Last updated: April 8, 2021. - Fortean Notes

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Last updated: April 8, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1826 to 1830


1826:

[1826 /] 1827 / J. Frank Inst 4/49 / Shells fell early in 1827, at Monastereen, Kildare. [I; 1299. "Shower of Shells in Ireland." Journal of the Franklin Institute, 4 (1827): 49. "Shower of Shells in Ireland." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 1 (1826): 187-188. The initial report was in the "April-July 1826" issue of the Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal; thus, the phenomenon probably occurred early in 1826.]


[1826 /] 1828 / Mass of ice / Candeish, India / (D-177). [I; 1363. The note copies information from page 177 of The Book of the Damned. Buist, George. "Hail-storms in India, from June 1850 to May 1851." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, Notices and Abstracts, 31-33, at 32. The fall of ice at Candeish occurred in 1826, (not in 1828).]


1826 Jan 26 / Albania / I. [I; 1232. A class I earthquake. Milne, 702.]


1826 Feb 1 / In the Basilicata, Italy / q / II. [I; 1233. A class II earthquake. Milne, 702.]


1826 Feb 1 / afternoon / After almost unbearable heat at Naples, etc., and smoke, several days from Vesuvius, a q. / BA 54. [I; 1234. Mallet, 170.]


1826 Feb 1 / Naples / Weather been cold and rainy, up to Jan. 29. On first of Feb, almost unbearable heat set in and smoke from Vesuius and q that threw down houses. / BA 54. [I; 1235. Mallet, 170.]


1826 Feb 1 / It / phe and q? / See 1805. [I; 1236. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 344-345. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1826 Feb 14 / La Manche / F. ball / [BA] 60. [I; 1237. Greg, 71.]


1826 Feb. 15 / (It) / Lugano, Italy / det. met. / BA, '60. [I; 1238. Greg, 71.]


[1826 Feb 21 /] 1826 Ap. 21 / [London Times], 4-b / q / Tornea / Eng? [I; 1250. "On the 21st of February...." London Times, April 21, 1826, p. 4 c. 2."On the 21st of February, at nine in the evening, there was a very smart shock of an earthquake at Tornea and the neighbourhood. It continued a minute, and the direction was from north to south." Mallet, 171. Tornio, (Tornea, in Swedish), is in Lapland, Finland.]


1826 last of Feb or first of March / Heavy rains and floods in Kansas / MWR 34-579. [I; 1239. Jennings, T.B. "Notes on the Climate of Kansas." Monthly Weather Review, 34 (no. 12; December 1906): 579- 580, at 579.]


[1826 March. Wrong date. See: 1836, about April, (I; 1240).]


[1826 March 29 /] 1826 Ap. 7 / [London Times]. 3-c / Aurora / Cupar. [I; 1247. "Wednesday night a very brilliant and interesting appearance of aurora borealis...." London Times, April 7, 1826, p. 3 c. 3. "Wednesday night a very brilliant and interesting appearance of aurora borealis...." Caledonian Mercury, April 3, 1826, p. 3 c. 3.]


1826 March, end of / See June. / Papilio Cardui / Air at Turin filled with them. Most numerous on 29th of March. On leaving Turin they flew in a mass northward. / Bib. Univ., Aug, 1827 / A.  J. Sci 14-387. [I; 1241. Huber, Pierre. "Notice sur une Migration de Papillons." Memoires de la Société de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de Genève, 3 pt. 2 (1825): 247-253, at 250. Huber, Pierre. "Notice sur une Migration de Papillons." Bibliothèque Universelle des Sciences, Belles-Lettres, et Arts, Sciences et Arts, 35 (1827): 305-311, at 309. "Emigration of Butterflies." American Journal of Science, 14 (1828): 387- 389. See: 1826 June, (I: 1258 & 1259), and, 1826 June 8 or 10, (I; 1260).]


1826 March 31 / N. England / great met / 7:30 p.m. / A. J. Sci 11/184. [I; 1242. Twining, Alexander C. "Observations on two late Meteors seen at New-Haven." American Journal of Science, 11 (1826): 184-189.]


1826 March 31 / 7:30 p.m./ Ap 19 p.m. / New Haven, etc.great mets / one a detonating / Am J. Sci 11/373 / right date / but see 1837. [I; 1243. Twining, Alexander C. "Observations on two late Meteors seen at New-Haven." American Journal of Science, 11 (1826): 184-189. "Am J. Sci 11/373" is an erroneous reference. See: 1837 March 31, (I; 2187).]


1826 Ap 1 / Great met. / Vermont, etc. / Detonations / ab. 9 p.m. / A. J. Sci 11/184. [I; 1244. Twining, Alexander C. "Observations on two late Meteors seen at New-Haven." American Journal of Science, 11 (1826): 184-189.]


1826 Ap. 1 / Saarbruck / grayish object / (D-275). ** [I; 1245. The note copies information from page 275 of The Book of the Damned. Olmsted, Denison. "Observation on the meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 26 (1834): 132-74, at 133. "Remarkable Meteoric Phenomenon, described by Chladni." Quarterly Journal of Literature, Science and the Arts, 24 (1827): 488. "Sur un Phénomène Météorique Remarkable" Bulletin Universel des Sciences et de l'Industrie. Premiere Section: Bulletin des Science Mathématiques, Astronomiques, Physiques et Chimiques, 8 (1827): 143. Chladni, Ernst Florens Friedrich. "Ueber eine merkwürdige meteorische Erscheinung am 1. April 1826, nicht weit von Saarbrücken." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, s. 2 v. 7 (1826): 373-377. "Remarkable Meteoric Phenomenon." Museum of Foreign Literature, Science and Art, 12 (March 1828): 479. Greg, 71.]


1826 Ap. 5 / 6 a.m. / off coast of Florida / Waterspout / A. J. Sci 14-171. [I; 1246. Lincoln, Benjamin. "An Account of a Water Spout, seen off the coast of Florida, in the spring of 1826." American Journal of Science, 14 (1828): 171-173, (with 4 figures).]


[1826 Ap. 7. Wrong date. See: 1826 March 29, (I; 1247).]


1826 April 12, 13 / Moon / by Rev. J. B. Emmett / near Boroughbridge, Eng / very conspicuous black cloud or cloudy appearance / Annals of Phil 28/81. [I; 1248. Emmett, J.B. "An Account of a curious Phenomenon observed in the Moon." Annals of Philosophy, 28 (n.s., v. 12), (August 1826): 81-83.]


1826 Ap. 14 / 11:20 p.m. / Vermont / great met / size of sun / A. J. Sci 11/120. [I; 1249. Benedict, George W. "Notice of a brilliant Meteor seen at Burlington, Vt. on the evening of April 14." American Journal of Science, 11 (1826): 120.]


[1826 Ap. 21. Wrong date. See: 1826 Feb 21, (I; 1250).]


1826 Ap 29 / [London Times], 3-a / Comet at Palermo. [I; 1251. "Palermo, March 23." London Times, April 29, 1826, p. 3 c. 1. Cacciatore claims to have seen, on March 18th, the comet observed in September and October of 1825; however, Comet C/1825 N1 would have disappeared from view to the naked eye, in December, and only been visible with a telescope, in March.]


1826 May 4 / Op. Mars / (Al). [I; 1252. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1826, 52.]


[1826 May 14 /] 1828 May 14 / 10:30 a.m. / A waterspout seen near Edinburgh. But water fell. None said to have gone up. / Arcana of Science 1829-192. [I; 1388. "Waterspout at Edinburgh." Arcana of Science, 2 (1829): 192-193. "Occasional Meteorological Remarks and Observations, during the years 1826-27." Edinburgh Journal of Science, 9 (1828): 129-142, at 131-132, (2 illustrations).]


1826 May 15 / Jamaica / fireball"and ferruginous mass found?" / BA 67-415. [I; 1253. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 415.]


1826 May 17 / Granada, Spain / q. / I. [I; 1254. A class I earthquake. Milne, 702.]


[1826 May 17. Wrong date. See: 1826 June 17, (I; 1255).]


1826 May 19 / (F) / at Ekaterinosloff / Stones fell. Principal mass in museum at Odessa. / BA 60. [I; 1256. Fletcher, 100. This is the Pavlograd meteorite. Greg, 71.]


1826 May 24 / 1:20 p.m. / q. at Trente / Had been cloudless. After the q., clouds gradually collected. / BA 54. [I; 1257. Mallet, 176.]


1826 June / Huge column of Vanessa in Switzerland. / In March, in Piedmont, flying from N to S. / Mag. Nat. Hist 7-610. [I; 1258. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (December 1834): 609-630, at 610). Huber, Pierre. "Notice sur une Migration de Papillons." Memoires de la Société de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de Genève, 3 pt. 2 (1825): 247-253, at 247-250. Huber, Pierre. "Notice sur une Migration de Papillons." Bibliothèque Universelle des Sciences, Belles-Lettres, et Arts, Sciences et Arts, 35 (1827): 305-311, at 306-309. Clarke writes "from N. to S."; however, Huber writes "une direction du sud au nord," (from south to north). In Switzerland, the passage of Belle Dames, (Vanéssa cardui), took more than two hours.]


1826 June / P[ainted] Ladies / See Junes of 1827, 1828. [I; 1259. See: 1827 June 8 or 10, (I; 1326), and, 1828 June 8 or 10, (I; 1397).]


1826 June 8 or 10 / See March, last. [I; 1260. See: 1826 March, end of, (I; 1241).]


1826 June 10, period of / Large sunspot / Niles Weekly Register, June 17. [I; 1261. "Spot on the Sun." Niles' Weekly Register, 30 (June 17, 1826): 285. ""There is at present a large spot on the disc of the sun near its western verge, which may be seen very plainly by a telescope of moderate power. Not having a micrometer, I have not been able to measure its size, but hudging from the eye, I should reckon its length to be equal to about one thirtieth of the sun's diameter."]


1826 June 17or May 17 / U.S. Columbia / q preceded by long continued drought / immediately followed by "a very heavy rain" / BA '54 / Shock on Dec. 8, immediately followed by rain. / See June 3, 1827. [I; 1262. Mallet, 174-175. The reference to rain following a shock on "Dec. 8" may refer to a West Indies quake, on November 30, 1825. Mallet, 169. See: 1827 June 3, (I; 1325).]


[1826 June 17 /] 1826 May 17 / Bogota, U.S. Col. / violent q. / "preceded by long-continued drought, and immediately followed by very heavy rain / BA 54. [I; 1255. Mallet, 174-175.]


1826 June 17 / "immense sunspot coming on the sun / according to a corr. / Edin J Sci 5-245. [I; 1263. "Notice of the severe Cold of last Winter, and of the late great Heats in June 1826, with original Observations." Edinburgh Journal of Science, 5 (1826): 240-245, at 245.]


1826 June 17 / U.S. Columbia / q / III. [I; 1264. A class III earthquake. Milne, 702.]


1826 summer / Piedmont / swarm of V. Cardui, like 1879 / Nature 20-255. [I; 1265. ("Notes." Nature, 20 (July 10, 1879): 254-256, at 255.) See: 1826 June, (I; 1258).]


1826 July / D-84 / Moradabad, India / fish. / Liv. Age 52/186. ** [I; 1266. The note copies information from page 84 of The Book of the Damned. Buist, George. "Showers of fish." Living Age, 52 (1857): 186. "In July, 1826, live fish were seen to fall on the grass at Moradabad during a storm."]


1826 about / Fish / Loch Levan, Scotland / J. F. Inst 4/43. * [I; 1267. "Shower of Herrings in Kinross-shire." Journal of the Franklin Institute, 4 (1827): 49. "Shower of Herrings in Kinross-shire." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 1 (1826): 187. Buist, George. "Showers of fish." Living Age, 52 (1857): 186. "In 1825, a shower of herrings is said to have taken place near Loch Levan, in Kinross-shire; the wind blew from the Forth at the time, and probably carried the fish from the sea across Fife to the place where they were found."]


1826 July or August / (mirage) / ac to M. Perrey / Image of Langres on clouds in sky / CR 12/768. [I; 1268. Perrey, Alexis. "Image d'une ville projetée sur un nuage." Comptes Rendus, 12 (1841): 768-770.]


1826 July 21 / Heidelberg / F. ball / [BA] 60. [I; 1269. Greg, 71.]


1826 July 29 / Florida / F. ball / BA 60. [I; 1270. Greg, 71.]


1826 July 31 / Another Stark Vulcan / See 1820, Feb. / round black spot crossing the sun / C.R. 83/623. [I; 1271. LeVerrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. "Examen des observations qu'on a présentées, à diverses époques, comme pouvant appartenir aux passages d'une planète intra-mercurielle devant le disque du Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 83 (September 18, 1876): 583-589, 621-624, 647-650, 719-723, at 621.]


1826 Aug 3 / Frankenstein / F. ball / S.W. to N.E. / BA 60. [I; 1272. Greg, 71.]


1826 Aug 3 / Leipzig / f. ball. / E.N.E. to W.S.W. / BA 60. [I; 1273. Greg, 71.]


1826 Aug 8 / [London Times], 3-f / "A great fall at Brighton and in the sea." / N.M. [I; 1274. "Lady-birds." London Times, August 8, 1826, p. 3 c. 6. "The great fall at Brighton, and in the sea near that place, of the insects commonly known by the name of 'lady-birds' is by no means an unprecendented occurrence. A similar fall took place some years ago in and near Rochester, when the 'lady-birds' infested, as long as they lived, that city, and left, after their death, a disgusting scent, which was retained for many months...."]


1826 August / th stone / Large stone fell on Mt. Galapean (Lot-et-Garonne), ac to Quetelet, in th storm. / Rept BA 1860-71 / (See Sept 5, '14.) [I; 1275. Greg, 71. See: 1814 Sept. 5, (I; 507).]


1826 Aug 8 / Odensee / F. ball / [BA] 60. [I; 1276. Greg, 71.]


1826 Aug 11 / Halle / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1277. Greg, 71.]


1826 Aug 18 / q / I / Jamaica / BA '11. [I; 1278. A class I earthquake. Milne, 702.]


1826 Aug 18 / Fireball / BA 60 / England. [I; 1279. Greg, 71.]


1826 Aug 26 / Fiery whirl at Carcassonne / Flammarion, The Atmosphere, page 387, says 14 sheep asphyxiated by it. [I; 1280. Flammarion, Camille. The Atmosphere. London: S. Low, Marston, Low, & Searle, 1873, 387-388. New York: Harper, 1874, 344.]


