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Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1884


1884:


1884 // Frankfort, Kansas / See May 5, 1888. [B; 585. See: (1888 May 5).]


1884 // Tingwick, Mass / Josephine Bedard / Fasting girl / See Ap. 20, 1889. [B; 586. See: 1889 Ap. 20, (B; 1024).]


1884 // Body of Mrs. W.I. Peters / Frankfort, Ind / See Dec. 22, 1888. [B; 587. See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1884 / winter / Jan or Mar. // Worms / Finland / LT, 1884, Mar. 7/4/e / new. [V; 1809. “A Rain of Worms.” London Times. March 7, 1884, p. 4 c. 5. See: 1884 March 7, (V; 1888).]


1884 Jan. / Explosions like those of Jan., 1883. [B; 588. See: 1883 Jan 1, (B; 420); 1883 Jan. 1, (B; 421); 1883 Jan 4, (B; 422); 1883 Jan 5, (B; 423); 1883 Jan 11, (B; 424); 1883 Jan. 13, (B; 425); 1883 Jan 19, (V; 1106); 1883 Jan 20, (B; 435); 1883 Jan. 20 (B; 436); 1883 Jan 21, (V; 1108); 1883 Jan 23, B: 426 & 427); 1883 Jan 26, (B: 444 & 446); 1883 Jan. 26, (B; 445); and, 1883 Jan 27, (B; 428).]


1884 Jan [31] / Railroad wreck near Indianapolis. Later a ghost seen. / See Feb. 23, 1888. [B; 589. See: 1888 Feb 23, (B; 866).]


1884 Jan 1 / Awake / Joseph Saulsbury, a ship carpenter, of Wheeling, W. Va., had not slept an hour at a time, nor ten hours in all, from Jan 1st. / (Religio-Phil. Jour., Ap 19) / Worked every day at his trade. Good health. Had been watched by physicians who assured themselves that he had not slept. [B; 590.1, 590.2. "Current Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 36 (no. 8; April 19, 1884): 5, (c. 2).]


1884 Jan 1 / Moon appeared green, Shetland Islands. / Symons' Met 18-188. [V; 1810. “The Sunsets and the Java Earthquake.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 18 (January 1884): 187-188.]


1884 Jan 2 / Red light / Sun storms / Jan 3—An electric storm which drove telephone operators from their instruments, and red light reappeared in some places. / See Jan 9. [V; 1811. Maine, Henry C. “The Red Light.” Sidereal Messenger, 5 (October 1886): 237-251, at 240-241. Refer to: 1884 Jan 9, (V; 1814).]


1884 Jan 3 / afternoon / Scranton, Pa. / Colliery explosion. “The shock of the explosion was like that of an earthquake.” / Sun 4-1-4. [V; 1812. “Scranton City Shaken.” New York Sun, January 4, 1884, p. 1 c. 4.]


1884 Jan 8 / Jupiter / See Jan. 27. [V; 1813. See: 1884 Jan 27, (V; 1848).]


1884 Jan 9 / Redlight / ac to the Prof. Henry C. Maine, Rochester, N.Y. / Sid Mess 5-237 / 9th—after great storm (solar?), the light was brilliant. / 17th—new sun storm and the light brilliant. 25—chain of sun storms—light brilliant. / 22—hurricane  in Eng. / 26—hurricane, France and Eng. The red light decreased. / Feb 11—active sun storms reappeared. / Feb 13—tornadoes in the south. / 14—the red light again. / 19—two new sun storms. Tornado in 6 southern states. No red light occurred. The sky was lurid at midnight. / Feb 24—new sun storm. / March 2, 5, 6—new sun storms and the light bright. / 13-14— more sun storms and the red light at a maximum on 17th. / 25th—sun storm and tornadoes swept 7 states and the red light of remarkable brilliance. / Ap 1—a great chain of sunspots—tornadoes in 5 states. On 5th, the red light was intense. [V; 1814.1 to 1814.4. Maine, Henry C. “The Red Light.” Sidereal Messenger, 5 (October 1886): 237-251, at 241-242.]


1884 Jan 9, 17, 22, 25, 26 / See Jan 9. [V; 1815. Refer to: 1884 Jan 9, (V; 1814).]


[1884 Jan 10] / Sheep / 1884, [LT], Jan 10/7/f / by mad dog—but Jan. [B; 591. "Ravages by Mad Dogs." London Times, January 10, 1884, p. 7 c. 6.]


1884 Jan 11-12 / night / See Dec 13 '83. [V; 1816. See: 1883 Dec. 13, (V; 1775).]  


1884 Jan 11 / Trib, 4-6 / q / great/ Ischia. [V; 1817. “General Notes.” New York Tribune, January 11, 1884, p. 4 c. 6 & p. 5 c. 1.]


1884 Jan 12 / Small comet / Australia / R A 22 + 40 / S Dec 40 – 8 / LT 18-4-b. [V; 1818. “A Comet.” London Times, January 18, 1884, p. 4 c. 2. Comet  C/1884 A1.]


1884 Jan 13 / 36° N / Long 73°. (sic) / Comet very distinct / seen by sea capt / Sun 17-2-4. [V; 1819. “A Comet Seen at Sea.” New York Sun, January 17, 1884, p. 2 c. 4.]


1884 Jan 13 and 19 / Changes in comet / Pons-Brooks / E. Mec 39-209. [V; 1820. Numsen, W.H. “Comet Pons-Brooks.” English Mechanic, 39 (no. 998; May 9, 1884): 209. “On Jan. 13 I saw the comet with the naked eye through light mackerel clouds before going up in the observatory, and I must say I was considerably surprised at its brightness, and expected to see, of course, something like a respectable tail when the clouds got away. It looked so bright between the clouds, that I could hardly believe it was the comet, and was wondering at first what star it was; but when the clouds rolled off, the moon was up and the sky bright, and my expectations disappointed, for the tail was very faint, if at all noticeable.” “I notice that a paper was read before the Paris Academy of Sciences on Feb. 11, by M. Perrotin, of Nice, on the appearance of the comet on Jan. 13 and 19, but I have seen no account of what the paper was.” Perrotin, Henri Joseph Anastase. “Sur la comète Pons-Brooks (Observatoire de Nice).” Comptes Rendus, 98 (1884): 344-346.  Perrotin, Henri Joseph Anastase. “Sur la comète Pons-Brooks.” Comptes Rendus, 98 (1884): 346. Faye, Hervé. “Sur la figure de la tîête de la comète actuelle.” Comptes Rendus, 98 (1884): 597-601. Comet 12P/1883 R1.]


1884 Jan 13 / 9:45 a.m. / “An explosion, supposed to have been aerial, which was heard in East and South Devon by Rev. W. Downes. / Trans Devonshire Assoc 16/637 / 2 sharp reports and a rumbling between. [V; 1821. Downes, W. “On an Explosion, Supposed to Have Been Aerial, Which Was Heard in East and South Devon.” Report and Transactions of the Devonshire Association, 16 (1884): 637-640.]


1884 Jan. 14 / at Montevideo / Buenos Ayres Standard, 16th / “About 7:30 a.m. The whole southern beach was alive with bathers...sea as still as a looking glass...suddenly the sun was veiled with inky clouds..an enormous wave, a compact mass of water—It overwhelmed the bathers. One was drowned. Thought due to submarine volcano. [V; 1822.1, 1822.2. (Buenos Ayres Standard, January 16, 1884.)


1884 Jan 14 / Tidal wave and cloud and dist th. Storm / See June 5, 1858. [V; 1823. See: 1858 June 5, (II: 2181 & 2182).]


1884 Jan 14 / early morning at Montevideo / Large gray cloud appeared and the sea began to rise. Lasted 15 minutes. / Suffolk Times, March 14-3-6. [V; 1824. (Suffolk Times, March 14, 1884, p. 3 c. 6.; not at BNA.)]


1884 Jan 14 / Sea phe / See June 17, 1889. [V; 1825. See: 1889 June 10, (VI; 1807), and, (1889 June 17).]


1884 Jan 14 / Cloud and tidal wave / See June 21, 1868. [V; 1826. See: 1868 June 21, (III; 1397.)]


1884 Jan 14 / 5 p.m. / Kalmar, Sweden / Green moon / ab 3 minutes // Jan 17 at 8 a.m., Stockholm, green moon, also ab. 3 minutes. / Nature 29-366. [V; 1827. “Notes.” Nature, 29 (February 14, 1884): 364-367, at 366.]


1884 Jan 14 / morning / Powder factory explosion / Lebanon, Pa. / Sun 15-1-6. [V; 1828. “Sparks from the Telegraph.” New York Sun, January 15, 1884, p. 1 c. 6.]


1884 Jan 15-18 / qs and explosions / See Dec 13-24, 1884 / and Nov. 13, 1884. [V; 1829. See: (1884 Nov 13), and, (1884 Dec 13-24).]


1884 Jan 16 / evening / Powder mill at Halifax. “Tremendous detonation.” / Sun 17-1-4. [V; 1830. “Powder Mill Blown Up.” New York Sun, January 17, 1884, p. 1 c. 4.]


1884 Jan 16 ./ N.Y. Times, 4-5 / Comet / Comic ed. [V; 1831. “The Comet.” New York Times, January 16, 1884, p. 4 c. 5.]


1884 Jan 16 / 5:30 a.m. / A “mysterious explosion” heard in Troy and Schenectady / Sun 17-1-4. [V; 1832. “Mysterious Explosion in Schenectady.” New York Sun, January 17, 1884, p. 1 c. 4.]


1884 Jan 17-18 / ab. Midnight / Scranton, Pa / Explosion of powder mill / Sun 19-4-1. [V; 1833. “Explosion of Powder Mills.” New York Sun, January 19, 1884, p. 4 c. 1.]


1884 Jan 18 / afternoon / Rochester, N.Y. / boiler explosion in a tannery “with a detonation that was heard for miles” / Sun 19-4-1. [V; 1834. “Boiler Explosion in a Tannery.” New York Sun, January 19, 1884, p. 4 c. 1.]


1884 Jan 18 / (Ref) / 2 a.m. / Contoocook, N.H. / q / Am. J. Sci 3-29-426. [V; 1835. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 14.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 29 (1885): 425-437, at 427.]


1884 Jan 18 / 8 a.m. / Shock / Wilmington, N.C. / Sun 19-2-6. [V; 1836. “Earthquake in North Carolina.” New York Sun, January 19, 1884, p. 2 c. 6.]


1884 Jan 18 / evening / Comet seen in Brooklyn. Could not be the one reported from Toronto. / Sun 19-2-6 / Which there barely above the horizon. Southern one seen near horizon at Toronto. [V; 1837. Jones, Walter S. “The New Southern Comet Seen in Brooklyn.” New York Sun, January 19, 1884, p. 2 c. 6.]


1884 Jan 18 / Feb. // See Jan 18. / Boston, a building on Hanover street “blown into fragments and utterly destroyed, by some mysterious agency which yet remains to be discovered”. Shock was tremendous about midnight. / Pop Sci News 18-39 / Had been a similar explosion in Boston in 1875. [V; 1838. “A Remarkable Explosion.” Popular Science News, 18 (March 1884): 39.]


1884 Jan 18 / The hatters explosion / Jan 15, 1885, a hat factory at S Norwalk blown up and attrib to strikers. / Sun 18-1-4. [V; 1839. “Shattered by Dynamite.” New York Sun, January 18, 1885, p. 1 c. 4.]


1884 Jan 18-19 / midnight / Explosion hatters store, 157-159 Hanover St, Boston / Sun 19-1-2. [V; 1840. “Shattered by an Explosion.” New York Sun, January 19, 1884, p. 1 c. 2.]


[1884 Jan 20] / 1884 Jan 22 / Substance fell Philadelphia. / Science 3-703. [V; 1844. Lewis, H. Carvill. “A near view of Krakatoa in eruption.” Science, s. 1 v. 3 (June 13, 1884): 702-703. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 3 (February 1884): 138-140, at 139-140. Wharton, Joseph. “Dust from the Krakatoa Eruption of 1883.” Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 32 (January 1894): 343-345. Wharton collected “clean new-fallen snow” while it was still falling on the morning of January 20, reduced his sample to less than a hundredth of a grain of dust, and compared it with pumice collected from the Krakatau eruption.]


1884 Jan 21 / and 24 / LT 25-9-f / Repetition of sunsets at Eastbourne this evening. / L.T. 22-6-f. [V; 1842. “Another Remarkable Sunset.” London Times, January 22, 1884, p. 6 c. 6.]


1884 Jan 21-22 / At Wingen (N S Wales), “...the wind blowing strong from the north-west, and the country was covered all day with a light haze which did not appear at all like smoke nor like ordinary dust.” / continued on 22th / Chem News 88/45. [V; 1843. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 88 (July, 10, 17. 24, and 31, 1903): 16-18, 32-34, 41-45, 55-58; at 44-45.]


