis Journal, January 30, 1891, p. 1 c. 2. "Sleeps For Many Days." Indianapolis News, August 3, 1891, p. 2 c. 5. "He Fooled The Doctors." Indianapolis Journal, October 25, 1891, p. 4 c. 5. In Seymour, Indiana, Jesse Streitt's repeated slumbers would alarm his family, (sometimes with his appearing to be next to death), whereupon he would awaken and speak of visiting heaven, (which attracted the attention of "sensational newsmongers"). See: 1891 (July 18), (B; 1143).]


[1891 Feb. 21. Wrong date. See: 1889 Sept., (B; 1129).]


1891 Feb 21 / Snow worms / Virginia and NY. / D-93. ** [VII; 71. The note copies information from pages 92 to 93 of The Book of the Damned. "Snow Worms." Scientific American, n.s., 64 (February 21, 1891): 116. "A puzzling phenomenon has been noticed frequently in some parts of Valley Bend District, Randolph County, Va., this winter. The crust of the snow has been covered two or three times with worms, resembling the ordinary cutworms. Where they come from, unless they fall with the snow, is inexplicable. The snow is two feet deep, and the crust is too strong for them to have come up out of the ground. A square foot of snow can scarcely be found some days without a dozen of these worms on it." "Snow Worms." Scientific American, n.s., 64 (March 7, 1891): 147.]


1891 Feb. 23 / Cyclone / N.S. Wales / Jour Roy Soc N.S.W. 25/58, 306. [VII; 72. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. "A Cyclonic Storm or Tornado in the Gwydir District." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 25 (1891): 58-60. "Wednesday July 1, 1891." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 25 (1891): 306.]


1891 Feb 23 / early morning / At Madison, Me, large meteor burst, shaking houses as if by earthquake, scattering blazing fragments in every direction. / Pub Ledg, Feb. 25 / “var.” [VII; 73. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 25, 1891.) "A Superb Meteor." Portland Daily Press, (Maine), February 24, 1891, p. 4 c. 4.]


1891 Feb 23 / Madison, Maine / met. explosion / Cosmos, N.S., 18-363. [VII; 74. “Chute d'une météorite.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 18 (March 7, 1891): 363.]


1891 Feb. 24, 25 / Mar 1, 2 / Ap. 24 / Aug 27, 30 / Nov 16 / Dec 6, 28, 30 / — = Ardoch q / q's Invergarry / Geo Mag 1892-304. [VII; 75. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1891.” Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 9 (1892): 299-305, at 304-305.]


1891 March, month of / ghost light  Near Middlefield, Geauga Co., Ohio, a luminous object that was frequently seen near the village. But said that it was a lantern carried by a ghost. / Glb-Dem, March 29. [B; 1130. (St. Louis Globe-Democrat, March 29, 1891; not found here.)]


1891 March 1 / N.Y. Herald of, copied in Med. and Dayb, March 13 / Polt in home of Mrs Hibbs, son and grandson, at Wheeldon Yard, Chesterfield, England. Phe started preceeding June. Loud raps on walls and tables. Stopped. Renewed ab. Christmas. A candlestick floats about, strikes ceiling and falls to floor. Boy hit hard by a tin can. [B: 1131.1, 1131.2. (New York Herald, March 1, 1891; not found here.) (Medium and Daybreak, March 13, 1891; not online.) "Extraordinary Occurrences at Chesterfield." Derbyshire Times and Chesterfield Herald, February 28, 1891, p. 5 c. 6-7.]


1891 March 3-4-5 / volc and hurricane / Sandwich Islands / Science 18-39. [VII; 76. Bishop, Sereno Edwards. "Atmospheric and Seismic Influences." Science, s. 1 v. 18 (July 17, 1891): 39. The Kilauea volcano.]


1891 March 6 / Auburn, Ala, 9 a.m., “completely enveloped in darkness”. “The phenomenon was purely local.” / Pub Ledger, 10th. [VII; 77. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 10, 1891.) “Darkness at Auburn Some Meteoric Body.” Montgomery Advertiser, (Alabama), March 7, 1891, p. 1 c, 1.]


1891 March 7 / Glb. Dem. / In vicinity of Sweet Springs, Mo., a fox killing pigs. Often chased and shot at, but could not be caught or killed, and was told that it was a phantom. [B; 1132. “The Phantom Fox.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, March 7, 1891, p. 9 c. 6. "Fox a Phantom." Omaha Daily Bee, March 27, 1891, p. 5 c. 4-5.]


1891 March 10 / Pollen / Pub. Ledger of / Few mornings beforeground at Nashville, Tenn, covered with yellow substance. Said was pine pollen. / See Ap. 19. [VII; 78. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 10, 1891.) “A Queer Shower.” Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer, (Kentucky), March 5, 1891, p. 1 c. 4.]


1891 March 13 ./ bet 7 and 8 p.m. / West of St Paul Rocks / Submarine volcboiling water / 3 N42 W / Nature 44-41. [VII; 79. “Notes.” Nature, 44 (May 14, 1891): 39-42 , at 41.]


1891 March 16 / 2 men whirled up and dropped / Wilkesbarre, Penn. * [VII; 80. "Caught in a Whirlwind." Brooklyn Eagle, March 17, 1891, p. 6 c. 5.]


1891 March 16 / Brooklyn / met explosion / Morehouse. * [VII; 81. "Hurt Most Mysteriously." New York Times, March 17, 1891, p. 1 c. 5.]


1891 March 18 / 5 a.m. and 5 p.m. / Waterspouts at sea, at Sydney. Paper read by H.C. Russell before Roy Soc N.S. Wales, Aug 3, 1898. / See 21. [VII; 82. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. “Water-Spouts on the Coast of New South Wales.” Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 32 (1898): 132-149, at 143-144. See: 1891 March 21, (VII; 83).]


1891 March 21 / Remarkable w. spout seen at Coogee Bay, N.S. Wales. / See March 18. / At Jervis Bay Light House another seen at 9:25 a.m. and at 10 a.m., 3 more were seen. [VII; 83. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. “Water-Spouts on the Coast of New South Wales.” Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 32 (1898): 132-149, at 144-145. See: 1891 March 18, (VII; 82).]


1891 March 21 / Substance / ab 11 miles from Hawkinsville, Ga. / Pub Ledger, 25th / “Between 7 and 8 p.m. something having every appearance of small sparks of fire was observed falling from the clouds. It came down and drifted about like snowflakes, and when caught in the hand proved to be a phosphorescent substance of some kind.” [VII: 84.1, 84.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 25, 1891.) "A Rain of Fire." Middle Georgia Argus, (Indian Springs), March 17, 1891, p. 3 c. 5. The phenomenon was observed on March 13.]


1891 March 26 / N. Cornwall / q and sound / Geol Mag 1892-299 / Nature 43-519. [VII; 85. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1891.” Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 9 (1892): 299-305, at 299-302. “Notes.” Nature, 43 (September 26, 1895): 519-521, at 519.]


1891 March 28 / [LT], 5-c / 31-9-f / q, N. Cornwall, Surrey / q. [VII; 86. “Earthquake Shocks in North Cornwall.” London Times, March 28, 1891, p. 5 c. 3. Hoare, J.S. “Earthquakes in Surrey and Cornwall.” London Times, March 31, 1891, p. 9 c. 6.]


1891 / spring / Red snow at Salt Lake City / Pub Ledger, Nov. 10. [VII; 87. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, November 10, 1891.) "Curious Condensations." Pittsburg Dispatch, November 12, 1891, p. 4 c. 7.]


1891 Ap. 5 / Palatka, Florida / luminous obj. / See "Owls". [B; 1133. See: Invaders / (+) / 1891 / Ap. 5, (SF-IV; 19).]


1891 Ap. 7 / Ships and successional shocksfired at? / Ship Elenfinlas from Calcutta. Severe shock. 3 days later a slighter shock. / Eagle, July 19-20-4. [VII; 88. “An Earthquake Shock at Sea.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 19, 1891, p. 20 c. 4. “The shock was severe enough to throw the crew down and displace everything in the ship. The vibrations lasted fully three minutes.”]


1891 Ap. 7 / Indarch, Elisabethpol, Transcaucasia / (F). [VII; 89. Fletcher, 106. This is the Indarch meteorite.]


1891 Ap. 7 / Capt vessel felt a q. On 10th felt another. / L Astro 10-436. [VII; 90."Tremblement de terre en mer." Astronomie, 10 (1891): 436.]


1891 Ap 7 and 11 / On 7th, 600 miles west of Java / P. Ledger, July 21. [VII; 91. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, July 21, 1891.)]


1891 Ap 7 / severe shock to ship Glenfinlas. 3 days later a slighter shock. / B. Eagle, July 19-20-4, 1891. [VII; 92. “An Earthquake Shock at Sea.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 19, 1891, p. 20 c. 4.]


1891 Ap. 9 / (Ch) / (1) / Metite / Indarck (Transcaucasia) / Cosmos, NS, 37/791. [VII; 94. Meunier, Stanislas. "Sur quelques circonstances particulières qui paraissent avoir avoir accompagné la chute d'une météorite le 9 avril 1891 à Indarck, en Transcaucasie." Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 37 (December 18, 1897): 790-792. Meunier, Stanislas. "Sur quelques circonstances particulières qui paraissent avoir avoir accompagné la chute d'une météorite le 9 avril 1891 à Indarck, en Transcaucasie." Comptes Rendus, 125 (1897): 894-897. The Elisabethpol Governate of Transcaucasie is now identified as Azerbaijan.]


1891 Ap. 19 / NY Times, 1-6 / Pine pollen in rain / Chattanooga / See March 10. [VII; 93. “Rain with Yellow Sediment.” New York Times, April 19, 1891, p. 1 c. 6. See: 1891 March 10, (VII; 78).]


1891 Ap. 24 / Trib, 1-3 / Powder magazine explosion / Rome. [VII; 95. "Rome Shaken by an Explosion." New York Tribune, April 24, 1891, p. 1 c. 3.]


1891 (May) / and continue all summer / Polts / Glb-Dem, Sept 19-4-7 / In the farm house of Hokan Nelson's near Lake Crystal, Minn. / At night beds stripped of the clothingsometimes torn up and found scattered about the house. Clothing locked in trunks found torn and cut to pieces. Members of the family stepping into dark rooms had their nose twisted. / 2 sons, 10 and 12. 2 daughters, 17 and 19. [B; 1134.1, 1134.2. “Infested by Spooks.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, September 19, 1891, p. 4 c. 7.]


1891 May / Red spot on Jupiter again prominent / Observatory 14/236. [VII; 96. Williams, Arthur Stanley. “The Red Spot on Jupiter.” Observatory, 14 (1891): 236.]


1891 May 1 / Pub Ledger of / Ghost with a lantern / Middlefield, Ohio. [B; 1135. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 1, 1891.)]


1891 May 2 / lightningclear sky / Pub. Ledger of / That several days before, a thunderbolt from an apparently clear sky had killed Redmond Dyer, a farmer from Emporia, Kansas. [VII; 97. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 2, 1891.)]


1891 May 4 / Sounds many kinds of birds in air / Dublin / Nature 45/20. [VII; 98. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (November 5, 1891): 18-21, at 20.]


1891 May 4 / Tulloona, N S Wales / violent shock as of earthquake or aerial disturbance / Rain, River and Evap. Obss, N S Wales, 1891. [VII; 99. “General Notes for 1891.” Results of Rain, River, and Evaporation Observations Made in New South Wales During 1891, (1891), xxviii-xxxix, at xxxvii.]


