Last updated: July 15, 2021. - Fortean Notes

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Last updated: July 15, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1856 to 1858


1856:


1856 / Sleeper Susan C. Godsey, near Hickman, Ky. / See July 14, 1869. [A; 338. See: 1869 July 14, (A; 547).]


1856 / Rugeley / Polt / murder there 1855, ab Dec / J. P. Cooke / Was this Palmer? [A; 339. Dr. William Palmer, (the Rugeley poisoner), was convicted of murdering John Parsons Cook, on November 21, 1855, and executed on June 14, 1856.]


1856 Jan 1 / [LT], 10-e / Variable stars / Hind's of Dec. [II; 1899. "Variable Stars." London Times, January 1, 1856, p. 10 c. 5.]


1856 Jan 2 / 10:10 a.m. / Beeston / Loud report unlike thunder. "Could it be the bursting of a meteor? / BA '56-59. [II; 1900. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1855-56." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1856, Reports on the State of Science, 53-62, at 58-59.]


1856 Jan 7 / 5 p.m. / great met and train that remainedlike a comet's tail / Southampton. Looked like a pillar of fire / LT 8-7-f. [II; 1901. "Southampton, Jan. 7." London Times, January 8, 1856, p. 7 c. 6.]


1856 Jan 7 / 4:55 p.m. / Met "around 10 minutes in daylight / Oxford / Canterbury / etc. / Kent / Southampton / Brighton / BA 56-60; 57-140 / Times quoted. [II; 1902. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1855-56." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1856, Reports on the State of Science, 53-62, at 60-61. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1856-57." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1857, Reports on the State of Science, 131-153, at 140-143. "The Meteor." London Times, January 11, 1856, p. 10 c. 2. Lowe, 138. Masters, William. "The Meteor." Kentish Gazette, January 8, 1856, p. 5 c. 2.]


1856 Jan 7 / ab. 5 p.m. / (Brighton) / "Apparently proceeding from a star, which, I think, is the planet Jupiter." / B Assoc '57/142. [II; 1903. Greg, 94. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1856-57." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1857, Reports on the State of Science, 131-153, at 141.]


1856 Jan 7 / Meteor immediately under Jupiter / Canterbury (?) / B Assoc 1856-55. [II; 1904. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1855-56." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1856, Reports on the State of Science, 53-62, at 54-55. Masters, William. "The Meteor." Kentish Gazette, January 8, 1856, p. 5 c. 2. Masters was at St. Thomas's Hill, near Canterbury. "I ran to a position where no trees intercepted my sight, and was astonished to find a bright vertical lineto appearance about 6ft. long and 2in. widein the south, immediately under Saturn," (not under Jupiter).]


1856 Jan 7 / 4:51 p.m. / Southampton / met train / M.W.R. '07/391. [II; 1905. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (no. 9; September 1907): 390-397, at 391, c.v. "Table 2."]


1856 Jan 7 / det met / L.S.P.T. - 1-61 / Meteor at Havre / C.R. 42/61, 78. [II; 1906. "M. Lecadre adresse quelques renseignements sur un météore lumineux...." Comptes Rendus, 42 (1856): 61. Deslongchamps, Eudes. "Observation faite à Caen du météore lumineux du 7 janvier." Comptes Rendus, 42 (1856): 78-80. "Météore du 7 Janvier." La Science Pour Tous, 1 (no. 9; February 7, 1856): 69.]


1856 Jan 7 / Riverhill, Sevenoaks / fell from a point 3 or 4 degrees south and east of Jupiter. / B Ass. 57/142. [II; 1907. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1856-57." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1857, Reports on the State of Science, 131-153,, at 142.]


1856 Jan 7 / Not said an ascend met / visible from 10 to 15 minutes in various places, and in Wiltshire, 20 minutes / Intel Obs. 4/160 / 29+. [II; 1908. Ansted, David Thomas. "Falling Stars and Meteorites." Intellectual Observer, 4 (1864): 157-168, at 160.]


1856 Jan. 7 / Eng and France / Met train / BA 60-94. [II; 1909. Greg, 94.]


1856 Jan 7 / 5:05 p.m. / Met train / 1/4 hour / Havre / C.R. 41-61. Great deal on page 78, etc. More than 20 minutes. [II; 1910. "M. Lecadre adresse quelques renseignements sur un météore lumineux...." Comptes Rendus, 42 (1856): 61. Deslongchamps, Eudes. "Observation faite à Caen du météore lumineux du 7 janvier." Comptes Rendus, 42 (1856): 78-80.]


1856 Jan 8  (?) / 5 p.m. / Details, great meteor of Havre and Rouen / La Sci Pour Tous 1-44, 69 / train20 minutes. [II; 1911. "Météore Vu au Havre et à Rouen." La Science Pour Tous, 1 (no. 6; January 17, 1856): 44-45. "Météore du 7 Janvier." La Science Pour Tous, 1 (no. 9; February 7, 1856): 69.]


1856 Jan. 23 / Steamship Pacific left Liverpool for N.Y, / Disap. / O'Donnell, Strange Sea Mysteries, p. 20 / VXCE. [A; 340. (O'Donnell, Elliott. Strange Sea Mysteries. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1927, 20. "VXCE" is the call number of this book at the New York Public Library.)]


1856 Jan 30 / (+) / Switzerland / “Wohlen (Berne) and Mollis (Glaris)” / Caterpillars / Cosmos, N.S., 50/353 / (D-93). [II; 1912. The note copies information from page 93 of The Book of the Damned. “Les pluies de chenilles.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 50 (March 19, 1904): 353. Müller, Albert. "On the dispersal of non-migrating insects by atmospheric agencies." Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, 1871, 175-186, at 184. "Les Pluies de Chenilles." Ciel et Terre, 25 (1904-1905): 23-24. Heer, Oswald. “Schneefall mit Würmern.” Vierteljahrsschrift der Naturforschenden Gesellschaft in Zürich, 1 (1856): 85-87.]


1856 Feb 3 / 8:25 p.m. / Great det met / France / CR 42 / pages / det-p. 281. [II; 1913. "Autres Observations du bolide du 3 février." Comptes Rendus, 42 (1856): 281-282.]


1856 Feb. 3 / (det met) / 8:05 p.m. / Met / Paris / C.R. 42-237, 279. Loud detonation heard at Sommevoire / p. 281. [II; 1914. Dien. "Sur un bolide vu à l'Observatoire impérial de Paris dans la soirée du 3 février." Comptes Rendus, 42 (1856): 237-238. "Bolide du 3 février dernier." Comptes Rendus, 42 (1856): 279-281.]


1856 Feb. 3 / Eng / Belg / Switz / Germany / France / Great det met / BA 60-94. [II; 1915, Greg, 94-95. Lowe, 138.]


1856 Feb 3 / ab 8 p.m. / Meteor seen at Paris . La Sci Pour Tous 1-78. [II; 1916. "Météore Vu à Paris." La Science Pour Tous, 1 (no. 10; February 14, 1856): 78.]


1856 Feb 4 / q. / Switzerland / Valley of Visp. / BA '11 / (not connected). [II; 1917. A class I earthquake. Milne, 713.]


1856 Feb 9 / 2:30 p.m. / at Pau / Series of sharp detonations. Sky cloudless. / C.R. 42/356. BA '60. [II; 1918. "M. De La Jonquière donne quelques détails sur un phénomène atmosphérique...." Comptes Rendus, 41 (1855): 356. Greg, 94-95.]


1856 Feb. 16 / 4 p.m. / Met / violent dets. / BA 60-106. [II; 1919. Greg, 106.]


1856 Feb 16 / qCal. / BA '11 / meteor, Eng. [II; 1920. Greg, 106. Greg lists a meteor in Westphalia, (not in England). A class I earthquake. Milne, 713.]


1856 March / U Geminorum / fluctuation of light in periods of 6 to 15 seconds, by Pogsonsee Sep. 26, 1856. / J.B.A.A., 13-326. [II; 1921. "Astronomical Publications." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 13 (1902-1903): 324-330, at 326. Hagen, Johann Georg. "Discussion of a Questionable Type of  Temporary Stars." Astrophysical Journal, 17 (1903): 281-285, at 282. Baxendell, Joseph. "Notes on Pogson's observations of U Geminorum, T Scorpii, and R Librae." Astronomical Journal, 22 (1902): 127-128. The U Geminorum binary consists of a white dwarf in a close orbit around a red dwarf, with an orbital period of 4 hours and 11 minutes. The outbursts of the (white) dwarf nova can rapidly increase its apparent magnitude from 14.0 or 15.1 to 9.0. See: 1855 Dec 15, (II; 1893), for Hind's discovery of this variable. There is no note for September 26, 1856.]


1856 March 2 / Eruption Great Sangir, in the Moluccas / Timbs '57-271 / Another on 17th. [II; 1922. "Volcanic Eruption in the Moluccas." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1857, 271. The Awu volcano.]


1856 March 2 and 3 / Volc. Island of Great Sangir / (Aberdeen Journal, Aug 13) / Also hot springs opened up and cast out boiling water. / March 17a new eruption. Loss of life ab. 3000. [II; 1923. "Destructive Earthquake in the Moluccas." Aberdeen Journal, August 13, 1856, p. 3 c. 1. The Awu volcano.]


1856 March 2 / bet 7 and 8 p.m. / Began eruption of Sangir / La Sci Pour Tous, 1-279 / 3,000 perished. [II; 1924. "Terrible Éruption d'Un Volcan; 3000 Victimes." La Science Pour Tous, 1 (no. 35; August 7, 1856): 279. The Awu volcano.]


1856 March 17 / See March 2, 3. [II; 1925.]


1856 March 2 and 17 / Eruption of Great Sangir / 12.5 E / 4. N. / News of the World, Aug 3, 1856. [II; 1926. (News of the World, August 3, 1856; @ Historic-newspapers.co.uk.) "Destructive Earthquake in the Moluccas." London Morning Chronicle, July 31, 1856, p. 6 c. 5. "An eruption of the active volcano on the island of Great Sangir, in long. 125 50 E., and lat. 3 50 N., has occurred." The Awu volcano.]


1856 March 14 / "On March 14, at about 4 o'clock, P.M., a loud report was heard similar to the explosion of a powder-magazine," and concussion felt. / (Wiltshire) / Timbs '57-270. [II; 1927. "Earthquakes in 1856." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1857, 266-270, at 270.]


1856 April, etc. / Witchcraft / Staffs / LT, 1857, March 7-12-e / 24-10-f. [A; 341. "Witchcraft in the Nineteenth Century." London Times, March 7, 1857, p. 12 c. 5. "Spring Assizes." London Times, March 24, 1857, p. 10 c. 6.]


1856 Ap 2 / Op Mars / (Al). [II; 1928. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1856; 526 & 530-535.]


1856 Ap. 7 / India / Kangara / q / I / BA '11. [II; 1929. A class I earthquake. Milne, 713.]


1856 Ap. 8 / Colmar, Haute Rhine / "aerolitic meteor? Or April 6?" / BA 60-94. [II; 1930. Greg, 94.]


1856 May 19 / [LT], 10-b / Ext destruction of sheep. [A; 342. "Extraordinary Destruction of Sheep." London Times, May 19, 1856, p. 10 c. 2.]


1856 May 23 / Peculiar appearance of atmosphere at St. Martin / Proc Amer Assoc 1856/237. [II; 1931. Smallwood, Charles. "On the Peculiar Appearance of the Atmosphere on the 23d of May, 1856, at St. Martin's, Isle Jesus, Canada East...." Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 10 (1856): 237-240. "The peculiar appearance of the atmosphere at this place was caused no doubt by the interception of the solar rays by dense haze, consisting of smoke and vapor." The cloud of ashes and smoke apparently originated from a forest fire near Pembroke, Ontario, (then, Canada West).]


[1856 May 30 and 31. Wrong date. See: 1855 May 30 and 31, (II; 1932).]


1856 June 4 / During a storm, water of Lake Ontario suddenly went up 3 feet. / La Sci Pour Tous 1-232. [II; 1933. "Phénomène sur le Lac Ontario." La Science Pour Tous, 1 (no. 29; June 26, 1856): 232.]


1856 June 9 / Guilford Co, N. Car / large hailstonesstrong flavor of turpentine / A.J.S.-2-22-298. [II; 1934. "Hailstorm in Guilford County, N.C." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 22 (1856): 298. "One measured eight inches in circumference.... This hailstone was a perfect globe. Others measured as large in one direction, but they were flat.... The hail had a strong flavor of turpentine." See: 1871 / middle of April, (IV; 375).]


1856 June 25 / 2 a.m. / Shock at Adelaide, S. Aust / Bedford Times, Oct. 15, 1856. [II; 1935. (Bedford Times, October 15, 1856; not at BNA.) "The Earthquake." Adelaide Observer, June 28, 1856, p. 5 c. 8.]


1856 July 7 / morning / Cosmos 11/200 / Ac to M. [Victor] Legrip, two residents of Chambon, France, had, upon July 7, seen passing in front of the moon, a human figuredisappearedthen a pond surrounded by bushes and treesnot identified with any terrestrial scene. [II; 1936. "Le 7 juillet, vers neuf heures du soir...." Cosmos, 11 (August 21, 1857): 200-201.]


1856 July 8 / Miss. / evening / A.J. Sci 2/22/448. [II; 1937. Spillman, W. "The Meteor of July 8th." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 22 (1856): 448-449.]


1856 July 8 / train 20 min / Hancock, Ala. / 6 p.m. / remarkable meteor seen / A.J. Sci 2/23/287. [II; 1938. Peters, Thomas M. "On the Meteor of July, 1856." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 23 (1857): 287. "The position of this meteor from our point of observation, indicated that it must have fallen in the direction of Columbus, (Miss.); therefore it could not have been Prof. Harper's meteor, which was seen farther north, at Orford in that State, on the same day."]


1856 July 8 / The meteor / ab. 4 p.m. / A.J. Sci 2/23/138. [II; 1939. Davis, N.K. "On the Meteor of July 8th." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 23 (1857): 138.]


1856 July 8 / "Mass of lava" fell ten miles west of Aberdeen, Miss., ac to a newspaper. As large as a barrel / A.J. Sci 2/24/449. [II; 1940. "Supposed Meteorite." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 24 (1857): 449. "The paper, called the 'Sunny South.' of Aberdeen, Miss., of Sept. 17, 1857, describes a mass of lava as large as a barrel, 'which fell near the farm of Mr. John Fortson, ten miles west of Aberdeen, on the 8th of July, 1856....'"]


1856 July 8 / Pontotoc, Miss / Col R. Bollon writes met explosion and 3 met clouds of long duration which developed into an M with an enclosed N. / [illustration] / Amer Met Jour 4/521. [II; 1941. Bolton, R. "The Pontotoc Meteor." American Meteorological Journal, 4 (March 1888): 520-527. [II; 1941.]


1856 July 8 / Alabama / 4 p.m. / Meteor / Am J. Sci / 2/22/448 / 23/138, 287. [II; 1942. Greg, 94-95. Spillman, W. "The Meteor of July 8th." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 22 (1856): 448-449. Davis, N.K. "On the Meteor of July 8th." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 23 (1857): 138. Peters, Thomas M. "On the Meteor of July, 1856." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 23 (1857): 287. There were two, (if not three), meteors, on this date, with one reported at 4 P.M. and another at 6 P.M., (and another, in the "evening," which was observed in a different direction from the one observed at 6 P.M.).]


1856 July 11 / Caucasus / During day, sun a red ball "shorn of his rays". 5 p.m., a q. 300 houses destroyed. / Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, Sept 21-3-1. [II; 1943. "Earthquake in the Caucasus." Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, September 21, 1856, p. 3 c. 1.]


1856 July 11 / morning / Rumbling sound and violent shock / Schemeka (Caucasus). Timbs '57-270. [II; 1944. "Earthquakes in 1856." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1857, 266-270, at 270.]