1884 (Jan 22) / Public Ledger (Philadelphia) of / Cor wrote that he had found in the snow volcanic dust of glassy particles. / Science 3/139. [V; 1845. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 3 (February 1884): 138-140, at 139-140. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 22, 1884.) See: 1884 Jan 20, (V: 1844).]


1884 Jan 22 / Kalmar, Sweden / brilliant thing fell from sky, occupying a minute and a half. / L'Astro, 1884-228. [V; 1841. “Bolide lent on Bradyte.” Astronomie, 3 (1884): 228.]


1884 Jan. 24 / 11:25 p.m. / Splendid meteor / Husqvarna, Sweden / Nature 29-344. [V; 1846. “Notes.” Nature, 29 (February 7, 1884): 343-345, at 344.]


1884 Jan. 27 / 9:55 p.m. / Sheffield / met from a point in Taurus near Saturn / Nature 29-336. [V; 1847. Howarth, Elijah. “Meteor.” Nature, 29 (February 7, 1884): 336.]


1884 Jan 27 / J / Marked change in Red Spot noted by Denning. Since Jan 8, a very bright region noted. / Had been dull in 1883. / Observatory 7-70. [V; 1848. Denning, William Frederick. "Approximate Times of Transit of the great Red Spot and Equatoreal White Spot...." Observatory, 7 (1884): 54. Denning, William Frederick. “The Red Spot on Jupiter.” Observatory, 7 (1884): 70-72, (illustration).]


1884 Jan 29 / N.Y.T., 2-2 / q / Nor. Car. [V; 1849. “North Carolina's Earthquake.” New York Times, January 29, 1884, p. 2 c. 2.]


1884 Jan 28 / 7:30 p.m. / Unusually bright meteor—western Germany / Nature 29-366. [V; 1850. “Notes.” Nature, 29 (February 14, 1884): 364-367, at 366.]


1884 Jan. 31 / Op. Mars / (A1). [V; 1851. (A1.)]


1884 / last of Jan // Larvae in Finland or Russia / See March 7. [V; 1852. See: 1884 March 7, (V; 1888).]


1884 Feb., ab / Phe start / Dublin / See Aug., 1884. [B; 592. See: 1884 Aug to Jan., 1885, (B; 610).]


1884 Feb. / The Arundel, Sussex, Polt / Proc. S.P.R. 12-67 / or 10/67. [B; 593. Podmore, Frank. "Poltergeists." Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, 12 (1897): 45-115, at 67-73.]


1884 Feb / Dust said be like volcanic in Missouri / Sc Am Sup 17/7202. [V; 1853. Westover, H.W. “A Peculiar Dust in Snow.” Scientific American Supplement, 18 (no. 451; August 23, 1884): 7202.]


1884 Feb 3 / On the disk, an extremely brilliant point, by M. Stuyvaert, or the Brussels Observatory. On 12th, M. Niesten saw an unknown small star a little south of Venus—not finding succeeding evenings. / Sc Am 51/145 / Ciel et Terre 5/127 / Stuyvaert. [V; 1854. “The Problematic Planet Neith.” Scientific American, n.s., 51 (September 6, 1884): 145. (Ciel et Terre, 5-127.) Stuyvaert, (not “Sluyvaerer”). “The Problematical Satellite of Venus.” Observatory, 7 (1884): 221-226, at 224. “I choose this date of February 1884, because at 6 P.M. On the 3rd of that month M. Stuyvaert, of the Brussels Observatory, saw on the disk of Venus, near the bright limb, an exceedingly bright point, which appeared like the satellites of Jupiter when crossing before the planet.”]


1884 Feb-March / Explosions attrib to Irish but see it / Dynamite / France and Poland. [V; 1855. (Refs.???)]


1884 Feb 2 / Moon boomerang shaped / England / Sci Gossip 1884/140. [V; 1856. “Peculiar Appearance of the Moon.” Science Gossip, 20 (no. 234; June 1884): 140.]


1884 Feb. 5 / (M) / 2 a.m. / M Lopez Morales, Director of the Observatory of Almeria, Spain, saw an illumination in the crater Kepler. / (NM) / L'Astro 9/149. [V; 1857. “Société Astronomique de France. Séance du 5 mars 1890.” Astronomie, 9 (1890): 148-150, at 149.]


1884 Feb. 5 / Red lights on moon / L Astro 9-149. [V; 1858. “Société Astronomique de France. Séance du 5 mars 1890.” Astronomie, 9 (1890): 148-150, at 149.]


1884 Feb 4-5 / Colossal protuberance on sun—tree like—brilliant in parts—almost gone on 6th / R—Sept 26, '79. [V; 1859. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 215-223, at 221 & 223, (figure 75).]


1884 Feb 8 / Polt / Arundel / Sussex / girl aged 13 / Jour Soc 1/58. [B; 594. Le Mesurier Taylor, George Lee. "Report on the Alleged Manifestations at Arundel, Sussex." Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 1 (May 1884): 57-62.]


[1884 Feb 8 /] 1884 Feb 12 / met ship / 10 a.m. / Atlantic / Meteor burst over a ship—strong sulphurous odor. / MWR, p 60 / terrific report. [V; 1865. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 12 (no. 2; February 1884): 59-61, at 60. The Monthly Weather Review indicated the date as February 12; but, the account by the third officer indicated  the phenomenon occurred on the second night of the voyage, on February 8, 1884. “A Meteor Seen at Sea.” New York Times, February 26, 1884, p. 8 c. 6.]


1884 Feb 9 / See 19th. / Pirthalla, Hissar, Punjab, India / (F). [V; 1860. Fletcher, 105. Medlicott, Henry Benedict. “Notice of the Pirthalla and Chandpur Meteorites.” Records of the Geological Survey of India, 18 (1885): 148-149. Medlicott identifies the date of the fall as February 9, 1884, (not February 19). This is the Pirthalla meteorite.]


[1884 Feb. 9 /] 1884 Feb. 19 / C.R., 102/96 / See 9th. / Metite / Hissar, Punjab / L'Astro 6/22 / See Jan 27, '86. [V; 1873.  Daubrée, Gabriel Auguste. "Météorites récemment tombées dans l'Inde les 19 février 1884 et 6 avril 1885." Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 96-97.  Daubrée, Gabriel Auguste. "Météorites Récemment Tombées dans l'Inde.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 22-24. See: 1884 Feb 9, (V; 1860), and, (1886 Jan 27). This is the Pirthalla meteorite.]


1884 Feb 10 / q. / Asia Minor / BA '11. [V; 1861. Milne, 731.]


1884 Feb 11, 13, 14, 19, 24 / See Jan. 9. [V; 1862. Refer to: 1884 Jan 9, (V; 1814).]


1884 Feb 11 / Morning—Blaendyffryn, Llandyssil, S. Wales / In a snowstorm, ball of fire almost as large as a barrel fell and exploded. / (Leisure Hours 33/313) / Another fell 200 yards off and another about ¼ mile away, all doing great damage. “It was the most appalling sight a human being could witness, and I could only imagine the end of all things had arrived,” says cor. [V; 1863.1, 1863.2. “Remarkable Display of Globular Lightning.” Leisure Hour, 33 (May 1884): 313-314. Taylor, William D. “Alarming Phenomena in South Wales.” London Times, February 16, 1884. p. 6 c. 1. “On Monday morning during a heavy snowstorm a huge ball of fire nearly as large as a barrel fell within twenty yards from my residence, and when within a few feet of the ground exploded with terrific force. It wrecked every window on that side into 10,000 pieces, mostly thick plate glass, and doing considerable damage. I was sitting with my family at breakfast, and at the moment looking out of the window, so saw everything perfectly. It appeared as though fire was raining from above all round.” “Another fell 200 yards off, burying into the ground 3ft., and destroying my water supply.” “Another fell at a farm a quarter of a mile off, destroying a building, and stripping an immense tree from top to bottom, and threw down four horses at work.” “It was the most appalling sight a human being could witness, and I could only imagine the end of all things had arrived.”]


1884 Feb 11 / In inundated district Powhatan, Ohio, mass of mud and gravel shooting 50 to 100 feet in the air—another geyser then started up. / Toronto Globe 23-3-4. [V; 1864. “Mud Geysers in Ohio.” Toronto Globe, February 23, 1884, p. 3 c. 4.]


[1884 Feb 12. Wrong date. See: 1884 Feb 8, (V; 1865).]


1884 Feb 12 / (3) / Light out from Venus / Ciel et Terre (L) 5/127. [V; 1866. Houzeau, Jean-Charles. “Le satellite problematique de Vénus.” Ciel et Terre, 5 (1884-1885): 121-129, at 127-128.]


1884 Feb. 15 / Arundel Polt / Medium and Daybreak of—at Arundel, home of a bricklayer, King Street,—named Clarke—wife and children—one a girl aged 12 and it was said the phe were occurring in relation to her. Mother in bed with the 2 children, heard the first phe, scratching sounds by the side of the bed. They went to another room. Sound followed them. Next day articles flew about when the girl was present. Mr. Clarke said he saw what seemed to be a faint arm go out far from his daughter when heavy objects at more than arm's length fell to floor. Some time before the girl had been ailing but had recovered and gone to school again. [B; 595.1, 595.2, 595.3. "Spontaeous Phenomena at Arundel." Medium and Daybreak, 15 (no. 724; February 15, 1884): 102. (West Sussex Gazette, ca. February, 1884; not at BNA.)]


1884 Feb 16-19 and March 10 / (+) / See Jan 9. / A glow in the sky at Reggio. Dust that fell there. / See March 29, 1880. / Jour Chem Soc London, 1885-A-231—gathered and analyzed by F. Maugini. Said different from Sahara dust and was not dust from Etna, the ashes of which are black; also wind blowing from Etna. / “So it would appear to be of peculiar origin.” [V; 1867.1, 1867.2. “Meteoric Sand.” Journal of the Chemical Society of London, 48 pt. 2 (1885): 231. Maugini, Francesco. “Sabbia meteorica.” Gazzetta Chimica Italiana, 14 (1884): 130-134. See: 1884 Jan 9, (V; 1814), and, (1880 March 29).]


1884 Feb 16-18 / Lorrach / met from place of one of 2 days before / L'Astro 1884/228 / Germany, near Swiss border. [V; 1868. “Singulier bolide.” Astronomie, 3 (1884): 227-228.]


1884 Feb 17 and a week or so before / Wellington, N.Z. / Green moon / Nature 29-604. [V; 1869. “Notes.” Nature, 29 (April 24, 1884): 603-606, at 604.]


1884 Feb. 18 / Shock felt at 5:20 a.m. By Thames R. / Musselwhite / vicar of W. Mersea / Colchester Gazette, Ap. 30 / Nature 53/4. [V; 1870. (Colchester Gazette, April 30, 1884; this year not at BNA.) Meldola, R. “Curious Aerial or Subterranean Sounds.” Nature, 53 (November 7, 1895): 4.]


1884 Feb 19 / Tornado / N and S Car / Georgia / Sun 22-1-1. [V; 1871. “The Track of the Tornado.” New York Sun, February 22, 1884, p. 1. c. 1-2.]


1884 Feb / Shower was Chatham, May, 1884. [V; 1872. See: 1884 Feb 25, (V; 1877), and, 1884 May 11, (V; 1954).]


[1884 Feb. 19. Wrong date. See: 1884 Feb. 9, (V; 1863).]


1884 Feb 20, ab / Luminous bird? / said been ghost / Newburgh, NY / Sun 23-1-4. [B; 596. “A Ghost in Orange County.” New York Sun, February 23, 1884, p. 1 c. 4.]


1884 Feb 20 / Met train in Twins [Gemini] seen from near Maulburg / L'Astro, ab. this time. [V; 1874. “Singulier bolide.” Astronomie, 3 (1884): 227-228. ]


1884 Feb. 21 / Tidal phe / Symons 19-21. [V; 1875. “Extraordinary Phenomenon on the Dee.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 19 (March 1884): 21.]


[1884 Feb 21 /] 1883 Feb 22? / Tide in River Dee, Feb 22, 1883 / L.T., Feb 22, '83/12/b / Tide flowed at 6:40 a.m.—after 2 hours ebb it began to flow again—at 9:30 ebbed again / Considered unaccountable. [V; 1144. “Phenomenon on the Dee.” London Times, February 23, 1884, p. 12 c. 2. “Extraordinary Phenomenon on the Dee.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 19 (March 1884): 21. “Extraordinary Phenomenon on the Dee.” Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, February 23, 1884, p. 4 c. 7.]