1891 May 7 / Pub Ledger, 9th / 3:40 p.m. / Victoria, Texas / great det met / Concussions of earth like a q. [VII; 100. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 9, 1891.)]


1891 / about May 7 / Nouvion (Aisne) Fr / rain filled with orange-colored larvae about ½ millimetre in length / Cosmos, NS, 19/171. [VII; 101. “Pluie de larves.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 19 (May 16, 1891): 171.]


1891 May 9 / alligator / Chicago Citizen of, 3-5 / "An alligator six feet long was found in the Little Cuyahogo River in Ohio, near Akron, by Prof. E.W. Claypole, of Butchel College. / See Sept 29. [B; 1136. (Chicago Citizen, May 9, 1891, p. 3 c. 5.) “Identified At Last.” Akron Beacon Journal, May 11, 1891, p. 1 c. 4. See: 1891 Sept 29, (B: 1161 & 1162). The alligator had been brought to Ohio by men who had visited Florida; but, it died, and was dumped into the river.]


1891 May 9 / Trans Mercury / Obs. 29/417. [VII; 102. Denning, William Frederick. "The Planets and Planetary Observation." Observatory, 29 (1906): 280-283, 308-314, 355-359, 375-380, 414-418, 458-462; 30 (1907): 92-96, 128-134, 205-208; at v. 29 p. 417.]


1891 May 11 / [LT], 6-d / 12-5-f / Transit Mercury. [VII; 103. “The Transit of Mercury.” London Times, May 11, 1891, p. 6 c. 4. “The Transit of Mercury.” London Times, May 12, 1891, p. 5 c. 6.]


1891 May 13, 16 / on or between these dates /Vast swarms at Ventnor of St Mark's flies. (Biblio marci) / Nature 48-127. [VII; 104. “Singular Swarms of Flies.” Nature, 48 (June 8, 1893): 127.]


1891 May 14 / Black spot on Jupiter. Large, conspicuous, and of long duration. / Observatory 15-140. [VII; 105. Williams, Arthur Stanley. “The Recent Disturbance in the Northern Hemisphere of Jupiter.” Observatory, 15 (1892): 109-112, at 110.]


1891 May 23 / morning / S.W. to N.E. / in Maine / great det met. / Concussions like q. / dense cloud of smoke behind / Sid Mess 10-203. [VII; 106. "A Remarkable Meteor." Sidereal Messenger, 10 (April 1891): 203.]


1891 May 25 / Pub Ledger of / On road between Buena Vista and Tazewell, Gaa ghost that hid in a tree. / (NM). [B; 1137. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 25, 1891.)]


1891 May 28 / Public Ledger of / A whirlwind recently at Shell Bluff, Georgia. After it passed, cottonwood crumbled when handled. [VII; 107. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 28, 1891.) “A Strange Whirlwind.” Atlanta Constitution, May 25, 1891, p. 2 c. 1. "The whirlwind that passed over the Powell place, at Shell Bluff, recently, had many curious features and resulted strangely and disastrously. It was so severe and of such a dry, parching nature that it destroyed between four and five acres of cotton. After the wind passed the cotton weed, which before was growing vigorously, would crumble to powder in the hand when handled."]


1891 June 2 / (obj) / 3:15 a.m. / Alta, Iowa / bright flash of red light and a very loud report. Object of stone and metal looked as if part of a globular object. / Sid Mess 10-377. [VII; 108. Hadden, David E. "Another Iowa Meteorite." Sidereal Messenger, 10 (August 1891): 377.]


1891 June 2 / obj / 5 miles north of Alta, Iowa, 3:15 a.m., bright flash, buzzing sounds, and loud report near house. Next morning near the house in sand an object foundcovered with black substance and of a strong sulphurous odor. The writer in Sidereal Messenger, quoted in P. Ledger, Oct 15, says, “I examined it and found it of a concavo-convex shape, nearly round, being about four inches high in the center and weighing fifteen ounces. The concave side is partly stone and metl and the convex side is completely covered with a small, crystalline yellowish-green metal, partly fused by heat on one side. It looks as if it might have been globular and shattered in two.” [VII; 109.1, 109.2, 109.3. Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 15, 1891.) Hadden, David E. "Another Iowa Meteorite." Sidereal Messenger, 10 (August 1891): 377. (Quote in SM slightly different.)]


1891 June 5 / (Cut) / L'Astro, 1891-397 / H. Guillaume, of the Observatory of Peronnas (Ain), lightning in skysuddenly an electric apparition. In his sketch of it, it looks like a hand grasping a dagger. / See July 10. [VII: 110.1, 110.2. "Curieux phénomène électrique." Astronomie, 10 (1891): 395-396), (illustration). See: (July 10.).]


[1891 June 6 /] 1890 June 6 / pebbles / France / (D-67). / 60. [VI; 2017. The note copies information from page 67 of The Book of the Damned. "La pluie de pierres de Pel-et-Der." La Nature, 1891 pt. 2  (no. 947; July 25): 127. The fall occurred on June 6, 1891, (not in 1890).]


1891 June 7 / 2:05 p.m. / 2:45 p.m. / Shocks or earthquake at Melbourne / near Adelaide, 7:20 p.m. / Sydney Daily Telegraph, 8 and 9th. [VII; 111. "Shocks of an Earthquake." Sydney Daily Telegraph, June 8, 1891, p. 5 c. 3. "Earthquake Shock." Sydney Daily Telegraph, June 9, 1891, p. 3 c. 5.]


1891 June 7 / Aust and Italy / 2:05 p.m. / 2:45 p.m. / Shocks / Melbourne, Australia / 6:45, 7:20 p.m., in South Australia / June 7severe q in Italy, around Vesuvius / Nature 44/272. [VII; 112. Ellery, R.L.J. “Earthquake Shocks in Italy and Australia.” Nature, 44 (July 23, 1891): 272.]


1891 June 7 / Severe shocks, Verona, Italy. Coninue less, 8 and 9. / Nature 44-136. / on 13th, violent at Tregano / 44-161. [VII; 113. “Notes.” Nature, 44 (June 11, 1891): 135-138, at 136. “Notes.” Nature, 44 (June 18, 1891): 161-164, at 161.]


1891 June 7 / Vesuvius / Nature 44/320. [VII; 114. Johnston-Lavis, Henry James. “The Eruption of Vesuvius of June 7, 1891.” Nature, 44 (August 6, 1891): 320-322.]


1891 June 7 / Q in Italy and Australia / Nature, 44/272 / Q's rare in Australia / See BA '11 / Seis. Reports. [VII; 115. Ellery, R.L.J. “Earthquake Shocks in Italy and Australia.” Nature, 44 (July 23, 1891): 272. A class II earthquake, in Italy. Milne, 736.]


1891 June 7 / Vesuvius / Nature 44/160, 320, 352. [VII; 116. Johnston-Lavis, Henry James. “The Eruption of Vesuvius of June 7, 1891.” Nature, 44 (June 18, 1891): 160-161. Johnston-Lavis, Henry James. “The Eruption of Vesuvius of June 7, 1891.” Nature, 44 (August 6, 1891): 320-322. “Notes.” Nature, 44 (August 13, 1891): 350-355, at 352.]


1891 June 9 / Pub Ledger of / Wild animal supposed to be a tiger prowling near Lewiston, Ill. Had entered a stable and disembowelled a horse. [B; 1138. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, June 9, 1891.) "Farmer Frank Chatterton...." Savannah Morning News, June 12, 1891, p. 4 c. 6. The animal was observed either on June 5 or 6, (not the "June 9" of the Public Ledger's article).]


1891 June 12 / (mirage) / Pub Ledger of / Five days before, mirage of a large forest at Ansonia, Conn.  [VII; 117. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, June 12, 1891.) “Scraps.” Indianapolis News, June 15, 1891 p. 4. c. 3. “A mirage that for beauty was remarkable was seen near Ansonia, Conn., a few days ago. There were the distinct and graceful outlines of a large forest, with a high bluff and running stream in the foreground. So distinct was the picture that the smallest limbs and leaves were plainly visible. After a few moments the picture gradually faded away.”]


1891 June 13 and 14 / Th. storms in Mauritius. First since year 1801. “There was a considerable increase of sunspots at about this time.” / Nature 44/451. [VII; 118. “Notes.” Nature, 44 (September 10, 1891): 450-453, at 451-452.]


1891 June 17 / Great flaming protuberance from sun seen by M. Trouvelot at Observatory of Meudon. / See Sept 1, 1859. / Ciel et Terre 12/212 / L'Astro 11-73. [VII; 119. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Phénomène lumineux extraordinaire observé sur le Soleil." Ciel et Terre, 12 (1891-1892): 210-213. Boissonnat, Joseph. "L'éruption solaire du 17 juin 1891." Astronomie, 11 (1892): 73. See: 1859 Sept. 1, (II: 2357, 2358, & 2359).]


1891 June 20 / Pub. Ledger of / “Swarms of big flies swooped down upon Eastport, Maine, the other day. Where they came from is a mystery.” [VII; 120. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, June 20, 1891.) (“Current Topics.” Dayton Herald, June 29, 1891, p. 4 c. 4; same quote.) “Maine Melange.” Bangor Daily Whig and Courier, June 16, 1891, p. 1 c. 6-7.]


1891 June 21, ab / New Park Theatre, New York, haunted. [B; 1139. (Refs.???)]


1891 June 24 / 12:45 p.m. / Stromboli / Nature 47-89 / Calm to 30ththen violent / See July 16. [VII; 121. Fulcher, L.W. “Stromboli in 1891.” Nature, 47 (November 24, 1892): 89-90. See: (July 16).]


1891 June 28 / 7:40 p.m. / Eaux-Chaudes (Busses Pyrénées) / sound like thunder / same 2 years before / L'Astro 10-311. [VII; 122. "Tremblement de terre en France." Astronomie, 10 (1891): 311-312.]


1891 June 30 / (+) / Trib, 1-6 / July 2-1-6 / Aug 24-1-3 / Cal. / desert flood. At Salton Colorado Desert in California. [VII; 123. "Colorado Desert a Lake." New York Tribune, June 30, 1891, p. 1 c. 6. "The Overflow of the Colorado." New York Tribune, July 2, 1891, p. 1 c. 6.  "The Colorado Desert Lake." New York Tribune, August 24, 1891, p. 1 c. 3.]


1891 / Frgs / Windham. [VII; 124. (Refs.??? Windham, Connecticut, had a “Battle of the Frogs” in 1754, in which their excessive noise was mistaken for the beating of drums.)]


1891 / summer / Living / Nothing in Bournemouth Weekly News. [VII; 125.]


1891 / about / summer / Frogs / Bournemouth / Eng Mec 94/62. [VII; 126. Hinder, F.S. “Tadpoles.” English Mechanic, 94 (no. 2421; August 18, 1911): 62.]


1891 / summer / frgs / See letter. / R.H. Tingley, 552 Willett Ave, Fort Chester, N.Y. / (Frgs) / Tingley / [Letter to Fort from Richard Hoadley Tingley, August 261924]. [VII; 127. (Letter from Tingley, Richard Hoadley, to Fort; August 26, 1924.)]


1891 July-Aug / Phe. in Minnesota continuing / See May 1, 1891. [B; 1140. See: 1891 (May), (B; 1134).]


1891 July, Aug / Collisions with unknowns / L.T. Index, Ship News. [B; 1141. (London Times Index.)]


1891 July 3 / [LT[, 5-d / 31-5-d / Aug 6-3-1. [VII; 128. “Renewed Activity if Vesuvius.” London Times, July 3, 1891, p. 5 c. 4. “Australia.” London Times, July 31, 1891, p. 5 c. 4. “The floods in Melbourne are the greatest that have occurred since 1863.” “Australia.” London Times, August 6, 1891, p. 3 c. 1.]