1856 July 16 / Shock at Clermont-Ferrand soon followed by a hailstorm. / Cosmos 11-43. [II; 1945. "Académie des Sciences." Cosmos, 11 (1857): 40-48, at 43. Lecoq, Henri. "Tremblement de terre du 16 juin ressenti à Clermont Ferrand." Comptes Rendus, 45 (1857): 34-35.]


1856 July 23 / Whirl in Staffordshire, near Baslaston / Dublin Commercial Journal, Aug 9. [II; 1946. "A Whirlwind in Staffordshire." Dublin Commercial Journal, August 9, 1856, p. 1. c. 2-3.]


1856 July 23 / Caucasia / great q / [BA] '11. [II; 1947. A class III earthquake. Milne, 713.]


1856 July 25 / Great submarine eruption in the Straits of Onimah, in Lat 54 and Long 165. Not said N or S or E or W. / Timbs 57-272. [II; 1948. "A Submarine Volcano." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1857, 272. "A Submarine Volcano." Melbourne Argus, March 25, 1857, p. 6 c. 6. (San Francisco Herald, 1856-1857, sailed Nov 1856 on whaling voyage). The "Straits of Onnimah" would be between Akun Island and Unimak Island, in the Aleutians. The coordinates of 54° 36' N. latitude and 165° W. longitude are off the western end of Unimak Island, where the volcano Shishaldin was erupting. Captain C.H. Newell of the Alice Frasier, wrote: "... As the breeze built up into a dashing wind along came four other ships. When, just as they got fairly in with the north base of this mountain, gazing upon the grand ebullition above them, there followed a long low rumbling directly beneath them, and there sprang into instant existence, simultaneous with the sound, a vast terrific volcano among the very fleet. First, the waters boiled and rose tumultuously into chaotic waves, then sprang, as by an effort of some vast fountain, into a splendid column of rolling waters to a great height. This gradually dissipated. Then from earth to heaven, with a thundering sound which rocked the very welkin, there sprang a burst of smoke and flame, as if earth's whole internal fires were seeking a vent therefrom. Following this it commenced casting up lava and pumice-stone, from the size of a pebble to that of a boulder, covering all the vessels with lesser fragments of each, and keeping the ship's companies in the most intense anxiety, from fear of either being blown into the air or crushed beneath the sea. These grades of action continued only for a time, the eruption sinking almost as sudden as it came, when the waters rolled into the vacated chasm with the rush of a whirlwind, meeting in the centre from every direction, and whirling into a vortex only equalled by the maelstrom, uttering a voice little short of the British Niagara heard from Table Rock." The account was corroborated by the masters of the William Thompson, Scotland and Enterprise, three of the other five or six whaling ships, at the scene.]


1856 July 25 / Kilkenny Journal / Nothing. [II; 1949.]


1856 July 25 / Kilkenny. / b. rain "of a densely sable hue" / News of the World, Aug 10-3-2. See May, 1854? [II; 1950. (News of the World, August 10, 1856, p. 3 c. 2l @ Historic-newspapers.co.uk.) "Black Rain." London Standard, August 4, 1856, p. 2 c. 5. See: 1854 May 23, (II: 1620).]


1856 July 26 / Deluge and hail size of "ordinary eggs" at Liverpool / Newry Examiner, Aug 2. [II; 1951. "Terrific Shower." Newry Examiner and Louth Advertiser, August 2, 1856, p. 3 c. 5.]


1856 July 30 / 9:30 p.m. / Remarkable meteor / Paris / C.R. 43-487. [II; 1952. Greg, 94. Godard. "note sur le bolide du 30 juillet 1856." Comptes Rendus, 43 (1856): 487.]


1856 July 30/31/ Aug 1 / Obj? / N. and Q. 2-2-105, quoting the Limerick Observer / July 30at Corbally, at 10:30 p.m.seemed to be a fire rising on a mountain to the east, then a globe of fire with a tail seemed to be 18 inches long to a globe size of an orangewatched it one hournext night againrose a few minutes later and was high in the sky at 11. 3rd night, rose ab. 10:40seemed smaller but far exceeded size of Jupiter. Then it occurred to one of the witnesses might be comet of 1556 which the astronomers were expecting, which failed to appear. [II; 1953.1, 1953.2, 1953.3. "Ireland." London Times, August 5, 1856, p. 7 c. 2. "The Great Comet of 1556." Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 2 (August 9, 1856): 105. “The Great Comet of 1556.” Dublin Daily Express, August 4, 1856, p. 1 c. 6. (Limerick Observer, August 2, 1856; on microfilm).]


1856 Aug 1, about / Editor of Limerick Observer, Aug 7, writes that his own observations had convinced him that his friends had seen Jupiter. [II; 1954. (Limerick Observer, August 2, 1856).(Limerick Observer, August 7, 1856; microfilm @ BL.) "The Great Comet of 1556." Dublin Daily Express, August 4, 1856, p. 1 c. 6. "Re-Appearance of the Great Comet of 1556." Dublin Freeman's Journal, August 4, 1856, p. 3 c. 6. The object was observed by a watchman for over an hour, and Jupiter, which had risen above the eastern horizon, would disappear over the southern horizon about sunrise.]


1856 Aug / q in Honduras / Harpers Mag 14/164. [II; 1955. "Earthquake in Honduras." Harper's New Monthly Magazine, 14 (January, 1857): 164-173.]


1856 Aug 3 / See Oct. 12. / (Malta) / bet. 2:30 and 4 p.m. / N.M. / Times 19-7-b. For Zante, see Dec 29, '20 / Ap. 9, '22. [II; 1956. "Earthquake at Malta." London Times, August 19, 1856, p. 9 c. 2. For Zante, see: 1820 Dec 29, (I: 832, 833, 834, 835, and 837), and, 1822 Ap. 9, (II: 940 & 941). The 1822 notes are of detonating meteor at Rhodes, (not at Zante).]


1856 Aug 3 / Frgs / Aberdeen Journal, Aug. 13 / "The post-runner between Redearth and Kessock, when passing Artafelie, on Sunday last, was suddenly enveloped in what appeared to be a shower of frogs. They fell fast upon his hat and shoulders, and dozens of them found an easy resting place in his coat pockets. The air was quite darkened with them for about thirty yards by fourteen or fifteen yards, and the road was so densely covered with the dingy little creatures, that it was impossible to walk without treading on them. They were about the size of a bee, and were quite lively when they found themselves on the road." / Make ref. Inverness Courier of 8th. [II; 1957.1, 1957.2, 1957.3. "A Shower of Frogs." Inverness Courier, August 8, 1856, p. 5 c. 4. "A Shower of Frogs." Aberdeen Journal, August 13, 1856, p. 7 c. 3. Artafallie, (not Artafelie), Scotland.]


1856 Aug 9 / (Comet) / Account in Limerick Observer / On 3rd night not so large "but still far exceeded the most brilliant form in which the planet Jupiter has ever been beheld. [II; 1958, (Limerick Observer, August 7, 1856). See: 1856 July 30/31/ Aug 1, (II; 1953), and, 1856 Aug 1, about, (II; 1954).]


1856 Aug 5 / [LT], 7-a / 11-8-e / Sept 8-9-c / 12-6-f / Comet in Ireland. [II; 1959. "Ireland." London Times, August 5, 1856, p. 7 c. 2. "Ireland." London Times, August 11, 1856, p. 8 c. 6. Hind, John Russell. "The Comet of 1556." London Times, September 8, 1856, p. 9 c. 3. "Ireland." London Times, September 12, 1856, p. 6 c. 6.]


1856 Aug 5 / (not F) / Aerolite / See 1855. [II; 1960. Monck, William Henry Stanley. "AerolitesPerpetual Motion.” English Mechanic, 79 (no. 2045; June 3, 1904): 383-384. Fort did not find the meteorite that Monck said had fallen on August 5, 1856, in Fletcher's catalog' but, the Oviedo meteorite fell in Spain on this date. See: 1855 Aug 5, (II: 1864 to 1866). This is the Oviedo meteorite.]


1856 Aug 7 or 14th / [?]1st / Ac to the Sligo Journal, copied in Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper. Several persons saw an object supposed to be the expected comet (1556). "It had the appearance of a large oval with a flowing tail. The body was a brilliant red, and the other portions of a pale blue tinge. The head was inclined toward the southwest. [II; 1961.1, 1961.2. "Re-Appearance of the Great Comet of 1566." Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, August 17, 1856, p. 6 c. 4.]


1856 Aug 8-10 / Unusual meteors / Eng. * [II; 1962.]


1856 Aug 9 / Fire / Bedford Times, Aug. 16 / Owner of a vacant house in Glasgow visited it at noon and found the roof of the butler's pantry on fire. "Will it be believed that there had not been a light in the house for six weeks?" Said that only thing could be thought of was that mice had nibbled matches. [A; 343.1, 343.2. (Bedford Times, August 16, 1856; not @ BNA.)]


1856 Aug 9 / Bedford Mercury of / In the Glenesake Mountainsa large number of sheepat least 100had been killed by foxes in a few nights. [A; 344. "Epitome of News." Bedfordshire Mercury, August 9, 1856, p. 4 c. 1. "A large number of sheep, not much less than 100, were killed in a few nights in the Glenesake mountains, by foxes." The "Glenesake mountains" were probably the Blue Stack Mountains, next to Lough Eske, in Donegal, Ireland.]


1856 or 1857 / Crocodile / In the Gentleman's Magazine, Aug, 1866, George R. Wright, F.S.A., tells of a young crocodile which had been killed by some laborers, who had seen it run from a stack of wood, 1856 or 1857, at Over-Norton, Oxfordshireon a farm. Also see Field, 1861 or 1862. It was preserved by a naturalist and pronounced undoubtedly a crocodile. / November issue, C. Parr writes that 30 years before a person near Over-Norton had been pursued by a young crocodile, about a foot long, and had then killed it. Said that several years later another been seen there. / Aug 67., cor sends account of one 3 feet long killed in Staffordshire ab. 40 years before. / Field, Aug 9, 1862, writes he had examined the preserved specimena young crocodile ab. 14 inches long. The naturalist F. T. Buckland writes. / Aug 23, 1861a cor writes that in the woods near where croc killed another was still seen occasionally ac to credible persons. [A; 345.1 to 345.5. Wright, George R. "Notes on a Young Crocodile Found in a Farm-Yard at Over-Norton, Oxfordshire." Gentleman's Magazine, n.s. v. 2 (August, 1866): 149-154. "Discovery of a Young Crocodile." Gentleman's Magazine, n.s. v. 2 (October, 1866): 496-497. Parr, C. "Crocodiles in England." Gentleman's Magazine, n.s. v. 2 (November, 1866): 640. Belfrage, John Henry. "Crocodiles in England." Gentleman's Magazine, n.s. v. 3 (January, 1867): 90-91. Belfrage, John Henry. "Crocodiles in England." Gentleman's Magazine, n.s. v. 4 (August, 1867): 215-216. Wright, George R. "Curious Discovery of a Crocodile." Field, August 9, 1862, p. 138. Here, Wright gives the date at Over Norton as "1850 or 1851." Wright, George R. "Curious Discovery of a Crocodile." Field, August 23, 1862, p. 186. "Curious Discovery of a Crocodile." Field, August 30, 1862, p. 210.]


1856 Aug 10 / News of the World, 7-1 / Explosion at Dorking. Origin unknown but thought be from escape of gas. [A; 346. (News of the World, August 10, 1856, 7-1; @ Historic-newspapers.co.uk.) “Dreadful Explosion.” Norfolk News, August 9, 1856, p. 7 c. 1.]


1856 Aug / Bedford fires / Period fires / See Sept. Oct, 1880, Canada. [A; 347. See: 1880 Sept 18, (B; 332); 1880 Sept 23, (B; 329); 1880 Sept 24, (B: 330 & 331); 1880 / about last of Sept, (B; 333); 1880 Oct 6, (B; 337); 1880 Oct 12, (B: 338 & 339); and, 1880 [Oct 13], (B; 340).]


1856 Aug. 6 and 15 / Windover / Ac to The Bucks Advertiser of the 9th there was at Windover on Aug 2 a myst fire in the farm house occupied by Edwin Collins ab 11 p.m. There was no known cause for the fire and it was thought incendiary. / of the 23rd, told that Elizabeth Chapman was charged with setting fire to the property of Mr. Juson, a baker, upon the 6th and 15th. There was no evdience against her. Said that she was suspected because there had been such fires where she had lived beforeno details given. Said that no reason to think there had been the men that she said she saw: no marks in ground where she said she saw them. The magistrate said that the case was suspicious but that there was no evdience against the prisoner and discharged her. As to the fire near the oven Mr Juson learned that the fire began in the roof over the oven but that there had been no oven-fire for 30 hours. [A.348.1 to 348.5. (Buckingham Advertiser And Free Press, August 9 and 24, 1856; not at BNA.)]


1856 Aug / Have D. News for Aug. [A; 349.]


1856 Aug 11 / Mauna Loa / An. Reg. '56-16. [II; 1963. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 98 (1856): pt. 2, 1-204, at 16, cv. "The Volcano of Hawaii (Owyhee)."]


1856 Aug 12 / Series / See Aug 18-Sept 11, 1907. [A; 350.]


1856 Aug 12 / Probably not Moulton and Morton, too. Mistake in a newspaper. / McCann / God or Gorilla / [note cut off] on [note cut off]. [A; 351.]


1856 Aug 12 / Fire / Someone in Bedford, opened the door of an upper room in home of Mrs Moulton, of Bedford. "Volumes of smoke issued there from and directly after the bed furniture was in flames." This in the morning. Night before some one with a candle had been in the room and it was thought a spark from it had smouldered all night. / Bedford Times, Aug 16 / See other notes. [A; 352.1, 352.2. (Bedford Times, August 16, 1856; not @ BNA.)]


1856 Aug 12 / At the inquest somebody inquired as to electrical conditions at the time. Called an "inquest" because the coroner investigated. Seems that there had been considerable rain but nothing remarkable had been noted. [A; 353.]


1856 Aug 12 / Mortons house adjoining store yard of Howards foundry. / News of the World, Aug 24. [A; 354. (News of the World, August 24, 1856; not @ BNA; @ Historic-newspapers.co.uk.)]


1856 [Aug 12] / Moulton (see other notesit is said was a foreman in Messrs Howard's iron foundry and lived in Horne-lane. Morton was a traveller for same firm and lived in Horne-laneSaid he was in Ireland at the time. / Said that the Moulton fire was on morning on 13th. / At Mortons the sulphur fireafternoon of 12th. The first bed fire 1 1/2 hours lateralso contents of a chest. On morning of 13theight o'clocksome "dirty linen" in a closet upstairs. Meantime Mr Howard had communicated with Mr Morton, who returned on 16th. Had been no further fires. Mr. M., night of 16th, took off stockings and other clothes, which were damp, and threw them on the floor. On the morning of 17th they were found burning. Then a succession of ab. 40 fires. In rooms, in closets, in drawers of bureaus. Neighbors and police came inbegan to fear for their own safety. Not only objects all around but their own handkerchiefs flamed. / As to the fire in cellar of James Howard, in High StreetGeorge Garratt testified that the fire occurred ab. time Mr. M. returned from IrelandHe said that the candle fell from the candlestick which he was carrying into some turpentine, which he had not seen on the floor. The flame ran along this, but it [word missing] toward the cask of turpentine from which he had supposed it had leaked, the cask itself did not burn though the fire in the cellar was serious. When earlier in day he had been to the cellar he had seen ni turpentine on the floor. / The brimstone was in a small earthenware jar placed in a bassinette of wickerwork. Said that the burning bromstone had flowed over into bas. and the floorburning bas. and floor. / Things in the yard that took fire there and not in the house were placed next to things that had burned in the house. Property of the Mortons not insured. The house was insured. (ver.) / Ann Fennimore as to matche testified had ignited the brimstone with the third match, having failed with two. Ab 1 1/2 ounces of brimstone been used. / Had been used in no other room of the house. / At the inquiry Mr Howard protested against the fire in his cellar being investigated, saying that it had been an ordinary fire with nothing of the mysterious to it, and not relating in any way to the fires in Mortin's house. However, according to the Coroner, a relation existed at least in the rumors that it was the purpose of the inquiry to quiet. / Considering this attitude of Howard's, it may be that Garratt told details accordingly. The one mysterious circ that I think of is a leak in the cask of turpentinefire running along itno fire in the cask. It was a good-sized fire. [A; 355.1 to 355.14.]