1884 Feb 24 / Ball light / Amiens, France. [V; 1876. (Refs.???)]


1884 Feb 25 / “mysterious” red matter / Chatham / Amer. Met. Jour 1/281. ** [V; 1877. “Literary Notes.” American Meteorological Journal, 1 (November 1884): 281-283, at 281. Venable, Francis Preston. “Fall of Blood in Chatham County.” Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 1 (1883-1884): 38-40. “Meantime nearly three weeks had elapsed, and several heavy rains had fallen, so that when the place was reached (a small negro-cabin in New Hope township, about a quarter of a mile from the Raleigh and Pittsboro road) no vestiges of the matter could be found on the ground, and only one or two marks of drops on the fence. The woman who saw it fall was, however, examined and inquiries were made of the neighbors who visited the spot soon after. The fall came from a cloudless sky, when the wind was so slight as to be almost imperceptible. The position of the drops seen on the fence indicated a very slight wind from the south or southwest, across some ploughed laud. The woman was standing on this ploughed land, near a fence, along which some small pine bushes were growing She noticed something falling between her and the ground, saw it leave a red splash on the sand, heard a pattering like rain around her, looked up, but it was all over and she could see nothing. She was a good deal frightened and affected, taking it as a portent of deat[h] or evil of some kind. Mr. S.A. Holleman visited the spot the nest morning, (the fall took place about mid-day), and has kindly given me the following facts observed: The space covered was about fifty by seventy feet, and nearly in a rectangular form. The drops were of sizes varying from that of a small pea to that of a man's finger and averaged about one to the square foot. Smaller drops were instantly absorbed, larger ones, with those on the wood, coagulated. Some fell in the bushes and coagulated upon the limbs. Dr. Robinson, living near, collected some of the freshly fallen material and made certain simple tests which satisfied him that it was blood. It even had the smell, he says, of fresh blood.” “To explain now: The yellow and green lines are characteristic of reduced hæmatine (the red coloring matter of the blood). The red line is characteristic of acid hæmatine. If you take fresh blood and add tartaric acid to it you get the red line—if you then add ferrous sulphate yon get the yellow and green. The material then, according to the spectroscope, is partially decomposed blood. The test known as hæmin crystals could be gotten only indistinctly, if at all.” “This leaves little or no reasonable doubt then that the samples examined had blood upon them. The question arises, were they carefully taken; had no animal ever bled on the same ground; had pigs never been slaughtered in that quarter of the field? etc. As to theories accounting for so singular a material falling from a cloudless sky, I have no plausible ones to offer. It may have been some bird of prey passing over, carrying a bleeding animal, but a good deal of blood must have fallen to cover so large a space. If a hoax has been perpetrated on the people of that neighborhood it has certainly been very cleverly done and an object seems lacking. On the possibility that it is not a joke, I have deemed this strange matter worthy of being placed on record.”]


1884 Feb 26 / Explosion / London Railroad Station / Dynamite? [V; 1878. (Refs.???)]


1884 Feb 26 / NY Times of / Met ship. [V; 1879. “A Meteor Seen at Sea.” New York Times, February 26, 1884, p. 8 c. 6. See: 1884 Feb 8, (V; 1865).]


1884 Feb 28 / q and met / 11:45 p.m. / q and met in Germany / Zeit Met 20-148. [V; 1880. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 20 (1885): 139-153, at 148.]


1884 Feb 26 / (Coincidence) / Trib, 4-3 / This editorial is upon red snow used figuratively and applied to a Massachusetts politician. [V; 1881. “Red Snow in Massachusetts.” New York Tribune, February 26, 1884, p. 4 c. 3.]


1884 Feb. 29 / Dust / La Nat, 1884-1-282 / M. Jules Tardieu writes that about noon Feb 29, at Limoges, that a fine sand fell for 20 (20?) minutes. Red substance and white. He writes that in his belief one was iron cinders and the other of carbonate de chaux vitrified by heat. He sent samples to the Editor, who writes that the dust had incontestably been raised by a whirlwind somewhere else upon this earth. [V; 1882.1, 1882.2. Tardieu, Jules. “Pluie de Poussières.” La Nature, 1884 pt. 1 (no. 565; March 29): 282. Calcium carbonate, (“carbonate de chaux carbonisé”), is used to purify iron produced in blast furnaces, separating impurities from the iron and being cast off as slag. The fine powder, (not sand), fell for 20 minutes from a cloud that obscured the sun onto Tardieu's clothing and his garden. The editor, (Gaston Tissandier), found organic matter during a microscopic examination and identified the powder as terrestrial in origin, probably raised aloft by a whirlwind.]


1884 March, about / Sleeper began in Allentown, Pa. / See Sept 26, 1885. [B; 597. See: 1885 Sept 26, (B; 668).]


1884 March, early / q / Persian Gulf / III / BA '11. [V; 1883. Milne, 731.]


1884 March 1 / meteoric b. rain / ab 9 a.m. / Roseneath, Scotland / ½ inch fall of sooty snow. Lewis P. Muirhead, in Nature 29-494 / Says that from hearsay it fell upon an area of 810 sq. miles. His estimates “the astonishing aggregate of say 5760 tons”. According to him it was meteoric. Under the microscope appeared “entirely metallic.” He says that a little more fell with snow on 3rd. / D-31. [V; 1884.1, 1884.2. The note copies information from page 31 of The Book of the Damned. “Meteoric Dust.” Nature, 29 (March 20, 1884): 494.]


1884 March 2, 5, 6, 13, 14, 17, 25 / See Jan 9. [V; 1885. Refer to: 1884 Jan 9, (V; 1814).]


1884 March 3 / [LT], 4-c / Mirage in California. [V; 1886. “A Mirage in California.” London Times, March 3, 1884, p. 4 c. 3.]


1884 March 5, 31—Ap 27, May 24—March 15, Ap. 9, May 6, June 2, 3. / (Sun spots) / At Stonyhurst Observatory. Was the opinion that when some spots disappeared they were succeeded by others at same points on sun, such as—see over. / Astro Reg 22-262. [V; 1887.1, 1887.2. Perry, Stephen Joseph. “Phenomena Observed upon the Solar Surface from 1881 to 1884 at Stonyhurst Observatory.” Astronomical Register, 22 (November 1884): 257-265, at 262.]


1884 March 7 / [LT], 4-e / “no little commotion” in Finland. Large quantities of larvae, one species gray and the other brown, had been found in the fields. “It was said that the masses of worms were so great that the peasants collected them into heaps, and burnt them.” About the end of Jan there had been a similar invasion in Åland. Said that the peasants believed that they had fallen from the sky but that they had come out of the ground. [V; 1888.1, 1888.2. “A Rain of Worms.” London Times, March 7, 1884, p. 4 c. 5. Åland is a province of Finland, consisting of islands in the Gulf of Bothnia.]


1884 March 10 / See Feb 16. [V; 1889. See: (Feb 16).]


1884 March 13 / morning / Great mine explosion / Pocahontas, Va. / Sun 15-1-4. [V; 1890. “Virginia's Mine Disaster.” New York Sun, March 15, 1884, p. 1 c. 4.]


1884 March 15 / (Cut) / 3 a.m. / Michigan / “directly under the full moon” / Exploded in the sky of Mich. / Observatory 7-142/ M.W.R., p. 87. [V; 1891. Osmun, G.R. “A Fine Meteor.” Observatory, 7 (1884): 141-142. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review,  12 (no. 3; March 1884): 85-87, at 87.]


1884 March 18 / Great and strange protuberance from sun / R—Sept 26, '79. [V; 1892. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 254-255, (figure 83).]


1884 March 19 / (It) / 11:45 p.m. / Viterbo, Umbria / great det met. / illuminated the whole city as if with magnesium light—loud report / Astro Reg 22-276. [V; 1893. “We read in an Italian paper....” Astronomical Register, 22 (November 1884): 276.]


1884 March 19 / (F) / See Oct 3, '83. / Java / stonefall / C.R. 105/203 / See Dec., 1871. [V; 1894. Fletcher, 105. Daubrée, Gabriel Auguste. “Météorite tombée le 19 mars 1884, à Djati-Pengilon (île de Java).” Comptes Rendus, 105 (1887): 203-205. See: 1883 Oct. 3, (V; 1639). This is the Djati-Pengilon meteorite.]


1884 March 19 / Met of Java / C.R. 105/203 / 4 a.m. / It is a rare type, seven others like it known. One of them the stone at Tjabe, Java, Sept 19, 1869. / M. Daubrée comments upon the remarkableness of this similarity. Notes the others fallen close together in Java and says that near this place, at Prambanan, a meteoric iron was found in 1784. [V; 1895.1, 1895.2. Daubrée, Gabriel Auguste. “Météorite tombée le 19 mars 1884, à Djati-Pengilon (île de Java).” Comptes Rendus, 105 (1887): 203-205. These are the Djati-Pengilon, Cléguérec, Moti-ka-nagla, Pillistfer, Cabarras County, Erxleben, and Ensisheim meteorites.]


1884 March 19 / 19? // (+) / Stat-over / 4:30 a.m. / Metite / Djali-Pengilon, fell, Tjabe, Java, Sept 19, 1869—p. 205. / The stones of 1869 and March 19, 1884, close together, were of stones said be identical—The fall of Oct 3, 1883, in the same part of Java. In 1784 very near the same point upon the island was found the meteoric iron of Prambanan. / (See Oct 3, 1883.) [V; 1896.1, 1896.2.  [V; 1895.1, 1895.2. Daubrée, Gabriel Auguste. “Météorite tombée le 19 mars 1884, à Djati-Pengilon (île de Java).” Comptes Rendus, 105 (1887): 203-205. See: 1883 Oct. 3, (V; 1639). This is the Djati-Pengilon meteorite.]


1884 March 19 / Fletcher / Java / stone. [V; 1897. Fletcher, 105. This is the Djati-Pengilon meteorite.]


1884 March 20 / Vertical ray from sun / Paris / Just after sunset. / Science 4/140. [V; 1898. (Science, 4-140; not found here.)]


1884 March 22 / NY Times, 4-7 / Meteorites Found in Russia. [V; 1899. “Russian Meteorites.” New York Times, March 22, 1884, p. 4 c. 7. (London Times, ca. March, 1884; not found.) This is the Gross-Liebenthal meteorite.]


1884 March 25 / Cyclone / Kentucky and Ohio / Toronto Globe 27-2-2 / also N. Car., Ind, Ga. / Forests laid waste. Town of Scipio, Ind, wiped out—only 2 houses remaining. / 28-1-5. [V; 1900. “Destroying Cyclone.” Toronto Globe, March 27, 1884, p. 2 c. 2. “Storm and Flood.” Toronto Globe, March 28, 1884, p. 1 c. 5.]


1884 March 26 / q—rain / ab 5 a.m. / q. / San Francisco / “The heavy thunderstorm with vivid lightning, which occurred soon after, is not generally mentioned.” / Amer Met Jour 1/6. [V; 1901. “Current Notes.” American Meteorological Journal, 1 (May 1884): 5-10, at 6.]


1884 March / Persian Gulf / great q. / [BA] '11. [V; 1902. Milne, 731.]


1884 March 27 / 9 a.m. / Most disastrous windstorm in many years / Denver, Col. / Toronto Globe 28-1-5. [V; 1903. “Storm and Flood.” Toronto Globe, March 28, 1884, p. 1 c. 5.]


1884 March 29 / Accomac Co., Va. / light shock / Ref, Jan. 18. [V; 1904. Refer to: 1884 Jan 18, (V; 1835). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 14.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 29 (1885): 425-437, at 428.]


1884 March 29-30 / Light like Nov. 4, 1883. [V; 1905. See: 1883 Nov. 4, (V; 1703).]


1884 / Good Friday evening  [April 11] // Sharp shock / Wellington, N.Z. / NZ Times, Sept 4, 1886. [V; 1906. “Sharp Earthquake.” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), September 4, 1886, p. 2 c. 8.]


1884 Ap. 1 / Cyclone / Ind., Ohio, Tenn., Ala. [V; 1907. (Refs.???)]


1884 Ap. 1 / “Very fine point of spots extending over a most extensive area. Sudden appearance near center of the sun. / New [???] 9-122.) [V; 1908. (New ???, 9-122.)]


1884 Ap. 1, 5 / See Jan 9. [V; 1909. Refer to: 1884 Jan 9, (V; 1814).]


1884 Ap 5 / Revival / Religio-Phil Jour, 4-5 / Revivals at Zanesfield and Pickereltown, Ohio, for several weeks. Women fall into trances—their bodies rigid for hours. [B; 598. "General Notes." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 36 (no. 6; April 5, 1884): 4, (c. 5).]


[1884 Ap. 6. Wrong date. See: 1885 Ap. 6, (V; 1910).]


1884 April 10 / Like Ap. 9, 1885 / road to Rogaelaor / ab 8:45 / Cor writes—night when Venus and the moon were brilliant—all at once a great flash as if of lightning illuminated the road—the cor looked around but saw nothing, no meteor. / L'Astro 1884/228. [V; 1911.1, 1911.2. “Singulier bolide.” Astronomie, 3 (1884): 227-228. See: 1885 Ap 9, (V: 2152).]