1891 July 4 / Yarn / Public Ledger of / “An enormous flight of eagles was seen recently from the village of Bjelgorod, Southern Russia. They numbered into the hundreds it is told and during their passage obscured the rays of the sun. They alighted in a forest, and after departing, it was found that they devoured ten horses, several sheep, and a vast number of smaller animals.” [VII; 129.1, 129.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, July 4, 1891.)]


1891 July 5 / Hailstones / some 6 inches in diameter / Rapid City, S Dakota / M.W.R. 1924-349. [VII; 130. Johnson, Harley N. “Severe Hailstorm at Rapid City, S. Dak., and Vicinity July 18, 1924.” Monthly Weather Review, 52 (no. 7; July 1924): 349.]


1891 July 7 / Jupiter / Stationary. [VII; 131. Jupiter stationary. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1891, 469.]


1891 July 8 / Body of Carl Gros found dead in field near Maspeth, L.I. No cut in clothes to correspond with wounds in body. Paris green sprinkled on clothesfound in brushwoodhad had fight with a saloon keeper, John Keller. / B. Eagle 10-1-9 / 13-6-4 / 16-4-8. [B; 1142. “More Mystery.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 10, 1891, p. 1 c. 9. “Was Carl Gross a Suicide?” Brooklyn Eagle, July 13, 1891, p. 6 c. 4. “Gross' Death Investigated.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 16, 1891, p. 4 c. 8. John Keller was an ice man, (not the saloon keeper), who had a drunken quarrel with Gross, (not “Gros”). “Justice Brandon holds the opinion that Gross was a suicide, because there is no cut in the vest or shirt covering the wound.” Yet, the knife inflicting the fatal stab wound to the heart was not found, and “death must have been instantaneous.” The only evidence that Gross committed suicide was the lack of any cut to his clothes, while the lack of the knife suggests that someone else stabbed him, disposed of the knife, and dumped the dead body away from the place of the murder. “The immediate vicinity bore no evidences of any struggle, nor were any blood stains found on the grass and the brushes and tall weeds were unbroken.”]


1891 July 10 / By Guillaume, from Péronnas (Ain). Lights called heat lightning during the evening and at 11:25 p.m. a meteor of unusual size and brilliance. / L Année Sci 35/11. [VII; 132. "Météorites et bolides." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 35 (1891): 10-11.]


1891 July 13 / first found / Unknown worm in rain barrel / Pop Sci News 26-7. [VII; 133. Brooke, K.C. “A Puzzle in a Rain-Barrel.” Popular Science News, 26 (January 1892): 7.]


1891 July 16-23 / See June 24. / Stromboli again violent. Calm to Aug 31. [VII; 134. (Refs.???)]


1891 July 17 / Th storm at Newcastle. In Knowledge, 15-149, photo believed to be of ball lightning. [VII; 135. Ranyard, Arthur Cowper. “Lightning Photographs.” Knowledge, o.s., 15 (n.s., 7; August 1, 1892): 149-150.]


1891 (July 18) / Sleeper / (accident) / Streitt / Jesse Streitt, aged 13, sleeping boy of Seymour, Indiana, again fallen into slumber. / B. Eagle, July 18-4-6, 1891 / The 3rd long sleep in 18 months. The first sleep lasted 21 days, and he could not be aroused. A few months before he had fallen from a barn loft and had injured his spine. Told that he had been in heaven and had seen his father working in Illinoistelling just what it was found his father was doing in Illinois. No sickness nor invalidism between sleeps. [B; 1143.1, 1143.2, 1143.3. “The Sleeping Boy of Seymour.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 18, 1891, p. 4 c. 6. “Jesse Streitt Fooled the Doctors.” Indianapolis Journal, October 26, 1891, p. 3 c. 2-3. “The more seen of these sleeps the more strange and unaccountable they become.” A younger brother Frank was frightened and claimed to have seen Jesse in a parlor and in a wood shed, while Jesse had been lying in bed for two days; yet, Jesse also claimed to the reporter that “he was” in the parlor and wood shed. “He says at such times he feels like there are two of him, and that while his body lies cold and helpless in bed his other being goes out from it and sees and knows what is going on. He said that when a party of curious people went in to see him yesterday he followed in behind them and stood beside them while they talked to him on the bed and tried to wake him.” See: 1891 Feb. 21, (B; 1128).]


1891 July 18 / James Cox / Expert Accountant / disap Brooklyn / B Eagle 27-4-4. [B; 1144. “James Cox Has Disappeared.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 24, 1891, p. 4 c. 4. “Friends declare as their opinion that he has gone off on a little pleasure trip, and will shortly return and refute some ugly rumors that have been circulated regarding the reason for his disappearance.” “Missing James Cox's Property.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 29, 1891, p. 6 c. 4. Cox disappeared with $16,800 belonging to his employer and a gripsack; detectives traced him to California “but there lost track of him.”]


1891 July 19 / early morning / Moodus sounds / Trib 26-13-4 / several shocks together / 2 explosive sounds. [VII; 136. "The Moodus Noises." New York Tribune, July 26, 1891, p. 13 c. 4.]


1891 July 26 / Evansville, Ill. / q. / BA '11. [VII; 137. A class I earthquake. Milne, 736.]


1891 July 26 / Whirled hay / Boraston, Shropshire / Nature 44/294. [VII; 138. Galton, Francis. “Meteorological Phenomenon.” Nature, 44 (July 30, 1891): 294.]


1891 July 28 / B. Eagle, 4-7 / Myst cattle disease, Lawrence Co, Ill. 15 minutes after seized, are dead. / 28-1-9myst cattle disease west of Lyons, Iowa. Joints swell, cattle soon die. / 29-1-8great numbers dying in Iowa. [B; 1145. "Mysterious Cattle Disease." Brooklyn Eagle, July 28, 1891, p. 1 c. 9. "The Iowa Cattle Plague." Brooklyn Eagle, July 29, 1891, p. 1 c. 8.]


1891 July 28, 29 / B Eagle, Aug 1-4-7 / Excitement in town of Barre, Vt. On 28th, young daughter of Jeremiah McCarthy died. 29th, another. / Mother and other daughter ill. Physicians baffled. Another family in the house unaffected. [B; 1146. “Died of a Mysterious Illness.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 1, 1891, p. 4 c. 7.]


1891 July 30 / B. Eagle, Aug 14-4-3 / q—Lerdo, Mexico. [VII; 139. “The Earthquake in Northern Mexico.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 14, 1891, p. 4 c. 3.]


1891 July 31 / night / caterpillars / Coonoor, Nilgiris (Indes) / (India?) / Cosmos, N.S., 20-143. [VII; 140. Léveillé, Hector. “Pluie de chenilles.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 20 (September 5, 1891): 143. Coonoor, Tamil Nadu, India.]


1891 Aug. / Frgs / Nevada desert / Stoker's letter / [Letter to Fort from Geo. C. Stoker, Lovelock, Nevada, September 26th, 1926]. [VII; 141. (Letter; Stoker, George C., to Fort; September 26, 1926.)]


1891 Aug 3 / Pub. Ledger of / Wld woman of Womelsdorf, Pa. [B; 1147. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 3, 1891.) (“Said To Be a Wild Woman.” New York Evening World, August 15, 1891, p. 2 c. 6.)]


1891 Aug 5 / animal or obj. / P.L. [of] / Unknown animal or object that was seen upon bank of a stream near Shieldsville, Minn. Someone who said he saw it described it as being "the shape of a cigar, brown in color and 25 or 30 feet long". / Said that something like this had been seen 3 years before. [B; 1148.1, 1148.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 5, 1891.) “Current Topics” Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, August 14, 1891, p. 4 c. 5.]


1891 Aug 5 / J / At the Adelaide Observatory, S. Australia / dark spots on Jupiter's North Temperate Belt / See May 14. / Described as appearing “absolutely black” rest of yearnot quite same rotation period as the planet's / Observatory 15-59. [VII; 142. Sells, Edward Perronet. “Dark Spots on Jupiter.” Observatory, 15 (1892): 58-59. See: (May 14).]


1891 Aug 5-6 / ab. midnight / Decided shock at Charleston, S.C. / B. Eagle 7-4-3. [VII; 143. “Another Earthquake in Charleston.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 7, 1891, p. 4 c. 3.]


[1891 Aug 11] / 1891 Aug 10, about / Turtle / Phil Ledger of of Aug 19, quoting the Detroit Free Press. / That during a th. storm, at Long Lake, Mich., a turtle 5 inches across and weighing 7 and a half ounces had fallen from the sky. [VII; 144. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 19, 1891.) “A Five-inch Turtle Rained Down.” New York Sun, August 17, 1891, p. 3 c. 5. “During the terrific thunderstorm on Tuesday afternoon a most remarkable event occurred on the farm of Fred Pless. about one mile from Long Lake, on the old Detroit and Lansing plank road, township of Genoa, Livingston county.” “During the storm one of Mr. Floss's hired men was standing in the open door of the grain barn watching the descending flood, when a turtle was rained down. The reptile when measured was found to be 5 x 3½ inches and weighed seven and one-half ounces. It struck upon its back in a pool that had been formed in front of the door by the rain with a 'splat' or 'crack' as loud as a pistol shot, indicating its fall from a considerable height. W.H.W. Russell, the attorney, who was at the house of Mr. Pless at the time, secured the turtle, and now has it at his room, 27 Moffat block. His theory is that it must have been swept up into the clouds by some strong uplift of atmosphere from one of the numerous small lakes in that locality. Its great weight, however, makes the circumstance chiefly remarkable, much more so than the fall of angle worms and small fish which have been noted in times past.” “A Strange Story This.” Detroit Free Press, August 13, 1891, p. 9 c. 5.]


1891 Aug 12 / B. Eagle, 4-5 / Woman's dream where a body be foundtrue. [B; 1149. "Found At Last." Brooklyn Eagle, August 12, 1891, p. 4 c. 5. When the coroner held an inquest into the death of Mrs. Ellen Short, her son told of her dream, a few days after her husband's disappearance on July 14, 1890, that his body was at the bottom of a well. A search was conducted, that night, at the railway roundhouse where the husband had been working and last seen. His body was found at the bottom an old well that supplied water to the locomotives. "The bodies of husband and wife will be buried at the same time."]


1891 Aug 14 / Most furious elec. storm ever known in Nova Scotia / B. Eagle 14-4-6. [VII; 145. “Nova Scotia's Electric Storm.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 14, 1891, p. 4 c. 6.]


1891 Aug 16 / Destructive typhoon / Japan / B. Eagle 31-3-9. [VII; 146. “Terrible Typhoon in Japan.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 31, 1891, p. 3 c. 9.]


1891 Aug 16 / Terrific typhoon / Japan / Nature 44-437. [VII; 147. “Notes.” Nature, 44 (September 3, 1891): 435-438, at 437.]


[1891 Aug. 18 /] 1891 Aug 28 / (+) / The hurricane at Martinique, Said that globular lightning was seen on all sidesglobes of fire bursting near the ground. / Nature 44/575. / But globe lightning a rare phe. Also it is said that thunder was scarcely perceptible, because of other sounds. [VII; 161.1, 161.2. “Notes.” Nature, 44 (October 15, 1891): 574-577, at 575. “Globular lightning was seen on all sides during the hurricane; the country folks speak of globes of fire which traversed the air for several minutes, and burst about two feet above the ground.” Tissandier, Gaston. “Le Cyclone de la Martinique.” La Nature, 1891 pt. 2 (no. 957; October 3): 273-274.]