1826 Aug 26 / Fiery Wind / Carcassone (Aude) / Great heat in the morning. At noon, massing clouds in the west. Then a thick black cloud suspended over a field. Crackling and hissing and air rushing toward the cloud. A loud detonation and an enormous column of fire traversed the fieldthrowing down walls and trees and picking up and killing sheep. A strong sulphurous odor. Nothing said it burning anything. [I; 1281.1, 1281.2. "Trombe." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 33 (1826): 426-427. "Le 26 août 1826, une épouvantable trombe dévasta une grande portion de terrain au nord de l'arrondissement de Carcassonne. Un jeune homme de dix-sept ans fut enlevé de terre et jeté sur un rocher où il eut la tête fendue; quatorze moutons, enlevés dans les airs, se trouvèrent en un moment fort loin du lieu où la trombe les prit. Le météore déplaça d'énormes rochers; souleva et renversa les pierres de taille de la porte cochère du château de Laconette, fit écrouler divers appartemens, emporta des charrettes, déracina plu sieurs noyers et laissa de profonds sillons dans le sol, sur toute la direction qu'il suivit. On assure que l'air était imprégné d'une forte odeur de soufre. Les journaux qui ont rapporté ces faits, appellent le météore une trombe en flammée, mais sans donner aucun détail sur les phénomènes de lumière dont son apparition fut accompagnée." "Trombe." Dictionnaire des Sciences Naturelles.... 55 (1828): 410-430, at 423-424. Lardner, Dionysius. A Manual of Electricity, Magnetism, and Meteorology. London: Longman, Brown, Green & Longmans, 1841-1844, v. 2, 243-244.]


1826 Sept 1 / 20 sunspots. Had been many in August. But after Sept 1, none till 23, when another outburst. / [London Times], Oct 6-3-d. [I; 1282. "Solar Spots." London Times, October 6, 1826, p. 3 c. 4. "Solar Spots." Monthly Magazine, or, British Register, n.s. v. 2 (October 1826): 441.]


1826 Sept / See Aug 7, 1823. / Waterville, Maine / night / great det met / a stone picked up / "probably not really meteoric" / BA 60-72. [I; 1283. Greg, 72-73. See: 1823 Aug. 7, (I; 1064).]


1826 Sept 4 / Halle / F. ball / [BA] 60. [I; 1284. Greg, 72.]


1826 Sept. 7 / Sea brilliantly luminous / Gulf St. Lawrence / Jour. Roy Inst Gt. Brit 1-194. [I; 1285. "Phosphorescence of the Sea in the Gulf of St. Lawrence." Journal of the Royal Institution of Great Britain, 1 (1830-1831): 194-195. "The night was starlight; but suddenly the sky became overcast in the direction of the high land of Cornwallis county, and a rapid, instantaneous, and very brilliant light, resembling the aurora borealis, shot out of the hitherto gloomy and dark sea on the lee bow, and was so vivid that it lighted everything distinctly even to the masthead. The mate having alarmed the master, put the helm down, took in sail and called all hands up. The light now spread over the whole sea between the two shores; and the waves, which before had been tranquil, now began to be agitated. Captain Bonnycastle describes the scene, as that of a blazing sheet of awful and most brilliant light. A long and vivid line of light, superior in brightness to the parts of the sea not immediately near the vessel, shewed us the base of the high, frowning, and dark land abreast of us; the sky became lowering and intensely obscure. The oldest sailors on board had never seen any thing of the kind to compare with it, except the captain, who said he had observed something of the kind in the trades. Long tortuous lines of light, in a contrary direction to the sea, shewed us immense numbers of very large fish darting as if in consternation at the scene. The spritsail-yard and mizen-boom were lighted by the reflection as though gas-lights had been burning immediately under them; and until just before daybreak, at four o'clock, the most minute objects in a watch were distinctly visible."]


1826 Sept 13 / Bordeaux / Daybreak / Met / BA '60. [I; 1286. Greg, 72.]


1826 Sept 18 / Most tremendous q in 50 years in Cuba. / Arcana of Sci. 1828-131. [I; 1287. "Earthquakes in 1826." Arcana of Science and Art, 1 (1828): 131. "The most tremendous earthquake which has been experienced at St. Jago de Cuba for 50 years, took place on the 18th September, 1826, between three and four o'clock, and destroyed nearly one-half of the town." A class II earthquake. Milne, 702.]


1826 Sept 28 / Innsbruck, in the Tyrol / 1:30 a.m. / q and sound like thunder / BA 54. [I; 1288. Mallet, 177.]


[1826 Oct 1 /] 1820 Oct 1 / Spiders / Times of Oct 9. / That over area of miles from Liverpool and especially at Wigan, fields and roads covered with a substance that was mistaken for cotton. Came down like a sheet on Wigan. Found to contain flies so as [to] require a magnifying glass to make them perceptible. / Nov 12that all summer, for the first time, his garden clear of celery flies. After middle of September, they appeared in great numbers. [I; 822.1, 822.2. "On Sunday last...." London Times, October 9, 1826, p. 2 c. 6. "On Sunday last, a phenomenon of rare occurrence was witnessed in our neighbourhood (Liverpool), and we believe, for many miles round, as we hear that it was more remarkable at Wigan than here. The fields and roads were covered with a light filmy substance, which, by many persons, was mistaken for cotton; although a moment's consideration must have convinced any person of the absurdity of the supposition, as the staple cotton does not exceed a few inches in length; while the fine filaments which were seen in such incrediable quantity extended as many yards. It was the gossamer of the garden, or field spider, often met with in the country in fine autumn weather, but seldom, we believe, in such astonishing profusion as on Sunday.... In Cheshire it was equally observable, and we hear that at Wigan it descended in every direction like sleet, and in such quantities as to affect the appearance of the atmosphere."]


1826 Oct 6 / [London Times], 3-d / Sun Spots. [I; 1289. "Solar Spots." London Times, October 6, 1826, p. 3 c. 4. "Solar Spots." Monthly Magazine, or, British Register, n.s.  v. 2 (October 1826): 441. The possibility of a relationship between the number of solar spots and the atmospheric temperature was suggested by William Herschel and Arago, and the numbers of solar spots was being recorded by Thomas John Hussey, from April to September, with doubtful success. These observations continued until 1837; and, Hussey's manuscript of Observations of Sun-spots Made at Chislehurst, 1826-1837 is preserved at the Royal Astronomical Society's library, (RAS MSS Add. 17).]


1826 Oct 26 / Lecce, Italy / q / I. [I; 1290. A class I earthquake. Milne, 702.]


1826 Oct 29 / India / Nepal / Katmandu / Patun / q / II. [I; 1291. A class II earthquake. Milne, 702.]


1826 Nov. 10 / [London Times], 2-f / Aurora. [I; 1292. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, November 10, 1826, p. 2 c. 6. The article only relates a few classical and native beliefs about the northern lights.]


1826 Nov 18 / Passage of comet across sun / Flammarion, Pop Astro, p. 521. [I; 1293. Flammarion, Camille. Popular Astronomy: A General Description of the Heavens. New York: D. Appleton, 1894, 521. Tho the passage of this comet, (C/1826 U1), across the sun's disc was predicted by Gambart, fog and clouds over Europe prevented its observation by the astronomers, who received short notice of this prediction, and it was not seen. Gambart, Jean-Félix Adolphe. "On the Passage of the Comet of Bootes over the Disc of the Sun on the 18th of November 1826." Memoirs of the Royal Astronomical Society, 3 (1827-1829): 85-87.]


1826 Dec 1 / (In Arctic) / Comet that had been indistinct 2 nights before, became brilliant in west. / Franklin, "Narrative of a Second Journey,["] p. 295 / It formed a trapezium with Alpha Aquilae, Alpha Lyrae, Alpha Corona Borealis. [I; 1294. Franklin, John. Narrative of a Second Expedition to the Shores of the Polar Sea, in the Years 1825, 1826, and 1827. London: John Murray, 1828, 295. "On the evening of the 1st of December a brilliant comet appeared in the western quarter, which had been indistinctly seen the two preceding nights. A line drawn through α and η Ursæ Majoris led to its position; it also formed a trapezium with α Aquilæ and α Lyræ and α Corona Borealis. This was the last night of its being visible." The observation was made at Fort Franklin, (now identified as Deline, Northwest Territories, Canada). As this object was seen in the same region as α Aquilæ (Altair), α Lyræ (Vega), and α Corona Borealis (Gemma), and southward from α Ursæ Majoris (Dubhe) and η Ursæ Majoris (Alkaid), and as Comet C/1826 U1 was observed in Hercules, (on December 1), and in Ophiuchus, (on November 23 and on December 3), this object was probably Comet C/1826 U1. Hnatek, Adolf. "Nachtrag zur definitiven Bahnbestimmung des Kometen 1826 V." Astronomishce Nachrichten, 178 (1908): 337-350, at 343-344. Kronk, Gary W. Cometography: A Catalogue of Comets. Volume 2: 1800-1899. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003, 84-86.]


[1826 Dec 17 /] 1824 / Jubilee of Leo XII / Poitiers / Cross 200 ft. high over a church / 2 hours / Sun, 1882, March 7-1-3. [A; 78. "Apparition of the Virgin." New York Sun, March 7, 1882, p. 1 c. 3. Rev. Peter Havermans, the pastor of St. Mary's Church, in Troy, New York, is quoted: "It was while I was a student at Poitiers, in France, on the Jubilee of Leo XII., in 1824. When the services were about to commence at midday, a cross apparently two hundred feet high, waved over the edifice and remained for nearly an hour. This wonderful spectacle was discussed by the press, and the name of the structure was changed to the Church of the Holy Cross." However, the apparition of a luminous cross occurred on December 16, 1826, during religious ceremonies at Migné, (now, Migné-Auxances, France), after a calvaire had been erected in the church's cemetery. It was seen by more than 2,000 people, in a cloudless sky, from 5 P.M. until it faded away by 5:30 P.M. "...Toutes ses formes étoient pures, et ressortoient très distinctement sur l'azur du Ciel. Elle n'offroit aux yeux un éclat éblouissant, mais une couleur partout uniforme et telle qu'aucun témoin n'a pu la définir d'une manière précise, ni lui trouver un objet de juste comparaison; seulement on s'accorde plus généralement à en donner une idée à l'aide d'un blanc argentin nuancé d'une légère teinte de rose." "Il résulte certainement de l'ensemble des dépositions, que cette Croix n'étoit pas à une hauteur considérable; il est même très probable qu'elle ne s'élevoit pas à 200 pieds au-dessus du sol; mais il est difficile de rien fixer de plus précis que cette limite." "La longueur total de la tige pouvait êtres de 140 pieds...." Rapports sur l'apparition d'une croix dans la paroisse de Migné. Poitiers: Fr.-Aimé Barbier, 1827, 10-11.]


1826 Dec 23 / 15 h / Venus / Inf. conjunction / (Al). [I; 1295. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1826, 136.]


1826 Dec 26 / Dark Day / Glasgow / LT, 1827, Jan. 5/4/b. [I; 1296. "Noon-day Darkness." London Times, January 5, 1827, p. 4 c. 2. The darkness was attributed to a "very thick fog, which tendered the smoky atmosphere of Glasgow almost palpable."]


1826 Dec 31 / Dammerung / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1297. Greg, 72.]


1827:


1827 about / Charcoal / England / (28). [I; 1298.]


1827 ab / Light of Cornwall / Gentlemans Mag 142/part2/637 / For invaders and H House see Oct, 1834. [A; 80. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 97 pt. 2 [v. 142] (1827): 636-637, at 637. There is no note in this series for "Oct 1834" regarding invaders nor a haunted house.]


[1827. Wrong date. See: 1826, (I; 1299).]


1827 Jan last / Myst dth / Times 1827/Feb 5/3/3e. [A; 81. "Mysterious Death." London Times, February 5, 1827, p. 3 c. 5-6. Thomas Morton was discovered dead from a cut throat, next to a canal at Stretford; but, the apparent suicide's blood-soaked clasp knife was found in his waistcoat pocket.]


1827 Jan 2 / Montague (Orne) / q / Arcana of Sci 1828/155. [I; 1300. "Earthquakes in 1827." Arcana of Science, 2 (1829): 155-156, at 155.]


1827 Jan 9-10 / Hurricane / Ireland / 16th, hurricane and noises in the air like explosions of artillery / Mag Nat Hist 8-25. [I; 1301. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 8 (January 1835): 1-28, at 25. The correct dates were "Jan. 9-10," (not "Jan 8 - 10"), and, "noises in the air resembling explosions of artillery," (not "like").]


1827 Jan 11 / [London Times], 3-a / q / Crawford / Lead Hills. [I; 1302. "About three o'clock...." London Times, January 11, 1827, p. 3 c. 1. "About three o'clock p.m. on the 25th ult. a smart shock of an earthquake was felt at Crawford Lead-hills and Crawford-John. The atmosphere at the time was hazy. The shock lasted only a few seconds, and resembled the firing of artillery, or dragging of heavy waggons along a street.Scotch Times." Mallet, 179.]


1827 Jan 16 / [London Times], 2-e / Hurricane / Eng / 23-4-b. / Belg. and Teneriffe. [I; 1303. "The New London Docks.Hurricane." London Times, January 16, 1827, p. 2 c. 5. "The Late Hurricane." London Times, January, 23, 1827, p. 4 c. 2. This storm raged across Ireland, Britain, and Holland, from January 11 to 14, 1827.]


1827 Jan 15 / China / q. / III. [I; 1304. A class III earthquake. Milne, 702.]


1827 Feb 9 / 7 p.m. / "A tremendous explosion was heard. Listed as a q, / Roper, List of Earthquakes, p. 32. [I; 1305. Roper, 32. Mallet, 180. The explosion was heard at Ripon, and shook Ripon, the Isle of Anglesea, and northwest Wales. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 119. "At Rippon (Yorkshire) a tremendous explosion heard, which shook while neighbourhood. Earth shook, so as to cause a fissure nearly 20 yards wide, which found to be 24 yards deep."]


1827 Feb 16 / Mhow (Azamgarh, N.W. Provs), India / (F). [I; 1306. Fletcher, 100. This is the Mhow meteorite.]


[1827 Feb 16 /] 1828 Feb 27 / See 1827. / Near Mhow, India, stone perfectly similar to one near Allahabad in 1802 and near Mooradabad in 1808. / Arcana of Sci 1829-196. [I; 1376. "Meteoric Stone." Arcana of Science, 2 (1829): 196-197. "Meteoric Stone which fell in India on the 27th February, 1827." Edinburgh Journal of Science, 9 (1828): 172.]