1884 Ap 10 / (Sun volc) / Sid. Mess 3/185 / Letter received from Engineer C.W. Irish / Iowa City / extraordinary solar outburst / 10 a.m. two large spots approaching western edge / other spots / between the spot limb of sun a bright appearance like a gush of brilliant matter / a sharply defined jet—fierce agitation of the solar surface around the outburst / watched it 3½ hours and saw a cloudlike top part develop in ab one a a half hours. [V; 1912.1, 1912.2. “Editorial Notes.” Sidereal Messenger, 3 (August  1884): 180-192, at 185-188, (illustrations). Charles Wood Irish.]


1884 Ap. 10 / Explosion on sun / L'Astro 3-383. [V; 1913. “Explosions dans le Soleil.” Astronomie, 3 (1884): 381-384, at 382-383.]


1884 Ap. 11, 16, 25, May 1 / Shocks / New Zealand / N.Z. Jour of Sci 2/124. [V; 1914. “Earthquakes.” New Zealand Journal of Science, 2 (May 1884): 124-125.]


1884 Ap. 11 / ab. 6:50 p.m. / N. Zealand, both sides of Cook's Strait, as far south as Christchurch—severe shock. 16th—6:27 a.m, slight at Wellington. / 25th, 11:55 a.m., sharp at W / May 1, 8:15 p.m., slight at W. / N.Z. Jour of Sci., 2-125. [V; 1915. “Earthquakes.” New Zealand Journal of Science, 2 (May 1884): 124-125.]


1884 Ap. 12 / Great protuberance on sun / R—Sept 26—'79. [V; 1916. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 254-255, (figure 84).]


1884 Ap. 12 / Conj Venus and Saturn / Astro Reg. 22/120. [V; 1917. Backhouse, Thomas William.”Conjunction of Venus and Saturn. Astronomical Register, 22  (May 1884): 120.]


1884 Ap. 15 / 23 h. / Miami, Missouri / In the east—a comet-like appearance tail or streamer. Turned toward north—then toward south. / M.W.R., Ap., 1884, p. 112. [V; 1918. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 12 (no. 4;  April 1884): 111-112, at 112.]


1884 Ap. 20, ab. / Lyrids conspicuous / Nature 48-5. [V; 1919. Denning, William Frederick. "The April Meteors." Nature, 48 (May 4, 1893): 5-6.]


1884 Ap. 19 / Lyrids / “very rich,” hourly number of onr observer being about 22. / Nature 35-606. [V; 1920. Denning, William Frederick. “April Meteors.” Nature, 35 (April 28, 1887): 606.]


1884 April 20 / Half a mile from Lilleshall, Shropshire, after a storm—clothes on lines were covered with pink spots that turned light blue in washing in soft water without soap. “These can in no way be accounted for but as a result of the storm.” / Jour Roy Met XI/p. 7 or 9. [V; 1938. Walker, Charles Clement. “On the Injury by Lightning to the Monument to the First Duke of Sutherland, at Lilleshall, Shropshire, April 28th, 1884.” Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 11 (1885): 7-11, at 9.]


1884 Ap. 22 / N.Y. Times, 4-5 / "Quaker Ghosts" of Flushing / Ed. [B; 599. “Quaker Ghosts.” New York Times, April 22, 1884, p. 4 c. 5.]


1884 Ap. 23 / Eng. / quartz stone from sky. / Knowledge 5/336. [V; 1921. Norgate, J.T. “A Strange Incident.” Knowledge, o.s., 5 (May 9, 1884): 336. Major-General Norgate was working in one of his hothouses, “when suddenly a stone, about 1 oz. 13 dwts., came through the largest pane in my house, fell with considerable force on the brick floor, and split in two pieces.” “I picked it up, and it burned my hand most severely before I could leave go of it” “It measure about 3 in. round, and inside appears to be quartz or feltspar, which looks as if it had been exposed to intense heat.”]


1884 April / Lots of clocks stopping / Nature 29/105. [V; 1922. Kinahan, G. Henry. “Sudden Stoppage of Clocks.” Nature, 29 (November 29, 1883): 105. Four clocks stopped in a house at Letterkenny, Co. Donegal, Ireland.]


1884 April / q—watches stopped. / See Aug 16, 1912. [V; 1923. See: (1912 Aug 16).]


1884 April / Eng / Series like India / June 12, etc., 1887. [V; 1924. See: (1887 June 12).]


1884 Ap 24 / Aust and Eng / See March 3, 4, 1869. / See 1903? [V; 1925. See: (1903).]


1884 Ap. 24 / Dust after rains / Dec 12, 13, 1884 / Australia. [V; 1926. See: (1884 Dec 12, 13; more probably 1883).]


1884 Ap 24 / Wilcannia and Deniliquin in N.S. Wales // Sandhurst / the dust shortly before the rain began / Argus—29th / Samples contained iron and quartz—iron oxide. [V; 1927. “The Rainfall in New South Wales.” Melbourne Argus, April 26, 1884, p. 10 c. 4. “A curious natural phenomenon....” Melbourne Argus, April 28, 1884, p. 5 c. 4. “The Bendigo Advertiser publishes a report....” Melbourne Argus, April 29, 1884, p. 5 c. 3. “Discolored Rain.” Bendigo Advertiser, April 28, 1884, p. 3 c. 1-2.]


1884 Ap. 24 / morning / Shepparton, Victoria / violent dust storm / It was followed here by heavy rain. Heavy rain in many other places broke a 4 weeks drought. / Melb. Argus, 25th // dust in Deniliquin followed by rain on 24th—Argus, 26th. At Wilcannia dust tremendous till rain fell—at Maldon muddy rain fell. [V; 1928.1, 1928.2. “The Weather.” Melbourne Argus, April 25, 1884, p. 6 c. 4. “The Rainfall in New South Wales.” Melbourne Argus, April 26, 1884, p. 10 c. 4. “The Weather.” Melbourne Argus, April 26, 1884, p. 10 c. 5.]


1884 Ap 25 / After heavy rains throughout Victoria on 24th, mud fell 4 a.m., at Castlemaine—Argus, 28th—also at Inglewood. Widespread at Castlemaine. Railway cars from 2 directions spattered with mud. Comment upon this fall so long after rains had begun and all ground soaked. [V; 1929.1, 1929.2. “A curious natural phenomenon....” Melbourne Argus, April 28, 1884, p. 5 c. 4. “Items of News.” Mount Alexander Mail, April 26, 1884, p. 2 c. 3-5.]


1884 Ap. 24 / At Sandhurst, Castlemaine and other places, in Victoria in a region of more than 2,500 sq miles / (Nature 30-170) / At several places in Victoria and N.S. Wales violent dust storms in morning, but here at 7 p.m. and ab midnight heavy showers of mud. Some of it, of a bronze color, was found to be composed of quartz, mica, and oxide of iron. [V; 1930.1, 1930.2. Smyth, R. Brough. “Atmospheric Dust.” Nature, 30 (June 19, 1884): 170.]


1884 Ap. 24 / q. / At Lewisham, groaning sounds from furniture heard and a clock stopped but nothing was felt. / Nature 30-170. [V; 1931. McLachlan, Robert. “The Earthquake.” Nature, 30 (June 19, 1884): 170.]


1884 April 24 / Sunderland / The first moderately bright aurora since Oct 5, 1883. / Nature 30/55. [V; 1932. Backhouse, Thomas William. “The Supposed Volcanic Dust Phenomena.” Nature, 30 (May 15, 1884): 54-55.]


1884 Ap. 24 / Hay—N.S. Wales / dust storm all day. “Business had to be suspended.” Heavy dust storm over Jerilderie. / Sydney Morning Herald 25-8-2 / At end of a drought. [V; 1933. “Country News.” Sydney Morning Herald, April 25, 1884, p. 8 c. 2-3.]


1884 Ap 26 / Obscuration in towns northwest of England / Ciel et Terre (L) 5/173. [V; 1934. "Quelques exemples de pluies de poussiìères et d'obscurissements du Soleil." Ciel et Terre, 5 (1884-1885): 173-174.]


1884 Ap. 26 / Intense dark / Preston, Lancashire, Eng. / Nature 30/6. ** [V; 1935. Perry, Stephen Joseph. “Extraordinary Darkness at Midday.” Nature, 30 (May 1, 1884): 6.]


1884 Ap 26-May 3 / B rains and Q in Eng. / D-33. ** [V; 1936. The note copies information from page 33 of The Book of the Damned. Perry, Stephen Joseph. “Extraordinary Darkness at Midday.” Nature, 30 (May 1, 1884): 6. "The Earthquake." Nature, 30 (May 1, 1884): 17-19. "The Recent Earthquake." Nature, 30 (May 8, 1884): 31-32. Perry, Stephen Joseph. "Black Rain." Nature, 30 (May 8, 1884): 32. "The Remarkable Sunsets." Nature, 30 (May 8, 1884): 32. Topley, William. "The Earthquake." Nature, 30 (May 15, 1884): 60-62.]


1883 / ab. end of April // E. Mec., 49-357 / Cor who signs “Rapier” saw, 5:30 a.m., for a few minutes, a small black speck which to his eye was like a black pea, crossing the sun's disk. Asks whether could have been Mercury. / p. 368, Capt. Noble points out Mercury then in greatest elongation. [V; 1937.1, 1937.2. “Planet Crossing Sun's Disc.” English Mechanic, 49 (no. 1265; June 21, 1889): 357. Noble, William. “A Doubtful Authority....” English Mechanic, 49 (no. 1266; June 28, 1889): 367-368.]


1884 April 28 / Church Stretton, Eng. / B. rain / Nature 30/32. [V; 1939. Perry, Stephen Joseph. "Black Rain." Nature, 30 (May 8, 1884): 32.]


1884 Ap. 30 / Ogreeta, Cherokee Co, N. Carolina / 6 h., 46 m / low rumbling sound / no tremors / Am J. Sci 3-29-428 / no q. reported. [V; 1940. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 14.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 29 (1885): 425-437, at 428.]


1884 May-June / Have Toronto Globe. [V; 1941.]


1884 May, June / Have N.Y. Herald at least around data dates. [V; 1942.]


1884 May / 1st of myst deaths in Philadelphia. Home George M Palmer, Otter Street. / See Dec 13, 1885. [B; 600. See: 1885 Dec 13, (B; 675).]


1884 May 2 / Spon Comb / NY Sun, May 4, 1884, 3-4 / Fonda, N.Y., May 3—Andrew Brumagin, a prominent broomcorn grocer, while working on the Mohawk Valley flats yesterday morning suddenly found himself enveloped in flames. He quickly stripped himself of his clothing and escaped with only a slight scorching. The cause of the fire is wrapped in mystery. He had no pipe or matches about him. [B; 601. (New York Sun, May 4, 1884, p. 3 c. 4; not found here.)]


1884 May 2 / (Fonda) / Strange picked out this man—other inflammable substances in the field. / (+) / It was a time of great forest fires. [B; 602.]


1884 May 2 / Point Judith, R.I. / 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. / Atmosphere filled with smoke and moon blood-red color / M.W.R., May, p. 134. [V; 1943. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 12 (no. 5; May 1884): 134-136, at 134.]


1884 May 2 / No fires in N. England reported in M.W.R., May. / In N.Y. at Port Jervis. [V; 1944. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 12 (no. 5; May 1884): 134-136, at 135. Providence, Rhode Island, reported a forest fire on May 2; but, extensive forest fires in New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania were considered the source of the smoke and discoloration of the moon, Sun, and the atmosphere, on this date.]


1884 May 2 / at New Haven, Conn. / evening. / A squall—a yellow mist—smoke, and the thermometer went up 11 degrees. / Herald, May 3 / supposed to have come from great forest fire / From 60 degrees to 71. / No reports of fires in New England. [V; 1945.1, 1945.2. “Effect of the Fires Down East.” New York Herald, May 3, 1884, p. 3 c. 2.]


1884 May 2 / 5 p.m. / New Haven, Conn. / a large spot on the sun. / MWR, p. 134 / was seen in the haze. Perhaps because of atmospheric state there. [V; 1946. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 12 (no. 5; May 1884): 134-136, at 134.]


1884 May 2 / NY Herald, May 3—atmosphere in Philadelphia thick with smoke / Orange Co, N.Y., in darkness from fires in Catskills / Long Island forests in flames. [V; 1947. “Forests Ablaze.” New York Herald, May 3, 1884, p. 3 c. 1. “Orange County in Darkness.” New York Herald, May 3, 1884, p. 3 c. 2. “Long Island Forests in Flames.” New York Herald, May 3, 1884, p. 3 c. 2-3.]


1884 May 2 / NY City / A “sickly greenish pallor overspread the city”. Sun and moon red. Forest fires. N.J. and Penn. / Sun 3-1-4 / 4-3-1. [V; 1948. “Invaded by Smoke Clouds.” New York Sun, May 3, 1884, p. 1 c. 4. “Miles of Forests on Fire.” New York Sun, May 4, 1884, p. 3 c. 1-2.]


1884 May 3 / See Sept., 1911. / See psycho notes. [V; 1949. See: (1911 Sept.).]


1884 May 4 / Fires in Catskills / Sun 5-1-2. [V; 1950. “Forest Fires in the Catskills.” New York Sun, May 5, 1884, p. 1 c. 2.]