[1891 Aug] / Find the Martinique air burst with meteors to go with Halifax, Aug 29, 1883. [VII; 162. See: 1822 Sept 1, (I; 991), and, 1883 Aug 29, (V; 1565).]


1891 Aug 18 / About this time great hurricane Martinique. [VII; 148. “North Atlantic Storms for August, 1891.” Monthly Weather Review, 19 (no. 8; August 1891): 185-186.]


1891 Aug 18 / Botzen, village in Austria, overwhelmed by a cloudburst. / B. Eagle 18-6-2 / 20-4-2 / 40 persons drowned. [VII; 149. “Disaster in the Cloudburst.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 18, 1891, p. 6 c. 2. “Forty Persons Drowned.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 20, 1891, p. 4 c. 2.]


1891 Aug 18 / Floods in Missouri / B. Eagle 18-4-9. [VII; 150. “Missouri's Cloud Burst.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 18, 1891, p. 4 c. 9.]


1891 Aug 19 / One of the most terrific rain-storms in history of Indianapolis / B. Eagle 20-4-3. [VII; 151. “Big Storm in Indianapolis.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 20, 1891, p. 4 c. 3.]


1891 Aug 19 / N.Y. Trib, 1-4 / Floods / Austria. [VII; 152. "Forty People Drowned in Austria." New York Tribune, August 19, 1891, p. 1 c. 3.]


1891 Aug 21 / Large white spot on Jupiter, by Denning / Observatory 14-312 / also a very conspicuous black spot. [VII; 153. Denning, William Frederick. “Jupiter.” Observatory, 14 (1891): 312.]


1891 Aug 22 / morning / Severe shocks / Central Portugal / B. Eagle 22-2-9. [VII; 154. “Earthquake in Portugal.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 22, 1891, p. 2 c. 9.]


1891 Aug 23 / metite / night / Object, white hot, fell from sky into Eighth street, Philadelphia, and was brought to the Phil Press office. / Eagle 24-3-8 / obj 4½ [inches] long and 2½ wide. / 23-24, night of. [VII; 155. “Even Philadelphia Was Disturbed.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 24, 1891, p. 3 c. 8.]


1891 Aug 23-24 / night / Schuylkill Valley / severest known storm there / Pub Ledger, 25th. [VII; 156. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 25, 1891.)]


1891 Aug 24 / Trib, 1-4 / Floods / Colorado Desert. [VII; 157. "The Colorado Desert Lake." New York Tribune, August 24, 1891, p. 1 c. 3.]


1891 Aug 24 / [LT], 4-b / q / Portugal and Italy. [VII; 158. “Earthquake Shock in Portugal.” London Times, August 24, 1891, p. 4 c. 2. “Italy.” London Times, August 24, 1891, p. 4 c. 2.]


1891 Aug 25 / N.Y. Trib, 1-1 / 24-1-1 / Floods / Pa. [VII; 159. "Cloudburst at Pottsville." New York Tribune, August 24, 1891, p. 1 c. 1-2. "Great Damage by Floods." New York Tribune, August 25, 1891, p. 1 c. 1.]


1891 Aug 25 / [LT], 7-a / Cuzco / phe. [VII; 160. “London, Tuesday, August 25, 1891.” London Times, August 25, 1891, p. 7 c. 1-4. The editorial concerns the Chilean Civil War of 1891, (not any phenomena related to Cuzco). ]


[1891 Aug. 28. Wrong date. See: 1891 Aug. 18, (VII; 161).]


1891 Aug 29 / NY Trib, 1-6 / Floods / N.Y. [VII; 163. "Work of a Cloudburst." New York Tribune, August 29, 1891, p. 1 c. 6 & p. 2 c. 1.]


1891 Aug 31 / Stromboli again violent . See July 16-23. [VII; 164. See: 1891 July 16-23, (VII; 134).]


1891 Sept / Look / Palmyra, Maine, phe with Feb-March, 1892. [B; 1150. See: 1892 Feb., March, (B; 1241).]


1891 Sept 1 / Phe, farm of Hokan Nelsons, near Lake Crystal, Minn., had continued all summer since May. [B; 1151. See: 1891 (May), (B; 1134), and, 1891 July-Aug, (B; 1140).]


1891 Sept. 1 / Beam / at Halifax / Nature 45/7. [VII; 165. “A Rare Phenomenon.” Nature, 45 (November 5, 1891): 7.]


1891 Sept. 1 / [LT], 6-d / Met. [VII; 166. Forbes, George. “A Bright Meteor.” London Times, September 1, 1891, p. 6 c. 4.]


1891 Sept 1-20 / Nothing / Toronto Globe. [VII; 167.]


1891 Sept 1 to 21 / World. [VII; 168.]


1891 Sept. 5 / Crawfordsville, Ind / obj. / See “Lo!” [B; 1152. The note refers to information from pages141 to 142 of Lo!Brooklyn Eagle, Sept. 10, 1891something that was seen, at Crawfordsville, Indiana, 2 a.m., Sept. 5th. Two icemen saw it. It was a seemingly headless monster, or it was a construction, about 20 feet long, and 8 feet wide, moving in the sky, seemingly propelled by fin-like attachments. It moved toward the icemen. The icemen moved. It sailed away, and made such a noise that the Rev. G.W. Switzer, pastor of the Methodist church, was awakened, and, looking from his window, saw the object circling in the sky.” “I supposed that there was no such person as the Rev. G.W. Switzer. Being convinced that there had probably never been a Rev. G.W. Switzer, of Crawfordsville—and taking for a pseudo-standard that if I'm convinced of something that is something to suspectI looked him up. I learned that the Rev. G.W. Switzer had lived in Crawfordsville, in September, 1891. Then I found out his present address in Michigan. I wrote to him, and received a reply that he was travelling in California, and would send me an account of what he had seen in the sky, immediately after returning home. But I have been unable to get him to send that account. If anybody sees a 'headless monster' in the sky, it is just as well to think that over, before getting into print. Altogether, I think that I make here as creditable and scientific a demonstration as any by any orthodox scientist, so far encountered by us. The problem is: Did a 'headless monster' appear in Crawfordsville, in September, 1891? And I publish the results of my researches: 'Yes, a Rev. G.W. Switzer did live in Crawfordsville, at the time.'” “A Substitute for the Sea Serpent.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 10, 1891, p. 4 c. 2-3. The Eagle's editorial suggested that the object was a large kite. “Squirmed Like a Serpent.” Indianapolis Journal, September 7, 1891, p. 1 c. 5. “The strange sight seen by Marshall Mclntyre and Will Gray, two ice men, last Saturday morning, about 2 o'clock, continues to be the talk of the people of this city. The men are very positive that they actually witnessed something that is as yet unaccounted for. Their story, in brief, as told by Mclntyre, was that when they were in the barn hitching up their teams a strange sensation of awe and dread came over them. Looking up Mclntyre saw a horrible apparition coming toward him from the west. The 'shape' was over one hundred feet above the ground and looked to be about twenty feet long and eight feet wide, and moved rapidly through the air by means of several pairs of fins. The men claim that it did not seem to have a head. When it got immediately over the residence of Mr. Martin, their employer, it commenced to turn round in a circle, where it remained some time. The men took safety in the barn, from which they viewed the phenomenon. It then sailed off toward the east, but very soon returned, and the men drove away to the ice-house. When they returned it was gone.” “This story received unexpected corroboration to-day from a source that leaves no doubt that some undefinable aerial specter visited the Athens of Indiana Friday night, or rather Saturday morning. Rev. G.W. Switzer, of the Methodist Church, and his wife also saw the ghostly spectacle. Rev. Switzer stepped out the back door of the parsonage to get a drink between 12 and 1 o'clock, and as he stood at the well a strange sensation crept over him. For some cause he looked upwards, and saw a sight that he cannot very well describe. The night was dark and still. The electric lights, however, were shedding their bright glare, and he noticed some strange object sweeping from the southwest. It appeared to be about sixteen feet long and eight feet wide, very much resembliug a mass of floating drapery. It seemed to work about like it was swimming through the air or squirming like a serpent. Mr. Switzer called his wife, and they watched it for a time as it hovered over the Methodist Church, and then it began to descend. Mr. Switzer went out into the street, and saw it arise again, as also did his wife. They became tired and went into the house, leaving the object still in sight.” “It was about an hour after Rev. Switzer went into the house that the two ice-men were almost scared to death by the same object. There are other persons who were out about the same time, and they all noticed that the birds were chirping as if in distress, and say that a peculiar sensation would come over them every few minutes, like as if they felt that something was going to swoop down upon them. There is no question but that the strange object was seen, but what it was is a mystery.” “A Strange Phenomenon.” Crawfordsville Daily Journal, September 5, 1891, p. 8 c. 3. “It was about three or four hundred feet in the air, and most gruesome in aspect. It was about eighteen feet long and eight feet wide and moved rapidly through the air by means of several pairs of side fins which it worked most sturdily. It was pure white and had no definite shape or form, resembling somewhat a great white shroud fitted out with propelling fins. There was no tail or head visible but there was one great flaming eye, and a sort of a wheezing, plaintive sound was emitted from a mouth which was invisible. It flapped like a flag in the winds as it came on and frequently gave a great squirm as though suffering unutterable agony.” “Mr. Switzer Saw the Spook.” Crawfordsville Daily Journal, September 6, 1891, p. 5 c. 3. “It was much too low to be a cloud and moved too swiftly, besides there was no wind at all.” “The Spook Explained.” Crawfordsville Daily Journal, September 8, 1891, p. 7 c. 3. “The horrible apparation [sic] which was seen by numerous citizens Friday night has been explained satisfactorily and it did not prove to be a ghost. John Hornbeck happened to step out in the yard about midnight, and saw the horrible apparition as it swooped about the town. He summoned Abe Hernley and they proceeded to investigate. They followed the wraith about town and finally discovered it to be a flock of many hundred killdeers. These birds were evidently passing over the city and becoming bewildered by the electric lights had lost their way. Their white breasts and wings gave the flock their ghostly appearance and the sound of agony was their plaintive dismal cry. Messrs. Hornbeck and Hernley were quite close to them once as they swept near the ground and are certain that they were not mistaken.” “The Glorious.” Crawfordsville Daily Journal, July 3, 1891, p. 3 c. 4. “Large crowds came swarming down town last evening after supper to witness the evening's entertainment. The first feature was the balloon ascension and parachute leap by Prof. Peacock. The ascent was made from north Washington street and was a great success. The parachute leap was made when the balloon was about over the reservoir of the city water works and Mr. Peacock landed safely in Hutton's woods.” “Boys, Balloons, Parachutes and Cats.” Indianapolis Journal, July 26, 1891, p. 1 c. 4. “Crawfordsville, Ind., July 25.The boys in this city are wild over sending up balloons. In fact, it is all the rage. They have also utilized every cat that can be captured, which they tie to a parachute attached to a balloon. It is so arranged that the parachute will become detached from the balloon in five minutes after the balloon is sent up, and from present prospects cats will become scarce in this city, but plenty in the country.” Following Prof. Peacock's exhibition, during Crawfordsville's Independence Day celebrations, such pranks may provide a more substantial explanation than a flock of birds, if a large parachute made from bedsheets, (possibly “a mass of floating drapery”), was being floated by balloons, (possibly mistaken for “several pairs of fins”), in the dark night sky, (the Moon had disappeared shortly after sunset), with a reluctant feline passenger, (“a sort of a wheezing, plaintive sound was emitted from a mouth which was invisible”). George Washington Switzer was the full name of the Methodist minister in Crawfordsville.]