1827 Feb-March / Hupeh (Yunyang), China / small q's / BA '11. [I; 1307. A class I earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1827 Feb 16 ./ [London Times], 3-b / q / Alicant / Eng? [I; 1308. "Extract of a letter dated Alicant, Jan. 26." London Times, February 16, 1827, p. 3 c. 2. The "very severe shock of earthquake" struck Alicant, Spain, on January 24, 1827.]


1827 Feb. 23 / March 21 / Dec 3 / q's in Holland where q's rare / Quar Jour Roy Inst 27/202. [I; 1309. "Earthquakes in Holland." Quarterly Journal of Literature, Science and the Arts, 27 (1829): 202.]


1827 March 25 / ab 2 p.m. / Supposed qbut explosion of a ship off coast of Lancashire. / An Reg 1827/59. [I; 1310. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 69 (1827): 1-203, at 59-61, cv. "Explosion of a Ship."]


1827 March 28 / [London Times], 3-c / Subterreanean fire / Osmington, Dorset. [I; 1311. "Subterreanean Fire at Osmington, Dorset." London Times, March 28, 1827 p. 3. c. 3. "On Friday, the 16th of this month, a flame was observed playing on the surface of the cliff, on a particular spot. The flame has now assumed the character of a subterranean fire burning continuously, and may be seen from the esplanade at Weymouth by night." Buckland, William, and, Henry Thomas De la Beche. "On the Geology of the Neighbourhood of Weymouth and the adjacent Parts of the Coast of Dorset." Transactions of the Geological Society of London, s. 2 v. 4 (1836): 1-46, at 23. The bituminous shale at the Holworth Cliff was still burning "feebly" in September of 1829, (three years after it began in September of 1826). Damon, Robert. Geology of Weymouth, Portland, and Coast of Dorsetshire.... Weymouth: R.F. Damon, 1884, 57-58.]


1827 March 29 / (Gent's Mag, Ap., 1827, p. 360, 396, 638) / Smoke from the cliffs opposite Weymouth. Apertures, or craters, formed. Said had been smoke at intervals for three years. / Holworth Cliff. But it was a slaty limestone that the people burned for a substitute coal. [I; 1312.1, 1312.2. "Burning Cliff." Gentleman's Magazine, 97 pt. 1 (April 1827): 359-360. "The following observations on Holworth Cliff...." Gentleman's Magazine, 97 pt. 1 (May 1827): 395-398. "Holworth Cliff, co. Dorset." Gentleman's Magazine, 97 pt. 1 (1827): 638. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 97 pt. 2 (1827): 636-637, at 637.]


1827 April / Manna-grain / Persia. [I; 1313. "Meteorological Information." American Almanac, 4 (1833), 65-88, at 71. Pouillet, Claude Servais Mathias. Élémens de Physique Expérimentale et de Météorologie. Paris: Béchet Jeune, 1830, v. 2, 770-771.]


1827 Ap 11 / Ischia, Italy / I / q. [I; 1314. A class I earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1827 Ap 17 / Austria / q. / I. [I; 1315. A class I earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1827 May 9 / Drake Co., Tenn., metite / (F). [I; 1316. Fletcher, 100. This is the Drake Creek meteorite.]


1827 May 9 / Nothing in Phil Nat. Gazette. [I; 1317.]


1827 May 9 / 4 p.m. / Sounds like cannonfire in aerolite / Drakes Creek, Sumner Co., Tenn. / A. J. Sci 18-378 / Immediately picked up. Was cold. / See May 8, 1829. [I; 1318. "Notice of the circumstances attending the fall of the Tennessee Meteorites." American Journal of Science, 18 (1830): 378-379. "They stated that the stone was cold but had the scent of sulphur." Greg, 72.]


1827 May 9 / "another shower of stones" / ac to Amer papers at Nashville, Tenn. / Gent's Mag, July, p. 78. [I; 1319. "Foreign News." Gentleman's Magazine, 97 pt. 2 (July 1827): 75-78, at 78.]


1827 May 20 / Geneva / 6 inches of rain in 3 hours / Q. J. Roy Inst 25-232. [I; 1320. "Extraordinary Instances of Fall of Rain." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 25 (1828): 232.]


1827 May 22 / or Aug 22? / Somer Co / Metite very similar to that of Utrecht / See June 21843. [I; 1321. Baumhauer, Eduard Hendrik von. "Ueber den muthmasslichen Ursprung der Meteorsteine, nebst einer Analyse des Meteorsteins, welcher am 2. Juni 1843 in der Provinz Utercht gefallen ist." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, s. 2 v. 66 (1845): 465-503, at 498. Baumhauer gives that date as May 22, 1827.]


1827 May 30 / Lima, Peru / II. [I; 1322. A class II earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1827 summer / Hay-silex object / Pop Sci Rev 6/475. [I; 1323. "Singular Effects of Lightning." Popular Science Review, 6 (1867): 475. Lightning struck a hay-stack in Forfarshire, Scotland; the fire was extinguished; a hole was found cutting through the hay-stack into the ground; and, a substance resembling lava was found in the hole. "The substance found in the hole was a mass of silex obviously formed by the fusion of the silex in the hay."]


1827 June / Eruption of Albay, in the Philippines, at least to middle of Feb, 1828. / BA 54. [I; 1324. Mallet, 189. The Mayon volcano began this eruption on June 27, 1827.]


1827 June 3 / Martinique / Unprecedented drought of 66 days. Upon July 21, a violent shock. Others in Oct and Nov. Then a slight q and rain. / BA '54 / See June 17, 1826. [I; 1325. Mallet, 181-183, 186. See: 1826 June 17, (I; 1262).]


1827 June 8 or 10 / See 1826. / Great migration of painted ladies in Switzerland / A. J. Sci 14/389 / Stream lasted 2 hours. [I; 1326. "Emigration of Butterflies." American Journal of Science, 14 (1828): 387-389.]


1827 June 12 / Tehuucan, Mexico / II. [I; 1327. A class II earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1827 June 25 / Perforation. / Italy / Edin New 26/107. [I; 1328. Arago, François. "On Thunder and Lightning." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 26 (1838-1839): 81-144, 275-291, at 107. Fusinieri, Ambrigio. "Sopra il trasporto di materia ponderabile nelle folgori." Giornale di Fisica, Chimica, Storia Naturale, Medicina ed Arti, s. 2 v. 10 (1827): 353-369, at 355-356.]


1827 June 29 / Ab 20 leagues E of the Azores, Capt. Le Sauvage traversed a space 3 leagues in width covered with volcanic stones, sugar canes, straws, and pieces of wood. He supposed they were the debris of a volcanic eruption. Nothing volcanic mentioned / BA '54June 12 == violent shock, Tehuacan, Mexicofinds nothing looking a year backMilne / BA ' 11 gives this medium rating. / See ab March, 1905. / Arcana of Science 1829-174. [I; 1329.1 to 1329.3. Mallet, 182. A class II earthquake. Milne, 703. "Floating Volcanic Products." Arcana of Science, 2 (1829): 175. The volcano Atitlán, in Guatemala, erupted on March 27, 1827. See: 1905 March 1, (VIII; 2223).]


1827 July 5 / 6 a.m. / and Aug 9, at night / Shock at New Albany, Ind. / National Gazette (Philadelphia), July 23 / Aug 9Gazette of 25th / on 9th, 2 / 10 p.m., and 1 a.m. of 10th. [I; 1330. “Earthquake.” National Gazette, (Philadelphia), July 23, 1827, p. 2 c. 4. “New Albany (Indiana), Aug. 11.” National Gazette, (Philadelphia), August 25, 1827, p. 2 c. 2. The earthquakes at New Albany were at 10 P.M., August 6, and, at 1 A.M., August 7, 1827.]


1827 Aug 7 / New Albany, Indiana. / I. [I; 1331. A class I earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1827 Aug 8 / qs and volc eruption in Kamtschatka / BA 54. [I; 1332. Mallet, 182-183. The Avachinsky volcano.]


1827 Aug 22 / or May 22? / "Somer Co., U.S.A. / stonefall / ac to Wolf. / BA 67-416. [I; 1333. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 416. Baumhauer, Eduard Hendrik von. "Ueber den muthmasslichen Ursprung der Meteorsteine, nebst einer Analyse des Meteorsteins, welcher am 2. Juni 1843 in der Provinz Utercht gefallen ist." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, s. 2 v. 66 (1845): 465-503. Glaisher and Baumhauer give the date as "May 22."]


1827 Aug 28 / Aurora / N.Y., etc. / A. J. Sci 14-91. [I; 1334. Silliman, Benjamin D. "Notice of the late Aurora Borealis." American Journal of Science, 14 (1828): 91-111.]


1827 [Aug] 30 / At Kuld-Schu, stones fell, ac to Baumhauer. Doubtful, ac to Greg. / BA 60. [I; 1335. Greg, 72-73. Kämtz, Ludwig Friedrich. Lehrbuch der Meteorologie. Halle: In der Gebauerschen Buchhandlung, 1836, v. 3, 296. 1801-1867. "Kuld-Schu" is the German name for one of the provinces of China.]


1827 Aug. / China / Stonefall / BA 60. [I; 1336. Greg, 72. Boguslawski, Georg von. "Zehnter Nachtrag zu Chladni's Verzeichnisse der Feuermeteore und herabgefallenen Massen (Wien 1819)." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, Ergänzungsband, 4 (1854): 1-155, 353-456, at 433. While Baumhauer's August 30 aerolite, (from Kämtz's book), was considered "doubtful," Greg accepts it with a date of "1827?" from Boguslawski's tables. See: 1827 Aug 30, (I; 1335).]


1827 Aug and Sept / Auroras / Gt Brit / Am J. Sci. 14/95, 108. [I; 1337. Silliman, Benjamin D. "Notice of the late Aurora Borealis." American Journal of Science, 14 (1828): 91-111, at 95-96, 108-109.]


1827 Sept / Aug = 15/199 / A / France / A.J.S. 14/107. [I; 1338. Silliman, Benjamin D. "Notice of the late Aurora Borealis." American Journal of Science, 14 (1828): 91-111, at 107-108. Gale, Leonard Dunnell. "Aurora BorealisMagnetic Needle, &c." American Journal of Science, 15 (1829): 199-200.]


1827 Sept / A / Denmark / A.J.S. 14/107. [I; 1339. Silliman, Benjamin D. "Notice of the late Aurora Borealis." American Journal of Science, 14 (1828): 91-111, at 107.]


1827 Sept. 25 / Ext. aurora / London / Quar Jour Roy Inst 24/385 / Arcana Sci 1828/150. [I; 1340. "Aurora Borealis Observed at Deptford." Arcana of Science, 1 (1828): 150. Kendall, E.A. "A Description of the Aurora Borealis seen in London on the Evening and Night of the 25th of September, 1827." Quarterly Journal of Literature, Science and the Arts, 24 (1827): 385-423.]


1827 Sept 25 / early evening / at Portland, Maine / Streamers of light from all points of horizon, focussing at zenith. Fewer streamers in north, where sky blood red. / National Gazette (Philadelphia), Oct. 3. [I; 1341. “Phenomenon.” National Gazette, (Philadelphia), October 3, 1827, p. 2 c. 4.]


1827 Sept. 25 / 11 p.m. / Great aurora / London / Gent's Mag, Oct, p. 354. [I; 1342. "Literature and Scientific Intelligence." Gentleman's Magazine, 97 pt. 2 (October 1827): 351-355, at 354, c.v. "Aurora Borealis."]


1827 before Sept 26 / Great q / Lahore / BA '11. [I; 1343. A class III earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1827 Sept 27 / [London Times]. 3-c / 28-3-b / Aurora. [I; 1344. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, September 27, 1827, p. 3 c. 3.  "A very unusual appearance...." Brighton Gazette, September 27, 1827, p. 3 c. 3. "A very unusual appearance of that brilliant phenomenon, the Aurora Borealis, was observed here on Tuesday night about eleven o'clock. The whole of the north-west of the atmosphere was illuminated, and remained more or less so during the night. The streamers changed frequently from a light to a dark red colour; and it is considered to have been the most vivid of that description of meteor which has been witnessed for a long period. The last was, we believe, seen in 1804."]


1827 Oct 5 / (F) / Stonefall / Bialistock, Russian Poland / Greg asks if date = Oct 8. / BA 60. [I; 1345. Fletcher, 100. This is the Bialystock meteorite. Fletcher gives the date of the fall as October 5, 1827. Greg, 72.]


1827 Oct 8 / right date / Belostok, Russia / bet 9 and 10 a.m. / great detonation and fall of stones / Q J. R. Inst 25-232. [I; 1346. "Fall of Aërolites." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 25 (1828): 233. This article gives "26th Sept." and "Oct. 8th" as the date of the Bialystock meteorite.]


1827 Oct 9 / Jour des Deb, 18th, tells of other great rains, especially on 11th, and floods. Rhone highest since 1801. [I; 1347. "Tandis qu'à Paris les eaux de la Seine...," "On nous écrit de Vienne (Isère)...," and, "On  écrit de Grenoble...." Journal des Debats, October 18, 1827, p. 3 c. 2, p. 4 c. 1.]


1827 Oct 9 / Mag of Nat Hist 1-384 / Joyeuse (Ardêche) / 29 inches of water fell in 2 hours. In 11 days, 36 inches fell. [I; 1348. "Extraordinary Fall of Rain." Magazine of Natural History, 1 (November 1828): 384. "Sur les Quantités extraordinaires de pluie qu'on a recueillies dans diverses villes en 1827."  Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 36 (1827): 413- 415.]


1827 Oct 9 / At Joyeuse (de l' Ardèche), fell 29 inches of rain. In eleven days in Oct there fell 36 inches of water, or about double the quantity for the whole year at Paris. / Arcana of Sci 1829-201. [I; 1349.1, 1349.2. "Extraordinary Instances of Fall of Rain." Arcana of Science, 2 (1829): 201.]


1827 Oct 17 / wrms / Jour. de St. Petersbourg, Nov 14, copied in Edin J. Sci 9-154 / At town of Pokroff, in Russia, "a prodigious quantity of worms of a black colour, ringed, and in length three-quarters of a verschok." "They had on each side three feet, by means of which they appeared to crawl very fast upon the snow." Body from head one-third down looked like black velvet. In a vessel filled with snow several lived nine days, although the thermometer 8 degrees below zero. Those carried to a warm place soon died. / D-92. [I; 1350.1to 1350.3. The note copies information from page 92 of The Book of the Damned. "Notice of a shower of Insects which fell in a Snow Storm at Pokroff in Russia." Edinburgh Journal of Science, 9 (1828): 154. "Queer rains." Scientific American, n.s., 31 (September 26, 1874): 193. A "verschok" is 4.445 centimeters, or 1.75 inches, in length.]