1884 May 7-8 / (night) / House in Cos Cob, Conn, set on fire by lightning / Sun 9-4-3 / no storm mentioned. [V; 1951. “Struck by Lightning at Cos Cob.” New York Sun, May 9, 1884, p. 4 c. 3.]


1884 May 8 / Sun, 3-3 / 18 barns set on fire in one month, Cincinnati. [V; 1952. “Fire Bugs in Cleveland.” New York Sun, May 8, 1884, p. 3 c. 3.]


1884 May 9 / Sun / Meeting of Roy Astro Soc., Rev S.J Perry said that 12 times at Stonyhurst Observatory had been seen spots passing so rapidly across sun and disappearing so soon that he could not believe they were upon the sun. / Astro Reg 22-132. [V; 1953. “Royal Astronomical Society. Session 1884-85.” Astronomical Register, 22 (June 1884): 129-144, at 133.]


1884 May 11 / Sun, 5-7 / (Bld) / from Raleigh News / That a few weeks before a woman had reported the fall of blood upon a ploughed field. Cloudless sky—pattering sound, drops falling upon a space about 50 by 75 feet. Dr Robinson, living near, collected some of the substance and, according to his tests, it was blood. Also blood ac to microscopic examination by Prof Venable of University of North Carolina. / Was Feb 25, ac to A.M.J. / at Chatham, N.C. [V; 1954.1, 1954.2. “Really a Shower of Blood.” New York Sun, May 11, 1884, p. 5 c. 7. See: 1884 Feb 25, (V; 1877).]


1884 May 12 / q. / Celebes / 13—Asia Minor // BA '11. [V; 1955. Milne, 731.]


1884 May 14 / Nyköping, Sweden / 12:30 a.m. / Streamers of light intense. / Nature 30/153. [V; 1956. “Notes.” Nature, 30 (June 12, 1884): 152-154, at 153-154.]


1884 May 16 / Ch-113 / 7 p.m. / In Knowledge, 6/17, copied from the N.Y. Tribune, an account by E. Stone Wiggins, the Canadian meteorologist, or a “foolish fellow”and his paradoxical absurdity”, as Knowledge calls him. That he had received a late letter of an eclipse ⅔ of totality seen in Michigan at a time when sun and moon were 24 degrees apart. / ec of sun. [V; 1957.1, 1957.2. “Our Paradox Column.” Knowledge, o.s., 6 (July 4, 1884): 17-18. Wiggins, Ezekiel Stone. “Wiggins' Dark Moon.” New York Tribune, June 8, 1884, p. 7 c. 5. ”The non-existence of a second satellite to the earth is therefore not proved by reason of its invisibility.” Ezekiel Stone Wiggins was a Canadian weather prophet with a propensity to predicting storms, tides, and earthquakes, and promoting unsubstantiated astronomical beliefs, (such as his discovery of Earth's invisible second moon, in 1882). “The Approaching Supreme Disaster.” New York Sun, September 29, 1886, p. 2 c. 4. Mark Twain wrote the following letter to the editor: “As the result of the most careful observation of the aspect of the fixed stars during the past two months, as affected by the remarkable changes now going on in the great nebula in G Cassiopeia, I am able to state with absolute certainty that by far the most awful disaster that has ever befallen the globe since its creation will occur on the 3d of October at 9:42 in the evening. The agent will be a meteoric stone—a meteoric world indeed, since its mass will be one-eighth as great as that of our own sphere. It will first come in sight about half way between the constellation of the Great Bear and the North Star and will make the circle of the southern skies, and then sweep northward with immeasurable rapidity, turning the night of this whole continent into a red glare of the most blinding intensity. As it approaches Canada it will make a majestic downward swoop in the direction of Ottawa, affording a spectacle resembling a million inverted rainbows woven together, and will take the prophet Wiggins right in the seat of his inspiration and lift him straight up into the backyard of the planet Mars and leave him permanently there in an inconceivable and mashed and unpleasant condition. This can be depended on.”]


1884 May 16 / See June 6. / Wiggins moon / In the London Daily Mail, July 5, 1907, it is said that Major A.B. Rogers, who was surveying the projected line of the Canadian Pacific Railroad, had written to Sir Sandford Fleming:: “Noticing the obscurity of the sun on May 16, I called the attention of the whole party to the striking phe., stating that it could not be a regular eclipse, as it lacked several days of the new moon.” [V; 1958.1, 1958.2. (London Daily Mail, July 5, 1907.)]


1884 May 19 / q / Persian Gulf / Science 7/117 / (BA '11). [V; 1961. Milne, 731. (Science, s. 1 v. 7 p. 117; not found here, nor found s. 1 v. 4 (1884).)]


1884 May 20 / [LT], 5-b / Strange Case. [B; 603. (London Times, May 20, 1884, p. 5 c. 2; not found here. Palmer's Index checked; nil.)]


1884 May 20 / Tysnes, Hardanger Fiord, Norway / (F). [V; 1962. Fletcher, 105. This is the Tysnes Island meteorite.]


1884 May 20 / Woodstock / one-min. meteor / Nature 30/102. [V; 1963. Hoskyns-Abrahall, John. “A Remarkably Brilliant Meteor.” Nature, 30 (May 29, 1884): 102.]


1884 May 22 / See June 20. / pebbles / Dakota / 100. [V; 1964. See: 1884 June 20, (V; 1978).]


1884 May 22 / Waterspout on L. Ontario / MWR, May, p. 135. [V; 1965. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 12 (no. 5; May 1884): 134-136, at 135. “A Cyclone Seen at Pultneyville.” Oswego Daily Palladium, May 30, 1884, p. 4 c. 3. The date of “(22d?)” is questioned by the Monthly Weather Review, as the Oswego Daily Palladium had copied the article from the Lyons Republican.]


1884 May 27 / Norway / wedge stone in storm / D-103 / See May 20. [V; 1966. The note copies information from pages 103 to 104 of The Book of the Damned. "Notes." Nature, 30 (June 26, 1884): 198-200, at 200. "Notes." Nature, 30 (July 24, 1884): 298-300, at 300. See: 1884 May 20, (V; 1962). This is the Tysnes Island meteorite.]


1884 May 27 / (Ch) / Ch-28 / night / Cor saw bird—looking headless—or an owl cross moon but took 30 seconds. / Eng Mechanic 48/420, column 1, near bottom. [V; 1967. Duke, P.F. “Lunar Objects.” English Mechanic, 48 (no. 1243; January 18, 1889): 420.]


1884 May 27 / 8:45 p.m. / At Skonevik, w. coast of Norway, det. meteor. Train visible 5 minutes. Sound like that of distant thunder but lasted longer. / Nature 30-200 / p. 300, metite said found. [V; 1968. "Notes." Nature, 30 (June 26, 1884): 198-200, at 200. "Notes." Nature, 30 (July 24, 1884): 298-300, at 300. See: 1884 May 20, (V; 1962). This is the Tysnes Island meteorite.]


1884 June 5, 10, 12, 27 / Shocks / New Zealand / N.Z. Jour of Sci 2/172. [V; 1969. “Earthquakes.” New Zealand Journal of Science, 2 (July 1884): 172-173.]


1884 June 5 / 2:58 a.m./ 11:50 a.m. / Slight shocks / Wellington, N. Zealand / 10th—11:30 p.m., at Christchurch, slight / 12th, 2 sharp shocks at Oxford. 27th, early morn., slight at Dunedin. / N.Z. Jour. of Sci., 2-173. [V; 1970. “Earthquakes.” New Zealand Journal of Science, 2 (July 1884): 172-173.]


1884 June 6 / Wiggins' moon of May 16 described in N.Y. Trib of. [V; 1959. Wiggins, Ezekiel Stone. “Wiggins' Dark Moon.” New York Tribune, June 8, 1884, p. 7 c. 5.]


1884 June 8 / Trib, 6-3 / Wiggins' dark moon / Ed. [V; 1960. “Wiggins's Dark Moon.” New York Tribune, June 8, 1884, p. 6 c. 3-4. “He says to himself: 'It is evident, from the failure of my predictions, that something is wrong with the solar system, if not with the Cosmos. And since the failure of my predictions is inexplicable on any theory which presupposes my knowledge of what I am talking about, and since it is impossible to discard that assumption so far as I am concerned, it becomes necessary to invent a dark moon, the invisibility of which may account for its never having been discovered, while its mere existence as a satellite of the earth will explain the apparent failure of my best-predicted storms to come to time.'”


1884 June 9 / —Texas / 15—Mass / fishes. [B; 604. “Stories of Fish and Fishing.” New York Sun, June 15, 1884, p. 8 c. 7.]]


1884 June 9 (?) / fish and hail / Sun 15-8-7 / “The nearest salt water to Floresville, Texas, is 100 miles away, yet Robert Lackey says that after the hail storm of last Monday he picked up a genuine redfish, yet alive, which weighed ten pounds.” [V; 1971. “Stories of Fish and Fishing.” New York Sun, June 15, 1884, p. 8 c. 7.]


1884 June 10 / obj / 10:54 a.m., G.M.T. / Stonyhurst Observatory / “A large ill-defined and not very dark body, tinged with crimson and purple, moved through several degrees of arc, in a curved path slightly above the sun's centre, and, increasing in size, appeared to burst as it disappeared.” / Rev. S.J. Perry gives opinion it was not solar. / Astro Reg 22-264 /// As Reg, 21-68. [V; 1972.1, 1972.2. Perry, Stephen Joseph. “Phenomena Observed upon the Solar Surface from 1881 to 1884 at Stonyhurst Observatory.” Astronomical Register, 22 (November 1884): 257-265, at 264. Richards, Walter John Bruce. “Lunar Work for March, 1883.” Astronomical Register, 21 (March 1883): This second reference concerns darks spots on the Moon. See: 1882 Aug 2, (V; 909).]


[1884 June 13] / 1884 June 14 / Sun 29-5-7 / warm shower at Waugoshance Lighthouse, on Lake Michigan, about 25 miles west of Mackinac. Crashing sounds were heard. A roof and a pier had been covered, in an instant, with a dry, chalk-like substance to a depth of an inch. Surface of the lake as far as could be seen was covered. “It smells strongly of lye, but seems to have much less specific gravity than potash.” / Men ran from lighthouse and found the substance on roof and pier, etc. [V; 1973.1, 1973.2. “A Peculiar Shower in Lake Michigan.” New York Sun, June 29, 1884, p. 5 c. 7.]


1884 June 16 / (+) / Stones / Sun 22-1-6 / That on farm north of Trenton, N.Y., 2 young men, George and Albert Sandford, hoeing in a corn field when a shower of stones. No fence, no building near, behind which a person could have been concealed. Stones size of a pea to a hen's egg fell so furiously the brothers fled. 4 p.m. / Tuesday, 9 a.m., another fall of pebbles. The young men went to Trenton and got several persons to return to the farm with them. 40 or 50 stones were seen to fall "near the brothers". Said that crowds went and some other persons saw the stones fall. [B; 605.1, 605.2, 605.3. “Mysterious Stone Throwing.” New York Sun, June 22, 1884, p. 1 c. 6.]


1884 June 16 / Toronto Globe of / That mysterious and terrible creature known as the Willipus-Wallipus had appeared near Clarksville, Tenn. [B; 606. “Round the Globe.” Toronto Globe, June 16, 1884, p. 3 c. 1. (“The Mysterious Monster.” Tennessean, (Nashville), March 8, 1884, p. 5 c. 3; “The Mysterious Monster.” Tennessean, (Nashville), March 21, 1884, p. 5 c. 3.; @ newspapers.com.) What had begun as reports of an unknown animal hunted by some residents of Clarksville soon deteriorated into newspaper yarns about the “Willipus Wallapus,” (or “Willipus Wallipus”).]


1884 June 17 / (Cut) / Eng / Hay passing overhead. Some fell. / Knowledge 6/328. [V; 1974. “A Flight of Hay.” Knowledge, o.s., 6 (October 17, 1884): 328. “Some fell, other lots sailed on; two large armfuls I watched as far as the sea—half a mile. They took about five minutes to do it, so the wind may be put at six miles an hour.”]


1884 June, middle / Thick clouds of dragonflies flying east over Moscow. / Nature 30/223. [V; 1975. “Notes.” Nature, 30 (July 3, 1884): 221-223, at 223.]


1884 June 15 / Sun 15-8-7—“After a heavy rainstorm recently, the people of Pawtucket were puzzled at finding in a street puddle more than 100 little eels, all alive, and from one to three inches in length.” [V; 1976. “Stories of Fish and Fishing.” New York Sun, June 15, 1884, p. 8 c. 7.]


1884 June 18 / Berlin / reddish brown atmosphere and the peculiar appearance of sun and sky like of Nov., 1883 / Nature 30-199. [V; 1977. "Notes." Nature, 30 (June 26, 1884): 198-200, at 199. (London Times, ca. June 26, 1884.)]