1891 Sept 5 / Jupiter / Opposition. [VII; 169. Opposition of Jupiter. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1891, 469.]


1891 Sept 5 / Toronto Globe / nothing. [VII; 170.]


1891 Sept 5 / J. / 3 conspicuous dark spots on Jupiter, rotating at very slightly different rates, all appeared on this date. / Observatory 15-110. [VII; 171. Williams, Arthur Stanley. “The Recent Disturbance in the Northern Hemisphere of Jupiter.” Observatory, 15 (1892): 109-112.]


1891 Sept 5 / Have St. Louis G-Dem and Chicago Tribune and Phil Pub. Ledger. [VII; 172.]


1891 Sept 5 / “A huge waterspout formed off the beach (Asbury Park, N.J.) this morning and moved seaward in a southerly direction. The volume of water was balloon-shaped and was fully 300 feet high. / N.Y. World 6-3-5 / World not read elsewhere. [VII; 173. (New York World, September 6, 1891, p. 3 c. 5; not @ LOC nor Newspapers.com.) (“Huge Waterspout.” Watertown Republican, (Watertown, New York) September 9, 1891, p. 2 c. 3.)]


1891 Sept 7 / Night, 8 o'clock, three girls working overtime in a Sunderland factory / (Sunderland Daily Echo, 8th), copied in Med and Dayb., 25th. Began to scream. Said had seen a ghost, "a person [all] clothed in white". Said that their overseer was a spiritualist. [B; 1153. "Scene in a Local Factory." Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, September 8, 1891, p. 3 c. 3. (Medium and Daybreak, September 25, 1891; not online.)]


1891 Sept 7-8 / metite / or 12:25 a.m. of 8th / Meteor of unusual size and brilliancy over Tucson. Said that a stone of estimated weight of 1,000 pounds some week before had fallen north of Tucson. / (Pubs. Astro Soc Pacific 3-371quoting S.F. Bulletin). [VII; 174. “Meteor Fall in Arizona.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 3 (no. 19; November 1891): 370-371. (San Francisco Evening Bulletin, ca. September 8, 1891.) Foote, Albert Edward. “A New Locality for Meteoric Iron with a Preliminary Notice of the Discovery of Diamonds in the Irom.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 42 (1891): 413-417. Foote led an expedition to Meteor Crater, (formed by a meteoric impact about 50,000 years ago),  and obtained fragments of the Canyon Diablo meteorite, (of which the two largest weigh 639 kg., the Holsinger meteorite, and 485 kg., a fragment at the Canterbury Museum, in New Zealand, and, the largest of the first specimens retrieved by Foote weighed about 91 kg.).]


1891 Sept 9 / Great q / San Salvador / Nature 44-475. [VII; 175. “Notes.” Nature, 44 (September 17, 1891): 475-478, at 475.]


[1891 Sept 9 /] 1891 Sept 19 / 1:55 a.m. / San Salvador / big q. / [BA] '11. [VII; 189. A class III earthquake. Milne, 736.]


1891 Sept 9 / Narrow band of light in skye to w. through zenith and aurora, at Toronto. / Nature 45-7. [VII; 176. “A Rare Phenomenon.” Nature, 45 (November 5, 1891): 7.]


1891 Sept 9 / Beam / Lyons, N.Y. / Science 18-261, 305 / With aurora. [VII; 177. Veeder, Major Albert. "Auroral Phenomena." Science, s. 1 v. 18 (November 6, 1891): 261. Fergusson, Sterling Price. "Auroral Phenomena." Science, s. 1 v. 18 (November 27, 1891): 305.]


1891 Sept 11 / In Norway the beam concurred with but was different from ordinary aurora. / Nature 44/614 / See 45/7 and 79. [VII; 178. “A Rare Phenomenon.” Nature, 44 (October 29, 1891): 614. “A Rare Phenomenon.” Nature, 45 (November 5, 1891): 7. Bell, Alexander Graham. “A Rare Phenomenon.” Nature, 45 (November 26, 1891): 79.]


1891 Sept 11 / [LT], 3-c / 14-6-b / Terrific q / Portugal. [VII; 179. “Terrific earthquake in Salvador.” London Times, September 11, 1891, p. 3 c. 3-4. “The Earthquake in Salvador.” London Times, September 14, 1891, p. 6 c. 2.]


1891 Sept 10, 11, 12 / Beam, but at Nottingham like aurora/ Nature 44/519. [VII; 180. “A Rare Phenomenon.” Nature, 45 (October 1, 1891): 519.]


1891 Sept 11 / A streak as if from the Pleiades (London) / Nature 44-519. [VII; 181. “A Rare Phenomenon.” Nature, 45 (October 1, 1891): 519.]


1891 Sept 10, 11, 25 / Beam / England and Norway / Nature 44/614 / 45/aurora. [VII; 182. “A Rare Phenomenon.” Nature, 44 (October 29, 1891): 614. “A Rare Phenomenon.” Nature, 45 (November 5, 1891): 7.]


1891 (Sept 11) / Beam / Lyons, NY / beam or arch / Narrow band of light from a point on horizon nearly due west and passed through Northern Crown and Lyra. / Nature 45-7. [VII; 183. “A Rare Phenomenon.” Nature, 45 (November 5, 1891): 7. This band of light, observed at Lyons, was that described on September 9, (not September 11). See: 1891 Sept 9, (VII; 177).]


1891 Sept 10, 11 / (D-276) / Comet-like / Nova Scotia and Eng. [VII; 184. The note copies information from page 276 of The Book of the Damned. "A Rare Phenomenon." Nature, 44 (September 24, 1891): 494. "A Rare Phenomenon." Nature, 44 (October 1, 1891): 519. "A Rare Phenomenon." Nature, 44 (October 8, 1891): 541. Bell, Alexander Graham Bell. "A Rare Phenomenon." Nature, 45 (November 26, 1891): 79.]


1891 Sept 9, 10, 11 / (Cut) / Beam / U.S., Canada / Nature 45/aurora. [VII; 185. “A Rare Phenomenon.” Nature, 45 (November 5, 1891): 7.]


1891 Sept 10 / Ireland / Edinburgh / Streak in the sky / Edinburgh / Nature 44/494, 541, 614 / Canada. [VII; 186. "A Rare Phenomenon." Nature, 44 (September 24, 1891): 494. "A Rare Phenomenon." Nature, 44 (October 8, 1891): 541. “A Rare Phenomenon.” Nature, 44 (October 29, 1891): 614.]


1891 Sept. 11 / (Ireland) / Westmeath / Streak in sky / Nature 44/494, 541. [VII; 187. "A Rare Phenomenon." Nature, 44 (September 24, 1891): 494. "A Rare Phenomenon." Nature, 44 (October 8, 1891): 541.]


1891 Sept. 13 / (+) / Troy / while hunting along Hudson River, near Albany, Michael Griffa, an Italian storekeeper of Troy, saw an animal swimming in the river. Shot it and brought it to Troy. "It is (ab) 2 feet long and its back is covered with coarse hair. The underside is the color of human flesh and the features and trunk bear a striking resemblance to a female child. It has a well-developed chest and breastbone. There are wings measuring 20 inches from tip to tip, four legs, two fins and a tail somewhat resembling a pig's. Several doctors have examined it but are at a loss to place it. The monstrosity has been placed in alcohol and will be sent to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. As it hangs against the wall at Griffa's, with the underside exposed, the visitor is impressed with the grotesque human features." / Sun 14-3-2. [B; 1154.1 to 1154.4. "What Is It?" New York Sun, September 14, 1891, p. 3 c. 2. "A Strange Fish Caught in the Upper Hudson—It Has Two Wings and Four Legs." "Troy, Sept. 13.—While while hunting along Hudson River, near Pleasure Island, Michael Griffa, an Italian storekeeper of this city, saw swimming on the surface an object which he supposed to be a turtle. He fired and hit it, and when he dragged the creature ashore he was aazed. He had never seen the like before. He brought it to Troy, and hundreds have visited his place to-day, but none can tell what it is. It is about two feet long in the body, and its back is covered with coarse hair. The under side is of the color of human flesh, and the features and trunk bear a striking resemblance to a female child. It has a well-developed chest and breastbone. There are wings measuring twenty inches from tip to tip, four legs, two fins, and a tail somewhat resembling a pig's. Several doctors have examined it, but are at a loss to place it. The monstrosity has been placed in alcohol and will be sent to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. As it hangs against the wall at Griffa's with the under side exposed, the visitor is impressed with the grotesque human features."]


1891 Sept. 14 / Great floods in Spain. [VII; 188. (Refs.???)]


[1891 Sept 19. Wrong date. See: 1891 Sept 9, (VII; 189).]


1891 Sept 20 / 10:45 a.m. / Shocks and detonations / Columbia, S. Car. / Chicago Citizen, Sept 26. [VII; 190. (Chicago Citizen, September 26, 1891.)]


1891 Sept 25 / [LT, 5-e / Curious adventure at Ilfracombe. [B; 1155. “A Curious Adventure at Ilfracombe.” London Times, September 25, 1891, p. 5 c. 5.]


1891 Sept 25 (and 26) / Flames / Glb-Dem 27-6-6 / In house in Carr Street, St Louis, a fire that was extinguished by the Fire Dept., on 25th, before much damage. Ab 8 p.m., 26h, the occupant went out. Half an hour later flames were discovered in a bedroom. The bed had been fired in 3 places. A blaze in a bureau and another in a closet. / N.M. [B; 1157.1, 1157.2. (St. Louis Globe-Democrat, September 27, 1891, p. 6 c. 6.; not found here.)]


1891 Sept 25 / Same beam as 10th and 11th / in Aberdeenshire / Nature 44/614. [VII; 191. “A Rare Phenomenon.” Nature, 44 (October 29, 1891): 614.]


1891 Sept 26 / 10:45 p.m. / q / Ill, Ind, Ky, Mo. / Glb Dem, 27th. [VII; 192. “Shaken Up.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, September 27, 1891, p. 3 c. 1-3.]


1891 Sept 26 / 11 p.m. / Shock / Mo, Ky, Ill, Iowa, Ind, Tenn / Sun 28-1-5. [VII; 193. “Shaking Up the Big West.” New York Sun, September 28, 1891, p. 1 c. 5.]


1891 Sept 27 / Fires / In Glb Dem of 28-5-1a list of 16 fires between 5:30 a.m. and 9:30 p.m. Also several other small fires in rubbish heaps, such as straw and packing. 2 of the fires caused great damage. / Said of one of the fires that it was incendiary; coal oil found on walls and floors. [B; 1156.1, 1156.2. “Destroyed by Fire.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, September 28, 1891, p. 5 c. 1-3. (Probably some information from other articles. Refs.???)]


1891 Sept 27 / B Eagle, 1-2 / Severe drought in Maine. [VII; 194. “Maine Is Having a Very Dry Time.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 27, 1891, p. 1 c. 2.]


1891 Sept 28 / An alley between 10th and 11th streets, St Louis, where coal sheds had burned several days before, again on fire. "The cause of the fire is unknown. / Glb Dem 29-4-6. [B; 1158. “Local Brevities.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, September 29, 1891, p. 4 c. 6.]