1827 Oct 21-23 / Caucasia / I. [I; 1351. A class I earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1827 Oct 31 / Along coast of Kent, extremely high tide. Bank of Thames flooded, and many sheep drowned. / Gent's Mag, Nov, p. 457. [I; 1352. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 97 pt. 2 (November 1827): 456-458, at 457.]


1827 Nov 15 / Frankfort / F. ball / [BA] '60. [I; 1353. Greg, 72.]


1827 Nov 16 / U.S. Columbia / Violent q.great destruction, detonations, "occuring at intervals of thirty seconds with wonderful regularity. Gases discharged and masses of mud. / BA 54. [I; 1354. Mallet, 184-185. A class III earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1827 Nov 16 / q. / Bogota / and extraordinary rains / Mag. Nat. Hist 6-300. [I; 1355. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 6 (July 1833): 289-308. at 300.]


1827 Nov 16 / 6 p.m. / Great q / U.S. Columbia / 17 / 9 a.m. / Severe shocks / E. Siberia / BA 54 / Almost exactly same time. [I; 1356. Mallet, 184-185. "This account is rendered very remarkable by its showing the earthquake in Siberia to have been almost exactly at the same time as that in S. America, and therefore making it probable that the same shock was propagated to the enormous distance between Sta Fé and Ochozk."]


1827 Nov. 18 / U.S. Columbia / eruption of volcano of  Purace. / BA 54. [I; 1357. Mallet, 185. The Purace volcano.]


1827 Nov. 30 / W. Indies / also coast S.A. / Shocks. In some places preceded by violent wind. / BA 54. [I; 1358. Mallet, 186. A class II earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1827 Nov. 30 / Dec 1 / Dec 8 / Violent shocks in Martinique, followed by rain. / B.A. 54. [I; 1359. Mallet, 186.]


1827 Dec 9 / Volc eruption near village of Jokmali (Baku), on Caspian Sea. / BA 54. [I; 1360. Mallet,  186. Humboldt, Alexander von. Elise Charlotte Otté, trans. Cosmos: a Sketch of a Physical Description of the Universe. London: H.G. Bohn, 1848, v. 1, 222. "When the mud volcano of Jokmali began to form, on the 27th of November, 1827, in the peninsula of Abscheron, on the Caspian sea, east of Baku, the flames flashed up to an extaordinary height for three hours, while during the next twenty hours they scarcely rose three feet above the crater, from which mud was ejected." Jokmali was one of the four hundred mud volcanoes, in Azerbaijan, (which spew mud, sand, and flaming gases, rather than magmatic eruptions).]


1827 Dec 9 / At Vega-de-Supia / 8:30 p.m. / detonation heard by Humboldt / Bull. Soc. Belge de Geol. 9-190. [I; 1361. Van den Broeck, E. "Les Mistpoeffers...." Bulletin de la Société belge de géologie, 9 (1895): 182-199, at 190. “Aprés la lecture du procès-verbal, M. Boussingault donne communication de la Note suivante....” Comptes Rendus, 93 (1881) 105-106. Humboldt, (who was residing in Berlin in December of 1827), only discusses detonations heard in the absence of any earth tremors, in his book, Cosmos; and, Jean-Baptiste Boussingault was the person who heard the detonations at La Vega de Supia, in Colombia, in 1827, and, later, recounted the phenomenon that occurred on  December 9th, (which was recorded in Comptes Rendus).  Humboldt, Alexander von. Cosmos: a Sketch of a Physical Description of the Universe. London: H.G. Bohn, 1848, v. 1, 203-204.]


1827 Dec 13 / Lisbon, Portugal / I. [I; 1362. A class I earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1828:


[1828. Wrong date. See: 1826, (I; 1363).]


[1828 /] 1829 / (P) / Bushmills, Ireland / frogs / "half-formed" /  Arcana of Sci., 1830/217. [I; 1433. "Shower of Frogs." Arcana of Science, 3 (1830): 217. "Shower of Frogs." Magazine of Natural History, 2 (April 1829): 103. "As two gentleman were sitting...." London Standard, June 19, 1828, p. 3 c. 5. "As two gentlemen were sitting conversing on a causeway pillar, near Bushmills, they were very much surprised by an unusually heavy shower of frogs, half-formed, falling in all directions; some of which are preserved in spirits of wine, and are now exhibited to the curious by the two resident apothecaries in Bushmills.Belfast Chronicle."]


1828 winter / Larvae / (D-93). [I; 1364. The note copies information from page 93 of The Book of the Damned. Müller, Albert. "On the dispersal of non-migrating insects by atmospheric agencies." Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, 1871, 175-186, at 184.]


1828 Jan 5 / [London Times], 3-a / Astro phenomena. [I; 1365. "Astronomical Phenomenon." London Times, January 5, 1828, p. 3 c. 1. The conjunction of Mars and Jupiter, (on January 4), was noted. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1828, 1.]


1828 Jan 7 / Eruption of fire and water / Jokmali, Persia / Mag Nat Hist 6-301. [I; 1366. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 6 (July 1833): 289-308, at 301.]


1828 Jan. 14 / Venice / Q / "After the motion had ceased a prolonged, dull noise was heard in the air." / det met? / BA '54 / 11:45 p.m. [I; 1367; Mallet, 187. The "det met?" is only Fort's speculation.]


1828 Jan 18 / Gotha / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1368. Greg, 72.]


1828 Jan 29 / Krassova, Hungary / q preceded by th. storm / BA 54. [I; 1369. Mallet, 187.]


1828 Feb. 2 / Island of Ischia, Italy / II. [I; 1370. A class II earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1828 Feb 2 / March 14 / Vesuvius after quiet 6 years. / Q of Ischia on Feb 2. / Bib Univ. 39/157. [I; 1371. Covelli, Nicolas. "Observations sur le Tremblement de Terre qui a eu lieu dans l'Île d'Ischia, le 2 Février 1828." Bibliothèque Universelle des Sciences, Belles-Lettres, et Arts, Sciences et Arts, 39 (1828): 157-165. The Vesuvius volcano.]


[1828or 1829: Feb 7. Wrong date. See: 1829 Feb 7, (I; 1372).]


1828 Feb. 11 / New York / S.W. to N.E. / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1373. Greg, 72.]


1828 Feb 19 / Iceland / II. [I; 1374. A class II earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1828 Feb. 23 / March 21 / Aug 13 / Dec 3 / q's / Belgium / Ciel et Terre 8/38. [I; 1375. Lancaster, Albert Benoît Marie. "Les Tremblements de terre en Belgique." Ciel et Terre, 8 (March 16, 1887): 25-43, at 38.]


[1828 Feb 27. Wrong date. See: 1827 Feb 16, (I; 1376).]


1828 Feb 29 / [London Times[, 3-f / March 4-3-a / 26-3-b / q / Antwerp. [I; 1377. "Earthquake.Antwerp." London Times, February 29, 1828, p. 3 c. 6. "The earthquake lately felt in the Netherlands...." London Times, March 4, 1828, p. 3 c. 1. "The Late Earthquake in the Netherlands." London Times, March 26, 1828, p. 3 c. 2.]


1828 March 14 / Vesuvius / 17 and 18, more violent, to 22nd, when diminish / An Reg 1828-40. [I; 1378. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 70 (1828): 1-188, at 39-40, cv. "Eruption of Vesuvius."]


1828 March 20 or 22 / b. snow. / Roseneath, Scotland. / Ac to old resident to Lewis P. Muirhead, in Nature 29-494, snow fell in black or sooty flakes. [I; 1379. "Meteoric Dust." Nature, 29 (March 20, 1884): 494.]


1828 Mar. 20, 22 / See 14. / B. R. Success[ive] / Scotland, Clyde Valley / (D-31). [I; 1380. The note copies information from page 31 of The Book of the Damned. Muirhead, Lewis P. "Meteoric dust." Knowledge, o.s., 5 (March 21, 1884): 190.]


1828 March 30 / Peru and rain and q / Very violent q"the most extraodinary and violent rain followed, lasted four days, and produced most disastrous inundations." / BA '54 / Peru. [I; 1381. Mallet,  191-192. A class II earthquake. Milne, 703.]


[1828 March 30 /] 1838 March 30 / q and aerial / Reported by ship Captaina black thin cloud passed overhead"very heavy distant thunder". Q at Lima and lives lost. / J. F. Inst 23/308 / Elec current seems to have passed over chain of ship's anchor. Parts had appearance of having been melted. [I; 2304.1, 2304.2. "Earthquake at Anchor." Journal of the Franklin Institute, s. 2 v. 19 (1837): 308. "Earthquake at Anchor." Nautical Magazine, 5 (1836): 695-696. "The ship was moored with two chain-cables, and on weighing the anchors a few days after, we found 56 links of the best bower cable much injured; the iron had the appearance of being melted, and nearly one-sixth of the link was destroyed."]


1828 April / Volc in Kamtschatka / Mag Nat Hist 6-301. [I; 1382. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...."  Magazine of Natural History, 6 (July 1833): 289-308, at 301. The Avachinsky volcano erupted on April 17, 1828.]


1828 April / Fish / ac to an April no of Inverness Courier, copied in Edin Jour Sci 9-156 / At Foddherty, Strathpfeffer, a field found covered with herring 3 to 4 inches long. Sea 3 miles away. [I; 1383. "Account of a shower of Herrings which fell in Ross-shire in Scotland." Edinburgh Journal of Science, 9 (1828): 154-155. "A Shower of Herrings." Inverness Courier, April 23, 1828, p. 3 c. 2.]


1828 Ap. 14 / Ross-shire / fish / (D-84) / Liv Age 52/186 / An Reg1828/55. ** [I; 1384. The note copies information from page 84 of The Book of the Damned. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 70 (1828): 1-188, at 55, cv. "Shower of Herrings." Buist, George. "Showers of fish." Living Age, 52 (1857): 186. "In 1828, a similar fall of fish occurred in Ross-shire, three miles from the First of Tain." "A Shower of Herrings." Inverness Courier, April 23, 1828, p. 3 c. 2.]


1828 May / Hauser enters Nuremberg. [A; 82.]


1828 May 8 or 9 / Wfor 1827 and 1829. [I; 1385.]


1828 middle May and end May / Unusual number of sunspots, one of them of unusual size / Edin J. Sci., 9-169. [I; 1386. "Spots on the Sun." Edinburgh Journal of Science, 9 (1828): 169.]


1828 May / Tscheroi, Turkey / Stonefall / BA 60. [I; 1387. Greg, 72.]


[1828 May 14. Wrong date. See: 1826 May 14, (I; 1388).]


1828 May 18 / I / Marsala, Italy. [I; 1389. A class I earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1828 May 24 / Tremendous sunspot by Pastorff / Ast. Reg 7-13. [I; 1390. "A Descriptive Account of the Sun and Planets." Astronomical Register, 4 (1866): 2-7, 29-33, 57-62, at 31. Pastorff, Johann Wilhelm. "Beobachtung der am 24. May und 21, Juny 1828 zur bedeutendsten Größe angewachsenen sehr großen Sonnenflecke vom Geheimerath v. Pastorff in Buchholz bei Frankfurt an der Oder." Astronomische Nachrichten, 6 (1828): 471-474.]


1828 May 26 / (C) / (N) op / Obj thought not been a sunspot, seen on disk of sun, by Pastorff / M Notices 34/26 / because Olbers had predicted comet across the sun this day. [I; 1391. Raynard, A. Cowper. "On a remarkable Nebulous Spot observed upon the Sun's Disc by Pastorff, May 26th, 1828." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 34 (November 14, 1873): 26. Fort apparently confuses this sunspot with the nebulous object observed by Pastorff on June 26, 1819, (which is when Olbers calculated the Comet of 1819, C/1819 N1, would have transited the Sun's disc). Hind, John Russell. "On the Transit across the Sun's Disk of the Second or Great Comet of 1819." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 36 (May 12, 1876): 309-313. See: 1819 June 26, (I; 710).]


1828 May 28 / Kratzburg / fishes / Archiv. Verein Freunde Natur of Mecklenburg 12-75 / Jour Amer. Museum Nat Hist 21/615. [I; 1392. The first article cited, by Ernst Boll, concerns the fall of fishes at Steur, in 1795; and, his second article, here, mentions the fall of fishes at Krazburg, in 1828. Boll, Ernst. "Beiträge zur Gewitterkunde mit besonderer Berücksichtigung von Meklenburg." Archiv des Vereins der Freunde der Naturgeschichte in Mecklenburg, 12 (1858): 59-155, at 75.  Boll, Ernst. "Fischregen in Pommern und Mecklenburg." Archiv des Vereins der Freunde der Naturgeschichte in Mecklenburg, 21 (1868): 151-152. Gudger, Eugene Willis. "Rains of Fishes." American Museum Journal, 21 (1921): 607-619, at 615.]


1828 last of May / No q / BA. [I; 1393.]


1828 June 4 / (F) / 9 a.m. / 7 miles S.W. of Richmond, Va. / metite / A. J. Sci 15/195 / 16/191 / Looked very much like volcanic rock. [I; 1394. Cocke, John H., Jr. "Virginia Aerolite." American Journal of Science, 15 (1829): 195-196. Shepard, Charles Upham. "A mineralogical and chemical description of the Virginia Aerolite." American Journal of Science, 16 (1829): 191-203. "Aérolithe aux Etats-Unis, dans le comté de Chesterfield, en Virginie."Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 39 (1828): 421-422. Fletcher, 100. Greg, 72. This is the Richmond meteorite.]


1828 June 6 / Great q. / Kashmir / 1000 killed / BA '11. [I; 1395. Milne, 703.]


1828 June 8 / Volc / Goentoer, Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [I; 1396. Backer, 880. The Guntur volcano.]


1828 June 8 or 10 / Canton de Vaud, Switzerland / Painted Ladies / from S to N / column 10 or 15 feet broad / for 2 hours / Athenaeum 1828/891. [I; 1397. "Popular Science." Athenaeum and Literary Chronicle, 3 (1828): 891-892, at 891, "Entomology."]


1828 June 15 / Smyrna / I. [I; 1398. A class I earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1828 June 16 / [London Times], 5-b / Sunspots. [I; 1399. "Spots on the Sun." London Times, June 16, 1828, p. 5 c. 2.]