1884 June 20 / Bismarck, Dakota Something like a heavy shower that did not reach the earth—or objects? Not raindrops. / Sun 22-4-6 / Same day unusual mirage (looming) at St Lawrence, Dakota. [V; 1978. “Phenomena in Dakota.” New York Sun, June 22, 1884, p. 4 c. 6.]


1884 June 22 / B. Rain / Fletching, Sussex. / Nature 30/216. [V; 1979. Treutler, W.J. “Black Rain.” Nature, 30 (July 3, 1884): 216.]


1884 June 22 and 7th July / Conspicuous sunset glows / England / Nature 30-268. [V; 1980. “Sky Glows.” Nature, 30 (July 17, 1884): 268.]


1884 June 22 / (/) // Shock / Colchester. [V; 1981. (Refs.???)]


1884 June 24 / 3 p.m. / Huron, Dakota / vivid flash of sheet lightning over entire sky, weather perfectly clear at the time / MWR, p. 154—describes many meteoric explosions. [V; 1982. “Atmospheric Electricity.” Monthly Weather Review, 12 (no. 6; June 1884): 153-154, at 154. (No reference to meteoric explosions in this article.)]


1884 / about // July or Aug /// Lassodie, near Dumferline / Cor, Glascow Herald, July 10, 1894, after a shower of big drops of rain, found great many small frogs on ground. On a narrow area about 50 paces long. [V; 1983. “A Shower of Frogs.” Glascow Herald, July 10, 1894, p. 9 c. 3.]


1884 // summer /// Drought / Amer Met. Jour 1-292. [V; 1984. “Current Notes.” American Meteorological Journal, 1 (December 1884): 287-300, at 292.]


1884 July 3 / 8:30 p.m. / Baltimore / large met / E Mec 39-488. [V; 1985. Numsen, W.H. “The After-Glow—Brilliant Fireball.” English Mechanic, 39 (no. 1010; August 1, 1884): 488.]


1884 July 3 / 9:32 p.m. / Stockholm / meteor / Nature 30-300. [V; 1986. "Notes." Nature, 30 (July 24, 1884): 298-300, at 300.]


1884 July 3 / Det met / 8:27 p.m. / Ontario / Sound like distant thunder / Nature 37-274. [V; 1987. “Meteors.” Nature, 37 (January 19, 1888): 273-274. (Canadian Weather Review, July 1884.)]


1884 July 3 / 8:25 p.m. / Cazenovia, N.Y. / meteor from above Polaris to w. horizon / Evening / eastern sky / meteor, Toronto / T. Globe 4-6-2. [V; 1988. “A Meteor.” Toronto Globe, July 4, 1884, p. 2 c. 4. “A Brilliant Meteor.” Toronto Globe, July 4, 1884, p. 6 c. 2.]


1884 July 3 / 8:30 p.m. / Phelps, N.Y. / by Prof Brooks / met from near Polaris—and brilliant train / Observatory 7-267. [V; 1989. “Remarkable Meteor-Train.” Observatory, 7 (1884): 267-268. Brooks, William Robert. “Observations of a Splendid Meteor Train.” Sidereal Messenger, 3 (August 1884): 167-168.]


1884 July 3 / 8:30 p.m. / Norwood[, N.Y.] / obj / Sc Am 51-71. [V; 1990. “A Great Meteor.” Scientific American, n.s., 51 (August 2, 1884): 71.]


1884 July 3 / (3) / Norwood, N.Y. / met with structure / globe size of moon, surrounded by a ring / Two dark lines crossed nucleus. Moved slowly. / Science Monthly (L) 2/136 / Another like, this somewhere. May 1, 1908. [V; 1991. (Science Monthly, 2-136.) (1909 October 7-8. Norwood, Massachusetts, alleged meteor. Science, n.s., 31, (1910): 298-299.)]


1884 July 4 / Cyclone / Iowa. [V; 1992. (Refs.???)]


1884 July 8 / Toronto Globe of / Volume of water (waterspout) fell in Texas. So great that “the great Trinity River ran upstream all day.” [V; 1993. (Toronto Globe, July 8, 1884; not found here.) “A Day at Dallas.” Fort Worth Daily Gazette, April 29, 1884, p. 4 c. 1-2.]


1884 July 11 / Inf conjunction Venus-Sun. [V; 1994.]


1884 July 11 / Ice / Risca, near Newport. / Ac to F. Pratt, E. Mec, 84-165, blocks of ice, weighing several hundred pounds each, fell at Risca, near Newport. “A tremendous piece fell at Murchen, of the form and size of a boat.” [V; 1995. (English Mechanic, 84 (1907): 165.)]


1884/ night of July 11 // (metite) / Grounds of College of Saint Mary's, Missouri / metite / MWR 1884/177. [V; 1996. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 12 (no. 7; July 1884): 176-178, at 177.]


1884 July 12 / Lightning phe / Norwich, Conn / any storm? / Sun 15-2-6. [B; 607. “Lightning Making Havoc in a Kitchen.” New York Sun, July 15, 1884, p. 2 c. 6.]


1884 July 14 / Tourettes (Vaucluse) / bottle wine / disap / lightning. [B; 608. Flammarion, Camille. Thunder and Lightning. London: Chatto & Windus, 1905, 217.]


1884 July 16 / Comet 1884b / by Barnard. [V; 1997. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 4 (July 25, 1884): 88-92, at 92.]


1884 July 16 / Comet / head of the Wolf / Science 4/92. [V; 1998. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 4 (July 25, 1884): 88-92, at 92. Comet D/1884 O1.]


1884 July 20 / Localized mets / (New Caledonia) / In Nature 30-538, E.L. Layard, of the British Consulate, Noumea, writes that this night at 6:02 p.m. he saw in the north the most majestic meteor in his experience. It moved slowly and at about N.N.W. suddenly broke into 6 pieces that continued on. 2 friends of his reported having seen low in the S horizon, from W to E a great meteor at 6:25 p.m. At 10:45 his wife saw one that fell from the zenith. Still others were seen. [V; 1999.1, 1999.2. Layard, Edgar Leopold. “Meteors.” Nature, 30 (October 2, 1884): 538-539.]


1884 July 26 / near Cologne / Thing sailing upward from earth—ab size of moon—stationary a while and then up and disappeared. / Nature 30/360. [V; 2000. Flinders Petrie, William Matthew. “Fireballs.” Nature, 30 (August 14, 1884): 360.]


1884 July 27 / NY Times, 2-7 / Ghost. [B; 609. “Following an Elusive Voice.” New York Times, July 27, 1884, p. 2 c. 7.]


1884 July 30 / Nothing in Toronto Globe. [V; 2001.]


1884 July 30 / (beam) / Philadelphia / ab. 10 p.m. / Appearance like a narrow thin, white cloud from a point about 30 deg above the horizon in the west to ab 20 deg beyond the zenith in the east. It looked like the tail of a comet. It was moving. In 20 minutes the western end had reached the zenith. Then it looked shorter and the eastern end dimmer. It passed from view in about half an hour. / Sid Mess, p. 251 / That Prof Swift had seen the obj at Warner Observatory and could not explain it. / Sid Mess 3/251 / He thought it a long narrow cloud at first, but its exceedingly slow motion convinced him it was not. It was a conspicuous object for ab. 45 minutes, then disappearing in the eastern horizon. / (Also it was seen at the Carleton College Observ.) [V; 2005.1 to 2005.4. “Editorial Notes.” Sidereal Messenger, 3 (September 1884): 216-224, at 222. “Editorial Notes.” Sidereal Messenger, 3 (October 1884): 248-256, at 251.]


1884 Aug to Jan., 1885 / Stones and L-servant / Medium and Daybreak, March 6, 1885case heard in Dublin CourtMr. Waldrom, a solicitor's clerk, had sued a mate in the Marine service, named Kiernan, to recover £500 damages for injuries to his house, but Kiernan, his next door neighbor. K denied that mischief and damage by him, saying that W'd house was haunted. For 6 months the windows been broken by stones coming from direction of  K's yard, also rappings. Detectives and policemen on watch could detect nothing. Even though accusing Kiernan, Mrs Waldron testified that one night she saw a white hand cutting a hole, with a diamond, in a pane of glass, and had struck the hand with a bellhook, cutting off one of the fingers, which however was unfindable. A police constable swore that he had seen W's servant kick a door with her heels about the time rappings started. The jury found for Kiernan. [B; 610.1. "An Alleged Haunted House." Medium and Daybreak, 16 (no. 779; March 6, 1885): 151.]


1884 Aug 1 / ab. 2 a.m. / Phelps, N.Y. / mag. meteor from zenith toward west / Toronto Globe, 2nd. [V;  

2002. “Magnificent Meteor.” Toronto Globe, August 2, 1884, p. 2 c. 2.]


1884 Aug. 3 / Severe shocks / Bosnia / Tor. Globe, 5th. [V; 2003. (Toronto Globe, August 5, 1884; not found here; from Vienna, August 4.)]  


1884 Aug 5 / + / a Fancher case / Banksville, Pa / Religio-Phil Jour., Nov 20-6-4, 1886, copying from St Louis Globe-Democrat—case of Maggie Beadling—unusually good-looking—aged 15. Aug 5, fell down stairs in her home—spine injured—lost use of limbs—convulsions. Had for more than 2 years been in a trance-like state. Never took more than 4 ounces of food a day—at times 3 or four days without eating. "One of the most wonderful features of her strange case is that she now weighs about 125 pounds, only five pounds less than when she was hurt, over two years ago." [B; 610.1, 610.2, 610.3. "In a Two Year Trance." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 41 (no. 13; November 20, 1886): 6, (c. 4). (St. Lous Globe-Democrat, ca. 1886.) See: 1886 November, (B; 765).]


1884 (Aug 10) / (2 p.m.) / N.Y.T., Aug, 11-1-1 / 12-5-3 / 13-8-3 / q's Maryland to Maine/ Sc Am 51-112. [V; 2004. “Unstable in the Shock.” New York Times, August 11, 1884, p. 1 c. 1. “Work of the Earthquake.” New York Times, August 12, 1884, p. 5 c. 3-4. “Sunday's Earth Quiver.” New York Times, August 13, 1884, p. 8 c. 3.]


1884 Aug 10 and 11 / 2:10 p.m. / q / Columns in Sun, Aug 11, 12. [V; 2006. “An Earthquake Shakes Us.” New York Sun, August 11, 1884, p. 1 c. 4-5 & p. 3 c. 1. “Another Earthquake Felt.”New York Sun, August 12, 1884, p. 1 c. 7.]


1884 Aug 14 / (Stat) / ab midnight / Lafayette, Alabama / 2 great mets / 15 or 20 minutes apart / Sc Am 51-257. [V; 2007. “The Remarkable Meteors.” Scientific American, n.s., 51 (October 25, 1884): 257.]


1884 Aug. 17 Rochester / by Isaac P. Guldenschuh / brilliant white spot on limb of Venus / E Mec 40/130. [V; 2008. “Is There a Snow Cap on Venus?” English Mechanic, 40 (no. 1020; October 10, 1884): 129-130. (Chicago Tribune, August 28, 1884, p. 4; @ newspapers.com.)]


1884 Aug 19 / [LT], 10-f / Met. [V; 2009. Smith, W. Harding. “A Brilliant Meteor.” London Times, August 19, 1884, p. 10 c. 6.]


1884 Aug 23 / Religio-Phil Jour, 6-5 / Family of 16 in Mt Morris, Michigan, gone crazy believing their home was bewitched. [B; 611. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 36 (no. 26; August 23, 1884): 6, (c. 5).]


1884 Aug 24 / Trib, 6-4 / Flying Machine / (Ed). [V; 2010. “A New Flying Machine.” New York Tribune, August 24, 1884, p. 6 c. 4.]


[1884 Aug 25] / Disaps / 3 cases at Clarington, Ohio / body of one found. / N.Y. Sun, 1884, Aug 25-1-5 / See Dec 17, 1888. [B; 612. “Mysteries of Clarington.” New York Sun, August 25, 1884, p. 1 c. 5. See: (1888 Dec 17).]


1884 Aug 30 / Religio-Phil Jour. / In county of Ximenees, Mexico, where been drought for 10 years, five springs had burst out. [V; 2011. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, ca. August 30, 1884; Jimenez???)]


1884 Aug 30 / mirage / At sunrise—Huron, Dakota / remarkably distinct mirage—a lake and shores dotted with farm houses and grain stacks and herds of cattle / attrib to a mirage of Lake Benton, ab. 40 miles away / M.W.R. '84/199. [V; 2012. “Optical Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review,  (no. 8; August 1884): 198-199, at 199. See: 1885 Sept 5, (VI; 132).]


1884 Sept 2 / Austria / I / q. / BA '11. [V; 2013. Milne, 731.]


1884 Sept 3 / [LT], 5-b / q / Wiener Neustadt / Stone fell, middle Jan., 1881. [V; 2014. “Austria.” London Times, September 3, 1884, p. 5 c. 2. See: 1881 / ab. middle of Jan, (V; 434).]