1891 Sept 28 / Great prairie fires / N. Dakota / Glb Dem 29-1-5. [B; 1159. “Prairie Fires.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, September 28, 1891, p. 1 c. 3-4.]


1891 Sept 28 / 2 p.m. / Great fire / Philadelphia. [B; 1160. (Refs.???)]


1891 Sept. 28 / (CH) 29+ / Plöermel / Bolide6 minutes / L'Astro 1891/435. [VII; 195. Martial, F. "Bradyte ou bolide lent." Astronomie, 10 (1891): 435-436.]


1891 Sept 29 / Animal / Glb Dem 30-6-6 / Ducks and chickens disap. at Lebanon, Pa. Then in the Reservoir said a crocodile was seen.6 miles from Lebanon. Word sent to city authorities. Excitementsomeone made it worse by ringing the fire bell. For that he was arrested. The Water Commissioners and members of the City Council drove to the reservoir to investigate. Said that they did find a crocodile there and that a policeman in wading was bitten. [B; 1161. “A Crocodile in the Dam.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, September 30, 1891, p. 6 c. 6. "It Is a Queer Fish." Savannah Morning News, October 3, 1891, p. 5 c. 3. "A Queer Story." Lebanon Daily News, (Pennsylvania), September 30, 1891, p. 4 c. 1. "The above we clip from the Philadelphia Press of to-day. It is probably needless to add that the writer of the dispatch has been drawing rather freely on the 'long bow.' He evidently has a glowing imagination and has succeeded admirably in writing up something that only exists in the fancy of the mind. It is true an animal has been seen at the dam, but nothing like the above occurred."]


1891 Sept 29 / Alligator / See May 9. [B; 1162. See: 1891 May 9, (B; 1136).]


1891 Sept 29 / Alligator / See July 28, 1912. [B; 1163. See: 1912 July 28, (D; 566).]


1891 Sept 29 / Alligator / a shower / Dec 26, 1877. [B; 1164. See: 1877 Dec 26, (IV; 2292).]


1891 Sept. 29 / See July 28, 1889. / See 2 cases (one a fall), summer, 1888. / alligator. [B; 1165. See: 1888 Sept 20, (B; 949); 1889 July 28, (B; 1035); and, (1888 summer).]


1891 Sept. 30 / Clbrst / During a th storm in Elizabeth, Arkansas, a “terrible roaring was heard” and a fall of water that covered the ground several inches deep. / P.L., Oct 5. [VII; 196. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 5, 1891.)]


1891 Oct / Wheel / China Sea / by Frenchman / N / D-264. [VII; 197. The note copies information from page 264 of The Book of the Damned. "Un corps lumineux." Astronomie, 10 (1891): 312.]


1891 Oct. 3 / Small, short eruption / Mayon Volc., Philippines / Ref—Feb 1, 1814. [VII; 198. Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


1891 Oct 7 / Daily falls of grain at San Jacinto / P.L. of Oct 7. [VII; 199. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 7, 1891.) “Coast Items.” San Francisco Morning Call, September 30, 1891, p. 3 c. 2. “The San Diego Sun says: They are having daily showers at San Jacinto, which come from the evaporation of the Salton Lake. Their origin and drift have been watched from the summit of San Jacinto Peak, and there is no further room for doubt as to the effect the lake is having upon the rainfall.” Rain, (not grain).]


1891 Oct 12 / P.L. of / Bear tracks were discovered, this week, at Brandwine Summit, near Wilmington. [B; 1166. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 12, 1891.)]


1891 Oct 14-26 / q and submarine / Italy / BA '11. [VII; 200. A class I earthquake. Milne, 736. The Pantelleria volcano.]


1891 Oct. 13 / Dec. 5 / q. / Charleston / B.S.A., 4/152. [VII; 201. Taber, Stephen. "Seismic Activity in the Atlantic Coastal Plain near Charleston, South Carolina." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 4 (1914): 108-160, at 152.]


1891 Oct 14 / Metite said fallen at Ealing. / Nature 44/599. [VII; 202. “Notes.” Nature, 44 (October 22, 1891): 597-601, at 599. “The Ealing Middlesex County Times (October 17) prints the following account of an incident which occurred at 'The Grange,' the residence of Mr. Yates Neill, Ealing, on Wednesday, October 14:—'It appears that during Tuesday night a large branch of one of the magnificent chestnut trees standing in the ground was broken off by the force of the wind, and fell on two stripling chestnut trees near the wall. On Wednesday morning, the gardener, a man named Parker, was engaged in sawing the detached bough, Mr. Delancey Neill and Mr. Vertie Neill watching the operation. Just before noon, the first-named gentleman saw what appeared to him to be a ball of fire fall, and striking the tree in an oblique direction, alight on the ground within two or three yards of where the three were standing, whence it rebounded and exploded with a sound like dynamite. Although neither of them was struck, the shock was so great that for a time all three were dazed, Mr. Vertie Neill, indeed, being thrown down, and rolling over two or three times. His brother was the first to recover from the shock, and promptly went to his help, and he was removed to the house, where the feeling of dizziness speedily wore off; and beyond somewhat severe headaches, which lasted for some hours, neither of the gentlemen nor the gardener appeared to have suffered any ill effects. The trunk of the tree struck by the meteor presents the appearance of having been burned in a zigzag direction for a distance of some 20 or 30 feet.'"]


1891 Oct 14-17 / Between these dates, a submarine eruption near Island of Pantelleria. / Nature 45/154. [VII; 203. “The October Eruption North-West of Pantelleria.” Nature, 45 (December 17, 1891): 154. The Pantelleria volcano.]


1891 Oct 15 / evening / light shock / Nashville, Tenn. / Sun 17-1-6. [VII; 205. “Earthquake Shock in Tennessee.” New York Sun, October 17, 1891, p. 1 c. 6.]


1891 Oct 16 / Soon after midnight—another bombardment of the skies by the rain-makers at San Diego, Texas. / Sun 17-1-6. [VII; 206. “More Sky Bombardment.” New York Sun, October 17, 1891, p. 1 c. 6.]


1891 Oct 16 / Eagle, 6-1 / q. / Burnsville, Miss. [VII; 208. “Earthquake Shocks in the South.” Brooklyn Eagle, October 16, 1891, p. 6 c. 1.]


1891 / ab middle Oct / Milford, Pa, and Port Jervis, N.Y. / Clouds of moths / Sun 21-7-4 / See Sept., 1881. [VII; 207. “The Moths That Swarmed at Milford.” New York Sun, October 21, 1891, p. 7 c. 4. See: 1881 Sept 1, (V; 664), and, 1881 Sept 18-20, (V; 713).]


1891 Oct 17-25 / Submarine eruption N.W. of Pantelleria, S. of Sicily / details / Nature 45-584 / q at P began on 14th. [VII; 204. Butler, G.W. “Abstract of Mr. A. Ricco's Account of the Submarine Eruption North-West of Pantelleria, October 1891.” Nature, 45 (April 21, 1892): 584-585. The Pantelleria volcano.]


1891 Oct 18 / Mrs Caroline Wolfsheimer, aged 88, died, in Albany, N.Y. Body buried in cemetery. Ab 10th of Nov.—body been removed. / B. Eagle, Nov 13-6-5. [B; 1167. "Body Snatching in Albany." Brooklyn Eagle, November 13, 1891, p. 6 c. 5.]


1891 Oct 19 / [LT], 6-a / 21-6-a / New volc. in Mediterranean. [VII; 209. “New Volcano in the Mediterranean.” London Times, October 19, 1891, p. 6 c. 1-2. “The New Volcano in the Mediterranean.” London Times, October 21, 1891, p. 6 c. 1. The Pantelleria volcano.]


1891 Oct. 25 / night / Tremendous meteor / west to east / Rigg's Station, Iowa, Pub Ledger, Oct 29. [VII; 211. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 29, 1891.)]


1891 Oct 25 / 4 p.m. / Bournemouth / q / Nature 44-614. [VII; 212. Cecil, Henry. “Earthquake at Bournemouth.” Nature, 44 (October 29, 1891): 614.]


[1891 Oct 26, 27] / 1891 Oct 25 / Rain / Globe Dem, Oct 29-1-5 / At Wellington, Missouri, in the garden of County Judge J.A. Lockhart, a guest of his, Mr. George Hanmore, of Independence, Mo., was walking, when he felt rain on his hands, but there was not a cloud in the sky and the sun was shining. Mr Hanmore looked up and saw water falling, He investigated and found it falling within a spot 15 feet sqaure. On the 27th, Judge Lockhart was in his store ab one p.m. when Mr. H came running in, telling him that water was falling again at the same spot. Judge L went to the garden and saw the rain so falling. Both times it began at one and ceased at 6. / No tree mentioned. [VII; 210.1, 210.2, 210.3. “Rain From A Cloudless Sky.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 29, 1891, p. 1 c. 5. “Beats a Rain Machine.” Stark County Democrat, (Canton, Ohio), November 5, 1891, p. 7 c. 5. “J. A. Lockhart, now a hardware merchant of Wellington, Mo., for four years one of the county judges of Lafayette county, a man of undoubted integrity, vouched for by local business firms, was in the city yesterday. He tells a most remarkable story: George Hanmore, of Independence, Mo., his wife and children have been guests of Judge Lockhart for the past week. Last Monday Mr. Hanmore walked down into Judge Lockhart's garden, and when near the center of the truck patch he felt drops of rain upon his hands and face. There was not a cloud in the sky, and the sun was shining brightly. Mr. Hanmore was astounded. He looked up. There was no doubt of it, rain was falling lightly, but rapidly. He moved on and fifteen feet farther no rain was falling. He walked back where he first noticed the rain drops rain was still falling there. He called to Judge Lockhart's colored servant. The man came out and stood within the little spot where the rain was falling. Frightened, he started to tho house on a dead run. Mrs. Hanmore, Mrs. Lockhart and the children went out to the garden. They, too, saw and felt the rain. Yesterday Judge Lock[h]art was at his store shortly after 1 o'clock, and Mr. Hanmore came running down and told him it was again raining on the same spot. Judge Lockhart had been loath to believe the story told him when he returned home to supper the night before, but he hurried home and was convinced. Again the rain was falling in a little spot probably fifteen feet square, while all about the sky was cloudless and the sun shining. Judge Lockhart, being in the city, does not know whether it is raining on his garden today or not. Both Monday and Tuesday the rain began falling about 1 o'clock and ceased about 6 o'clock. No rain-makers have been experimenting in that vicinity.”]


1891 Oct 26 / (Fires) / Globe-Dem, Dec 19, 1891, from the Toronto World—home of Robert Dawson, a farmer, at Thorah, about 3 miles from Beaverton—his wife and adopted daughter, aged 14, an English girl, named Jennie L. Bramwell. The girl had been ill. Said had gone into a trance, and awakening had exclaimed—"Look at that!"—and pointed at the ceiling. The ceiling was on fire. Later the girl again startled Mr and Mrs D. pointing and another fire. Next day fires broke out—one extinguished and another break out, ac to story told to the World reporter by Mrs. D. A picture suddenly took fire. While they sat looking at a wall, fire broke out. A towel with which Mrs D had wiped a table, thrown to another table, burst into flames. Jennie Bramwell's dress flamed, and Mrs. D's hand was burned in extinguishing it. All week these fires went on. A kitten flamed, but running into the yard, the fire went out, leaving it singed. It is said that the fires seemed special to the atmosphere of the house; anything put outside no longer burned. The reporter interviewed Mr. John Shier, brother of Mrs Dawson, and he said that he had seen the kitten take fire; also other fires. [B; 1168.1 to 1168.6. “Queer Pranks of a Ghost.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 19, 1891, p. 16 c. 5-6. (Toronto World, ca. Nov. (dateline "Nov. 6.") and November 12, 1891.)]