1828 summer / BO / Teleport / In Amer Jour. Sci, 16-41, Joseph E. Muse tells of a ditch that had been dug upon his farm near Cambridge, Maryland, in land ten feet above a river that was a mile away. The work was interrupted by rain that continued 10 or 12 days. The rain water filling the ditch contained hundreds of fish, two kinds of perch. They could not have developed from fish spawn in so short a time: they were from four to seven inches long. There had been a similar occurence several years before. In a ditch unconnected with any body of water had appeared many perch, some of them a foot in length. [I; 1400.1, 1400.2, 1400.3. Muse, Joseph E. "Notice of the appearance of fish and lizards in extraordinary circumstances." American Journal of Science, 16 (1829): 41-44. Gudger, Eugene Willis "Rains of Fishes." American Museum Journal, 21 (1921): 607-619, at 610.]


1828 summer / fish / Cambridge, Maryland / Am. J. Sci 16/41. [I; 1403. Muse, Joseph E. "Notice of the appearance of fish and lizards in extraordinary circumstances." American Journal of Science, 16 (1829): 41-44.]


1828 June 30 / 15 h / Op. Mars / (Al). [I; 1401. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1828, 64.]


1828 July 7 / 20 h / Venus / Inf. conjunction / (Al). [I; 1402. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1828, 76.]


1828 Aug 9 / Caucasia / III. [I; 1404. A class III earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1828 Sept. 7 / Horton, Ribblesdale / Met size moon / brilliance = sunlight / BA 60. [I; 1405. Greg, 72.]


1828 Sept 14 / Tarragone, Spain / Storm / lightning / terrific concussions in the sky / fall of hailstones of 4 or 5 ounces and more each / Arch. des. Decouv. 1829-187. [I; 1406. "Gréle extraordinaire tombée en 1828." Les Archives des Decouvertes et des Inventions Nouvelles, 22 (1829): 186-188. "Gréle extraordinaire en Espagne." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 39 (December, 1828): 427-428. The hail fell at Tarragona between 8 and 8:30 A.M.]


1828 Sept 14 / Catalonia, Spain / "Extraordinary storm, accompanied by hail of most unusual size. / BA 54-196 / Q on 15. [I; 1407. Mallet, 196. Shocks began in Murcia on the 13th with the most violent at 5 P.M., on the 15th. "In some places loud subterranean noises were heard. On the 14th there had been an extraordinary storm in Catalonia, accompanied by hail of most unusual size." A class II earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1828 Sept 14-15 / night / Murcia, Spain / disastrous q / Arch. des Decouv. 1829-198. [I; 1408.  "Tremblemens de terre en Espagne." Les Archives des Decouvertes et des Inventions Nouvelles, 22 (1829): 198-199.]


1828 Sept 29 / Norwich, Eng / shaft of light in the sky / Mechanic's Mag 22/192. [I; 1409. "Late Celestial Phenomenon." Mechanics' Magazine, Museum, Register, Journal, and Gazette, 22, (no. 592; December 13, 1834): 192. This article refers to an earlier article of a recent phenomenon seen at Liverpool, on November 3, 1834. "Celestial Phenomenon." Mechanics' Magazine, Museum, Register, Journal, and Gazette, 22, (no. 588; November 15, 1834): 128.]


1828 Sept 29 / Great beam / Phil Mag 2/4/index / lum. of one. [I; 1410. Kater, Henry. "On the Luminous Zone observed in the Heaven on the 29th of September last." Philosophical Magazine, s. 2 v. 4 (1828): 337-338. Forster, Thomas. "On the Zodiacal Light of the 29th of September, as It Appeared from Chelmsford." Philosophical Magazine, s. 2 v. 4 (1828): 389-390. "Aurora Borealis." Philosophical Magazine, s. 2 v. 4 (1828): 392-393. "Aurora Borealis?" Philosophical Magazine, s. 2 v. 4 (1828): 393-394. Dalton, John. "On the Height of the Aurora Borealis above the Surface of the Earth. Philosophical Magazine, s. 2 v. 4 (1828): 418-428. Gilbert, Davies. "On the Luminous Belt of September the 29th." Philosophical Magazine, s. 2 v. 4 (1828): 453- 454. Forster, Benjamin Meggot. "Luminous Belt of Sept. 29th." Philosophical Magazine, s. 2 v. 4 (1828): 463-464.]


[1828 Sept 29 /] 1829 Sept 29 / Ext aurora or zod light / Phil Mag 2/4/463 / See Sept 29, 1828. [I; 1507. Forster, Benjamin Meggot. "Luminous Belt of Sept. 29th." Philosophical Magazine, s. 2 v. 4 (1828): 463-464. See: 1828 Sept 29, (I; 1410).]


1828 Oct 1 / Canary Islands / I. [I; 1411. A class I earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1828 Oct 2 / Beam / [London Times], 3-e / 4-4-b / 1-3-a / Rainbow phe / See Sept 29, 1829. [I; 1412. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, October 2, 1828, p. 3 c. 5. "About half-past eight o'clock on the evening of the 29th instant, I was kindly invited by a neighbour to walk out into the street to witness an extraordinary appearance in the heavens. On doing so, my attention was instantly rivetted by a fine luminous arch, extending about 150 deg., as nearly as possible, from west to east, not immediately crossing our zenith, but depressed from it about 20 or 30 deg. to the south. Perhaps I am not quite correct in speaking of it as an arch; for its direction was somewhat irregular, and, at one part, nearly rectilinear. It was much brighter at its western than at its eastern extremity, though in all parts surpassing the brightness of the Milky Way. It was perfectly transparent, offering no interruption to the ray's proceeding from the stars behind it. The apparent width of this luminous band was perhaps six feet, though it was far from regular, tapering off to the east, and reaching to the constellation Pleiades. This phenomenon was visible for upwards of an hour, though with occasional variations in its degree of brightness, and with one or two interruptions of its continuity. The night was beautifully clear...." "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, October 4, 1828, p. 4 c. 2. "On tracing the course of this singular phenomenon upon a celestial globe, its path appears to have been that of a great circle meeting the horizon in E.N.E. and W. by S." "Rainbow phenomena." London Times, October 1, 1828, p. 3 c. 1. Only a bright fragment of a rainbow was visible to the observer, as it dissipated under a series of clouds. "At length the whole bow vanished, except a fragment of a few degrees high, in contact with the ground. Viewing the vivid brilliancy of this fragment, we were surprised to see it suddenly shoot up to near the top of the complete arch, and after remaiing unsteadily for a few moments, again die away. This was repeated again and again for at least half a dozen times, presenting a series of flitting primatic coruscations more beautiful than can easily be conceived." See: 1829 Sept 29, (I: 1409, 1410).]


1828 Oct 5-8 / Emilia, Italy / I. [I; 1413. A class I earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1828 Oct 9 / Italy, north of Genoa / II. [I; 1414. A class II earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1828 Oct 9 / (+) / (It) / q and geolog / See next. / Piedmont / flames from a crevice? /See 1805 and q. [I; 1415. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 345-346. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1828 Oct. 10 / Turin / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1416. Greg, 72.]


1828 Oct 9 / Oct 10 / TurinGenoa, etc. / qs / a met on 9th / BA '54. [I; 1417. Mallet, 197.]


1828 Oct 10 / (It) / det met / Piedmont / and q / See: 1805. [I; 1418. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 346. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1828 Oct. 10 / Violent q in Italymany villages ruined. "Several persons said they had seen a luminous meteor shortly before the shock." / B. Assoc, '54-197. [I; 1419. Mallet, 197.]


1828 Oct 13 / St Lawrence / Dark day / smoke / rain bitter with effects / smoke fell / Arcana of Science 1830/237. [I; 1420. "Dark Day." Arcana of Science, 3 (1830): 237.]


1828 Oct 17 / (It) / The concussions of the 10th repeated at Voghera till the 17th. / See 1805. [I; 1421. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 346. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1828 Oct 20 / astro / [Lond. Times], 3-c / Nov. 12-3-c / Comet of 1835. [I; 1422. Herapath, John. "The Comet of 1835." London Times, October 20, 1828, p. 3 c. 3. Herapath, John. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, November 12, 1828, p. 3 c. 3. Two of John Herapath's letters to the Times, (before his reputed discovery of the Great Comet of 1831, or C/1831 A1), attempted to dispel concerns about comets colliding with the Earth.]


1828 Oct 9 / Oct 24, [London Times], 2-c / qGenoa / See Oct, 9, 10. [I; 1423. "Earthquake." London Times, October 24, 1828, p. 2 c. 3. See: 1828 Oct 9, (I: 1414, 1417, 1418), and 1828 Oct 10, (I: 1418, 1419).]


1828 Oct. 29 / India / II. [I; 1424. A class II earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1828 Nov. 5 / Mars in quadrature. [I; 1425. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1828, 124.]


1828 Nov. 6 / Cape Town / Meteor / BA 60. [I; 1426. The meteor is listed in Greg's catalog, ("60"), not Mallet's, ("54"). Greg, 72.]


1828 Nov. 9 / Philippines / II. [I; 1427. A class II earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1828 Nov 11-12 / In Isère, France, large meteor and others smaller. / C.R., 3-50. [I; 1428. Bruyas. "Météores lumineux vus dans la nuit du 11 au 12 novembre 1828." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 50.]


1828 Nov. 21 / 1 p.m. / Mysterious explosive sound heard by the naturalist Roth, in Switzerland. / Bull Soc. Belge D'Astro, 4-196. [I; 1429. Vincent, Jean. "Les Bruits Mystérieux en Suisse." Bulletin de la Société belge d'astronomie, 4 (1898): 191-198, at 196. "Le 21 novembre 1828, la nuit, vers 1 h., le bruit mystérieux fut entendu par le naturaliste [Albrecht Wilhelm] Roth et par d'autres observateurs attentifs. Le ciel était couvert et donna de la pluie."]


1828 Dec 3 / [London Times]. 3-d / 10-2-c / 19-3-a / Somnamb. [A; 83. "The Following case...." London Times, December 6, 1828, p. 3 c. 4. "Extraordinary Case of Somnambulism." London Times, December 10, 1828, p. 2 c. 3. "Remarkable Instance of Somnambulism." London Times, December 19, 1828, p. 3 c. 1.]


1828 Dec 16 / [London Times], 3-f / Stormfrightful at Portsmouth. [I; 1430. "The Late Storm." London Times, December 16, 1828, p. 3 c. 6. The article refers to the "Frightful Tempest" at Limerick, (with no mention of Portsmouth).]


1828 Dec 18 / q. / Sea waves / Japan / III. [I; 1431. A class III earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1828 Dec 29 / 10 a.m. / Great q., Celebes, and sea rose tremendously. / BA 54. [I; 1432, Mallet, 200. A class II earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1829:


[1829. Wrong date. See: 1828, (I; 1433).]


1829 / Persia / Manna / D-53. [I; 1434. The note copies information from page 53 of The Book of the Damned. "Fall of manna." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1848, 235-236.]


1829 / Volc reported in N. S. Wales / Gent's Mag 1829/1/636. [I; 1435. "Foreign News." Gentleman's Magazine, 99 pt. 1 (July 1829): 636-637.]


1829 Jan / Unusual fall of rain in Lakes District / Tr. Roy Soc Edin 22-41. [I; 1436. Davy, John. "Notice of an unusual Fall of Rain in the Lake District, in January 1829." Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 22 (1861): 41-49.]


1829 month of Jan / q and aerial and stationary / (Cut) / Shocks almost daily at Patras, Greece, always accompanied [by] atmospheric disturbance. / B Assoc54-201. [I; 1437. Mallet, 201.]


1829 Jan 1 / [London Times], 3-f / Aurora / Hull. [I; 1438. "A singular modification of the Aurora Borealis...." London Times, January 1, 1829, p. 3 c. 6.]


1829 Jan 10 / [London Times]. 2-f / 24-2-c / 31-4-a / Feb 9-5-f / Trance. [A; 84. "The following is an account of the extraordinary case of trance...." London Times, January 10, 1829, p. 2 c. 6. "In addition to the particulars of the extraordinary case of Sarah Carter...." London Times, January 24, 1829, p. 2. c. 3. "Sarah Carter." London Times, January 31, 1829, p. 4 c. 1. "We understand that Sarah Carter..." London Times, February 9, 1829, p. 5 c. 6.]


1829 Jan-April / # / Series of fires / Rheims / An Reg 1829/138. [A; 85. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 71 (1829): pt. 2, 1-191, at 138-140, cv. "Juvenile Incendiary."]


1829 Jan 31-Ap 9 / Fires / An. Reg. 1829-138 / Boy Lambert Canizot, who lived with father at Sommerville, (Hermouville) France. On Jan 31, house took fire on thatched roof, whic[h] sloped down to a few feet of the ground. Feb 9, at 9 in morning, another fire in an out house. Boy was first to see it, and spread the alarm. Same day, another fire on another thatched roof. The boy gave the alarm. On 15th, in afternoon, a shoe full of dead embers found near a pile of straw. Shoe belonged to the boy's small brother. "It was evident" that the cinders had been so carried. 3 days later, at 9 on the morning, in the home of one Latuc, fire on lower part of thatched roofheated conders found near it. The boy gave the alarm. Feb 24, house of one Deen afire on thatch a few feet from ground. March 14another housethatch, near groundboy gave the alarm. Other firesthen Canizot was seen thrusting his hand into a thatched roofhe saw he was watched and crept away on hands and knees. A little later fire burst out here. The boy was arrested, found guilty and sentenced to 20 years imprisonment in the House of Correction. [A; 86.1 to 86.6. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 71 (1829): pt. 2, 1-191, at 138-140, cv. "Juvenile Incendiary."]


1829 Feb. 7 / ab 3 p.m. / Capt Sturt, exploring Southern Australia, camped on the bank of the Darling River. Heard what seemed to be the report of a gun 5 or 6 miles away"heavy piece of ordnance". Great mystery to him, and he could in no way account for it. / Nature81-127. [I; 1439.1, 1439.2. Cleland, John Burton. "Barisàl Guns in Australia." Nature, 81 (July 29, 1909): 127. Cleland quotes from Strut's Two Expeditions into the Interior of Southern Australia. See: 1829 Feb 7, (I; 1372).]


[1829 Feb 7 /] 1828or 1829: Feb 7 / 3 p.m. / On Darling River, Australia. / Report as if big gun. / Sturt, "Central Australia, 2-21. [I; 1372. Sturt, Charles. Narrative of an Expedition into Central Australia. London: T and W. Boone, 1849, v. 2, 25. "When I was on the Darling, in lat. 30°, in 1828, I was roused from my work by a similar report; but neither on that occasion, or on this, could I solve the mystery in which it was involved. It might, indeed, have been some gaseous explosion, but I never, in the interior, saw any indication of such phenomena." Sturt, Charles. Two Expeditions into the Interior of Southern Australia. London: Smith, Elder and Co., 1833, v. 1, 98. "About 3 p.m. on the 7th, Mr. Hume and I were occupied tracing the chart upon the ground. The day had been remarkably fine, not a cloud was there in the heavens, nor a breath of air to be felt. On a sudden we heard what seemed to be the report of a gun fired at a distance of between five and six miles. It was the hollow sound of an earthly explosion, or the sharp cracking noise of falling timber, but in every way resembled a discharge of a heavy piece of ordnance. On this we all agreed, but no one was certain whence the sound proceeded." While Strut identifies this expedition as "in 1828," the phenomenon occurred on February 7, 1829.]