1856 Aug. 12 / Other data in Bedford Mercury, Aug. 23 / 3 children in the house. / There was a peculiar odor by which could know there was a firebut described by another as only "the smell of fire". The Moulton fire not mentioned in Bedford Mercury. [A; 356. "The Fires in Horne-lane." Bedfordshire Mercury, August 23, 1856, p. 3 c. 1-4.]


1856 Aug 12 / No Bedford Directory in B.M. / for Moulton. [A; 357.]


1856 Aug 12 / Called "inquest / The coroner only one who investigated. [A; 358.]


1856 Aug. 12 / Bedford Times of 23rdThe first myst fire (see Sept. 29) was in a straw mattress soon after the sulphur fire put outafter that a new fore every 5 minutes ac to testimony before the coroner at Bedford. / one fire on 13th / then three days and no fire / mostly in closets and chests, but on 17th carpet afire / brimstone burnt on 12th / Testimony of Mrs Morton and Ann Fennimore, servant. / Neither house nor furniture insured. First fire on 17th like the other Bedford case (also 12th) / upon entered a room finding bed on fire. Morton was away from home till 16th. Mrs Morton was home. The verdict of the Jury was that the first fire was accidental, but that as to cause of other fires not enough evidence to show. / It is said that in the cellar of the house of Morton's employer, James Howard, on another street, there had night of the 16th been a fire, and this outbreak as well as public curiosity and gossip, had brought on the inquiry, but seems clear this fire was accidental. George Garratt, a servant, had gone with a candle to a cellar, and the candle had fallen onto turpentine spilled on the floor. [A; 359.1 to 359.6. (Bedford Times, August 23, 1856; not @ BNA.) See: 1856 Sept 29, (A; 376).]


1856 (Aug 12) / A witness testified that in investigating generally he had picked up a pillow and had examined it. Then he was called upstairs to another fire. He says that it was extraordinary but while he was upon this upper floor, the pillow that he had picked up burst into flames. / Point against brimstone permeation in the houseThings that been burned and other things put out in the yardhere some of the other things burst into flames. [A; 360.1, 360.2.]


1856 Aug 12 / Seems have to accept that the first fire so soon followed by the beginning of the series did have relationThat something that wanted fires saw an opportunity to have a series associated with the accidental. / But seems that a spirit-pyromaniac had first of all tipped over the brimstone. [A; 361.]


1856 Aug. 12 / Like a spirit thing vengeful against both Morton and his employer. / As if in first case confounding Morton and Moulton. Here enters suggestion of a thing that could put bits of candle about like Hampstead, 1921, or San Fran, 1892also Leamington, Feb., 1921. [A; 361.1, 361.2.]


1856 Aug 16 / night / Rouen / Immense cloud of small white moths burst over the town. In morning covered the ground, almost all dead. / Inverness Courier, 21st. [II; 1964. "A Shower of Moths." Inverness Courier, August 21, 1856, p. 7 c. 3.]


1856 Aug 16 / at Rouen / "An immense cloud of small white moths burst over the town and completely covered everything in a few seconds." / Bedford Mercury, Aug 23 / This at nightin morning found on the ground almost all dead. / (Suffolk Chronicle, (Aug. 16) / Almost all fell only upon one sid[e] of the river. [II; 1965.1, 1965.2. "Miscellaneous." Suffolk Chronicle, August 16, 1856, p. 2 c. 6-7. "A singular phenomenon presented itself on Saturday night at Rouen. An immense cloud of small white moths burst over the town, and completely covered the ground in a few seconds. What is singular is that they fell almost exclusively on the left bank of the river. In the morning they lay on the ground in myriads, and almost all dead." "Epitome of News." Bedfordshire Mercury, August 23, 1856, p. 4 c. 1.]


1856 Aug 17 / Suffolk Chronicle, 23rd / Early morn. at Ramsey, Essex. Stroke of lightning and cartful of wheat sheaves in a field burn. Not said if rainbut said fire not easily put out because water not available. [A; 363. (Suffolk Chronicle, August 23, 1856; not found here.)]


1856 Aug 17 / Messina / Terrific hailstorm from the N-W. some of them weighed 2 rostoli eachor size of oranges. / Times, Aug 25 / I get from Trans Bombay Geog Soc 13/15. [II; 1966. (London Times, August 25, 1856.) "Malta.Terrific Hailstorm at Messina."" Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 13 (1856-1857): Appendix C, 15. A Sicilian rotolo weighed about 800 grams.]


1856 Aug 17 / Great q. / China / had been  minor q's several days before / Timbs '57-266. [II; 1967. "Earthquakes in 1856." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1857, 266-270, at 266.]


1856 Aug 17 / Great q. / China / Details / La Sci Pour Tous 2-7. [II; 1968. "Tremblements de Terre en Chine; Destruction d'Une Ville." La Science Pour Tous, 2 (no. 1; December 11, 1856): 7-8.]


1856 Aug 12 / "Times" / [typescript]:


In the Lond[on] Times, August 21, 1856, there is an account of a series of occurrences that, the writer thinks, would not be out of place in one of Mrs. Radcliffe's novels, but seeming strange in the matter-of-fact columns of the Times, because it was as if old theories of spontaneous combustion and demoniac possession would come back.


A house in Bedfordowner awayservant in chargeand, upon August 12th, to get rid of vermin, she had fumigated the house with sulphur. The sulphur had set a floor afire. It is said that this fire was soon put out. Five days later, the occupant of the house, named Howard, returned. In his room, he took off his stockings, which were damp, and threw them on the floor. They burst into flames. The next day, in the presence of different witnesses, in different parts of the house, no less than thirty fires broke out. The matter was taken to the Magistrate's Court. Here, one witness testified that he had found damp towels, in his bedroom, on fire, and a woman testified that she opened a box of clothing, finding them burning. By the morning of the 18th, "the greater part of the property in the house had been hope of connecting the burning of sulphhur, of five days before, with these combustions, but that this idea had to be abdandoned, though two physicians had given their opinion that inflammable sulphurous fumes had permeated all things in the house. A discussion of this possibility by one of the physicians, and by disagreeing chemists appears in later issues of the Times. Usually, as to human reasoning, my own and that of everybody else, I take a view that may be a little gloomy, but I outline this discussion in the Times, with the idea of giving a more joyous sidelight upon logical processes, as they are, always correlating to something taken for a dominant, and not as they are ideally supposed to be:


That oxides of sulphur are not inflammable, but that a combination of sulphur and phosphorus isthe phosphorous might have been derived from the matches used to set the sulphur afirebut that would have been an oxide of phosphorusnevertheless the aforesaid combination is inflammablebut to permeate a whole house, many matches must have been used—but the testimony in court was that only a few had been used—but many matches must have been used—but combination of sulphur and phosphorous is of a very disagreeable odor—but no odor had been noticed in this house—but that the sulphur did it anyway—but, for fumigating purposes, sulphur has been burned in millions of homes, never followed by such phenomena—but the sulphur did it.


[A; 364. A typescript note. "Spontaneous Combustion in the Town of Bedford." London Times, August 21, 1856, p. 9 c. 2.]


1856 Aug 21 / Letter dated [Aug 21] from Arequipa, Perufor several hours each night for several weeks a comet. / Bicester Advertiser, Nov. 1, 1856. [II; 1969. (Bicester Advertiser, November 1, 1856; not @ BNA.) "The Comet." London Standard, October 8, 1856 p. 2 c. 5.]


1856 Aug 21 / Violent shocks / Algeria / Inverness Courier, Sept 4. Several villages destroyed. [II; 1970. "Earthquake in Algeria." Inverness Courier, September 4, 1856, p. 3 c. 1.]


1856 Aug 22 / Q destroyed town of Djidjelly, Algeria. / Cosmos-20-1. [II; 1971."Tremblement de terre en Algérie." Cosmos, 20 (January 3, 1862): 1.]


1856 Aug 22 and Oct 2 / Philippeville, Algeria / C.R. 43/589. 764, 5 / 44/586 / 46/515, 589. [II; 1972. Claubry, Gaultier de. "Sur les effets du tremblement de terre des 21 et 22 août dans certaines parties de l'Algérie." Comptes Rendus, 43 (1856): 589-590. "M. Gaultier De Claubry, qui avait précédemment communiqué...." Comptes Rendus, 43 (1856): 764-765. Sénarmont, Henri Hureau de. "Analyse des documents recueillis sur les tremblements de terre ressentis en Algérie du 21 août au 15 octobre 1856." Comptes Rendus, 44 (1857): 586-594. "Tremblements de terre en Algérie (février et mars 1858)." Comptes Rendus, 46 (1858): 515. "Tremblements de terre du 9 mars dans plusiers points du département d'Alger." Comptes Rendus, 46 (1858): 589-590.]


1856 Aug 24 / News of the World of, 4-6 / Incendiarism in Spain described as "insane mischief". In Andalusiaat Buendia, Andujar, Cordova, Lucena, Seville, and Jaen. [A; 365. (News of the World, August 24, 1856, 4-6; @ Historic-newspapers.co.uk.)]


1856 Aug 24 / Lloyds Weekly Newspaper of, 2-3 / Much excitement at Wendover, Bucks. 3 fires of unknown origin. Two of them upon premises of a Mr. Juson. A woman named Chapman, who lived next door, who had given the alarm in both cases, saying she had seen a strange man leave, was arrested upon suspicion. [A; 366.1, 366.2. "Buckinghamshire.Incendiarism and Suicide." Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, August  24, 1856, p. 2 c. 3-4.]


1856 Aug 25 / St. Ives / Met listed by Lowe as "Curious". / Rec Sci 1/137. [II; 1973. Greg, 94. Lowe, 134, 138, (Figure 22).]


1856 Aug. 31 / Met listed by Lowe as "Curious". / Rec. Sci 1/138 / Highfield House / by Lowe. [II; 1974. Greg, 94. Lowe, 138.]


1856 Sept 1 / Ormesby St Margaret / In th. storm, a fall of a column of water. / N.Q. 2-2-328. [II; 1975. Taylor, E.S. "Waterspouts on Land." Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 2 (October 25, 1856): 328-329.]


1856 Sept 6 / All day and night, fires in London. [A; 367.]


1856 Sept. 7 / Essex Herald, Sept. 16 / Account of a fire at Castle Hedinghamreminds us of explanation of the Moulton fireof unknown origin, but thought that all night a smouldering from a spark from a candleor if not that spon comb of a box of matches. [A; 368. “Fire at Castle Hedingham.” Essex Herald, September 16, 1856, p. 6 c. 2. "Castle Hedingham.Fire." Suffolk and Essex Free Press, September 11, 1856, p. 4 c. 3.]


1856 Sept 7 / Icicles / Lloyds Weekly Newspaper of, 2-2 (quoting the Newry Examiner) / that at Crossmaglen, Armagh, Ireland, been a great fall of hail, which consisted "strange to say, [consisted] of icicles and sharp flakes of ice". [II; 1976. "Destructive Hailstorm." Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, September 7, 1856, p. 2 c. 2. "Melancholy Destruction of Property." Newry Examiner and Louth Advertiser, August 30, 1856, p. 2 c. 3. "The ice lay unmelted on the fields for two or three days, and this in the midst of tropical summer weather!"]


1856 Sept 7 / Ice / Can't find in Newry Examiner nor Belfast paper. [II; 1977. "Melancholy Destruction of Property." Newry Examiner and Louth Advertiser, August 30, 1856, p. 2 c. 3.]


1856 Sept. 10 / Date of the Manningtree fires / Essex Herald, 16th / near Colchester. [A; 369. (Essex Herald, September 16, 1856; not at BNA). "Mysterious Fires." Essex Standard, September 17, 1856. p. 2 c. 6. The fires occurred on September 9 and 10, 1856.]


1856 Sept. 13 / Bedford Mercury of / "There is now a very fine spot [up]on the sun." [II; 1978. "Epitome of News." Bedfordshire Mercury, September 13, 1856, p. 4 c. 1.]


1856 Sept 16 / [LT], 10-a / 18-9-e / 20-8-f / Spon Comb / at BedfordAug 21-9-b. [A; 370. "Spontaneous Combustion in the Town of Bedford." London Times, August 21, 1856, p. 9 c. 2. "The Late Fires in Bedford." London Times, August 23, 1856, p. 7 c. 5-6. Barker, T. Herbert. "The Mysterious Fires in Bedford." London Times, September 16, 1856, p. 10 c. 1. "Spontaneous Combustion." London Times, September 20, 1856, p. 8 c. 6. (London Times, September 18, 1856, p. 9 c. 5.)]


1856 Sept 17 / (+) / Fires / Suffolk Chronicle 20-4-4 / Bet 7 and 8 o'clock night of (17th)see noteat home of Rev. B. Frankland, Wesleyan minister at Manningtree, a fire broke out in the library. "What makes it appear more mysterious is that a fire broke out in the front parlor of the house, underneath the library, on the previous afternoon, during Mr. and Mrs. F's absence, when it was discovered by a dressmaker working in another room. The damage was confined to a few articles of furniture and some skirting boards near the fireplace. There were no fires in the grates in either room and yet the flames broke out near the fireplaces in the skirting." Seemingly no knowledge of the Bedford fires. Said that the police were investigating but that no clue had been found to the mystery. / Manningtree, Essex. [A; 371.1 to 371.5. (Suffolk Chronicle, September 20, 1856, p. 4 c. 4.; not found here.) “Mysterious Fires.” Essex Standard, September 17, 1856, p. 2 c. 6. The fires occurred on September 9 and 10, 1856.]


1856 Sept 17 / Metite / Italy? / BA 60-94. [II; 1979. Greg, 94-95.]


1856 Sept 17 / 10:30 a.m. / Civita-Vecchia / great det met with train of fire / Cosmos 9/421. [II; 1980. "Nouvelles et Faits Divers." Cosmos, 9 (October 24, 1856): 421-428, at 421.]


1856 Sept 20 / "Comet" / Luton Times of, quotes Cork Examiner / that "Saturday night13th or 6th? ) a luminous object larger than the moon was seen. At 10:30 p.m. it appeared in the W.S.W. Sank rapidly below horizon at 11 p.m. [II; 1981. "The Comet." Luton Times and Advertiser, September 20, 1856, p. 3 c. 2. (Cork Examiner, September, 1856; not at BNA.)]


1856 Sept 24 / Fires / News of the World 28-4-5 / Ab. 1 a.m. 4 ricks of hay on Boxted farm, ab. a mile from Boxmoor, Herts, on fire. Ac to a policeman on duty on the railroad line, all burst into flames simultaneously. Ab same time on another farm a rick on fire. Consequently attrib to incendiarism. [A; 372.1, 372.2. (News of the World, September 28, 1856, p. 4-5; @ Historic-newspapers.co.uk.)]


1856 Sept 28 / early morn. / Fire in the stacksyard at Ramsey of unknown origin. / Bedford Mercury, Oct. 4 / Ramsey, Hunts. [A; 373. "Ramsey." Bedfordshire Mercury, October 4, 1856, p. 3 c. 4.]


1856 Sept 28 / bet 11 and 12 p.m. / At Barrow large stack, 45 yards long, on fire of unknown origin. / Suffolk Chronicle, Oct. 4 / Early in morning of 12th of Oct. fire in a barn on same farm. / S. Chronicle, Oct 18. [A; 374. "Fire at Barrow." Suffolk Chronicle, October 4, 1856, p. 4 c. 3. "Incendiary Fire." Suffolk Chronicle, October 18, 1856, Supplement, p. 1 c. 1.]