1884 Sept 4 / (Cut) / Cor—E Mec 40/60—observing moon, three times saw a black object cross field of his telescope. / Again on 5th, once. He found that it was a bird. [V; 2015. Nelson, Edward M. “Birds—Plato.” English Mechanic, 40 (no. 1017; September 19, 1884): 60.]


1884 Sept. 4 / Turkey / metite / L'Astro 4-191. [V; 2016. Mavrogordato, F.A. “Chute d'un uranolithe en Turquie.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 191-192.]


1884 Sept 5 / France / 10:05 p.m. / bolide from Zeta Andromeda / details of flight given / C.R. 99-447. [V; 2017. Jaubert, L. “Observation d'un bolide dans la soirée du 5 septembre.” Comptes Rendus, 99 (1884): 447.]


1884 Sept / Floods / Argentine / Symons 49/81 / N.M. [V; 2018. “Floods in the Argentine Republic.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 49 (June 1914): 81-82.]


1884 Sept 5 / 10:05 p.m. / Observatory of Trocadero / great bolide from Zeta Androm. / C.R. 99-447. [V; 2019. Jaubert, Léon. “Observation d'un bolide dans la soirée du 5 septembre.” Comptes Rendus, 99 (1884): 447.]


1884 Sept 6 / Sci Amer of / 3 wolf cubs found in Epping Forest. [B; 613. “An English Wolf.” Scientific American, n.s., 51 (September 6, 1884): 152. See: 1884 Dec., (B; 617).]


1884 Sept 9 / Clear Lake, Wis. / Tornado. House carried away. Searched for—not a place of it found. / Sun 11-1-7. [V; 2020. “Tornadoes in the West.” New York Sun, September 11, 1884, p. 1 c. 7.]


1884 Sept 9 / Nebulous obj. by Brooks / Sid Mess. 3/249. [V; 2021. “Editorial Notes.” Sidereal Messenger, 3 (October 1884): 248-256, at 249.]


1884 Sept 9 / ab 9 p.m. / Unknown nebulous obj by Prof Brooks / Red House Observatory, Rochester / RA. 13 h, 5 m / N. Dec. 57 deg / not seen again / Sid Mess 3-249. [V; 2022. “Editorial Notes.” Sidereal Messenger, 3 (October 1884): 248-256, at 249. Brooks suspected the object was a comet, but had lost sight of it in moonlight; and, two nights later, it could not be found, altho both Brooks and Lewis Swift had searched for it up to September 19, 1884.]


1884 Sept 10 / evening / at Amiens / Obj supposed by some workmen to be an incandescent aerolite—fell into the Somme. / L'Astro 4-155. [V; 2023. “Chute d'uranolithe, près d'Amiens.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 155.]


1884 Sept 12 / (It) / Brescia / q / BA '11. [V; 2024. Milne, 731.]


1884 Sept 16 / Extraordinary explosion in a boys' school in Manchester. A loud report like that of a gun. As assistant teacher was struck by something over her right eye. Three boys who were near were slightly scorched. "There was nothing to show the nature of the substance which exploded, but the flooring was torn up.” Said that the police were investigating but had discovered no clew. / LT 18-9-e / See June 13, 1885. [B; 614.1, 614.2. “Mysterious Explosion.” London Times, September 18, 1884, p. 9 c. 5. See: (1885 June 13).]


1884 Sept. 16 / Polt explosions / [typescript] Jour. Amer. S.P.R., 7-476. [B; 615. Typescript note. (Wilkins, Mary. “Personal Experiences.” Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research, 7 (September 1913): 469-495, at 476.???)]


1884 Sept. 16 / moon / 3:30 to 4 a.m. / By Prof. John Heywood, at Otterbein College, Westerville, Ohio. Unusually bright glow covering almost uniformly the dark part of the moon's disc. Seemed electric. Too bright for earthshine. / Sid. Mess. 3-252. [V; 2025.1, 2025.2. “Editorial Notes.” Sidereal Messenger, 3 (October 1884): 248-256, at 252. See: 1877 June 14, (IV; 2133), and, 1883 Nov. 4 / and Nov and Dec, (V; 1703).]


[1884 Sept 16. Wrong date. See: 1884 Sept 19, (V; 2026).]


1884 Sept 18 / q. / U.S. and Canada / BA '11. [V; 2027. Milne, 731.]


1884 Sept 18 / The sunsets or like Nov., 1883, at Eastbourne / L.T. 19-5-d. [V; 2028. “Remarkable Sunset.” London Times, September 19, 1884, p. 5 c. 4.]


1884 Sept 19 / 2:45 p.m. / Severe q / Toledo, Ohio / and Windsor, Ontario / and Michigan / Buildings rocked. / See Nov. 13 / Nature 30/518. [V; 2029. “Notes.” Nature, 30 (September 25, 1884): 517-519, at 518. See: 1884 Nov. 13, (V; 2047).]


1884 Sept 19 / 2:45 p.m. / q / Sun 20-1-1 / 3 distinct shocks, Cleveland, Ohio / 2:05, Dubuque / 2:15, Louisville / Trib 20-1-4. [V; 2030. “Shaken by an Earthquake.” New York Sun, September 20, 1884, p. 1 c. 1. “An Earthquake in the West.” New York Tribune, September 20, 1884, p. 1 c. 4.]


1884 Sept 19 / 14 h, 14 m / q / Ind, Mich, Ontario, Pa, Ohio / R—Jan 18. [V; 2031. Refer to: 1884 Jan 18, (V; 1835). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 14.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 29 (1885): 425-437, at 432-434.]


[1884 Sept 19 /] 1884 Sept 16 / 2:43 p.m. / Slight shock / Ohio / Science 4/302. [V; 2026. Nelson, E.T. “The Ohio Earthquake.” Science, s. 1 v. 4 (September 26, 1884): 302.]


1884 Sept 23 / Banks of the Gironde (France), flight of dragonflies, hour and a half, or 1¾ / Ent. Mo. Mag., 21-192. [V: 2032. Campbell, F.M. “Dragon-fly migration.” Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 21 (January 1885): 192.]


1884 Oct-Dec. / Haze / Grand Rapids / N.Y. Times. [V: 2033. (New York Times; nothing found, index checked, ca. 1884-1885.)]


1884 Oct 4 / [LT], 9-e / Sunset remarkable / Yorkshire. [V: 2034. “Remarkable Sunset.” London Times, October 4, 1884, p. 9 c. 5.)]


1884 Oct. 4 / Trib, 1-4 / Hurricane in Iceland. [V: 2035. “Seventy-Nine Boats Lost in a Storm.” New York Tribune, October 4, 1884, p. 1 c. 4.]


1884 Oct. 4 / Total eclipse of moon / Eng. [V; 2036. Parséhian, Jérome. “Encore l'éclipse de Lune.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 69-70. A spot was observed in the crater Tycho.]


1884 Oct 11 / by an astronomer of Lisbon / Brilliant spot on sun. On 12th like tail [of] a comet, / L'Astro 4/34. [V; 2037. Lacerda, Narciso Manuel Correia de. “Phénomène observé sur une tache solaire.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 34-35.]


1884 Oct 14 / 7 groups of sunspots / Ciel et Terre 4-404. [V; 2038. “Taches du Soleil.” Ciel et Terre, 4 (1883-1884): 404.]


1884 Oct. 16 / mirage—city / Lindesberg, Sweden / mirage—large town with 4-storied houses, a castle, and a lake, It lasted ab. 15 minutes. / Nature 31/42. [V; 2039. “Notes.” Nature, 31 (November 13, 1884): 40-42, at 42.]


1884 Oct 26 / Detached cloud like “protuberance” from sun / R—Sept 26, '79. [V; 2040. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 254-255, (figure 85).]


1884 Oct 26 / no q. reported / (20 h.) / Nashua, N.H. / noise only of heavy explosion / Am. J. Sci 3-29-428. [V: 2041. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 14.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 29 (1885): 425-437, at 435.]


1884 Oct 30 / evening / Mülheim / N.E. to S.W. / loud det. met. / Nature 31-64. [V; 2042. “Notes.” Nature, 31 (November 20, 1884): 62-65, at 64.]


1884 Nov 3 / 9:15 [p.m.], Paris time / Meteor / France and Switz / C.R. 99-829. [V; 2043. Dufour, Charles. “Observation d'un bolide, le 3 novembre 1884.” Comptes Rendus, 99 (1884): 829-830.]


1884 Nov 8 / Met / germany / Met Zeit 1/471. [V; 2044. “Meteor am 8. November 1884.” Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 1 (1884): 471-473.]


1884 Nov 12 / 7:50 p.m. / Contoocook, N.H. / (q.) / N.Y. Times. [V; 2045. “An Earthquake Shock.” New York Times, November 14, 1884, p. 1 c. 2.]


1884 Nov 12-13 / night / q. at Concord. / Toronto Globe 14-2-4. [V; 2046. “A Severe Earthquake.” Toronto Globe, November 14, 1884, p. 2 c. 4.]


1884 Nov. 13 / Explosion / Toledo / See Sept. 19. [V; 2047. See: 1884 Sept 19, (V; 2029).]


1884 Nov 13 / Shock in Essex Co., Ontario, “about 10 o'clock” in the morning. Window glass broken. / Toronto Globe 14-2-4 // q east and explosion west / Like Oct, 1907. [V; 2048. “A Severe Earthquake.” Toronto Globe, November 14, 1884, p. 2 c. 4. See: (1907 Oct).]


1884 Nov. 13 / 10 a.m. / Shocks in several towns in Essex Co., Ontario. Window glass broken in one (Kingsville). / NY Times 14-1-2 / (Here said Toledo explosion at 10.) Looks to me as if a q set off nitroglycerine in Toledo. / Said that men thawing out a tub of n.g.—tub caught fire. [V; 2049.1, 2049.2.  “An Earthquake Shock.” New York Times, November 14, 1884, p. 1 c. 2. (No reference to nitro explosion in this article.)]


1884 Nov 13 / 20,000 pounds powder near Toledo, Ohio / heard and felt 150 miles away / Sun 14-1-5 / (See q.) [V; 2050. “All North Ohio Shaken.” New York Sun, November 14, 1884, p. 1 c. 5.]


1884 Nov. 14 / V.S. / 5:10 p.m. / At Litheroe and neighborhood “A terrific report” and vibrations. / Lancashire. A lurid glare in the sky. The seismologist Wm. White thinks this only a sunset glow and nothing to do with the phe. / Nature 31-172? It was one hour after sunset. [V; 2051.1, 2051.2. White, William. “Earthquakes in England, and their Study.” Nature, 31 (December 25, 1884): 172.]


1884 Nov 15 / Trib, 5-2 / Meteors. [V; 2052. “The Meteors of November.” New York Tribune, November 15, 1884, p. 5 c. 2.]


1884 Nov 15 and 23 / Tonchie, in the Catskills / That T had an uncanny reputation. “Strange noises and rumbling sounds have been heard from time to time for several years past.” / NY Times 30-1-6 / That on dates given, rocks weighing tons were thrown or rolled several yards, and a “queer rumbling sound was heard.” [V; 2053.1, 2053.2. “Upheavals at Tonchie.” New York Times, November 30, 1884, p. 1 c. 6.]


1884 Nov. 23 / 12:30 / 12:45 / qs and loud rumbling noise / NY Times 24-5-7 / (See Nov. 15.) // Contoocook, N.H., etc. / 25-4-7. [V; 2054. “Earthquake in New-Hampshire.” New York Times, November 24, 1884, p. 5 c. 7. (New York Times, November 25, 1884, p. 4 c. 7.) See: 1884 Nov 15 and 23, (V; 2053).]


[1884 Nov 24 /] 1884 Nov. 25 / (Cut) / Hot Springs, Arkansas / Man hit by meteor. Editor doubts the story. / L'Astro 1885/35. [V; 2055. “Tué par une aérolithe.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 35.]


[1884 Nov 24 /] 1885 Nov 25 / Dispatch of / Farmer in Montgomery Co., Ark., killed by meteorite. / L'Astro 4/35. [VI; 288. “Tué par une aérolithe.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 35.]


1884 Nov. 26 / q / Bolivia / 27—France // BA '11. [V; 2056. Milne, 731.]


[1884 Nov 27 and Dec 28 /] 1885 Nov 27 and Dec 28 / La Nat 1885/1/77 / q's. [VI; 249. “Les Tremblements de Terre du 27 Novembre et du 28 Décembre 1884.” La Nature, 1885 pt. 1 (no. 605; January 5): 77.]


1884 Nov 30 / psychic) / Sun, 1-4 / Girl persecuted like Esther Cox, but by tramp who came to house many times. [B; 616. “Hattie Holmes Tormented.” New York Sun, November 30, 1884, p. 1 c. 4.]