1829 Feb 21 / Disastrous q throughout south of Iceland / BA 54. [I; 1440. Mallet, 201. A class II earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1829 Feb 21 and 22 / south of Iceland / Shocksq / farms destroyed / Smithsonian Inst Rept. 1885-510. [I; 1441. "Volcanic Eruptions and Earthquakes in Iceland within Historic Times." Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian, 1885, 495-541, at 510.]


1829 Feb 24 to March 10 / Several qs a day around Lake Baikal / Mag Nat Hist 6-301. [I; 1442. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 6 (July 1833): 289-308, at 301.]


[1829 March. Wrong date. See: 1829 Oct 24, (I; 1443).]


1829 March / Slight shocks in Murcia. Went in at least to Ap., 1833. / See BA 54. [I; 1444. Mallet, 202-205, 207-211, 220, 238. Garnier, Jean Guillaume. Traité de météorologie, ou Physique du globe. Brussels: Société belge de librairie, 1837, 172.]


1829 March 5 / [London Times], 7-a / Ext. Discovery. [A; 90. "Extraordinary Discovery." London Times, March 5, 1829, p. 7 c. 1. The discovery of the Gallagh Man, a preserved bog body found in Galway, is described along with an offer of it to a museum. The remains of the Gallagh Man, who died about two thousand years ago, are now on display at the National Museum of Ireland, in Dublin.]


1829 Mar 8 / Irkutsk, Siberia / Said severe q felt several hundred milesbut no damage recorded. / A clattering noise heardIt was Dr. Erman's conclusion noise was overhead and not subterranean. The noise "seemed to recur according to a certain rule. Vibrations were felt up to the 22nd. / B Assoc 54/201. [I; 1445.1, 1445.2. Mallet, 201-202. A class I earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1829 Mar 19 / 12:30 a.m. / Maling, Dalecarlia, Sweden / q and met sound / BA '54. [I; 1446. Mallet, 202. "Accompanied by loud noise in the air." Mallet does not mention any meteor with this quake.]


1829 March 21 / q. / Murcia, Spain / Fearful noise and a column of fire to the eastward of Murcia. / L.T., Ap. 14-4-a / At Benejuzar, four craters opened, 2 of which threw out lava. / L.T. 16-3-c. [I; 1447.1, 1447.2. "Earthquake in Spain." London Times, April 14, 1829, p. 4 c. 1. "The earthquake of the 21st was accompanied with a fearful noise. Travellers observed a column of fire, which at the moment of the shock, made its appearance towards the eastward of Murcia." "The Late Earthquake in Spain." London Times, April 16, 1829, p. 3 c. 3. "At Benejuzar four craters opened, two of which threw out lava, and others exhalations so fœtid that they were felt at more than the distance of a league."]


1829 March 21 / 5:20 a.m. / Violent shocks in Jamaica / BA 54. [I; 1448. Mallet, 202.]


1829 March 21 / Q in province of Murciasevere. 2 salt lakes, water disappeared. At Benejuzar, 250 perished. / A. Reg., p. 63 / Here, at B., 4 craters opened and threw out lava. Out of all towns by Ap. 3, more than 3,000 bodies dug out. A column of fire was seen toward the eastward of Murcia. [I; 1449.1, 1449.2. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 71 (1829): pt. 2, 1-191, at 63-64, cv. "Earthquake."]


1829 March 21 / 6:30 p.m., in Murcia. Premonitory sounds like thunder heard 3/4 hour. It was like cannon fire. / BA 54. [I; 1450. Mallet, 202. A class III earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1829 March 22 / Sounds like cannon firing and shocks / Ancona, Italy / BA 54. [I; 1451. Mallet, 203.]


1829 March 22, 23, 24, 30 / Shocks / Jamaica / BA 54. [I; 1452. Kieswetter: "27 great severity." Mallet, 203.]


1829 Ap 1, 6, 16, 24/ qs and rain / Q's in Spain. "Heavy rain fell almost the whole month through, in Spain, producing great inundations." / BA '54 / See June 1. [I; 1453. Mallet, 203-205. See: 1829 June 1, (I; 1473); and, 1829 June 1 to 5, (I; 1474).]


1829 April / Heavy rains and floods almost whole month in Spain. / BA 54. [I; 1454. Mallet, 203-205.]


1829 April / "Heavy rain fell almost the whole month through in Spain, producing great inundations." / BA 54-204. [I; 1455. Mallet, 205.]


1829 Ap. 2 / BO / Volc eruption near Hudson's River, N. S. Wales, reported. / Mag Nat Hist 6-301. [I; 1456. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 6 (July 1833): 289-308, at 301. "A Volcano has just been discovered in the vicinity of Hunter's River...." Australian, (Sydney), March 19, 1828, p. 2 c. 1. "The Volcano." Australian, (Sydney), July 30, 1828, p. 3 c. 3-4. "It does not appear as if an eruption had ever yet taken place—there is, as we have remarked, no appearance of lava; and the extent of the crater, though said to be daily enlarging, when Mr. M. left the spot, was not very considerable. It is evident that a vein of bitumen exists, to supply the subterranean fire." "A Volcano in Australia." Australian Quarterly Journal of Theology, Literature & Science, 1 (1828): 382-385. Mount Wingen, (near Hunter's River, not Hudson's), is now believed to be a seam of coal has been burning underground for thousands of years, (and, not a volcano).]


1829 Ap. 10 / Leon, Spain / q., preceded by violent storm of rain and snow / BA 54. [I; 1457. Kieswetter noted: "should be 10th," (not "Ap. 2" in the original note). Mallet, 204.]


1829 Ap. 18 / q. / Murcia, Spain / LT, May 20-5-e. [I; 1458. "On the 18th instant another shock of an earthquake...." London Times, May 20, 1829, p. 5 c. 5.]


1829 Ap. 18 / Smaller q's on 16th and 17th. On 18th, almost equal to 21st. / BA 54. [I; 1459. Mallet, 204. In Spain.]


1829 Ap. 23 / In Baden / severe q / 9:30 p.m. / sound like thunder / severe snowstorm. [I; 1460. Mallet, 205.]


1829 Ap. 26 / Lght / [London Times], Ap 30/4/d. [I; 1461. "Afflicting Calamity." London Times, April 30, 1829, p. 4 c. 4. "During the time of divine service at Newark Church, last Friday, three or four vivid flashes of lightning, accompanied by thunder, spread consternation among the while of the congregation. The electric fluid had such an alarming effect on the Vicar, the Rev. William Thomas Wild, in the pulpit, as to deprive him almost instantaneously of sight, and he was unable to finish the service. Every possible assistance has since been rendered to him, but we are sorry to add, from the opinion of several medical gentlemen, not the slightest hope can be entertained of his eventual restoration to sight. The lightning was attracted by the ornamental iron work which is immediately over the pulpit where the rev. gentleman stood."]


[1830 Ap. 26 /] 1829 May 7 / Lght / [London Times], May 7/6/d. [I; 1463. "Newark Church, Nottinghamshire." London Times, May 7, 1829, p. 6 c. 4.]


1829 May 5 / Q in Salonica and a mt. poured out reddish water. / BA 54. [I; 1462. Mallet, 205. A class III earthquake. Milne, 703.]


[1829 May 7. Wrong date. See: 1830 Ap. 26, (I; 1461).]


1829 May 8 / Forsyth, Ga / (F) / Farrington / Mems Nat. Acad. of Science, vol. 13. / 13. [I; 1464. Fletcher, 100. Farrington, Oliver Cummings. "Catalogue of the Meteorites of North America, to January 1, 1909. Memoirs of the National Academy of Science, 13 (1915): 1-513, at 199-200. Greg, 72. This is the Forsyth meteorite.]


1829 May 8 / Stone of Forsyth, Ga. / bet. 3 and 4 p.m. / A. J. Sci 18-388 / Greatly resembles stone of May 9, 1827. [I; 1465. "Georgia Meteor and Ærolite." American Journal of Science, 18 (1830): 388-389. The Forsyth meteorite, like the Drake Creek meteorite, is also a chondrite. "On breaking the stone, it had a strong sulphureous smell, and exhibited a metallic substance resembling silver." "Very soon after the explosion, some black people heard a whizzing noise, and on looking saw a faint 'smoke' descend to the ground; at which time they heard the noise produced by the fall of the stone: they ran to the spot, for they saw where it fell, and discovered the hole it had made in the ground, being more than two feet in a hard clay soil: the negroes, and others who went early to the spot, say they perceived a sulphureous smell." "Domestic Items." Niles' Weekly Register, 36 (June 20, 1829): 270. "The Macon, (Geo.) Telegraph, gives an account of a meteoric stone, weighing thirty-six pounds, which fell in Monroe county on the 8th of May. Its fall was preceded by a noise heard at the distance of 25 or 30 miles. The sound was compared to the produced by a large cannon, quickly followed by a small one, and then by a great number of muskets." This is the Forsyth meteorite.]


[1829 May 8 /]1829 May 28 / See 5th. / Monroe Co., Ga. / fall of stones / C.R. 3-51 / I think this is newspapers of 28th. [I; 1469. "Aérolithes." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 50-51. The date of the meteorite's fall was on May 8, (not on "28 mai 1839," as reported in Comptes Rendus for the Macon Telegraph's publication date). The Forsyth meteorite was also known as the Monroe County meteorites.]


1829 May 21 to early in Dec / It. Sounds / (+) / See 1816. / at Albano Laziale / 41 detonations not accompanied by quake. [I; 1466. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 38. Mallet, 206-207. See: 1816 Dec 16 - 25, (I; 581).]


1829 May 22 / [London Times, 4-c / Storm / Isle of Bourbon. [I; 1467. "Storm at the Isle of Bourbon." London Times, May 22, 1829, p. 4. c. 3.]


1829 May 22 / Graz, Austria / q preceded by uninterrupted rain for 8 days / BA 54-206. [I; 1468. Mallet, 206.]


[1829 May 28. Wrong date. See: 1829 May 8, (I; 1465).]


1829 May 30 / Eels / not said where / Niles Register of, copying from the Maine Patriot. / Said fell a few rods north of Capital Hillpresumably fell in capital of Maine. / A fall of living eels. "They were of various sizes, generally from a foot to a foot and a half in length." [I; 1470.1, 1470.2. "During a shower on Sunday morning...." Niles' Weekly Register, 36 (May 30, 1829): 222. "During a shower on Sunday morning, several eels fell to the earth a few rods north of Capital Hill, making impressions in the mud where they lighted, which very plainly indicated the great degree of momentum they had acquired in their descent. They were of various sizes, generally from a foot to a foot and a half in length, and when we saw them a few minutes after they had fallen, were as lively, and twisted themselves into as many different postures, as if they had just been taken from the water." The location was probably at Augusta, Maine, (where the Maine Patriot was published, and where a new state capital building was to be built). (Maine Patriot and State Gazette, 1829; Maine Historical Society Library in Portland has an incomplete set of original copies from January 7 to October 21, 1829; LOC has microfilm.)]


1829 June / Murcia / Series / qs / Jan., 1883. [I; 1471. See: 1883 Jan. 11, (V; 1093), and, 1883 Jan. 16, (V: 1101 & 1102).]


1829 June / Huesca, Spain / spring of 1871 / Metite / qs of 1883, etc., here. [I; 1472. See: 1871 / spring of, (IV; 407); 1883 Jan. 11, (V; 1093); and, 1883 Jan. 16, (V: 1101 & 1102).]


1829 June 1 / q in Spain / 7th, "violent storm of rain, producing inundations" / See Ap. 1. [I; 1473. See: 1829 Ap 1, 6, 16, 24, (I; 1453).]


1829 June 1 to 5 / 68 shocks in Valencia, Spain. "on the 7th, a violent storm producing inundations." / BA 54-206. [I; 1474. Mallet, 207.]


1829 / Murcia, Spain / mets there / Aug 18, 1870 / Nov 5, 1851 / Dec 24, 1858 / Catalonia / Huesca, Spain / spring of 1871. [I; 1475. See: 1851 Nov 5, (II; 1560); 1858 Dec. 24, (II; 2263); and, 1871 / spring of, (IV; 407).]


1829 June 7 / Violent fall of rain, producing floods / Valencia, Spain / BA 54. [I; 1476. Mallet, 207.]


1829 / See Murcia, Spain. / See July 8, 1811, near Murcia. [I; 1477. The reference is to the fall of the Berlanguillas meteorite. See: 1811 July 8, (I; 346).]


1829 June 10 to 15 / 24 more shocks / Valencia / one very severe / BA 54. [I; 1478. Mallet, 207.]


1829 May, June and July / Remarkable th storms in many parts of Europe. / BA 54-208, 206. [I; 1479. Mallet, 206, 208. "The month of May was marked by storm and rains in many parts of Europe." "The storms, thunder and lightning, rain, and hail, of this month and the preceding were very remarkable in many parts of Europe."]


1829 June / Shocks in Murcia continued occasionally at least to Ap. 17, 1833. / BA 54. [I; 1480. Mallet, 202-205, 207-211, 220, 238. "In Murcia, especially at Torrevieja and Almoradi, earthquake shocks had not ceased to be occasionally felt since 1829."]


1829 June 15 / (+) / See preceding. / Ice / Spain / N / (D-176) / See July 24. [I; 1481. The note copies information from page 176 of The Book of the Damned. Flammarion, Camille. James Glaisher, ed. The Atmosphere. London: S. Low, Marston, Low, & Searle, 1873, 445. New York: Harper, 1874, 397. "On June 15, 1829, there was a hailstorm at Cazorta, in Spain, which crushed in houses; some of the blocks of ice weighed four and a half pounds."]


1829 June 15 / "On June 15, 1829 there was a hailstorm at Cazorta, Spain that crushed in houses; some of the blocks of ice weighed 4 1/2 lbs." / Flammarion, The Atmosphere, p. 445. [I; 1482. Flammarion, Camille. The Atmosphere. London: S. Low, Marston, Low, & Searle, 1873, 445.]