1856 Sept. 29 / The Bicester fires / Bicester Advertiser, Oct 18A committee formed to investigateand £500. reward offeredand the Govt. offered pardon to any informing accomplice not an actual incendiary. [A; 375. “£500 Reward.” Bicester Advertiser, October 18, 1856, p. 1 c. 4.]


1856 Sept 29 / Bedford Times, Oct 11, quoting the Banbury Guardian / That upon a preceding Monday night at Bicester a fire on a farm. Next night fire upon another farm early in evening. 10 p.m., fire on another farm. About same time barn on another farmvery soon afterward on another farm. All these farms ab 1/2 mile apart. A few minutes later another fire upon a farm 1 1/2 miles away. Nothing found out; thought vengefulness of farm laborers against introduction of threshing machines. / Bicester ab 35 miles SW of Bedford. [A; 376.1 to 376.3. " (Banbury Guardian, 1856; not at BNA.) (Bedfordshire Times, October 11, 1856; not at BNA.)]


1856 Sept 30 / (Cut) / Penang, India / flash of lightning from clear sky / Trans Bombay Geog. Soc. 13/155. Struck top of a cocoanut tree, where loose fibrous matter burned for 3 hours. [II; 1982. "Globular Lightning, Fireballs of the glow discharge of Electricity contradistinguished from the Meteorolytes or Fireballs usually composed of solid matter." Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 13 (1856-1857): 148-155, at 154-155, cv. "Penang." No mention is made, here, of a "clear sky."]


1856 / qs of Nice / from Oct, '56, to Sept, '57 / CR 45-446. [II; 1983. Prost. "Vibrations du sol observées à Nice du milieu d'octobre 1856 au milieu de septembre 1857." Comptes Rendus, 45 (1857): 446-447.]


1856 Oct. 5 / Bohemia / det met / BA 60-106. [II; 1984. Greg, 106.]


1856 Oct. 12 / q. / Malta / Sea receded two feet and a half. / An. Reg, '56-167 / Felt in Italy and Greece. [II; 1985. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 98 (1856): pt. 2, 1-204, at 167-168, cv. "Earthquake in the Mediterranean."]


1856 Oct 12 / qsmetvolc. / Times, 28(See Nov 9.) / That Etna, which had been quiet 2 months, emitted smoke after the q. / 31 / 50 houses thrown down in Rhodes / Island of Candia, houses shaken down and many persons killed or injured5 or 6 killed. Times, 31 / that th storms, winds, heavy rains, and waterspouts occurring at Malta were unexampled in records of the Island. [II; 1986.1, 1986.2. "The Recent Earthquake in the Mediterranean." London Times, October 28, 1856, p. 8 c. 6. "The Recent Earthquake in the Mediterranean." London Times, October 31, 1856, p. 7 c. 2. See: (Nov 9).]


1856 Oct / Vesuvius active, especially Oct 11-12, 23-27 / Inverness Courier, Nov 27. [II; 1987. "Vesuvius." Inverness Courier, November 27, 1856, p. 7 c. 3.]


1856 Oct. 12 / L.T. 18-6-f / at Sorrento / Before it a "peculiarly dense and ill-smelling fog had obscured the Bay". [II; 1989. "Earthquake at Sorrento." London Times, October 18, 1856, p. 6 c. 6.]


1856 Oct 12 / ab 2. a.m. / Maltasound like thunder. "Sentries report a great red glare in the heavens to have preceded the outbreak." / L. Times 21-8-c. / Times, Nov 12500 corpses dug out of the ruins at Candia. [II; 1990. "Earthquake at Malta." London Times, October 21, 1856, p. 8 c. 3. "The Late Earthquake in the Mediterranean." London Times, November 12, 1856, p. 5 c. 6.]


1856 Oct 12 / q. / Crete / 6000 houses destroyed / L.T., Jan 7-10-e, 1857 / 1856. [II; 1991. Ongley, H.S. "The Earthquake in Crete." London Times, January 7, 1857, p. 10 c. 5.]


1856 Oct 12 / Times, Dec.1 / that since Oct 12, many slight shocks been felt in Malta. [II; 1992. "The Late Earthquake in the Mediterranean." London Times, December 1, 1856, p. 10 c. 3.]


1856 Oct 12 / Rhodes / q / 3 a.m. / Timbs 57-270 / at Palermo, ab 2 a.m., Oct 11. [II; 1993. "Earthquakes in 1856." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1857, 266-270, at 270.]


1856 Oct 12 / q and rain / ab 1:50 a.m. / Malta, and afterward deluged with rain / said that between Oct [17] and Nov 16, 21 inches fell / Timbs 57-270. [II; 1994. "Earthquakes in 1856." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1857, 266-270, at 270.]


1856 Oct 12 / q and fog / Q felt at Sorrento, Italy, ab. 2 a.m. Before the q there had been a "peculiarly dense and ill-smelling fog". / L.T., Oct 18. [II; 1995. "Earthquake at Sorrento." London Times, October 18, 1856, p. 6 c. 6.]


1856 Oct 12 / 3 a.m. / Shocks / Alexandria, Egypt / Morn Post 30-5-1 / also Cairo. [II; 1996. "Sunday, the 12th, at three in the morning...." London Morning Post, October 30, 1856, p. 5 c. 1.]


1856 Oct 12 / See Vesuvius this period. [II; 1997.]


1856 Oct 12 / See Rhodes, March '63. [II; 1998. See: 1863, (III; 378).]


1856 Oct 13 / See Nov. 15, 1872. / Eclipse sun and moon / both above horizon? / See Dec. 5, 1881. [II; 1999. Partial lunar eclipses occurred on October 13, 1856, November 15, 1872, and, December 5, 1881. See: 1872 Nov. 15, (IV; 1024.), and, 1881 Dec 5, (V; 766).]


1856 Oct 13 / Mauna Loa still in full blasthad been in eruption 63 days. / An Reg '56-16. [II; 2000. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 98 (1856): pt. 2, 1-204, at 16, cv. "The Volcano of Hawaii (Owyhee)."]


1856 Oct 27 / St Ives / met listed by Lowe as "Curious" / Rec. Sci., 1/138. [II; 2001. Greg, 94. Lowe, 138.]


1856 Oct 28 / Missile through a train window near Woking. / M. Post 29-5-2. [A; 377. "A Shot Fired at a Railway Train." London Morning Post, October 29, 1856, p. 5 c. 2.]


1856 Oct 29 / Laybach / met train / 30 mins. / BA 60-17. [II; 2002. Greg, 94. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1859-60." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1860, 1-27, at 17.]


1856 Oct / Incend. / See LT / Nov. 15-10-e / 22-11-f / 24-5-e / 18-10-a / 20-7-f / 28-8-a. [A; 378. (London Times, November 20, 1856, p. 7 c. 6.) "Incendiarism near Nottingham." London Times, November 15, 1856, p. 10 c. 5. "Incendiary Fire near Doncaster." London Times, November 18, 1856, p. 10 c. 1. "More Incendiarianism near Nottingham." London Times, November 19, 1856, p. 12 c. 4. "More Incendiarianism near Nottingham." London Times, November 22, 1856, p. 9 c. 5. "More Incendiary Fires near Nottingham." London Times, November 24, 1856, p.5 c. 5. "The Late Incendiary Fire at Hatfield, near Doncaster." London Times, November 28, 1856, p. 8 c. 1.]


1856 Nov. / Witchcraft / parish of Hockham / LT, 1857, Ap. 7-10-b. [A; 379. "Witchcraft in the Present Day." London Times, April 7, 1857, p. 10 c. 2-3.]


1856 Nov 6 / Times, Nov 19 / said that the heavy rain for 30 days after the q had, on Nov 9, ended up with so heavy a fall of hail that cartloads and boatloads were collected and sold to an ice contractor. [II;

1988. "Hailstorm at Malta." London Times, November 19, 1856, p. 10 c. 5.]


1856 Nov. 8 / [LT], 7-c / 11-9-e / Dec 31-7-c / Jupiter. [II; 2003. "The Planet Jupiter." London Times, November 8, 1856, p. 7 c. 3. "Occultation of Jupiter by the Moon." London Times, November 11, 1856, p. 9 c. 5. "The Planet Jupiter." London Times, December 31, 1856, p. 7 c. 3.]


1856 Nov. 11 / [LT], 12-e / Myst drowning of 3 men. [A; 380. "Mysterious Case of Drowning." London Times, November 12, 1856, p. 12 c. 5.]


1856 Nov 12 / (It) / Piedmont / (F) / Trenzano, Brescia / Metite / B.A., 60 / See 1883. [II; 2004. Fletcher, 102. This is the Trezano meteorite. Greg, 94.]


1856 Nov. 21-22 / Night / 2nd fire within a week, farm of Mr. Baker near Nottingham / LT 24-5-e. [A; 382. "More Incendiary Fires near Nottingham." London Times, November 24, 1856, p. 5 c. 5.]


1856 Nov. 22 / [LT], 12-f / Remarkable Fantasy. [A; 381. "A Remarkable Case of Fantasy." London Times, November 22, 1856, p. 12 c. 6.]


1856 Nov. 22 / [LT], 12-f / Fantasy. [A; 383. "A Remarkable Case of Fantasy." London Times, November 22, 1856, p. 12 c. 6.]


1856 Dec 8 / [LT], 11-d / Myst. disap. of property in Derry. [A; 384. "Mysterious Disappearance of Property." London Times, December 8, 1856, p. 11 c. 4.]


1856 Dec 12 / ab. noon / Quito, Ecuador / ashes thickly falling to 7 p.m.attrib to Cotopaxi, and then to another far distant volc / A. J. Sci 2/23/276. [II; 2005. Jones, George. "On a Shower of Ashes over the plains of Quito." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 23 (1857): 276-277. "It is now pretty well ascertained that the ashes were not from Cotopaxi, but from a volcano called Laraurco, in a wild country to the eastward of this, a considerable distance." "Still doubts about the origin of the ashes; more probably they are from Cotopaxi." Cotopaxi was erupting from October to December, 1856; but, the "Laraurco" volcano may be the Reventador volcano, which erupted on December 12 to 13, 1856, as well as in 1844. "There was a similar shower of ashes from that volcano in 1844, about as heavy as this, but on that occasion the air was more obscured than at this tie, so much so that people had to use lanterns along the streets in Quito, at midday."]


1856 Dec. 13 / MetHighfield Houseby Lowe / listed by him as "Curious". / Rec Sci. 1/138. [II; 2006. Greg, 94. Lowe, 138.]


1856 Dec 14, 27 / 1857 May 18, June 6, Aug 15, Oct 7 / Mets / Olmütz / BA '69-282. [II; 2007. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 282.]


1856 Dec 15 / [LT], 10-a / Flood ext. in York. [II; 2008. "Extraordinary Flood." London Times, December 15, 1856, p. 10 c. 1.]


1856 Dec. 25 / q / India / Bombay / I / BA '11. [II; 2009. A class I earthquake. Milne, 713.]


1856 Dec. 26 / Ext hail / Mem Soc Sci Cherbourg 4-337. Cosmos 8-58. [II; 2010. "Observation d'une chute de grêle remarquable." Mémoires de la Société impériale des sciences naturelles de Cherbourg, 4 (1856): 337-339. "Nouvelles et Faits Divers." Cosmos,  8 (January 18, 1856): 57-58, at 58.]


1856 Dec 30 / qcold (one degree above zero) and snow for several hours / City of Mexico / An Reg, 1857-23. [II; 2011. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 99 (1857): pt. 2, 1-262, at 23, cv. "Earthquake in Mexico."]


1856 Dec 30 / 4 a.m. / near equator and 20 or 22 degrees W. Longitude / La Sci Pour Tous, 2-143 / Vessel felt concussions and metallic sounds. In fine weather. [II; 2012. "Volcan Sous-Marin Existant Prés de l'Equateur et Vers le 20e ou 22e Degré de Longitude Occidentale." La Science Pour Tous, 2 (no. 18; April 9, 1857): 143.]


1857:


1857 / Sleeper, Susan C. Godsey, near Hickman, Kt. / See July 14, 1869. [A; 385. See: 1869 July 14, (A; 547).]


1857 / about / Sun / "minimum" time. [II; 2015.]


1857 / Mrs Stephens Monthly, in 1857 / an account of Barisal Guns of Seneca Lake. [II; 2016. Cooper, James Fenimore. "The Lake Sun." Mrs. Stephens' Illustrated New Monthly, 3 (November 1857): 207-211. James Fenimore Cooper provided an earlier account of the detonating sounds at Seneca Lake, New York, in this short story, in 1851. "The 'Lake Gun' is a mystery. It is a sound resembling the explosion of a heavy piece of artillery, that can be accounted for by none of the known laws of nature. The report is deep, hollow, distant, and imposing. The lake seems to be speaking to the surrounding hills, which send back the echoes of its voice in accurate reply. No satisfactory theory has ever been broached to explain these noises. Conjectures have been hazarded about chasms, and the escape of compressed air by the sudden admission of water; but all this is talking at random, and has probably no foundation in truth. The most that can be said is, that such sounds are heard, though at long intervals, and that no one as yet has succeeded in ascertaining their cause."]


1857, early in / Bewitched farm near Rugeley / An. Reg 1857/50. [A; 387. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 99 (1857): pt. 2, 1-262, at 49-50, cv. "Witchcraft in the Nineteenth Century."]


1857 Jan / Meteoric dust / Syria and Egypt / ac to Ehrenberg / Le Courier des Sciences, N.S., 1/63. [II; 2017. (Le Courier des Sciences, N.S., 1/63; not found by this title.) Ehrenberg, Christian Gottfried. "Hr. Ehrenberg las und sprach über zwei Staub-Meteore aus Wesphalen und Syrien sammt deren Vergleichung mit dem Passatstaub und mit 2 neuen centralafrikanischen Oberflächen-Erden." Monatsberichte der Königlich-Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin, 1860, 137-157, at 148-151.]


1857 Jan 2 / Occult of Jupiter by Moon. [II; 2013. Occultation of Jupiter by the Moon. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1857, 503.]


1857 Jan 2 / Met of / [LT], Jan 6-12-d. [II; 2014. Haviland, Alfred. "The Meteor of January 2." London Times, January 2, 1857, p. 12 c. 4. "Its form was that of an immense torch projected with great force; and previously to its disappearance it seemed to explode and send forth splendidly coloured cruscations, reminding both myself and groom of a highly successful Roman cansle. The head of the meteor appeared relatively to be about the size of the moon, which at the time was surrounded by a very complete halo."]


1857 Jan 2 / 6:30 p.m. / Meteor size Moon at time of occultation of Jupiter / L.T. 6-12-d. The occult had just taken place. / at Bridgewater. [II; 2018. Haviland, Alfred. "The Meteor of January 2." London Times, January 2, 1857, p. 12 c. 4. "The occultation of Jupiter by the moon had just taken place, and the fact of this planet having been obseved at one time to be near the upper limb of our satellite, and then beneath the lower part of her disc at a later period of the evening, gave rise, associated, as it was, with the meteor and the splendid halo, to many a superstitious dread in the minds of the peasantry who witnesssed the phenomena."]


1857 Jan 9 / bet 8 and 9 a.m. / shock / Cal. / A. J. Sci 2/25/146. [II; 2019. Trask, John B. "On the Direction and Velocity of the Earthquake in California of January 9, 1857." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 25 (1858): 146-147.]


[1857 Jan 17. Wrong date. See: 1857 June 17, (II; 2020).]


1857 Jan 21 / [LT], 10-a / Explosion / powder magazine / Time of q. [A; 386. "Foreign Intelligence." London Times, January 21, 1857, p. 10 c. 1-2. At Naples, but, no mention of a quake. None on this date in Milne's catalog.]


1857 Jan 25 / 3:20 p.m. / Beeston / slight shock and rumbling sound / L.T. 28-4-d. [II; 2021. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "Earthquake." London Times, January 18, 1857, p. 4 c. 4.]