1884 Dec. / Animal / Essex Notebook of, said that in answer to a Times cor, Mr. Ffennell having investigated, that the animal captured in Epping Forest was a prairie wolf. Times before November? /// 309/70/150. [B; 617.1, 617.2. "Wolves in Essex." Essex Notebook and Suffolk Gleaner, 1 (no. 3; December 1884): 27. Ffennell, Henry. "Wolves in Essex." London Times, October 27, 1884, p. 7 c. 4. Foster, Henry. “Supposed Wolves in Essex.” London Times, October 23, 1884, p. 6 c. 5. Foster identified one of the supposed wolves in Epping Forest, on being shown its head; as, he recognized it as his own “colley dog,” which had disappeared a few days before and undoubtedly fell victim to indiscriminate hunters. (Bartlett, Abraham Dee. Land and Water, July 19, 1884.) "Wolves in Epping Forest." School Newspaper, 11 (no. 129; September 1, 1884): 140. "A few years ago four cubs were brought to England in a ship belonging to Mr. J.R. Fletcher, of the Union Docks, and were turned down in Ongar Wood. These cubs were subsequently taken to the late Mr. Arkwright's, Master of the Essex Hunt, and turned out at Marl's Farm, whence they roamed at will until one of their number got captured." "Wolves in Essex." Essex Standard, July 26, 1884, p. 6 c. 5. "It appears that a Colonel Howard brought from abroad four cubs, believing them to be fox cubs." "Epping Forest Wolves." St. James's Gazette, November 25, 1884, p. 6. "How came the strange family into this country? was then asked; and naturally there were some who maintained that the cubs had been brought from Leadenhall Market, and hawked about on the calculation that local association would make them more valuable. This might have been so, though such rarities are not to be had every day, even in Leadenhall Market; and though the original retailers could not be found, the evidence was in favour of the cubs being Epping Forest bred—possibly the progeny of an animal escaped years ago from some travelling wild-beast show. In the museum at Chelmsford there is now specimen of the coyote shot in the Forest in 1862; and a strange quadruped had been often seen by the botanist and collector whilst searching the most unfrequented portions of the Forest for rare plants, insects, or birds." "Modern Legends of Supposed Wolves in Epping Forest." Transactions of the Essex Field Club, 4 (1886): cciv-ccix, (illustration). "Charlie," (who was still alive in December of 1891 at the Zoological Gardens), was re-identified by Bartlett, (the superintendent): "The animal you ask about is alive. At the time it came here, we considered that it was a ' Prairie Wolf,' but we now find that it is a North African Jackal. The two species are very much alike, differing only in size." The "prairie wolf" (Canis latrans) is more popularly called a coyote, and, by some an "American jackal"; but, sketches of Charlie closely resemble the side-striped jackal of Africa, (Canis adustus). "The English Wolf." The Graphic, (London), July 26, 1877, p. 77, (illustration).]


1884 Dec. 2 and 3 / Afterglows like those of year before again at San Salvador / C.R. 100-191. [V; 2057. Montessus de Ballore, Fernand Jean Baptiste Marie Bernard de. “Sur de nouvelles lueurs crépusculaires, observées récemment dans l'Amérique centrale.” Comptes Rendus, 100 (1885): 191.]


1884 Dec 4 / 0 h, 18 m / Very light shock / Northampton, Mass / Ref, Jan. 18. [V; 2058. Refer to: 1884 Jan 18, (V; 1835). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 14.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 29 (1885): 425-437, at 436.]


1884 Dec 8 / [LT], 10-b / Large met. [V; 2059. Lowe, Edward Joseph. “Large Meteor.” London Times, December 8, 1884, p. 10 c. 2.]


1884 Dec 8 / for some weeks // Unknown buried substance burning on mt in Virginia. / Sun 9-1-4. [V; 2060. “Burning Mountain in Virginia.” New York Sun, December 9, 1884, p. 1 c. 4.]


1884 Dec 13 / metite / (B.M.) / 3 a.m. / on a farm near Quebec / Metite / M.W.R. 84/315 // See no. “14”. / Sc Am., 51-426. [V: 2061. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 12 (no. 12; December 1884): 314-315, at 315. “A Splendid Aerolite Secured.” Scientific American, n.s., 51 (December 27, 1884): 426.]


1884 Dec 13 / 3 a.m. / At Chateau-Richer, near Quebec / Aerolite ab a foot in diameter / Toronto Globe 16-2-1. [V; 2062. “Quebec.” Toronto Globe, December 16, 1884, p. 2 c. 1. “Deux Phénomènes.” La Presse, (Montreal), December 16, 1884, p. 1 c. 2. The aerolite was about five feet in circumference and was buried at a depth of about five or six feet. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 12 (no. 12; December 1884): 314-315, at 315. “An Aerolite Falls in Canada.” New York Herald, December 17, 1884, p. 4 c. 3. (Not identified in Fletcher nor in later catalogs.)]


1884 Dec 13 / 6:30 p.m. / Loud explosion, London—Supposed Fenian attempt to blow up London Bridge but no damage to the Bridge. / Later cracks found in it. [V; 2063. “Supposed Fenian Outrage.” London Standard, December 15, 1884, p. 5 c. 6-7.]


1884 Dec 15 / from 9 a.m. / Great gale / Buffalo. [V; 2064. “A Gale on Lake Erie.” New York Tribune, December 16, 1884, p. 1 c. 6.]


1884 Dec 15 / 11:25 p.m. / Powder mill in N.J. near N.Y. / Sun 17-2-7. [V; 2065. “Monday Night's Explosion.” New York Sun, December 17, 1884, p. 2 c. 7.]


1884 Dec 17 / 2 a.m. / q / New Hampshire / heaviest at Centre Harbor / Sun 18-2-6. [V; 2066. “Earthquake Shock in New Hampshire.” New York Sun, December 18, 1884, p. 2 c. 6.]


1884 Dec 18 / Ac to a sea captain, commotion in the Atlantic that he attrib. to submarine volcano. / L.T, 1885, Jan 13-10-2. [V; 2067. “The Earthquakes.” London Times, January 13, 1885, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1884 Dec 19 / 10:30 a.m. / Explosion / Cartridge factory / Bridgeport, Conn. / Sun 20-1-3. [V; 2068. “Explosion of Fulminate.” New York Sun, December 20, 1884, p. 1 c. 3.]


1884 Dec. 19 / 5 h., 15 m / met near Shanghai / L.A. Sci 29-3. [V; 2069.”Bolides.” Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 29 (1885): 2-5, at 3-4. Dechevrens, Marc. “Bolide Extraordinaire Observé en Chine.” La Nature, 1885 p. 1 (no. 614; March 7, 1885): 214, (illustration). Lou-Ngan, China, is now identified as Changzhi, (in Shanxi province); and, Zi-Ka-Wei is now identified as Xujiahui, (a location within Shanghai, China).]


1884 Dec 20 / Sun, 2-6 / Wild Man / Tennessee. [B; 618. “Tennessee's Wild Man.” New York Sun, December 19, 1884, p. 1 c. 3. “Tennessee's Wild Man.” New York Sun, December 20, 1884, p. 2 c. 6.]


1884 Dec. 21 / Disap / Dr. Richard C. Brandeis, a well-known physician / NY Trib, 1889, Jan 6-15-3. [B; 619. “The Army of the Missing.” New York Tribune, January 6, 1889, p. 15 c. 3.]


1884 Dec 21 / q, 11 p.m. / and tidal wave, 11:15 p.m. / New Haven, Conn / Sun 23-1-1 / If q. here. [V; 2070. “Tidal Wave at New Haven.” New York Sun, December 23, 1884, p. 1 c. 1.]


1884 Dec. 22 / 2:30 a.m. / Shocks in Azores / C.R. 100-197. [V; 2071. Da Praia. “Secousses de tremblements de terre ressenties aux Açores, le 22 décembre 1884.” Comptes Rendus, 100 (1885): 197.]


1884 Dec 22 / q and hurricane / 3:30 a.m. / Spain and other qs to at least Jan 21 / Science 5-195, 351. [V; 2072. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “The Spanish Earthquakes, Science, s. 1 v. 5 (March 6, 1885): 191-195, at 194-195. “Views of the devastation....”  Science, s. 1 v. 5 (April 24, 1885): 351-352.]


1884 Dec 24 / q. / Philippines / B.A. '11. [V; 2073. Milne, 731.]


1884 Dec. 25 / (+) / q and aurora / Spain (?) / q, reddish lights, smoke, globes of fire, etc. / See 1805. / Some of this in French. [V; 2074. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146). (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 379.)]


1884 Dec 25-26 / Inhabitant / fear houses / live in tents. [V; 2075. “Fresh Earthquake Shocks in Spain.” London Daily News, January 3, 1885, p. 5 c. 4-5.]


1884 Dec 25-26 / Town of Alhama, two parts, upper and lower—upper part fell upon lower. / [LT], Jan 5-5-f. [V; 2076. “The Spanish Earthquakes.” London Times, January 5, 1885, p. 5 c. 6.]


1884 Dec. 25 /q phe / Great q, Spain. 2,000 persons killed. “After the first shock there were flashes of lightning from a clear sky.” On 30th, violent q. / Sun, Jan. 3-1-3. [V; 2077. “The Earthquakes in Spain.” New York Sun, January 3, 1885, p. 1.c. 3.]


1884 Dec 25 / q's in Spain, “Terrible rains,” After the first shocks there were flashes of lightning in clear skies. / D. News, Jan 1 / Det—Ruin that was then covered with snow. After “terrible rains.” In January, the shocks continued. Province of Granada, Malaga, Spain, 5 towns destroyed. [V; 2078.1, 2078.2. (London Daily News, January 1, 1885; incomplete copy at BNA.) “Fresh Earthquake Shocks in Spain.” London Daily News, January 3, 1885, p. 5 c. 4-5.]


1884 Dec 25-26 / (+) / night / Liberty and other places, Sullivan Co., N.Y. / Heavy snow and in afternoon of 26th, “oddly shaped [and] yellowish worms” were seen on the snow. Said that an “extraordinary number” of them seen at Stevensville. / N.Y. Times 27-5-6. [V; 2079. “Worms in the Snow.” New York Times, December 27, 1884, p. 5 c. 6. “It Was Not A Lie.” Tri-States Union, (Port Jervis, New York), January 15, 1885, p. 4 c. 7. “On the morning stated [December 24] snow was falling very fast and it was my lot to travel some two miles to my school. The entire distance, roads and fields, which I traveled, were strewn with these crawling worms, which appeared as lively as if they had been on 'mother earth.'”]


1884 Dec 25 / Great q / Spain / Sc A Sup 19/7652. [V; 2080. “The Great Earthquake in Spain.” Scientific American Supplement, 19 (no. 479; March 7, 1885): 7652.]


1884 Dec 26 and 27 / Town of Alberquerque, Spain, destroyed by shocks. / [LT], Jan 1-3-c. [V; 2081. “The Earthquakes in Spain.” London Times, January 1, 1885, p. 1 c. 3-4.]


1884 Dec 26-27 / q and phe / q / Spain / Next day at Granada—cloudless sky, numerous lights. / L'Astro 4-67 / Before the shock, brilliant lights in the sky, p. 83. / Concussions from Dec 22—to Feb 19, recorded in L'Astro. / The concussions preceded by heavy rains—p. 96. / 2000 dead. [V; 2082.1, 2082.2. Flammarion, Camille. “Les Tremblements de Terre de l'Espagne.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 60-69, at 67. Flammarion, Camille. “Les Tremblements de Terre.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 81-99, at 83 & 96.]


1884 Dec 28 / severe shock at Tarvis, Carinthia. / LT, Dec 30-3-a. [V; 2083. “Earthquake in Carinthia.” London Times, December 30, 1884, p. 3 c. 1.]


1884 Dec 29 / Hurricane in Spain—destroyed houses in Nerja that had been shaken by the qs. / [LT] 31-5-d. [V; 2084. “The Earthquakes in Spain.” London Times, December 31, 1884, p. 5 c. 4.]


1884 Dec 30 / NY Times, 1-6 / Wormelsdorf, Pa / Wild Woman. [B; 620. “A Wild Woman in the Woods.” New York Times, December 30, 1884, p. 1 c. 6.]


1884 Dec 30 / 7 and 10 p.m. / New violent shocks, Spain / [LT], Jan 1-3-c. [V; 2085. “The Earthquakes in Spain.” London Times, January 1, 1885, p. 1 c. 3-4.]


1884 Dec 30 / Vienna / At Kralup, Bohemia, tremendous gunpowder explosion / [LT] 31-5-e. [V; 2086. “Disastrous Gunpowder Explosion.” London Times, December 31, 1884, p. 5 c. 5.]


1884 Dec 31 / Three new cases of cholera in Toledo, Spain / [LT], Jan 1-3-d. [V; 2087. “The Cholera in Spain.” London Times, January 1, 1885, p. 3 c. 4.]


                                                                                                                                                                                                    

1884 Dec 31, etc. / Cholera long before qs in Spain . (Cholera Year). [V; 2088. (Refs.???)]

 
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