1829 June 25 / Treves / After a storm a moving column like a chimney in the sky, discharging smoke and fire. / Annales de Chimie, Dec., 1829 / Moved with sounds like those of great numbers of clattering stones. For 18 minutes it discharged fires, itself a great greyish mass, finally disappearing, leaving a strong odor of sulphur. [I; 1483.1, 1483.2. "Sur une trombe d'air remarquable, accompagnée d'um météore lumineux, qui a été observée, le 25 juin 1829, dans les environs de Trèves." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 42 (1829): 420-425.]


1829 June 25 / dets of phe of Treves / An. de Chimie, 1829, p. 420, of one of the vols / P.P. 1495. [I; 1484. "Sur une trombe d'air remarquable, accompagnée d'um météore lumineux, qui a été observée, le 25 juin 1829, dans les environs de Trèves." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 42 (1829): 420-425.]


1829 July 1 / q / rain / Hungary / Reddish clouds on horizon and an appearance like lightning. / q / heavy rain / preceded by some hail. BA '54-208. [I; 1485. Mallet, 208.]


[1829 July 1 /] 1829 Aug 15 / Hun / [London Times], 3-f / q / Hungary. [I; 1494. "Earthquake in Hungary." London Times, August 15, 1829, p. 3 c. 6. Dr. Franz, of Stainz, Austria, wrote: "On the 29th of June, about 11 o'clock, in the direction of Petnehaza, where I was upon business, a singular phenomenon presented itself. The whole firmament, the air being perfectly calm, was so enveloped in black clouds that the sharpest eye could not discover a star, and yet the horizon was illuminated as if by a northern light: there was at the same time a smell of sulphur. On the 30th, a picturesque beautiful morning gave promise of a brilliant day; but this did not last long, for soon after six o'clock gigantic clouds collected from every side, and immediately a heavy rain, like a waterspout, came thundering in torrents, and continued by intervals until four p.m. There were often drops of water as large as a hazel nut. During this violent rain a singular rumbling and rolling was heard in the air, from south-west to north-east; it resembled the bellowing of bulls at a distance. For three days together, from the 28th to the 30th, the dogs and cats were singularly disquieted; the first howled continually, and scraping up the earth, applied their ears anxiously to listen; they never remained at a hole they had scraped out, but went scraping up others. I slept in a room alone, with a house-dog; towards midnight he became uncommonly disturbed, and broke out frequently into a howl. About four I was suddenly awoke by a rough shaking of the arm by the dog; I heard a crash, and let him out of the room, but heard all the others howling in the court. This was the first shock, which several persons as well as I perceived...."]


1829 July 10 / Aurora? / Near Namur / Cor. to Mag of Nat Hist. 3-199 / 6 p.m. / Appearance like a rising sun. Upon a low bank of cloudsshafts of light divurging from a luminosity like the sun clouded over. [I; 1486. Clarke, William Branwhite. "A very unusual Appearance in the sky." Magazine of Natural History, 3 (March 1830): 199-200. Clarke was travelling between Quatre Bras and Namur, after six o'clock in the evening, and writes: "It is at Mazy where the range of hills at the back of the Meuse first bound the horizon; and it was at Mazy that we first saw the appearance in question. The sun was nearly behind us; but, in the direction of the Meuse, from which we were distant nearly 3¼ Brabant leagues (say 11 English miles), we distinctly saw rays of light, as of the sun, issuing from a low bank of clouds, which seemed to be stationary and to hang over the valley of the river, and piercing the intermediate clouds (as openings occurred in the course of their separation from each other), in long diverging lines stretching towards the meridian, so as to give the idea of a rising sun, and in the same manner as I have seen him rising in a cloudy morning over the same country. So strong was the resemblance to that of the sunbeams, that one might easily have imagined we were travelling directly contrary to our route."]


1829 July 20 / Fishes / Moradabad, India / Lin. Soc Trans. 16/764 / (D-84). ** [I; 1487. The note copies information from page 84 of The Book of the Damned. "Extracts from the Minute-Book of the Linnean Society of London." Transactions of the Linnean Society of London, 16 (1833): 764. July 20, 1829, is the date of the letter reporting the fall of fish at Moradabad.]


1829 July 24 / bet 10 and 11 p.m. / Murcia, Spain / Shocks, violent storm, and hail of unusual size. "Some of the hailstones weighed 10 or 12 ounces." / BA '54-208. [I; 1488. Mallet, 209. "...some of the hailstones weighing 10 or 12 oz...."]


1829 Aug / "The storms of July still continued in many parts of Europe. / BA 54-210. [I; 1489. Mallet, 210.]


1829 Aug 4 / Hungary / II. [I; 1490. A class II earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1829 Aug 7 / 3 a.m. / Colmar, etc. / q and sound like dist. thunder / BA 54. [I; 1491. Mallet, 209.]


1829 Aug. 14 / Gümbinnen / 3 fireballs / BA 60. [I; 1492. Kieswetter: "Should be vol. 60," (not "BA 54"). Greg, 72.]


1829 Aug 14 / (F) / Deal, N.J. / Meteorite / Farringtons list / Mems Nat Acad of Sciences, vol. 13. [I; 1493. Fletcher, 100. Farrington, Oliver Cummings. "Catalogue of the Meteorites of North America, to January 1, 1909. Memoirs of the National Academy of Science, 13 (1915): 1-513, at 157-158. Greg, 72. This is the Deal meteorite.]


[1829 Aug 15. Wrong date. See: 1829 July 1, (I; 1494).]


1829 Aug 26 / Parina / Met / [BA] '60. [I; 1495. Kieswetter: "Should be vol. 60," (not "BA 54"). The bolide is listed in Greg's catalog, ("60"), not Mallet's, ("54"). Greg, 72.]


1829 Sept / (frgs) / Rouen, France / multitude of young frogs in a heavy th. storm / Arcana of Sci 1830-217. [I; 1496. "Shower of Frogs." Arcana of Science, 3 (1830): 217. "Shower of Frogs." Magazine of Natural History, 2 (April 1829): 103. "When at Rouen, in September last, we were assured by an English family resident there, that during a very heavy thunder shower, accompanied by violent wind, and almost midnight darkness, an innumerable multitude of young frogs fell on and around the house. The roof, the window-sills, and the gravel walks were covered with them."]


1829 Sept 6 / Cremona, Italy / I. [I; 1497. A class I earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1829 Sept 9 /Krasnoi-Ugol, Rjasan, Russia / Met-ite. / (F). [I; 1498. Fletcher, 100. Rjasan is now identified as Ryazan, Russia. This is the Krasnoi-Ugol meteorite.]


1829 Sept 9 / Räsan / Stonefall / ac to Kamtz / BA 67-416. [I; 1499. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 416. Räsan is now identified as Ryazan, Russia.]


1829 Sept 15 / Violent local whirlwind, all calm around it, at Gorschoff, Pskow, Russia. / Arc Sci 1830-246. [I; 1500. "An Air Spout." Arcana of Science, 3 (1830): 246.]


1829 Sept 18 / after 7 a.m. / 2 strong shocks at Calcutta / Arc. Sci '30-170. [I; 1501. "Earthquakes." Arcana of Science, 3 (1830): 170-171.]


1829 Sept 26 / Fireball, ac to Kamtz / stones, ac to Baumhauer / Dusseldorf / BA 60. [I; 1502. Greg, 72-73.]


1829 Sept 26 / Shocks and volc eruptions / 27, 28 and Oct 1 / Chile / Am. J. Sci 2-12-426. [I; 1503. "On the Great Earthquake experienced in Chile, April 2, 1851." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 12 (1851): 424-426, at 426.]


1829 Sept 26 / q / Chile / I / BA 11. [I; 1504. A class I earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1829 Sept 24 / Murcia, Spain / q / "Storms and heavy rains continued to prevail in many parts of Europe during this month." / BA '54-210. [I; 1505. Mallet, 210.]


1829 Sept 29 / See F. / Krasnol-Ugol, Kasan Russia / Metite / BA, '60. [I; 1506. Fletcher, 100. Greg, 72. This is the Krasnoi-Ugol meteorite. Fletcher gives the date of its fall as September 9. See: 1829 Sept 9, (I; 1498).]


[1829 Sept 29. Wrong date. See: 1828 Sept 29, (I; 1507).]


1829 ab Oct 1 / Aubonne (Vaud), Switzerland / Brillliant det meteor "followed by gusts of wind and snow showers." Several shocks were felt. / BA 54. [I; 1508. Mallet, 210-211.]


1829 Oct. 17 / First attack on K. Hauser. [A; 91.]


1829 Oct 19 / Det met / Cape Town / BA 60/72. [I; 1509. Greg, 72.]


[1829 Oct 24 /] 1829 March / Spain / qs / also meteors and halos around sun and moon / BA 54p. 211. [I; 1443. Kieswetter notes: "Should be Oct 24, Granada." Mallet, 211.]


1829 Oct 25 / Fog in London / on sun seen (N.E.) a large spot near the center / Mag of Nat Hist 5-396. [I; 1510. "Spot on the Sun." Magazine of Natural History, 5 (May 1832): 396. "N.E." means that it was seen with the "naked eye."]


1829 Nov. 11 / Volc / Bromo / Java / C.R. 70-878. [I; 1511. Backer, 880. The Bromo cone of the Tengger Caldera.]


1829 Nov 13 / See Nov. 19, 1830. / Prague / Met fell and burned surface of a field brick red. / BA 65/128. [I; 1512. Kieswetter: "See note on 13 Nov 1835." Kieswetter refers to the fiery meteor at Belley, France; see: 1835 Nov 13, (I: 2053, 2056 to 2060). Greg, 72-73. Hallaschka, Franz Ignaz Cassian. "Beobachtete Feuerkugal im Karolinenthal (Vorstadt Prag)." Astronomische Nachrichten, 8  (1829-1830): 107-110. Kämtz, Ludwig Friedrich. Lehrbuch der Meteorologie. Halle: In der Gebauerschen Buchhandlung, 1831-1836, v. 3, 297. Kämtz gives the date as November 19, 1828. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1864-65." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1865, 57-142, at 128. Hallaschka, in the first report, gives the date as November 13; later, Kämtz gives the date as November 19, which was copied by Baumhauer, on his tables, and also by Greg. Baumhauer, Eduard Hendrik von. "Ueber den muthmasslichen Ursprung der Meteorsteine, nebst einer Analyse des Meteorsteins, welcher am 2. Juni 1843 in der Provinz Utercht gefallen ist." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, s. 2 v. 66 (1845): 465-503. See: 1829 Nov 13, (I; 1577).]


[1829 Nov 13 /] 1829 Nov 19 / Metite / stones / ac to BA '60. [I; 1514. Greg, 72-73. Greg gives this date for Prague.]


[1829 Nov 13 /] 1830 Nov 19 / See Nov. 13, 1829. / Prague / little red stones? / BA '60. [I; 1577. Greg, 72. See: 1829 Nov 13, (I; 1512).]


1829 Nov 18, 19 / 2 great q's / China / BA '11. [I; 1513. Two class III earthquakes. Milne, 703.]


[1829 Nov 19. Wrong date. See: 1829 Nov 13, (I; 1514).]


1829 Nov. 19 / Great q / China. [I; 1515. A class III earthquake. Milne, 703.]


1829 Nov. 23 / Bucharest / q and "strong atmospheric perturbations". / BA 54. [I; 1516. Mallet, 212.]


1829 Nov. 24 / China / III / Nov 24 / III. [I; 1517. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1829 Nov. 26 / S.W. Russia and Roumania / III. [I; 1518. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1829 Nov 26 / ab 4 a.m./ from Transylvania to Kieff, Russia / violent qin Moldavia, shocks followed by a heavy fall of snow / BA 54. [I; 1519. Mallet, 212-214.]


1829 Nov 27 / Mondavio and Todi, Italy / q preceded by violent gust of wind / BA 54. [I; 1520. Mallet, 215.]


1829 Nov. 27 / La Rochelle / Rochefort (Char-Inf.) / qexplosion seemed high in air. / B As. '54 / 4:05 p.m.shock again at 5. [I; 1521. Mallet, 213-215. Both the shocks of November 27 occurred about 4:05 P.M., within seconds of one another, (not "again at 5"); however, another "rather severe shock" struck La Rochelle on December 6th, at 5 A.M.]


1829 Nov 29 / 4:05 p.m. / La Rochelle / Sound appeared to be high in the air and was thought the explosion of a meteor, by many persons. / An. de Chimie, Dec., 1829. [I; 1522. "Tremblemens de terre." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 42 (1829): 347-351, at 350-351.]


1829 Nov 30 / Siberia / I. [I; 1523. A class I earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1829 Dec 22 / after 1825 / Phe continuing at Belley, dept. of the Ain. / for instance, Dec. 22, 1829, several / and Jan 5, 1838. [I; 1524. Mallet, 216. Mallet notes shocks on December 22 and 29, at Belley. "Tremblemens de terre." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 42 (1829): 347-351, at 351. Annales de Chimie notes the strong shock on the night of December 22.]


1830:


1830 / Fishes / herring / Islay, Scotland / Eng Mec. 108/118. [I; 1525. "Showers of Fishes and Other Things." English Mechanic, 108 (no. 2793; October 4, 1918): 118-119. "Showers of Fishes and Other Things." Scotsman, September 21, 1918, p. 4 c. 8. "Queer Sorts of Rain." Family Friend, 1866 (Midsummer, 1866): 427-429. "In the Isle of Islay, after a day of very heavy rain, the peasants were surprised at finding a number of small herrings, all fresh, and some of them alive, strewed over a field." The alleged shower of herrings at Islay appears similar to that at Ulva, (on March 9, and about 85 kilometers north of Islay); and, Islay may have been substituted for the misspelled "Ula" when copying accounts from the Penny Magazine article. See: 1830 Mar. 9, (I; 1538).]


1830 and for 18 months / House near Chesterfield, occupied by a Mr. J. Ashwell / Bell ringing / See Major Edward Moor's "Bealing's Bells." [A; 92. Moor, Edward. Bealings Bells. Woodbridge, England: John Loder, 1841, 54. "The house was large, and old; and, with some, had the reputation of being 'haunted.' I forget the date of the occurrences; but believe ten or twelve years ago—say 1830—his ringings, from first to last, continued about eighteen months. They differed from mine, among others, in this particular :—that, instead of ringing in peals (of four or five) by sudden starts and instant quietude, his rang continually; many seconds, with violent oscillations and clatter. Insomuch, that while one was in such violent vibration, he would seize it between his hands, and compel cessation. But, on being liberated, it would resume its vibration and ringing."]