1857 Jan 29 / Jupiter, Moon and Venus in a st. line / Astro Reg 1/189. [II; 2022. Chambers, George Frederick. "Planetary Conjunctions." Astronomical Register, 1 (December 1863): 188-189.]


1857 Feb / New star in Orion? / See CR 20/44. / Index, "Astro". [II; 2023. Porro, Ignazio. "Astronomie.Découverte d'une nouvelle étoile dans le quadrilatère de la nébuleuse d'Orion." Comptes Rendus, 44 (1857): 1031. "Astronomie.M. Porro communique à l'Académie une Lettre du P. Secchi relative à l'étoile aperçue par lui dans le trapèze d'Orion...." Comptes Rendus, 44 (1857): 1279-1282. "1e. Que le R. P. Secchi a pu observer le 10 février dernier avec son magnifique équatorial la petite étoile découverte par M. Porro à Paris avec son réfracteur de 52 centimètres." Secchi had difficulty confirming the existence of a small star in the center of the Trapezium, ("une petit etoile dans le centre du quadrilatrere d'Orion"), but accepted Porro's claim of its discovery. The fifth and sixth stars in the Orion Trapezium, discovered by Friedrich Georg Wilhelm von Struve, in 1826, and by John Herschel, in 1830, would be on the outer part of the Trapezium, (not "dans le centre"). The seventh, (G, the next brightest, with a magnitude of 13.68, inside of the Trapezium), wasn't "discovered" until 1888 by Alvan Clark with his 36-inch refractor telescope. Porro's new star was again reported, as seen on March 15, 1857, and its position was provided on a sketch, (with no accurate measures). D'Abbadie, Antoine Thomson. "Discovery of a New Star in the Nebula of Orion." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 17 (June 12, 1857): 245. "As there was no ring-micrometer at hand and the faintness of the stars prevented illuminating the wires, no measures were taken, but M. Porro thinks that the relative declination of the star P is not so good as its relative R.A. The stars P, D', D", and S disappeared under a very faint illumination, H alone remaining then visible."]


1857 Feb 2 / [LT], 8-b / Ext. flights of larks. [II; 2024. "Extraordinary Flight of Larks." London Times, February 2, 1857 p. 8 c. 2. At Regent's Park, London, on January 31st, a correspondent writes: "Their numbers were countless, and they literally darkened the air; they were flying very low, and were obliged to divide in order to pass me on either side.... I stayed on the spot for upwards of an hour, during which time flight after flight passed over me, sometimes in detachments of a few hundreds, at others in myriads."]


1857 Feb. 7 / [LT], 12-f / Lunar phe. [II; 2025. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "Lunar Phenomenon."London Times, February 7, 1857, p. 12 c. 6. A double lunar halo, with a portion of a third halo, was observed on February 4th, at Beeston.]


1857 Feb 14 / Montbéliard / 4 a.m. p.m. / qsound like cannon and gust of wind. C.R. 44-874. [II; 2026. "Note sur une secousse de tremblement de terre ressentie aux environs de Montbéliard." Comptes Rendus, 44 (1857): 874-876. At 4:45 A.M.]


1857 Feb. 16 / Holland / Large met / [BA] 69-282. [II; 2027. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 282.]


1857 Feb. 18 / (Hun) / Hungary, etc. / 3 a.m. / det met seen / BA '60. [II; 2028. Greg, 94.]


1857 Feb 24 / [LT], 5-b. / Met / Blackheath. [II; 2029. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, February 24, 1857, p. 5 c. 2.]


1857 Feb 25 / Celebes / q. / BA '11. [II; 2030. A class I earthquake. Milne, 713.]


1857 Feb. 28 / Parnalee / stone / 2 stones . ab. noon, / good account / A.J. Sci 2/32/401, 442 / terrific sounds. 9-14' N / 78-21' E. [II; 2031. Fletcher, 102. This is the Parnallee meteorite. Greg, 94. Cassels, J. Lang. "Notice of a Meteorite which fell in Hindostan in 1857." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 32 (1861): 401-403. Haidinger, William. "Notices of Meteoric Masses." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 32 (1861): 440-443, at 442.]


1857 Feb. 28 / near village of Parnalee, India / Rumbling in sky and stone fall later. / Trans. Bombay Geog. Soc. 13 / Appendix B. See June 8, 1834. [II; 2032. "Fall of Meteoric Stones." Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 13 (1856-1857): Appendix B, 5-7. See: 1834 ab. June 8, (I; 1888).]


1857 Feb 28 / Parnalee, S of Madura, Hindostan / dets. / BA '61/35. [II; 2033. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 35-36.]


1857 March 3 / Det met / Smyrna / See 1805. / 11:30 p.m. [II; 2034. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 363. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1857 March 12 / (Sound and parahelion) / 7:30 a.m. / A parahelion at Feings (Montagne, Orne) . The sound from 5 to 5:30 p.m. C.R. 44-574. [II; 2035. "M. Gautier, instituteur primaire à Feings, canton de Mortagne (Orne) transmet la description...." Comptes Rendus, 44 (1857): 574.]


1857 March 12 / Feings (Orne) / Sounds like wind shut[ting][?] not the slightest wind at timefor 1/2 hour / C.R., 44-574. La Sci Pour Tous 1857/143. [II; 2036. "M. Gautier, instituteur primaire à Feings, canton de Mortagne (Orne) transmet la description...." Comptes Rendus, 44 (1857): 574. (La Science Pour Tous, 1857-143). The description of "le vent dans les portes" suggests the sound of wind rattling doors.]


1857 March 21 / Mud / Corfu / Edinburgh New, N.S., 6/174. [II; 2037. Lawson, George. "Remarks on Dust Showers, with Notice of a Shower of Mud which occurred at Corfu on 21st March 1857." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, n.s., 6 (1857): 173-174. "The second question is more difficult to solve; namely, is this native dust, or has it been imported by aerial currents from Africa? From the state of the weather during the three previous days, I am led to favour the latter opinion, and forward an extract from my meteorological register."]


1857 March 23 / (Darkness) / Bolton-le-Moors. / Liv. Age 55-61. [II; 2038. "Darkness at Mid-Day." Living Age, 55 (s. 2, v. 19; 1857): 61. "Darkness at Mid-Day." Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 3 (May 9, 1857): 366.]


1857 March 30 / 4:35 p.m. / LT, Ap 1-11-f / At Whitechurch, Salop. A waterspout, or broad band of cloud ending in a point, from sky to earth. Heavy rain fell. Nothing said of anything going up. [II; 2039. "A Waterspout." London Times, April 1, 1857, p. 11 c. 6.]


1857 Ap. 1 / Heredia, Costa Rica / (F?). [II; 2040. Fletcher, 102. This is the Heredia meteorite.]


1857 Ap. 5 / Stavropol / N side of the Caucasas, Russia / (F). [II; 2041. Fletcher, 102. This is the Stavropol meteorite.]


1857 Ap. 6 / [LT], 12-d / Sunspots. [II; 2042. "Solar Spots." London Times, April 6, 1857, p. 12 c. 4. On April 3, a correspondent writes: "Now, however, a group of fourtwo pretty conspicuous and two very minute oneshave entered on the northern hemisphere, and the state of the borders of the disc in their neighbourhood is such as to indicate the probable appearance of more or enlargement of those existing."]


1857 Ap. 6 / Moluccas / 1. / I / BA '11. [II; 2043. A class I earthquake. Milne, 713.]


1857 Ap. 6 / Met from near Alpha Persei to near Venus / B Assoc '58-139. [II; 2044. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1857-58." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1858, Reports on the State of Science, 137-157, at 139.]


1857 Ap. 6 / Metite? / LT21-8-f. / Dr. Dussourt, near Colmar, France, afternoon, heard a whistling sound and saw a black object rather pear-shapedfrom 11 to 15 inches long and thick as a man's armnot pearit was spherical at one end and pointed the other. Passed ab 100 yards above him. [II; 2045.1, 2045.2. "Fall of an Aerolite in France." London Times, April 21, 1857, p. 8 c. 6.]


1857 Ap 9 / q. / Asia Minor / II / BA '11. [II; 2046. A class II earthquake. Milne, 713.]


1857 Ap. 11 / 8:50 p.m. / Lake Winnibigoshish, Minn / splendid meteor in Hydra moving westward. Greater than full moon / train 5 or 10 minutes / moved very slowly N or N.E. / A.J. Sci 2/24/158 / BA 60-94. [II; 2047. Odell, B.F. "Notice of a brilliant Meteor seen near Lake Winnibigoshish, Minnesota, April 11, 1857." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 24 (1857): 158. Greg, 94-95.]


1857 Ap. 12 / Lightning in Nottinghamattrib to storm far away, near Cape Griz Nez / Jour Met Soc 30/29. "As far [north] as Nottingham" / In Jour 14/299, distance give=175 miles. [II; 2048. Marriott, William. "The Thunderstorms of May 18th and 19th, 1888." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 14 (1888): 296-299, at 299. Symons, George James. "Report on the Thunderstorms of 1857." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 30 (January 1904): 29-40, at 29. "The striking uniformity in the times and points of the compass assigned to this storm from the three stations of Uckfield, London, and Nottingham apparently demonstrates the visibility of a storm over a line of country 150 miles in length, and therefore the altitude of the electrical discharges must have been great."]


1857 Ap. 15 / (F) / Metite / Kaba, Hungary / 10 p.m. / A.J. Sci 2/27/424. [II; 2049. Fletcher, 102. This is the Kaba meteorite. "Kaba-Delreczin Meteorite." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 27 (1859): 424.]


1857 Ap. 15 / (Hun) / Resinous / Hungary / (D-72, 77). [II; 2050. The note copies information from pages 72 and 77 of The Book of the Damned. Greg, 94-95. "The resinous matter like ozocerite; possibly absorbed in passing through the atmosphere, or from the earth into which it would have fallen when hot." Atkinson, Edmund. "Chemical notices from foreign journals." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 4, 17 (June 1859): 422-30, at 424-425. "In an analysis of a meteoric stone which fell at Kaba in Hungary, Wöhler made the interesting observation that it contained a substance of organic origin. The stone had the usual composition of a meteorite, but contained in addition a certain quantity of free carbon, and, further, a smal quantity of a carbonaceous, readily fusible, and partially volatile substance, soluble in alcohol. The substance had most analogy with the fossil waxes, as ozokerite; but the quantity was too small to permit of a quantitative investigation." Wöhler, Friedrich. "Ueber die Bestandtheile des Meteorsteines in Ungarn." Annalen der Chemie und Pharmacie, 109 no. 3 (March 1859): 344-348. The Kaba meteorite is a carbonaceous chondrite.]


1857 May 2 / [LT]. 7-f. [II; 2051. "Witchcraft." London Times, May 2, 1857, p. 7 c. 6. "Those who have studied the modern phenomena of mesmerism, clairvoyance, and others more startling still, and who have paid attention to the instances of spontaneous development of these phenomena, abounding throughout the literature, the chronicles, and legends of antiqua and mediæval times, are struck with a sameness so complete between the old phenomena and the new as to be irresistibly led to infer the existence of an occult law to which they must be reducible." This letter to the Editor refers to a previous letter on the subject of witchcraft, which he lamented  had continued to be widely believed in the "rural population." "Witchcraft." London Times, April 27, 1857, p. 12 c. 4.]


1857 May 2 / N.M. / b. rain / Glastonbury / Gardeners' Chronicle, May 9. [II; 2052. "Black Rain.." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1857 no. 19 (May 9): 326. "Have any of your correspondents remarked the peculiar black colour of the rain water which fell on Saturday, the 2d inst., or accounted for it? Throughout this neighbourhood it was the case. There was much lightning and blight at the time. Glastonbury, May 5."]


1857 May 9 / Venus Inf conjunction Sun / (Al). [II; 2053. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1857, 504.]


1857 May 20 / Dark / Persia / 122 / (D-223). [II; 2054. The note copies information from page 223 of The Book of the Damned. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 99 (1857): pt. 2, 1-262, at 132-133, cv. "Extraordinary phenomenon."]


1857 May 21 / Deluge / France / An. Soc. Met 5-179. [II; 2055. "Communications." Annuaire de la Société Météorologique de France, 5 (1857): 172-191, at 179-185.]


1857 May 23 / [LT], 6-b / June 23-12-f / 29-12-c / Expected comet. [II; 2056. "The Comet." London Times, May 23, 1857, p. 6 c. 2. "Should an instance of actual contact occur, there seems no more reason to infer convulsion from the attack than in the case of a squadron of clouds striking the top of a mountain."  "The Comet." London Times, June 23, 1857, p. 12 c. 6. "Our letters from Malta mention that at a few minutes after 5 p.m. on Sunday the 14th, a bright luminous band of variegated hues was observed to shoot across the heavens in a direction from east to west, remaining visible merely a few minutes." Carrington, Richard Christopher. "A New Comet." London Times, June 29, 1857, p. 12 c. 3. "A tolerably bright telescopic comet was discovered on the 22d by Dr. Klinkerfues, of Gottingen, about an hour after midnight.... It may not be unnecessary to add that the appearance and path of the present body offer no similarity to those of the comet of 1556." This comet was C/1857 M1. "New Comet." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 17 (1857): 253.]


[1857 May 24. Wrong date. See: 1858 May 24, (II; 2057).]


[1857 May 24 /] 1873 May 22 / fishes fell ab 5 p.m. at Eystrup, near Bremen. said ab same time a water spout move from ocean / from Amer Museum Nat. Hist 21-615. [IV; 1218. Gudger, Eugene Willis. "Rain of Fishes." American Museum Journal, 21 (1921): 607-619, at 615.]


[1857 May 24 /] 1873 May 22 / Bremen / fishes / Abhandlungen Nat. Verein, Bremen 3-440. [IV; 1219. Buchenau, Franz. "Ein Fischregen." Abhandlungen Herausgegeben vom Naturwissenschaftlichen Verein zu Bremen, 3 no. 4 (December, 1873): 440. "Mittheilung der Weser-Zeitung vom 25. Mai 1857. Abend-Ausgabe. Bremen, 24. Mai. Vorgestern Nachmittag gegen 5 Uhr fielen in der Gegend von Eystrup während eines Gewitters eine Menge Fische auf und neben den Eisenbahndamm. Es waren kleine sogenannte Weissfische. Man bringt das Erscheinen dieser ungewöhnlichen Gäste mit einer Wasserhose in Verbindung, welche, wie später an die hiesige Eisenbahndirection berichtet wurde, ziemlich um dieselbe Zeit sich aus dem etwa vier Meilen entfernten Steinhuder Meer erhob."


1857 May 28 / 11:30 p.m. / Cheshire / large met / BA 67-417. [II; 2058. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 417.]


1857 June / A Langloft waterspout / See July 3, 1892. [II; 2059. See: 1892 July 3, (VII: 562, 563, 565, & 566).]


1857 June 13 / 4 p.m. / Schuyler, N.Y. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 2060. Finley, 3.]


1857 June 13 / Deerfield, N.Y. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 2061. Finley, 3.]


1857 June 13 / Oswego Co., N.Y. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 2062. Finley, 3.]


1857 June 14 / Japan / q. / II / B.A. '11. [II; 2063. A class II earthquake. Milne, 713.]


1857 June 16 / 11:28 a.m. / strong q. / Clermont-Ferrand / q. and rolling sound / then thunder and hail / C.R. 45-34. [II; 2064. Lecoq, Henri. "Tremblement de terre du 16 juin ressenti à Clermont Ferrand." Comptes Rendus, 45 (1857): 34-35.]


1857 June 17 / Ab 1:45 p.m., on a farm 10 miles s.w. from Ottawa, Ill., cinders that fell from a dense black cloud. They were warm. Specimens were sent to the Editor of the A.J. Sci. They were like volcanic bombs, glassy exterior, cellular insideblack. A.J. Sci 2/24/449. [II; 2065. "Supposed Meteorite." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 24 (1857): 449.]