1891 Oct 25 / In the Toronto Globe, Nov 9, is an account by a Globe reporter who went to Beaverton to investigate. Says the house looks desolated; charred patches on the walls, looking as if a lighted lamp had been held against them, black and smoked, finally catching fire: conditions miserable; all furniture moved out of the house and wallpaper hanging in strips. He learned that the Dawsons had sent the girl back to the home from which she had been adopted, having suspected her because no fires occurred at night, when she was in bed. According to the reporter's interview she had no known grudge against either of the Dawsons. Her illness had been something of a mystery, because the doctor who was called in could not account for it. She had recovered suddenly, saying that she had dreamed she was cured. The reporter writes that "A half-witted" girl had walked about the house setting things on fire. He was doubtful as to what to think about the kitten, as asked to see it. He writes that it was nothing but a kitten with a few hairs on its back slightly singed. He inquired in the town and was told that the girl was an incorrigible little thief. His difficulty is that many of the fires were upon walls, where paper pasted would be most difficult to ignite, often with the house crowded with neighbors. He asked Mrs Dawson whether the girl had any knowledge of chemistry. I “learned that she was well versed in the rudiments of the science.” Accepting this, and seeming to forget that he had said she was half-witted, and bringing in the datum that she was an incorrigible little thief, he writes that there was no longer a mystery. He says that she had been seen in the drugstore several times and had managed to procure "some chemical", which she had applied to parts of the house. He does not mention the circumstance of the girl having herself been afire. [B; 1169.1 to 1169.8. “Beaverton's Bubble.” Toronto Globe, November 9, 1891, p. 1 c. 6 & p. 3 c. 1-2. Two curious factors are also mentioned in this article, which had been reported in the Ontario Gleaner, (a local newspaper published in Cannington). “A peculiar thing connected with these fires was  that as soon as any of the burning lumber, paper, cloth or wood (no matter how furiously they were burning in the house) was thrown outside the fire would immediately die out. After all the fire had ben extinguished Mrs Dawson pulled a piece of paper from the wall and rolled it up in a piece of an old muslin dress and dropped it on the centre of the floor, and, accompanied by Mr. Dawson and the rest of the family, stepped outside to see the result. No sooner had they stepped out of the door than the muslin and the paper became ignited and burned furiously.”]


1891 Oct 26 / Pub Ledger of / Yarn from Georgia of several weeks before. Someone out hunting near Crawfordsville shot thing, head like a turtle's and wings like a bat's, 2 webbed feet. [B; 1170. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 26, 1891.) “Interesting State News.” Macon Telegraph, October 19, 1891, p. 3 c. 1-2. “Crawfordsville Democrat: Last week a gentleman of our county who hunts a great deal was out hunting. While attempting to cross a branch he noticed something curious swimming just under the water. It didn't seem to be a fish nor yet a bird. Presently it rose, shook the water from its wings and started to fly when he shot it down. It had a head like a turtle, wings like a bat and a tail scaly and like a carp. There were two feet webbed like a goose. Was it a young dragon?”]


1891 Oct 27 / (+) / Wld Man / (See Sept, 1886.) / Glb Dem of, 6-5 / Dispatch from Gladwin, Mich, story told by 2 residents of this town, George Frost and W.W. Vivian: that they saw while hunting not far from Glad—saw man-like creature 7 feet tall, covered with hair, his arms reaching below his knees. Their dog sprang upon him. He killed it with a blow of his fist. He fled. The 2 men measured marks of his jumps—20 to 23 feet apart. [B; 1171.1, 1171.2. “They Saw a Giant.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 27, 1891, p. 6 c. 5. See: 1886 Sept., (B; 732).]


1891 Oct 27 / 1:35 a.m. / “Very perceptible, not to say alarming, shock” at Jamaica. / Nature 45-207. [VII; 213. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (December 31, 1891): 207-210, at 207.]


1891 Oct. 28 / q. / Japan / another, Jan 3. [VII; 214. See: 1892 Jan. 3, (VII: 289 & 290).]


1891 Oct. 28 / q. / Japan / Geog. J. 17-635 / Nature 45/19. [VII; 215. Davison, Charles. "Great Japanese Earthquake of October 28, 1891." Geographical Journal, 17 (1901): 635-655. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (November 5, 1891): 18-21, at 19-20.]


1891 Oct 28 / “Terrible q., Japan. Volc. Nakusan violent. 50,000 houses destroyed—4,000 persons perished. / Nature 45-20 / At Nagerio, slight shock night of 25th. / 45-86. [VII; 216. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (November 5, 1891): 18-21, at 19-20. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (November 26, 1891): 85-89, at 86.]


1891 Oct 29 / Afterglow, Lyons, N.Y. / Nature 45-30 / For almost an hour after sunset—w. sky lurid as if from a great conflagration. [VII; 217. “Red Light after Sunset.” Nature, 45 (November 12, 1891): 30.]


1891 Oct 29, etc. / Index / Great q. / Japan. [VII; 218. (Ref.??? New York Times, or, London Times???)]


1891 Oct. 30 / Ac to A.S. Williams, the Rev. A. Freeman saw “a remarkably bright, round spot entering over the east limb of Saturn north of the ring." 4 minutes later wholly within the ring. / Jour B.A.A. 2/168. [VII; 219. Williams, Arthur Stanley. "Recent Observations of Bright Spots on Saturn." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 2 (1891-1892): 167-170, at 168.]


1891 Oct 30 / 9:13 p.m. / England / met train / MWR 07/391. [VII; 220. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (no. 9; September 1907): 390-397, at 391.]


1891 / late in Oct / Globe Dem, Dec. 26, from the Pittsburg Dispatch. In the home of young man, Edward Ascher, a teamster, Evergreen Road, Allegheny, Pa. One evening, late on Oct, the house suddenly shook all over and the lights went out. Sounds like footsteps. The occupants felt oppressed as if by heavy weights. A mirror fell from the wall and broke, but cord and nail intact. Ascher moved away and was not followed by phe. and none reported by new tenants. [B; 1172.1, 1172.2. “Allegheny's Haunted House.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 26, 1891, p. 14 c. 4. “The House Shakes.” Pittsburg Dispatch, December 16, 1891, p. 2 c. 1.]


1891 / ab. last of Oct / Began the Peterborough phe of Jan 10. [B; 1173. See: 1892 Jan 10, (B; 1213).]


1891 (November) / BO / For an account of poltergeist performances, during which blood said to have dripped from a ceiling, home of a family named Walsingham, in Oakville, Georgia, November, 1891—nothing known about it except that it had been published in the San Francisco Examiner, see Review of Reviews, vol 5, appendix, p. 94. [B; 1174.1, 1174.2. “From the Spirit Land.” San Francisco Examiner, November 29, 1891, p. 9 c. 1-2. (Review of Reviews, v. 5 (1892): appendix, p. 94; check Stauffer Compact Shelving, AP4.R4 or Proquest; the chapter on “Haunted Houses” was not published in the 1891 edition of Stead's book.) “From the Spirit Land.” Philadelphia Times, November 18, 1891, p. 5 c. 1-2. “From the Land of Spirits.” Indianapolis Journal, November 22, 1891, p. 18 c. 1-2.  "Did Not Like It." Brooklyn Eagle, December 5, 1891, p. 2 c. 3. Stead, William Thomas. Real Ghost Stories. Revised edition. London: Grant Richards, 1897, 323-327. No record of this matter was found in a search of Georgia newspapers; no further information upon the Walsingham family nor Horace Gunn were found, nor a hamlet identified as Oakville, near Statesboro; no further information has been found beyond the telegraphed story to the Philadelphia Times, (only reprinted copies); and, thus, (as was suspected by Stead), it was probably a newspaper yarn.]


1891 Nov. 3 / Jupiter / Stationary. [VII; 221. Jupiter stationary. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1891, 469.]


1891 Nov 5 / (+) / Eagle, 2-2 / See Sept 5. / That at Peterhead, fishermen, one of whom had sent an account, had seen "an object like a waterspout looming up against a foggy background at a distance of 2 or 3 miles. They investigated and saw what seemed to be a living serpent, towering in the air, possibly 300 feet in height." Fins, eyes, and enormous teeth are described. / This is from the Glasgow Mail. [B; 1175.1, 1175.2. "Sea Serpents." Brooklyn Eagle, November 5, 1891, p. 2 c. 2. (Glasgow Mail, ca. October, 1891; not at BNA.) See: 1891 Sept. 5, (B; 1152). The Peterhead sea serpent appeared, (after newspapers complained of the lack of sightings), with a sensationally enormous account from an obliging fisherman. “The Sea Serpent Off Kinnaird HeadA Peterhead Fisherman's Story.” Peterhead Sentinel and General Advertiser for Buchan District, September 15, 1891, p. 4 c. 5. “Rising straight up from the water was a large body somewhat resembling the fore part of a horse and not less than four times the height of our mast, dark looking in colour, with large eyes, which seemed to shine like green fire, and with a mouthful of white teeth, which in the declining sun shone like a white wall. We were all struck with fright, and put the boat up in the wind when we were so near that could discern the lower parts af the animal's body, which were near the surface and which must have been at least 600 feet long, if not great deal longer. We sailed homewards for an hour, before it disappeared from view.”]


1891 Nov. 7 / by d'Ajuda, at Lisbon—very distinct luminous point in Aristarchus / L. Astro 11/33 / (not before long time not sunlight). [VII; 222. Armelin, Gaston. "Société Astronomique de France." Astronomie, 11 (1892): 32-36, at 33. The observer was only identified as "F."; and, "d'Adjuda" identifies the location, the "Tapada da Ajuda," (which is the parish where the Lisbon Astronomical Observatory is located).]


1891 Nov 8 / B. Eagle, 7-4 / Moodus, Conn / Drought. Reservoirs of town exhausted. [VII; 223. “Moodus Has a Water Famine.” Brooklyn Eagle, November 8, 1891, p. 7 c. 4.]


1891 Nov. 9 / Saturn / 16:30 to 18:12, G.M.T.—Two bright equatorial spots "strongly suspected". / A.S. Williams / Jour. B.A.A. 2/167 / These obs had been going on from May. [VII; 224. Williams, Arthur Stanley. "Recent Observations of Bright Spots on Saturn." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 2 (1891-1892): 167-170, at 167.]


1891 Nov. 15 / First ob of great sunspot. Around again Dec 12. / See. [VII; 225. See: 1891 Dec 12, (VII; 236); 1892 Jan 9 to 21, (VII; 310); 1892 Feb 5, (VII: 369 & 373); 1892 Feb 5, Feb 10, and Jan 21, (VII; 371); and, 1892 Feb, (VII; 374).]


1891 Nov. 16 / Repeat / Vallicita, Calaveras Co, Cal / fall of spider web / Had occurred there for the last four years in Oct, Nov. / Sun, Oct 23-8-3. [VII; 226. “Genuine Spider Web from the Clouds.” New York Sun, October 23, 1892, s. B p. 8 c. 3. "Spider Web from the Clouds." Scientific American, n.s., 67 (November 19, 1892): 325.]