1830 Jan 10etc. / Immense group of sunspots / E. limb of sun / On 17th, 3 groups and one isolated spot. / An. de Chimie 1830-392. [I; 1526. "Taches solaires en 1830." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 45 (1830): 392-395.]


1830 Jan 18 / Philippines / III. [I; 1527. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1830 Feb 8 / q and fog / Agram, Hungary / 10:40 a.m. / BA 54 / Ab an hour later "the heavens became obscurred by clouds as before, and a thick fog of a disagreeable smell prevailed for 3 hours. [I; 1528. Mallet, 217.]


1830 Feb 8 / qfog / Agram / "A fog, having a very bad smell, spread itself abroad, and lasted for three hours." / BA '50/75. [I; 1529. Mallet, Robert. "First Report on the Facts of Earthquake Phenomena." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 1-89, at 75.]


1830 Feb 9 / [London Times], 3-a / q. /Valparaiso. [I; 1530. "Extract from a letter...." London Times, February 9, 1830, p. 3 c. 1. "Extract from a letter dated Valparaiso, 8th October:'On the 26th ult. we had a severe shock of an earthquake, which in force was little short of that of 1822, but only of about one-eighth in duration. The injury done to the buildings is considerable, but by no means equal to the former occasion, very few houses having fallen, though, more or less, all are shook. It occurred in this place at three minutes after 2 p.m."]


[1830 Feb. 11. Wrong date. See: 1850 Feb 11, (I; 1531).]


1830 Feb. 15 / (+) / Launton, Bicester, Oxfordshire / Metite / (F) / (Nature 94/258). [I; 1532. Fletcher, 100. This is the Launton meteorite. Greg, 72-73. Denning, William Frederick. "A Meteoritic Fall in Lancashire." Nature, 94, (November 5, 1914): 258-259.]


1830 Feb. 15 / Birmingham / Met = Moon / N.E. to S.W. / ab. 7:30 p.m. / BA 60. [I; 1533. Kieswetter: "Should be vol 60," (not "BA 54"). The fireball is listed in Greg's catalog, ("60"), not Mallet's, ("54"). Greg, 72. Lowe, 136.]


1830 Feb 19 / Fish"mut" / India / 38 / (D-84, 85). [I; 1534. The note copies information from pages 84 and 85 of The Book of the Damned. Prinsep, James. "Fall of fishes from the atmosphere in India." American Journal of Science, 32 (1837): 199-200. "A large number were collected by several witnesses; some were found desitute of a head, and had commenced to putrefy; others were entire and fresh, but no one dared to eat them." Prinsep, James. "Fall of fish from the sky" Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, 2 (1833): 650-652. "The shower of fish took place on the 19th February, 1830, in the neighbourhood of the Surbundy factory, Feridpoor." Prinsep, James. "Chute de Poissions de l'Atmosphère dans l'Inde." Bibliothèque Universelle des Sciences, Belles-Lettres, et Arts, Sciences et Arts, n.s., 2 (March 1836): 159. Buist, George. "Showers of fish." Living Age, 52 (1857): 186. "They were seen at first in the sky like a flock of birds descending rapidly to the ground. There was rain drizzling at the time, but no storm."]


1830 March / Maury Co., Tenn. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [I; 1535. Finley, 3.]


1830 / Near (Dunkeld), Perthshire / (?) / (D-84) / fish / Liv Age 52/186. ** [I; 1536. The note copies information from page 84 of The Book of the Damned. Buist, George. "Showers of fish." Living Age, 52 (1857): 186. "About 1830, fish fell near Dunkeld in Perthshire...."]


1830 March 7 / 3 h / Venus / Inf. conjunction / (Al). [I; 1537. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1830, 28.]


1830 Mar. 9 / Fish / island of Ulva / Argyleshire / Penny Mag. 12/127. ** [I; 1538. "On Preternatural Rains." Penny Magazine, 12 (1843): 127-128. "Shower of Young Herrings." London Morning Chronicle, April 5, 1830, p. 3 c. 4. "On the 9th of March, 1830, the inhabitants of the island of Ul[v]a, in Argyleshire, after a day of very hard rain, were surprised to find numbers of small herrings strewed over the fields, perfectly fresh, and some of them exhibiting signs of life. Similar instances of showers of small fish are well authenticated. The solution long since agreed on by the learned is, that they have been taken from the surface of the sea, where they happened at the time to be swarming, by a water-spout, and carried over the land, where, on the breaking of the column, they descended in what the writer calls 'the down pour of rain.'"]


1830 March 9 / Caucasia / III / [Heavy quake / BA 1911]. [I; 1539. Milne, 704.]


1830 March 13 to May / Submarine explosions near Iceland / Smithsonian Inst. Rept 1885-510. [I; 1540. "Volcanic Eruptions and Earthquakes in Iceland within Historic Times." Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian, 1885, 495-541, at 510.]


1830 Ap. 1 / [London Times], 4-b / Met / London. [I: 1541. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, April 1, 1830, p. 4 c. 2.]


1830 Ap. 6 / Vesuvius active. / BA '54. [I; 1542. Mallet, 218.]


1830 Ap. 12 and 23 / Guatemala / III each time. [I; 1543. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1830 Ap. 14 / Violent q / St Domingo, W. Indies / BA 54. [I; 1544. Mallet, 218. A class I earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1830 Ap / 27 / also Etna / Vesuvius / great eruption / Mag Nat Hist 6-301 and 302. [I; 1545. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 6 (July 1833): 289-308, at 301-303. "May 16th, Etna in eruption...."]


1830 May 9 / Persia / I. [I; 1546. A class I earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1830 May 12-22 / China / II. [I; 1547. A class II earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1830 May 15 / Dust / Malta / and at Sardinia / A. J. Sci 2/11/373. [I; 1548. Ehrenberg, Christian Gottfried. "On the Infusoria and other Microscopic forms in Dust-showers and Blood-rain." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 11 (1851): 372-389, at 373.]


1830 May 16 / volc and dust cloud / Great eruption of Etnafall of red dust. Yet a writer in Mag of Nat Hist 1833-298 says that the dust was of cause attrib to the eruption, but that inasmuch as the principal depositions were south of Etna. the substance was brought from somewhere elseHe thinks from the Sahara. [I; 1549.1, 1549.2. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 6 (July 1833): 289-308, at 298.]


1830 May 16 / at Siena / An organic material collected from leaves of trees in the Botanical Garden of Siena. Thought to have fallen from the sky. Said to be vegetable matter. [I; 1550.]


1830 May 16 / Siena / Organic matter. [I; 1551.]


1830 May 16 / Etnaashes to Calabria / 8 villages destroyed / Gent's Mag 100/1/551, 639. [I; 1552. "Foreign News." Gentleman's Magazine, 100 pt. 1 (June 1830): 551. "Foreign News." Gentleman's Magazine, 100 pt. 1 (1830): 638-639, at 639.]


1830 May 17 / (F) / fell in th. storm / Trans. Perthshire Soc Met. Sci 7/pt. 2 / City of Perth. [I; 1553. Fletcher, 100. This is the Perth meteorite. Maskelyne, Nevil Story, and, Lang, Viktor von. "Mineralogical Notes." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 25 (January & June, 1863): 39-58, 432-453, at 437, cv. "Perth." "The note in Dr. Thomson's writing is as follows:'Part of a meteorite that fell on the North Inch of Perth during a thunderstorm on the 17th of May, 1830, at half-past 12 o'clock noon. The mass of which this is a portion, was about 7 inches in diameter.'" Coates, Henry. "History of the Strathmore Meteoric Fall of 3rd December, 1917." Transactions and Proceedings of the Perthshire Society of Natural Science, 7 (1918-1923): pt. 2, 80-111, at 87-88.]


1830 May 12 / May 12-22 / q's in China / II / BA '11. [I; 1554. A class II earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1830 May 20 / Etna / An Reg '30-79 / Ashes as far as Rome. [I; 1555. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 71 (1829): pt. 2, 1-191, at 79, cv. "Eruption of Etna."]


1830 May 31 / evening / Charlotte, Tenn. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [I; 1556. Finley, 3.]


1830 June 1 / China / III. [I; 1557. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1830 June / near Greisau, Silesia / Yellowish brown corpuscles, some cylindrical, some round. / Symons Met 21/146 / La Belg. Horticole 2/319. [I; 1558. Wallis, Herbert Sowerby. "Remarkable Showers." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 21 (November 1886): 144-147, at 146. "Accurate researches have shown that these grains were tubercles of the ficaire (ranunculus ficaria L.), a plant very common in Silesia." Morren, Charles François Antoine. "Les Pluies de Grains et Les Fleurs du Ciel." La Belgique Horticole, 2 (1852): 319-325, at 320.]


1830 June 9 / Waterspout / Lake of Neufchatel / Jour. Roy Inst Gt. Britain 1-200 / 9 a.m. [I; 1559. "Waterspout on the Lake of Neufchatel." Journal of the Royal Institution of Great Britain, 1 (1830-1831): 200-201. "Trombe sur le lac de Neuchatel." Bibliothèque Universelle des Sciences, Belles-Lettres, et Arts, Sciences et Arts, 44 (1830): 218-219. Lake Neuchâtel, Switzerland.]


1830 June 9 / q and thunder and hail / 12 towns in province of Honan in China overthrown or engulfed in chasms6,000 perished. / Ponton, Earthquakes, p. 102. [I; 1560. Ponton, Mungo. Earthquakes and Volcanoes. London: T. Nelson, 1868, 63. Revised ed. London: T. Nelson, 1870, 58.]


1830 June 12, 16, and July 29 / China / III. [I; 1561. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1830 June 25 / (Ch) 28 / thing like a moon / Gloucester / B. Assoc., '52-181. [I; 1562. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 181. Lowe, 136.]


1830 June 25 (?) / (Ch) / Herefordshire / luminous thing / "size of a garden" / Brit. Assoc 1852/181. [I; 1563. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 181.]


1830 June 25 / Caucasia / II / [Medium quake / BA 1911]. [I; 1564. Milne, 704.]


1830 June 26 / Austria / I / [Light quake / BA 1911]. [I; 1565. Milne, 704.]


1830 June 26 and 27 / q and abovestat. / China / "Some days before the earthquake, burning vapours filled the atmosphere,. dull explosions were heard in the air, long bands of fire appeared on the horizon." Then the q. 12 towns were "swallowed up or more or less injured." Supposed that at Canton 6,000 or 7,000 persons perished. / B Assoc 1854-219. [I; 1566.1, 1566.2. Mallet, 219-220.]


1830 July 1 / Hungary / I. [I; 1567. A class I earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1830 July 26 / Torrents of water in a th. storm at Malta. Most unusual for time of year. Mag Nat Hist 6-302. [I; 1568. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...."  Magazine of Natural History, 6 (July 1833): 289-308, at 302.]


1830 July 29 / Quick flood / Conn. / See Fassig 1-282. [I; 1569. Fassig, Oliver Lanard, ed. Bibliography of Meteorology. Part II: Moisture. Washington: Signal Office, 1889, 282. Eldridge, Lemuel B. The Torrent. Middleburg: 1831.]


1830 Aug 9 / Shower ice / Staffordshire / Edin, Journ Sci 9/354. [I; 1570. "Shower of Ice in Staffordshire." Edinburgh Journal of Science, 9 (1828): 354.]


1830 Aug 19 / Kioto, Japan / III. [I; 1571. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1830 Aug 29 / Spots seen, in Algiers, on sun, almost across disc in a line. Sept 1, had collected in 2 groups. / Athenauem 1833/405. [I; 1572. "Spots upon the Sun's Disk." Athenæum, 1833 (no. 295; June 22): 405. Rozet, Claude Antoine. Voyage dans la Régence d'Alger. Paris: A. Bertrand, 1833, v. 3, 158-159.]


1830 Aug 30 / Fall of fine sand at Tripoli / Galigani's Messenger, May 25, 1870 / It was as hot as if it had come from a furnace. [I; 1573. (Galigani's Messenger, May 25, 1870).]


1830 last of Aug / near Avallon (Yonne) / frgs / (L'Institut 2-386). [I; 1574. "Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 2 (no. 81; November 26, 1833): 386. "M. Berfrield, étudiant en médecine, écrit pour apprendre que lui aussi a été témoin d'une pluie de crapauds." "Vers la fin d'août 1830, dit-il dans sa lettre, j'étais près d'Avallon (Yonne), je fus surpris vers 4 heures du soir, dans une journée étouffante, par un violent orage. La pluie tombant à larges gouttes me força bientôt à m'abriter dans une hutte de plâtre. Après une ondée de 5 à 6 minutes, je me disposais à continuer ma route lorsque après quelque pas je me vis forcé d'y rentrer par une nouvelle averse; mais quelle fut ma surprise lorsque mettant le nez au vent pour reconnaître la direction des nuages, je reçus sur la figure 5 à 6 petits corps qui me semblèrent tout autre chose que des gouttes de pluie; et quand jetant les yeux à terre je vis sauter autour de moi une multitude de petits crapauds de la grosseur d'une forte noisette.... Quelques minutes après, lorsque je repris ma route, je vis la terre couverte de ces reptiles sur une étendue d'environ ¼ d'heure de marche.... Une odeur fétide de boue et de marécage était répandue dans l'atmosphère...."]


1830 Sep 19 / Op. Mars / Mem. R. A. S. 6/223. [I; 1575. Opposition of Mars. Slavinski, Piotr. "Observations of the Planet Uranus in 1829 and 1830; and of Mars, Jupiter, and Vesta, in 1830; made at the Observatory, Wilna." Memoirs of the Royal Astronomical Society, 6 (1833): 221-227, at 223.]


1830 up to Sept 25 / Noted in Scotland / Auroras / Before and after, nearest were May 5 and Oct 5. / Sept. 7, 10, 12, 13, 17, 19, 20, 21 - 25 / Annales de Chimie, Dec., 1830. [I; 1576. "Aurores boréales."Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 45 (1830): 403-415, at 411-413.]


[1830 Nov 19. Wrong date. See: 1829 Nov 13, (I; 1577).]


1830 Dec 4 / Russia and Taman Peninsula / I. [I; 1578. A class I earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1830 Dec 14 / Insects / Orenburg, Russia. (D-92). ** [I; 1579. The note copies information from page 92 of The Book of the Damned. "Showers of flies. Singular appearance of the Moon." American Journal of Science, 22 (1832): 375-376. "Russie." Revue Encyclopédique, 50 (May, 1831): 397-398.]


1830 Dec. 14 / Warsaw / F. ball / BA 60. [I; 1580. Greg, 72.]


1830 Dec. 31 / q. / India / Chittagong / I / BA '11. [I; 1581. A class I earthquake. Milne, 704.]

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