[1857 June 17 /] 1857 Jan 17 / Cinders / U.S. / Ill. / (29) / D-71. [II; 2020. The note copies information from page 71 of The Book of the Damned. "Supposed meteorite." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 24 (1857): 449. The fall occurred on June 17, 1857, (not in January).]


1857 June 17 / Tornado / Oneida Co., N.Y. / A.J. Sci. 2/24/290. [II; 2066. "The Schuyler Tornado, Oneida County, New York." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 24 (1857): 290-293.]


1857 / summer / Swarm of V. cardui in Piedmont like in 1879 / Nature 20-255. [II; 2067. "Notes." Nature, 20 (July 10, 1879): 254-256, at 255.]


1857 July 4 / [LT], 6-a / body on Mt. Snowdon. [A; 388. "Discovery of Human Remains." July 4, 1857, p. 6 c. 1. Some bones and clothing of an unknown person were found on Mynydd Mawr, west of Snowden, in North Wales.]


1857 July 20 / MetSt. Ives, Hunts. / Met went up from Ursa Minor to Camelopardalis, "remained stationary for upwards 5 minutes, then slowly passed downward. / BA 57-137. [II; 2068. Greg, 94. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1856-57." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1857, Reports on the State of Science, 131-153, at 136-137.]


[1857 July 24 /] 1875 July 25 / Cut / damp hay / Wrexham, Eng / Nature 12/index, hay / (D-242). ** [IV; 1700. The note copies information from page 242 of The Book of the Damned. "Notes." Nature, 12 (August 12, 1875): 297-300, at 298. "A Shower of Hay." Scientific American, n.s., 33 (September 25, 1875): 197. References were made to a correspondent of the Illustrated London News, of August 1, 1875; however, the correct issue was August 1, 1857. The similar shower of hay occurred about twenty years before, (not two days before). "Flight of Hay." Illustrated London News, 31 (August 1, 1857): 117. "A Correspondent writes, July 25th, from Pen-y-Gardden, Denbighshire:—'The accompanying Sketch represents a phenomenon which was observed by some haymakers, at two o'clock yesterday, in a field in my occupation, where a quantity of hay, apparently about half a ton, was seen sailing in the air, at a height above which they said they had ever seen crows fly, which caused it to be mistaken for a flight of birds. The day was very calm, and the hay separated slowly as it passed along, dropping in wisps, larger or smaller, as they stood observing it. A large mass now lies on the middle of a field of turnips adjoining. On inquiry this day I find that the hay was taken up from a field about half a mile distant; travelling on in a northerly, direction, it caused much consternation while passing over the town of Wrexham, five miles distant. It should be added that the hay at that time travelled in a contrary direction to the wind, which was moderate and from the north-west.” No sketch was included with this article. "Strange, If True." Wrexham Advertiser, August 15, 1857, p. 3 c. 3. Below a reprint of the Illustrated London News article, the editor of the Advertiser writes: "We cannot positively deny the truth of the above statement, only so far as it relates to the 'consternation' which is said to have taken place in the town of Wrexham. That certainly cannot be correct, because no one in Wrexham ever heard or saw anything whatever of the phenomenon until they were made acquainted with it in the pages of the Illustrated News. Is it not possible that the 'correspondent' may have mistaken a few thin clouds floating low in the air for 'whisps' of hay? As for mistaking 'hay' for 'birds,' that is 'very like a whale.'"]


1857 July 28 / (fish[?]) / LT, 11-e, quoting Northern (Wick) Ensign / At Brora, large numbers of herrings scattered in one of the Dalihalm gardens, ab. 1/2 mile from the sea. [II; 2069. "A Shower of Herrings." London Times, May 23, 1857, p. 6 c. 2. "A Brora correspondent informs us that a considerable sensation has been created in that neighbourhood by there being found a large quantity of herrings, on a recent morning, lying scattered in one of the Dalihalm gardens, which is nearly half a mile from the shore. When cooked the herrings were found quite good and fresh; and it is regarded, from numerous substantial reasons, as impossible that they could have been carried by any individuals, and thus scattered by them over the garden. They filled an average sized basket. Many conjectures are afloat as to the cause of this singular phenomenon; but the most likely is that it has been occasioned by a waterspout, several instances of a like character having occurred in the north since the commencement of the present century. The superstitious have made the most of this occurrence, and some are found to be in a state of indignation against the persons who dared to eat fish found under such equivocal circumstances, But we are glad to add that no judgment has yet overtaken them for such a daring act of impiety.Northern (Wick) Ensign."]


1857 July 30 / [LT], 12-d / 22-12-f. [II; 2070. "Witchcraft in Bristol." London Times, July 30, 1857, p. 12 c. 4. "Witchcraft." London Times, July 22, 1857, p. 12 c. 6. Two different court cases, at Bristol and at York, involved people who pretended to practice witchcraft.]


1857 Aug 3 (?) / Ice / Cricklewood, Eng. / (D-177). [II; 2071. The note copies information from page 177 of The Book of the Damned. "Extraordinary Meteorological Phenomena." London Times, August 4, 1857, p. 10 c. 2. ]


1857 Aug 12 / Maximum of Perseids and very abundant in Belgium / BA 57-153. [II; 2072. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1856-57." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1857, Reports on the State of Science, 131-153, at 153.]


1857 / middle of August / Hancock Co, Ohio / Someone saw an angel in the sky—that it came down and spoke to her. / Sun, Feb 5-8-6, 1888. [II; 2073. "Face to Face with an Angel." New York Sun, February 5, 1888, p. 8 c. 6. A young daughter and her mother see an angel, who predicted their deaths. “A Messenger From Heaven.” Wilkes-Barre Sunday Leader, February 19, 1888, p. 1 c. 6. About two weeks, after a member of the “theatrical profession” told his story of an angelic to a little girl, the same story, (with the angel telling the day and hour of the mother's death), was told by a “commercial traveler,” in Wilkes-Barre.]


1857 Aug 13 / Stones in a horse's stomach / L.T., 1850, Ap. 29-3-e / See Jan., 1922. [II; 2074. "Stones in a Horse's Stomach." London Times, April 29, 1850, p. 3 c. 5. See: (1922 Jan.; not found).]


1857 Aug 13 / Obj at Nottingham. D / obje[ct] / "On Aug 13[th], (1857), a ball as smooth and round as a billiard-ball, and larger than a cricket-ball, fell N. of Nottingham". E.J. Lowe / Brit Assoc 1857/140. [II; 2075. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1856-57." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1857, Reports on the State of Science, 131-153, at 140).]


1857 Aug 13, 14 / tremendous th. storms / The Nottingham Review, Aug 21, 1857, gives more than a page to various accounts. [II; 2076. (Nottingham Review, Aug 21, 1857; not @ BNA.)]


1857 Aug 13 / (with) / Th. stone / Ciel et Terre, Dec. 1, 1901 / That Musée de l'Etat Independent du Congo had received from M. Waquez, Commandant at Suruango, stone said fallen in a thunderstorm in 1893. Spheroidal and had concentric "couches". [II; 2077. "Un Prétendu Aérolithe au Congo." Ciel et Terre, 22 (1901-1902): 479.]


1857 Aug 13 / Nottingham Review, Aug 21after the great storm of the 13th, a large ball rather larger than a cricket ball had been found in a pasture at Calverstonperfectly spherical, of an olive green or grayish color, and the surace polished like marble. The object was taken to Dr. Wilson, of Nottingham, and he "pronounced it to be a concretion or stone from the intestines of a horse. It weighed 17 ounces. "It was not above two thirds of the weight of marble, and a slight bruise on the surface showed that in its outward texture at least it was composed of thin layers." [II; 2078.1 to 2078.4. (Nottingham Review, August 21, 1857; not at BNA).]


1857 Aug 13 / Chem News 23/199 / An account of the calculus from a horseextracted from a horse"and a sketch of an aggregated object of very convoluted appearance. [II; 2079. Stark, James F. "Analyses of an Earthball and Intestinal Calculus from the Horse." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 23 (April 28, 1871): 199-200.]


1857 Aug / Stone in horses stomach of layers / Zoologist 16-421. [II; 2080. Chamberlain, Walter. "Stone in a Horse's Stomach." Zoologist, s. 3 v. 16 (December 1892): 421. No date is given regarding the stone found in Chamberlain's horse, (simply a similar phenomenon to that observed in 1857).]


1857 Aug 13 / Earth ball or Intestinal Calculus from a horse / See Chem News, 23/199. Five inches in diameterand weighed over 2 pounds. Analysis in Jour Chem Soc 24/425. / or alternate layer[s] of mineral matter, and of mineral matter intrmingled with substance of organic origin. [II; 2081.1, 2081.2. Stark, James F. "Analyses of an Earthball and Intestinal Calculus from the Horse." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 23 (April 28, 1871): 199-200. Stark, James F. "Analyses of an Earthball and Intestinal Calculus from the Horse." Journal of the Chemical Society, 24 (1871): 425.]


1857 Aug 31 / [LT], 8-c / Locusts / Ireland / Sept. 1-7-d / London / 2-7-d / London. [II; 2082. "A Strange Visitor." London Times, August 31, 1857, p. 8 c. 3. "A Live Locust in London." London Times, September 1, 1857, p. 7 c. 4. "Locusts in England." London Times, September 2, 1857 p. 7 c. 6.]


1857 Sept. 6 / Locusts, single onesvarious parts of England / N.Q. 2-4-397. [II; 2083. "Locusts in England." Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 4 (November 14, 1857): 397-398.]


1857 Sept 7 / Total eclipse of sun / Peru / C.R. 47-658. [II; 2084. "Rapport sur l'éclipse totale de soleil observée le 7 septembre à Payta...." Comptes Rendus, 47 (1858): 658-660.]


1857 Sept 12 / (Ch) / Wandsbeck / a Vulcan by Ohrt / Observatory 3/137 / C-29+. [II; 2085. Ledger, Edmund. "Observations or supposed observations of the Transits of Intra-Mercurial planets or other Bodies across the Sun's Disk." Observatory, 3 (1879-80): 135-8, at 136. "Vermischte Nachrichten." Astronomische Nachrichten, 53 (1860): 333-334.]


1857 Sept. 29 / MetHighfield Houseby Lowelisted by him as "large and curious". / Rec. Sci 1/138. [II; 2086. Greg, 94. Lowe, 135, 138., (Figure 26).]


1857 Sept ? / ? [LT] 31-10-f / July, Aug or Sept / Vesuvius / and Oct 10-8-d. [II; 2087. "Eruption of Mount Vesuvius." London Times, July 31, 1857, p. 11 c. 4. "Italy." London Times, October 10, 1857, p. 8 c. 3-4.]


1857 Oct. 1 / Rain of stones / Ormes (Yonne), France . La Sci Pour Tous 2-402, col 2-x. [II; 2088."Bolides, Étoiles Filantes, Aérolithes." La Science Pour Tous, 2 (no. 51; November 26, 1857): 401-403.]


1857 Oct. 1 / Orme / (F) / L'Yonne / stonefall . C.R. 45/687 / BA 60-94 / 4:30 p.m. Bet. 4 and 5 p.m. [II; 2089. Fletcher, 102. This is the Les Ormes meteorite. Greg, 94. "M. Séguier met sous les yeux de l'Académie un fragment d'un aerolithe...." Comptes Rendus, 45 (1857): 687.]


1857 Oct 5 / First shock / St Louis / See Oct 8. [II; 2090. See: 1857 Oct 8, (II; 2092).]


1857 Oct 6 / [LT], 7-c / 7-10-c / 26-8-d / Floods / Italy. [II; 2091. "Italy." London Times, October 6, 1857, p. 7 c. 3-4. "Italy." London Times, October 7, 1857, p. 10 c. 3. "Italy." London Times, October 26, 1857, p. 8 c. 4.]


1857 Oct 8 / q-met / St Louis / New Lands, p. 109. [II; 2092. The note copies information from pages  108 and 109 of New Lands. Ponton, Mungo. Earthquakes and Volcanoes. London: T. Nelson, 1868, 80. Revised ed. London: T. Nelson, 1872, 73. Revised ed. London: T. Nelson, 1885, 118. Ponton gives the date as October 9, 1857, (not "the 8th of October," as noted by Fort and written in New Lands). "The Earthquake at St. Louis." New York Times, October 12, 1857, p. 5 c. 4. "The northern sky was clear, but from the southward a heavy mist was swiftly advancing, and in a moment nearly obscured the street lamps." One man running into the street "found a dense fog rolling from the southward, and shortly enveloping everything."]


1857 Oct 8 / Centralia, Ill. / q. / BA '11. [II; 2093. A class I earthquake. Milne, 713.]


1857 Oct 10 / [LT], 8-d / Vesuvius. [II; 2094. "Italy." London Times, October 10, 1857, p. 8 c. 3-4.]


1857 Oct. 10 / (Hun) / (F) / Ahaba, Karlsburg, Transylvania / Metite / BA 60. [II; 2095. Fletcher, 102. This is the Ohaba meteorite. Fletcher gives the date of the fall as October 11, 1857. Greg, 94.]


1857 Oct. 20 / Vesuvius violent / La Sci Pour Tous 2-408. [II; 2096. "Éruption du Vésuve." La Science Pour Tous, 2 (no. 51; November 26, 1857): 408.]


1857 Oct 21 / Fishes / Meeting this date of Boston Soc of Nat Hist, letter from Prof. Hubbard, of Dartmouth College, read  upon fall of fishes in a town in Vermont. / Proc. of B.S. Nat H. 6-283 / N.M. [II; 2097. Öctober 21, 1857." Proceedings of the Boston Society of Natural History, 6 (1856-1859): 283-286, at 283. "Dr. A.A. Gould read a letter from Prof. Hubbard of Dartmouth College, giving an account of a fish which was seen to fall to the earth, during a sudden squall of wind and rain, in a town in Vermont. Dr. Gould thought the fact interesting, as corroborating several instances of the same kind which had previously been recorded, some of which had come to his own knowledge."]


1857 Oct 29 / Précigné (Sarthe) / 6 p.m. / magnificent meteor / Cosmos 11-506. [II; 2098. "Nouvelles de la Semaine." Cosmos 11 (November 6, 1857): 505-511, at 506.]


1857 Nov 11 / Michigan / met / BA 67-417. [II; 2099. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 417.]


1857 [Nov. 11] / Ext death / fly sting / [LT], Nov. 11-5-b. [A; 389. "Dr. Livingstone's Discoveries." London Times, November 21, 1857, p. 12 c. 2-4. Livingstone's party suffered from the "sting" of the tsetse fly.]


[1857 Nov 15 (or before) /] 1857 Dec. 28 / Ac to "Carribber" (Sir George Duncan Gibb) "Odd Showers", p. 16the account in Montreal Weekly Gazette is from the Leroy (N.Y.), near Rochester, Gazettethat "during the heavy rain of Sunday last" fell the live lizards, some 4 inches in length. [II; 2132. Gibb, George Duncan. Odd Showers. London: Kerby, 1870, 16-18. "Shower of Lizards." Montreal Gazette, December 26, 1857, p. 3 c. 5.]


[1857 Nov 15 (or before) /] 1857 Dec 27 / D-90 / lizards of Montreal / Wm. Andrews, Book of Oddities, p. 32. Says that some specimens of frogs said fallen from sky preserved in the Museum of Nat Hist, Montreal. These were Gibbs. / July, ab 1841. [II; 2133. The note copies information from page 90 of The Book of the Damned. Wallace, R. Hedger. "A Shower of Frogs." Notes and Queries, s. 8 v. 6 (August 11, 1894): 104-105. The fall of lizards often reported as having taken place in Montreal, on this date, is publication date of an article in the Montreal Weekly Gazette; and, the shower of Lizards was said to have occurred at Le Roy, New York. Andrews, William. The Book of Oddities. London: Simpkin, Marshall, 1882, 32-33. "Shower of Lizards." Montreal Gazette, December 26, 1857, p. 3 c. 5. "Shower of Lizards." Lewistown Gazette, November 19, 1857, p. 2 c. 2. "The Le Roy (N.Y.) Gazette says that during the heavy rain on Sunday night last, live lizards some of them measuring four inches in length, came from the clouds like manna, though neither as plenty nor half as welcome. They were found crawling on the sidewalks and in the streets like fugitive infantile alligators, in places far removed from localities where they inhabit." The text of the article in the Lewiston Gazette is identical with that in the Montreal Gazette.]