1891 Nov. 19 / Auriga / 6:45 p.m. / Dublin / great meteor as if from Capella / E Mec 54/308 / p 330 / Another cor from Dublin, his letter dated before first was published, writes of this meteor as moving from Capella. [VII; 227. Travers, Edward J. "Brilliant Meteor, Nov. 19, 1891." English Mechanic, 54 (no. 1392; November 27. 1891): 308. Milligan W.H. "Large Meteor, 19th Nov...." English Mechanic, 54 (no. 1393; December 4, 1891): 330-331.]


1891 Nov. 19 / 6:40 p.m. / Large brilliant meteor moving slowly from a point in Auriga, near Capella. / E Mec 54-330, 308 / So seen in Dublin by 2 different cors writing independently. [VII; 228. Travers, Edward J. "Brilliant Meteor, Nov. 19, 1891." English Mechanic, 54 (no. 1392; November 27. 1891): 308. Milligan W.H. "Large Meteor, 19th Nov...." English Mechanic, 54 (no. 1393; December 4, 1891): 330-331.]


[1891 Nov 22 /] 1892 Nov 22 / Observatory 15/71 / On Nov 22, 1892, people on cliffs of Ramsgate saw what they believed rockets fired from a ship. A lifeboat put out to the Goodwin Sands. Then the story from a lightship that only 2 meteors had been seen. / (Cut). [VII; 739. “Large Meteors.” Observatory, 15 (1892): 71-72. The correct date was 1891, (not 1892).]


1891 Dec, etc. / (Shaking house) / (See Jan. 10.) / Med and Dayb., Jan 22, 1892 / At Peterborough, some months before, a small house, 22 Mayor's Walk, had been taken by a railway man, named Rimes, his wife, brother, wife's brother, and 3 children. Ever since entering, there had been phe, and continued till they were driven out. A private detective, named Wright, had been called in to investigate, but he, too, had been driven out. Bedclothes pulled from beds and tossed on floors. The noises were terrific, house shaking with sounds so violent as to alarm neighbors. One time a door was partly broken. However, nothing moved. The phe were preceded by a low, humming sound. Especially violent Friday before Christmas and night of Dec 30. [B; 1176.1 to 1176.4. (Medium and Daybreak, January 22, 1892; not online.) See: 1892 Jan 10, (B; 1213). “The Provinces.” London Standard, January 9, 1892, p. 3 c. 7.]


1891 Dec 1, ab. / Bridgeport ghost—see Jan. 7. [B; 1177. See: 1892 Jan. 7, (B; 1210).]


1891 Dec 2 / Wld Man / taken to Melbourne. [B; 1178. "A Wild Man of the Woods." Adelaide Advertiser, December 3, 1891, p. 5 c. 1.]


1891 Dec 3 / Followed by other eruptions / Colima / B. Eagle 13-20-3. [VII; 229. “News From Mexico.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 13, 1891, p. 20 c. 3. The Colima volcano was in eruption from July to June, 1892.]


1891 Dec 3 / bet 4 and 5:30 p.m. / Colima, Mexico, in violent eruption. / B Eagle 6-6-7. [VII; 230. “Volcanic Eruption in Mexico.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 6, 1891, p. 6 c. 7. The Colima volcano.]


1891 Dec 4 / First of the 4 Johnstown murders. [B; 1179. See: 1892 Feb. 4, (B: 1251, 1253, & 1254).]


1891 Dec. 4 / First of the Reading murders / See early in Feb., 1892. [B; 1180. See: 1892 Feb. 4, (B; 1250).]


1891 Dec 9 / Sig Aurora / Lyons, N.Y. / no. 1 / Sc Am 66/292. [VII; 231. Veeder, Major Albert. "The Aurora." Scientific American, n.s., 66 (May 7, 1892): 293.]


1891 Dec. 10 / Pub Ledger / The S S that had been terrifying people of Danbury, Conn., by appearing in Lake Kenosia near that town, found in a road, half frozen. Taken to Danbury—measured 19 feet and 8 inches—32 inches in circumference. Said that a number of huge serpents had escaped from a menagerie some years before. [B; 1181.1, 1181.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 10, 1891.) “Lake Kenosia Serpent.” Meriden Journal, December 7, 1891, p. 1 c. 1. The big Lake Kenosia serpent is captured—at least so they say—and is now on exhibition in Danbury. It turns out to be a nineteen-foot boa constrictor but has dark skin, which does not show any of the bright yellow spots characteristic of such serpents. There is no question however about its being a constrictor, but there is some question about its being the real Lake Kenosta serpent. The story they tell about it is a pretty one. but doesn’t bear close investigation.” “It was captured during the recent cold snap by one Warren C Baker, a well known local character, on a road near the lake. It was in a dormant state, and Baker had little difficulty in putting it in his wagon The theory is that it is one of the big snakes that escaped from John B. Doris’ circus many years ago and has made Lake Kenosia its abode ever since. Dr. Knox’s wife, who years ago was Millie de Granville, the strong woman in Barnum’s show, purchased the snake from Baker. She has put it on exhibition charging ten cents admission, and the crowds that visit the place are almost too large for the vacant store.”]


1891 [Dec] (10) / Dec 1-15 / Have Boston Post / n.g. [B; 1182.]


1891 Dec 10 / N. Auriga / On Dec 8, Dr. Max Wolf, of Heidelberg, took a photograph of the sky around Chi Aurigae showing blank space at point where the nova appeared. On the 10th and subsequently 12 times Prof Pickering, at Harvard, photographed it, as a bright star of the 4th or 5th magnitude, as was found later by examining the plates. In this period its maximum of 4.46 on Dec 18, and 4.4 on Dec 20, was reached. / Observatory 15-197. / The plates showed stars to 11th mag so in one day or 2 it had flashed up fully 6 mags. [VII; 232.1, 232.2, 232.3. “Nova Aurigæ.” Observatory, 15 (1892): 196-198, at 197. Clerke, Agnes Mary. “Nova Aurigæ.” Observatory, 15, (1892): 334-339, at 335. The photographic plate of December 8, 1891, showed stars to the 9th magnitude, (not the 11th); so, between December 8 and 10, the nova increased from below the 9th magnitude up to a magnitude of 5.37.]


1891 Dec. 10 / Nov. Aurigae bright—faint on 1st / maximum on Dec 20 / Science, March 18, 1892. [VII; 233. Hill, George A. "The New Star in Auriga." Science, s. 1 v. 19 (March 18, 1892): 160-161.]


1891 Dec. 10 / Date of outburst of Nova Aurigae as found on photo plates by Prof Pickering. / D. Packer not say meteors then. [VII; 234. (Refs.???) (See: 1901 Aug 9-11, (VIII; 873).)]


1891 Dec. 11 / Saturn series / One very faint. / See '91, Nov. 9. [VII; 235. See: 1891 Nov. 9, (VII; 224).]


1891 Dec 12—12-24th / Next ob on great sunspot of Nov 15 / See Jan 9. [VII; 236. See: 1891 Nov. 15, (VII; 225); 1892 Jan 9 to 21, (VII; 310); 1892 Feb 5, (VII: 369 & 373); 1892 Feb 5, Feb 10, and Jan 21, (VII; 371); and, 1892 Feb, (VII; 374).]


1891 Dec 15 / Brooklyn Eagle, July 3-20-7 1892 / Brooklyn house, 35 Moore Street. Mrs Boschinsky and child killed. Mystery unsolved—the house said be haunted—torn down in July, 1892. [B; 1183. “Waiting To See a Ghost.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 3, 1892, p. 20 c. 7. “Always, it has been said, that white baby face has appeared at the upper window, at or soon after dusk, when the Hebrew Sabbath day had ended.”]


1891 Dec 16 / Sleeper / B. Eagle, 4-7 / Mary White, a sleeper, after an injury—Ypsilanti, Michigan. [B; 1184. “A Young Woman's Long Nap.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 16, 1891, p. 4 c. 7.]


1891 Dec 16 / ghost bell / Globe Dem, Dec 26, from Cin. Enquirer—a tolling of a large bell over Freedmans Town, ab a mile and a half from Junction City, Texas. A dirge from 10 to 11 at night untl 2 or 3 every morning. [B; 1185. “A Ghostly Bell.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 26, 1891, p. 14 c. 4. “December 16” is the date of the dispatch.]


1891 Dec 17 / Nature of—That Colima, Mexico, which had been active, was again showing signs of an eruption. [VII; 237. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (December 17, 1891): 154-159, at 158. The Colima volcano.]


1891 Dec 19 / Glb-Dem of / Polts / Columbus, Ohio. [B; 1186. “Queer Pranks of a Ghost.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 19, 1891, p. 16 c. 5-6.]


1891 Dec 20 / Maximum of Nova Aurigae = 4.4 mag. / Todd, Stars and Telescopes, p. 267. [VII; 238. Todd, David Peck. Stars and Telescope. Boston: Little, Brown, 1899, 267.]


1891 Dec 20 / Saturn / One very faint and ill-definied / See—'91, Nov. 9. [VII; 239. See: 1891 Nov. 9, (VII; 224).]


1891 Dec 20 / It Sounds / (?) Premia (Novara) / Rombi / See 1816. [VII; 240. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 42. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1891 Dec. 21 / Pub. Ledger of / Ghost reported from Nappaner, Ind. Joker tied horses' tails together, etc. / past 2 months. [B; 1187. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 21, 1891.)]


1891 Dec 21 / One faint but well-defined / See '91, Nov. 9. [VII; 241. See: 1891 Nov. 9, (VII; 224).]


1891 Dec. 22 / q. / Italy / Lombardy / BA '11. [VII; 242. A class I earthquake. Milne, 736.]


1891 Dec. 22 / A very small bright, well-defined spot / See Nov. 9, '91. [VII; 243. See: 1891 Nov. 9, (VII; 224).]


1891 Dec 23 / Eagle, 4-7 / Explosion / powder / Vincennes, Ind. [VII; 244. “Blown Over Fifty Feet and Lived.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 23, 1891, p. 4 c. 7.]


1891 Dec 24 / Insomnia / B. Eagle, 1-5 / John F. Roberts, a wealthy farmer of Adams township, Ohio, had not slept for 3 weeks. [B; 1188. “He Has Not Slept For Three Weeks.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 24, 1891, p. 1 c. 5.]


1891 Dec 26 / Glb. Dem of. / At Nappaner, a ghost. Tricks such as tying horses' tails together. [B; 1189. “Ghosts Tied Their Tails.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 26, 1891, p. 14 c. 4. “Their Tails Tied. Cincinnati Enquirer, December 17, 1891, p. 9 c. 5.]


1891 Dec 31 / Disap? / 1:30 p.m. / Beach at Staten Island. Capt. E.F. Keegan of the quarantine tug Geo. C. Preston saw 2 men. One jumped into the sea. Capt K. and Richard Lee, a newspaper reporter, ran to place, getting there just as man finally disappeared. His hat was picked up on the beach. But the other man had unaccountably disappeared. / Glb-Dem, Jan 2-1-5—no bodies found later on beach. No one else had seen the 2 men. / (A third witness with Capt K, a deck hand.) [B; 1190.1, 1190.2, 1190.3. “A Staten Island Mystery.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 2, 1892, p. 2 c. 3.]


1891 / late in / Slag said to be fraud / Germany. [VII; 245. (Refs.???)]


1891 / winter / or summer in Australia / Fishes in a city / [Letter to Fort from R.J. Rotton, Sydney, Australia, 6/4/1925]. [VII; 246. (Letter. Rotton, R.J., to Fort; 1925 6/4.)]

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