1857 Nov 15 / Beaune / Meteor and globe lightning enter a room. / La Sci Pour Tous 1857/403. [II; 2100. "Bolides, Étoiles Filantes, Aérolithes." La Science Pour Tous, 2 (no. 51; November 26, 1857): 401-403. A pulsating luminous meteor with a large train, (with a disagreeable odour), disappeared from the night sky; then, something luminous appeared inside of a house. "Au même instant, une femme du faubourg Saint-Jean a vu entrer dans sa chambre un globe de feu qui, après avoir étient la lampe au passage, a circule de long des parois, et s'est échappe par la porte en tr'ouverte. Il est probable que ce météore était un bolide dû à une cause electrique."]


1857 Nov. 16 / (Ch) / (D-68) / Hair substance / Charleston, S.C. / or globe lightning. BA 67-417. * [II; 2101. The note copies information from page 68 of The Book of the Damned. "Catalogue of the Meteoric Collection of Charles Upham Shepard...." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 31 (1861): 456-459, at 459. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 417.]


1857 Nov 17 / 5 p.m. / At Paris, by the meteorological, Dr. Phipson, large drops of warm water from a cloudless sky / C.R. 45-906. [II; 2102. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. "Sur une pluie sans nuages observée à Paris." Comptes Rendus, 45 (1857): 906-907.]


1857 Nov 17 / 5 p.m. / Rain without clouds / Paris / La Sci Pour Tous 3-15. Ab sunset. [II; 2103. "Pluie sans nuages observée à Paris." La Science Pour Tous, 3 (no. 2; December 17, 1857): 15.]


1857 Nov. 19 / [LT], 10-a / Wtch / Stockport. [A; 390. "Witchcraft in Stockport." London Times, November 19, 1857, p. 10 c. 1. Two bottles were found during road work used as witchcraft spells by the victims of fortune-tellers.]


1857 Nov 21 / (Candy) / Living Age of, copying from the Napa Republican / That at Clear Lake in the same county (look up Napa) had fallen a "shower of sugar candy" covering a large area. "It covered everythingleaves of trees, rocks and the earth's surface alike. Part of it was of the consistency of syrup and part was crystallized." The Editor writes that a boxful had been sent to him. He said that it tasted like unflavored candy and he invites persons interested to call upon him and see the substance. "The specimens before us are generally irregularly crystallized, rounded at one end and irregular in form at the other, as if broken off from some surface to which they adhered. They are from one fourth to five eighths of an inch in length, some pure white and others of a delicate pink hue. Their general appearance is that of very small stalagmites such as we have often seen in caves. A similar shower occurred at Salt Lake some years since." (See July 3, 1881. / See ab. June 15, 1893.) See July, 1922. [II; 2104.1 to 2104.5. "A Shower of Manna." Living Age, 55 (s. 2, v. 19; 1857): 491. (Napa Republican, 1857.) See: 1881 July 3, (V; 550); (ab. June 15, 1893); and, (1922 July).]


1857 Nov. 24 / Spital, Windisch-Garsten, Austria / q. / I / BA '11. [II; 2105. A class I earthquake. Milne, 714.]


1857 Nov. 26 / Konigsberg / det met and "stonefall?" / BA 67-417. [II; 2106. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 417.]


1857 Nov. 29 / 12:30 p.m. / 12:45 / Bayonne, France / qs and rumbles / L.T., Dec 6-8-a. [II; 2107. (London Sunday Times, December 6, 1857, p. 8 c. 1; not at BNA.)]


1857 Nov. 30 / Jabez Brown / Report of the British Association, 1858 / [Typescript]:


Prof. Baden-Powell


"The subjoined extraordinary statement is copied from the Times, of Dec. 4. It bears the appearance of a simple, straightforward account of fact, the nature of which seem difficult to conjecture. It is here inserted simply in the hope of attracting attention, and that in time some light may be thrown upon it by other observations: 'Last night (Nov. 30), at 15 minutes to 9, it being very dark, I was ascending one of the steep hills in this neighborhood, when suddenly I was surrounded by a bright and powerful light, which passed me a little quicker than the ordinary pace of man's walking, leaving it dark as before. This day I have been informed that the light was seen by the sailors in the harbor, coming from the sea and passing up the valley like a low cloud.'Jabez Brown."


[II; 2108. Typescript. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1857-58." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1858, Reports on the State of Science, 137-157, at 155-156. Brown, Jabez. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, December 4, 1858, p. 7 c. 4.]


1857 Dec. 16 / (It) / Salerno / great q / [BA] '11. [II; 2109. A class III earthquake. Milne, 714.]


1857 Dec 16 / See Dec 17, 1852. / Cal. and Eng. [II; 2110. See: 1852 Dec 17, (II: 1677 & 1678).]


1857 Dec 16-17 / Simul / See Nov 19, 1861. / also Dec 8, 1861. [II; 2111. Pabst writes: "Perhaps referring to simultaneous occurrences in England and Italy." (See: 1861 Nov. 19-28, (III; 192), and, (1861 Dec 8; meteors but no quakes.)]


1857 Dec 16 / On morning of 17th (ab 5 a.m.), a remarkable aurora in Belgium. / N.Q. 2-5-28. [II; 2112. "Earthquakes and Meteors." Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 5 (January 9, 1858): 28-29. "The Meteor." London Times, December 22. 1857, p. 9 c. 6.]


1857 Dec 16 / Q of Naples felt near Norwich, England. / N and Q 2-5-437. [II; 2113. "Neapolitan Earthquake, Dec. 16, 1857." Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 5 (May 29, 1858): 437.]


1857 Dec 16 / At 7:50 p.m., great met. On 17th, at 4 a.m. sky in n.w. fiery red as if lighted by a conflagration at Wokingham, Berks. / Times18th. Other say ab. 7:45 p.m. [II; 2114. "Extraordinary Meteor." London Times, December 18, 1857, p. 10 c. 2.]


1857 Dec 16 / 10:15 p.m. / q. at Naples / Times 26-7-4. [II; 2115. "The Earthquake at Naples." London Times, December 26, 1857, p. 7 c. 3-4.]


1857 Dec 16Jan 4 / 84 shocks in Naples / Timbs '58-273. [II; 2116. "Great Earthquake at Naples." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1858, 271-273, at 273.]


1857 Dec. 16 / q. / Naples / Timbs '58-271 / Had been a slight shock on 7th which threw down the cone of Vesuvius. / 16th at 10:10 p.m. [II; 2117. "Great Earthquake at Naples." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1858, 271-273.]


1857 Dec 16 / q in Naples / 2 hours earlier, met in Eng / N and Q 2/9/28, 437 / q felt in E. [II; 2118. "Earthquakes and Meteors." Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 5 (January 9, 1858): 28-29. "Neapolitan Earthquake, Dec. 16, 1857." Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 5 (May 29, 1858): 437.]


1857 Dec 16 / It / q and phe / See 1805. [II; 2119. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 364-366. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1857 Dec 16 / Great met near London ab 7:45 p.m. Cor (19th) says saw lightning at intervals 1/2 hour after. Other letters. [II; 2120. "Extraordinary Meteor." London Times, December 19, 1857, p. 10 c. 2. "The Meteor." London Times, December 21, 1857, p. 10 c. 3.]


1857 Dec 16 / qdistant / See Aug 26, 27, 1839. [II; 2121. See: 1839 Aug 26, (II; 79), and, 1839 Aug 27-31, (II; 80).]


1857 Dec 16 / See Aug 21, 1871. / Ireland and W. Indies. [II; 2122. See: 1871 Aug 21, (IV: 482. 485 & 486).]


1857 Dec 16 / Met, France, and Etna / July 19, 1899. [II; 2123. See: 1899 July 19, (VIII: 466 to 473).]


1857 Dec. 16 / q and distant met / Sept 8, 9, 1891 / July 8, 1892. [II; 2124. See: 1891 Sept 7-8, (VII; 174); 1891 Sept 9, (VII: 175); 1892 July 8, (VII:  568, 569 & 571); and, 1892 July 9, (VII; 574).]


1857 Dec 16 / Vesuvius and meteor in England / Dec 8, 1861. [II; 2125. See: 1861 Dec, (III; 206); 1861 Dec. 8, (III: 203 to 205, 207 to 210); and, 1861 Dec 9, (III; 211).]


1857 Dec 16 / Great q, Greece / met, Germany / Dec 28, 1869. [II; 2126. See: 1869 Dec 28, (IV: 54 to 56).]


1857 Dec 16 / (Algeria) / Met and Vesuvius / (?) / Sept 15, 1878. [II; 2127. See: 1878 Sept 15, (IV: 2444 & 2449), and, 1878 Sept 16, (IV: 2450).]


1857 Dec 17 / Aurora. Deep blood-red flames in the sky of Belgium, ab. 5 a.m. Consternation. At Malines, fire engines called out. / Times, 22nd. [II; 2128. "The Meteor." London Times, December 22, 1857, p. 9 c. 6.]


1857 Dec 17 / Germany / Westphalia, etc. / met-det / BA 60. [II; 2129. Greg, 94.]


[1857 Dec 17. Wrong date. See: 1854 Dec 17, (A; 391).]


1857 Dec. 19 / 9:03 a.m. / Charleston / q and rumbling / Bull. Seis A 4-117. [II; 2130. Taber, Stephen. "Seismic Activity in the Atlantic Coastal Plain near Charleston, South Carolina." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 4 (1914): 108-160, at 117. Gibbs, Lewis Reeve. "Notice of the Phenomena attending the Shock of the Earthquake of Dec. 19, 1857." Proceedings of the Elliott Society of Natural History..., 1 (1853-1858): 288-289.]


1857 Dec. 27 / (F) / 2:25 a m. / Metite near Bassein, in Pegu, India / A. J. Sci 2/32/142. Great detonation / seen 200 miles away. [II; 2131. Fletcher, 102. This is the Pegu meteorite. Greg, 94. "Calcutta Meteorites." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 32 (1861): 141-143, at 142.]


[1857 Dec 27. Wrong date. See: 1857 Nov 15 (or before), (II; 2133).]


[1857 Dec 28. Wrong date. See: 1857 Nov 15 (or before), (II; 2132).]


1857 Dec 28 and 29 / Shocks in Sala and Potenza, Italy. Potenza was in ruins from shocks of 16th. / Timbs 1858-273. [II; 2134. "Great Earthquake at Naples." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1858, 271-273, at 273.]


1857 Dec 28-30 / (It) / q and phe / See 1805. [II; 2135. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 364.) See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1858:


1858 / Artific iron / Mass / 152. [II; 2136.]


1858 / Klausenberg, Transylvania / fishes / Cosmos 3/5/79. [II; 2137. "Pluie de poissons." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 5 (July 17, 1869): 79. "En 1858, pendant une nuit des plus orageuses, des milliers de poissons ayant jusqu'à 0 m, 1 de long, tombèrent dans les rues de Klausenbourg, en Transylvanie."]


1858 / Disap of man, and his money belt found in a ring of earth. / See Aug. 11, 1886. / near Helena, Sandusky Co., Ohio. [A; 392. See: 1886 Aug 11, (B; 709).]


1858 / Sleeper Susan C. Godsey, near Hickman, Ky. / See July 14, 1869. [A; 393. See: 1869 July 14, (A; 547).]


1858 Jan 7 / [LT], 8-c, etc. / Great q / Naples. [II; 2138. "Naples." London Times, January 7, 1858, p. 8 c. 3. "The Earthquake at Naples." London Times, January 14, p. 6 c. 5.]


1858 Jan 11 and 12 / Sunspots noted in La Sci Pour Tous 3-103. [II; 2139. "Taches du Soleil." La Science Pour Tous, 3 (no. 13; March 4, 1858): 103.]


1858 Jan 20 / Olmütz / Large met / BA 69-282. [II; 2140. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 282.]


[1858 Jan 20 /] 1850 Jan 20 / Larvae / Warsaw / D-93. [II; 1359. The note copies information from page 93 of The Book of the Damned. "Fallen from the Clouds." All the Year Round, 8 (November 22, 1862): 250-256, at 253. "On so-called Showers of Insects." Naturalist: A Popular Monthly. 8  (1858): 235-236. Waga, Blatta. "Sur la prétendue pluie d'Insectes." Revue et Magazin de Zoologie, s. 2 v. 10 (June 1858): 261-269.]


1858 Jan 23 / (It) / Caggiano (Salerno) / flash and q / See 1805. / See March 3. [II; 2141. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448.) See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146), and, 1858 March 3, (II; 2150).]


1858 Jan. 27 / 3:45 p.m. / Switzerland / det met / BA 60-106. [II; 2142. Greg, 106.]


1858 Feb 3 / (dust) / Alexandria / Dense clouds at noon obscuring the sun and the fall of a fine powder. An account of a ship that sailed 40 or 50 miles and was still in these conditions. Attrib to sand from Sahara. / Trans. Bombay Geog. Soc 14/A p.A/11. [II; 2143.1, 2143.2. "Extraordinary appearance at Sea." Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 14 (1857-1858): Appendix A, 11.]


1858 Feb. 11 / First phe at Lourdes / story in Religio Ph. J, Nov. 30, 1872 / YRA. ++ [A; 394. "La Dame de Massabelle." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 13 (no. 11; November 30, 1872): 1. "YRA" is the shelfmark for this journal at the New York Public Library.]


1858 Feb 16-17 / Switzerland? / brownish substance / Vierteljahrsschr. Naturf. Ges., Zuer., 13/313 / (Fassig). [II; 2144. Fassig, Oliver Lanard, ed. Bibliography of Meteorology. Part II: Moisture. Washington: Signal Office, 1889, 384. Cramer, Carl Eduard. "Auszüge aus den Sitzungs-Protokollen." Vierteljahrsschrift der Naturforschenden Gesellschaft in Zürich, 13 (1868): 308-316, at 313. "Ueber die in der Nacht vom 16. auf den 17. Februar 1858 in unsern Centralalpen gefallene röthlich-braune Substanz.— Eine nochmalige mikroskopische Untersuchung dieser Substanz, die früher von Herrn Prof. Heer mit einem Ausbruch des Vesuv in Beziehung gebracht worden, hat gezeigt, dass auch hier dieselben Melosiren oder Gallionellen, Eunotien, Discopleen und Pinnularien wie im Bündnerstaub vorkommen. Es ist daher auch diese Substanz als dem Ehrenberg'schen Passatstaub verwandt zu bezeichnen." Oswald Heer was a professor of botany at the University of Zurich.]


1858 Feb 19 / [LT], 10-d / Aurora / Isle of Man. [II; 2145. "To the Editor of Times." London Times, February 19, 1858, p. 10 c. 4.]


1858 Feb 21 / Greece / 24—Martinique / 27—Moluccas / q's / BA '11. [II; 2146. Three class I earthquakes. Milne, 714.]


1858 Feb. 21 / Rain of stones on a ship off coast of Florida / La Sci Pour Tous 3/160. [II; 2147. "Martime Intelligence." New York Herald, March 12, 1858, p. 8 c. 5. "Feb 21, lat 41 25, lon 54 35, during a heavy squall, very dark, ship under close reefed sails, was struck by a meteor—a thunderbolt, no lightning, but a tremendous report, and our main mast was enveloped apparently in a shower of rockets, many of the men were benumbed from the effects. Found the sheet lead on man mast coat ripped off completely; around the combings on deck the copper tacks were brightened, but not started." The Caroline Tucker (ship) was  about 1600 kilometres east of New York City, (not off the coast of Florida). "Phenomene en Mer." La Science Pour Tous, 3 (no. 20; April 22, 1858): 160.]


1858 Feb. 23 / 11:20 p.m. / Beeston Observatory / Magnificent meteor. Streams of auroral lights immediately before its starting point. / BA 59-82. [II; 2148. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1858-59." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1859, Reports on the State of Science, 81-95, at 82-83.]


1858 Feb 26 / It Sounds / Saponara / Sounds like gunfire / See 1816. [II; 2149. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 37. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1858 March 3 / See Jan 23. [II; 2150. See: 1858 Jan 23, (II; 2141).]


1858 March 5 / Hurricane / Madeira / N.Y. Herald, Ap 1-4-1. [II; 2151. "The News." New York Herald, April 1, 1858, p. 4 c. 1.]


1858 March 9 / q / Algeria / BA 11 / 1st I list / many others before Algeria series begins back Oran before 1820? [II; 2152. A class I earthquake. Milne, 714.]


1858 March 12-19 / Great sunspot noted in La Sci Pour Tous 3-142. [II; 2153. Chacornac. "Note sur le groupe de taches solaires du 15 mars 1858." Comptes Rendus, 46 (1858): 592-594. "Astronomie.Grande Tache du Soleil Vue devant l'Éclipse." La Science Pour Tous, 3 (no. 17; April 1, 1858): 142.]


1858 March 15 / Eclipse of sun / Leisure Hour 7-157, 277. [II; 2154. "The Annular Eclipse of the Sun, March 15, 1858." Leisure Hour, 7 (1858): 157-160. "The Great Solar Eclipse in our Parish." Leisure Hour, 7 (1858): 277-278.]


1858 March 15 / Annular eclipse of sun and appearance of tremendous sunspot / Ast. Reg 8/10. [II; 2155. Jeffries, Richard. "Spots on the Sun." Astronomical Register, 8 (May 1870): 109-110. The editor noted: "At the beginning of the month of April, spots on the sun were visible easily without optical assistance."]


1858 March 17 / [LT[, 12-f / Aurora. [II; 2156. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, March 17, 1858, p. 12 c. 6.]


1858 March 25 / Apparition / Etades / ab. March, 1908. [A; 395. (The 16th of the Marian apparitions at Lourdes was on March 25, 1858.)]


1858 Ap. 2 / Shock / Plymouth and Liskeard / See May 3 '09. [II; 2158. Parfitt, Edward. "On Earthquakes in Devonshire." Report and Transactions of the Devonshire Association, 16 (1884): 641-661, at 652. See: 1809 May 3, (I; 265).]


1858 Ap 9-May 2 / Ap 9Japan / 13—Austria / 19—Asia Minor / 23—Japan / 24—Cent. Amer / 30—Austria / Early in May—Nicaragua / May 2—Mexico / BA '11 / Sim q's—Feb 18, 1889. [II; 2159. Milne, 714. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1858 Ap. 9 and 10 / Cyclone / Andaman Sea / Jour Asiatic Soc Bengal 27/323. [II; 2160. Liebig, G. von. "Account of a Cyclone in the Andaman Sea, on the 9th and 10th April, 1858." Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 27 (1858): 323-337.]


1858 Ap. 9 / Nottingham / Many small meteors. Aurora at the time. / B.A. '58. [II; 2161. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1857-58." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1858, Reports on the State of Science, 137-157, at 148-149.]


1858 Ap. 11-12 / (Fr) / q / Grenoble / C.R. 46/764. [II; 2162. "M. Vicat écrit de Grenoble, relativement à une secousse de tremblement...." Comptes Rendus, 46 (1858): 764.]


1858 Ap. 15 / [LT], 11-f / Aurora. [II; 2163. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, April 15, 1858, p. 11 c. 6.]


1858 Ap. 24 / 8:10 p.m. / Met 1/3 size moon from Canis Majoris / Hobart Town / BA 67-290. [II; 2164. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 290-291. (Abbott, Francis. Results of twenty-five years' meteorological observations for Hobart Town. Hobart, Australia: Mercury. 1866, 16. @ Univ of Toronto.)]


1858 May 4 / Quainton, 6 miles N.W. of Aylesbury. "Ignited globe" fell in a farm yard. Exploded with a loud report. Fragments flew in different directions. One hit a cow. / BA 58/152. [II; 2165. Greg, 95. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1857-58." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1858, Reports on the State of Science, 137-157, at 152-153.]


1858 May 10 / Shock / Richmond, Canada / 17th, another and sound like distant thunder / See Nov 9, 1810. [II; 2166. Brigham, William T. "Volcanic Manifestations in New England." Memoirs Read Before the Boston Society of Natural History, 2 (1871/1878): 1-28, at 20. See: 1810 Nov 9, (I; 308).]


1858 May 15 / Op Mars / (Al). [II; 2167. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1858, 511.]


1858 May 19 / Hun / near Oravitza, Hungary / Metite / BA 60. [II; 2168. Greg, 95.]


1858 May 19 / Kakowa, Krasso-Szoreny, Hungary / (F). [II; 2169. Fletcher, 102. This is the Kakowa meteorite. Greg, 95.]


1858 May 19 / Floods / Highwater mark, St Louis / not exceeded until June 7, 1903 / NY Trib, 8th. [II; 2170. "Highest Since 1858." New York Tribune, June 8, 1903, p. 1 c. 5.]


1858 May 21 / Vesuvius / A. Reg. [II; 2171. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 100 (1858): pt. 2, 1-201, at 92-94, cv. "Eruption of Mount Vesuvius."]


1858 May 24 / 2 qs / 25, whirlwind on land. Then a whirlwind on the sea. Then Vesuvius. Naples—C.R. 46-1098. [II; 2172. "M. Ch. Sainte-Claire Deville communique l'extrait suivant d'une Lettre écrit de Naples...." Comptes Rendus, 46 (1858): 1098.]


[1858 May 24 /] 1857 May 24 / Vesuvius / At Naples this day a whirlwind and a trombe marine. / C.R., 46-1098. [II; 2057. "M. Ch. Sainte-Claire Deville communique l'extrait suivant d'une Lettre écrit de Naples...." Comptes Rendus, 46 (1858): 1098.]


[1858 May 24 /] 1858 May 27 / At Naples a Whirlwind on land—one at sea, and eruption of Vesuvius. / La Sci Pour Tous 3-231. [II; 2174. "Phénomènes à Naples." La Science Pour Tous, 3 (no. 29; June 24, 1858): 231.]


1858 May 24 / France and Germany / q. / BA '11. [II; 2173. A class I earthquake. Milne, 714.]


1858 / last of May / (D-93) . larvae of beetles / near Mortagne [aux Herbiers], France / may be same as crickets. ** [II; 2175. The note copies information from page 93 of The Book of the Damned. "M.H. Lucas communique la note suivante relative à une espèce d'Orthoptères." Annales de la Société Entomologique de France, s. 3 v. 6 ("Bulletin Trimestriel," no. 2; April, May June, 1858): xcvi. The insects were identified as Gryllus domesticus, or crickets, which are not beetles.]


1858 May 27—June 5 / Vesuvius violent / Cardiff Times, June 12. At least to June 5 / L. Times, 14th. [II; 2176. "The Eruption of Mount Vesuvius." London Times, June 14, 1858, p. 6 c. 6. (Cardiff Times, June of 1858; not @ BNA.)]


1858 May 29—etc. / at least to June 1st / Vesuvius / reflections from the glare like an aurora / Morn Post, June 10. [II; 2177. "The Eruption of Vesuvius." London Morning Post, June 10, 1858, p. 3 c. 4.]


1858 / last of May / At Mortagne / aux Herbiers / Thick rain of beetles (Gryllus domesticus) fell in cold wind and seemed inanimate. An. Soc Ent. 1858/XCVI. [II; 2178. "M.H. Lucas communique la note suivante relative à une espèce d'Orthoptères." Annales de la Société Entomologique de France, s. 3 v. 6 ("Bulletin Trimestriel," no. 2; April, May June, 1858): xcvi.]


1858 June / Insects like crickets—half-frozen / La Sci Pour Tous, June 17, 1858. / 223 / La Vendée. [II; 2179. "Une Pluie d'Insectes." La Science Pour Tous, 3 (no. 28; June 17, 1858): 223.]


1858 June 2 / Donati's comet discovered in Leo / Good in Am Sci Disc. [II; 2180. "Donati's Comet." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1859, 383-388.]


1858 June 5 / At Boulougne-sur-Mer. Also at Folkstone and other places on English Channel. Bright sunshine—water receded—in 5 minutes came back. (8 a.m.) 8 feet higher than normal, with great wind and sky densely obscured and then again bright sunshine. Cardiff Times, 12th. [II; 2181. (Cardiff Times, June 12, 1858; not at BNA.) "Singular Phenomenon." Lake's Falmouth Packet and Cornwall Advertiser, June 12, 1858, p. 4 c. 5. "A letter from Boulogne-sur-Mer says:—'An extraordinary phenomenon, considered volcanic, occurred here this (Saturday) morning, eight o’clock. The tide, which was receding, suddenly fell, and left the harbour dry, but returned five minutes with great force eight feet higher, accompanied with a perfect tornado of wind, and the sky densely obscured. The whole did not last more than ten minutes, but what was most strange was that there existed the brightest sunshine immediately before and after.—P.S. The passengers of the Folkstone boat, who have just come (half-past five p.m.), report that a similar occurrence took place there and at other places on the English coast at the same time as here.'”]


1858 June 5 / 5:30 a.m. / Th. storm violent, S of England. At Ramsgate, a "tidal wave". Symons Met Mag 3-81. [II; 2182. "Thunderstorms and Tidal Disturbances." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 3 (July 1868): 81-83, at 81. "At Ramsgate it was very severe, and about 9.15 a.m. the "water in Pegwell Bay, the tide being then about two hours past flood, suddenly receded about 200 yards, and returned to its former position within the space of about 20 minutes. The shrimpers, many of them elderly men, and others in the neighbourhood, never before experienced such a surprising phenomenon."]


1858 June 6 / Dry fog at Munster / ac to M. [Eduard] Heis / no odor / Night of seventh, dry fog and meteor / Cosmos 15/37. [II; 2183. "Faits de science." Cosmos, 15 (July 8, 1859): 36-38, at 37.]


1858 June 7 / d. fog and met / Dry fog and a meteor at Munster / Cosmos 15/37. [II; 2184. "Faits de science." Cosmos, 15 (July 8, 1859): 36-38, at 37.]


1858 June 8 / Rhymney, Wales / violent th storm and hail size of walnuts / Cardiff Times, 12th. [II; 2185. (Cardiff Times, June 12, 1858; not at BNA.)]


1858 June 10 / "Pollen" / Scotland / Edin N—, N.S., 10.116. [II; 2186. Davy, John. "Notice of a Shower of 'a Sulphurous Substance' (so-called), which fell in Inverness-shire in June 1858." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, n.s., 10 (1859): 116-118.]


1858 June (10-?) / Inverness-shire / "sulphurous substance" / Proc Roy Soc Edin 4/157. [II; 2187. Davy, John. "Notice of a Shower of a Sulphurous Substance (so-called), which fell in Inverness-shire in June 1858." Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 4 (1852-1853): 157-160. "Curious Phenomenon." Inverness Courier, June 24, 1858, p. 5 c. 4.]


1858 June 11 / Ice / at Plinlimmon (Cardigan/ Clbrst and 5 blocks of ice / one 2 yards along by 3 wide. 4 others a yard square each / Field, June 26, p. 531. [II; 2188. "A Most Extraordinary Thunder-Storm...." Field, June 26, 1858, p. 531. "A most extraordinary thunder-storm occurred in the upper part of this county (Cardigan) on the 11th inst., the following account of which I have received, and beg to forward you for insertion in.—John Pugh Pryce (Bwichbychan).—"We had a heavy storm on Plinlimmon on Friday last, the 11th inst., which from its nature appears to have been a water-spout which burst over the south-east part of Bwichystellan sheepwalk, for it was not felt at all at a short distance off. Mr John Edwards saw five blocks of ice fall; one of them was two yards long by one yard thick, the other four blocks were one yard square each. The lightning has struck rocks and torn up the ground in several places. That part of the flood which came down the river Lery has done great damage, particularly at Pontcock, where it has washed away a flannel manufactory adjoining the mill; some of the machinery was found four miles down the river. The first indication of the storm at Tal-y-Bont village was the appearance of the river Lery, which had swollen to the height of from five to six yards, coming down in a body like a wave, carrying everything before it until it came in contact with the bridge, the arch of which was too small fur the water; it then burst over and filled all the houses in the vicinity. No lives were lost, but several sheep and cattle."]


1858 June 12 / Birm Daily Post, June 9, 1868, cor writes that from a platform 2 and a half feet above the ground he had in 1858 gathered many of the stones and also many little frogs "all shrivelled up, as if by heat". Said still had dried body of one of the little frogs. Said the stones were lighter than Rowley rag and looked porous. [II; 2189.1, 2189.2. "Shower of Meteoric Stones." Birmingham Daily Post, June 9, 1868, p. 4 c. 6.]


1858 June / Birmingham / pebbles / See Aug 13, 1860. [II; 2190. See: 1860 Aug 13, (III; 31).]


1858 June 12 / Birm. D. Post, 14th—Dr Ingleby writes, "Many hundreds of thousands must have fallen, some of the streets being strewn with them. They are like fragments of lava, of very low specific gravity." [II; 2191. Ingleby, C. Mansfield. "The Aerolites." Birmingham Daily Post, June 14, 1858, p. 1. c. 6.]


1858 June 12 / In Birm Journal (a weekly), 19th shower of small stones, mostly black, water-worn bits of flint, but colored pebbles, too. Fell all over the city. From canvas awnings many pounds of them gathered. [II; 2192. "Thunderstorm in Birmingham." Birmingham Journal, June 19, 1858, p. 7 c. 5-6. "During these three hours the rain poured down in torents, and the thunder and lightning lasted nearly the whole time. It was accompanied by a phenomenon as rare as it is physically extraordinary. At the height of the storm showers of small stones fell with the rain. These were mostly black water-worn bits of flint but coloured pebbles were to be found amongst them. In structure they were not of the usual aerolite character, but similar in appearance to those found on a shingly coast at low tide. They seem to have fallen over the whole town. Upon the canvas awnings over the platforms fronting Christ Church and St. Peter's many pounds weight of these were gathered, and some greenhouses in the suburbs were damaged. After the storm thousands of them were visible on the pavement in New Street[,] Bull Street, &c."]


1858 June 12 / Great storm / Liverpool and Ireland / Birm. Daily Post, 15th. [II; 2193. "Accident During Saturday's Storm." Birmingham Daily Post, June 15, 1858, p. 1 c. 4.]


1858 June 12 / In Birm Daily Post, June 6, 1868, a conventional scientist, ridiculing that the stones had fallen from the sky. Says that there were two such reports in the year 1858. He says were bits of pavement. [II; 2194. Williams, W. Mattieu. "The Birmingham Shower of Meteoric Stones." Birmingham Daily Post, June 6, 1868, p. 4 c. 5.]


1858 June 12 / Stratford-upon-Avon / Great th. storm and large hail / 11 a.m. / Birmingham Daily Press, 14th / At Birm., one of the most terrific th. storms remembered. Roads like rivers. [II; 2195. Birmingham Daily Press, June 14, 1858; not at BNA.)]


1858 June 12 / Birm Daily Press, 15th, cor writes that soon after noon on 12th the stones fell—hundreds of thousands. "Nearly every stone is angular, smooth at the edges, dark green and of a hard light substance which easily cuts glass." One of the stones in his possession was "somewhat globular and brightly polished with a neck, altogether like a dark-green pear pip. Evidently crystallized." Cor says that at 10:15 p.m. night before the storm he saw a great meteor dart into the tail of Ursa Major. [II; 2196.1, 2196.2. (Birmingham Daily Press, June 15, 1858; not at BNA.)]


1858 June 12 / "Unequalled" th. storm at Liverpool / Birm Daily Press, 16th. [II; 2197. (Birmingham Daily Press, June 16, 1858; not at BNA.)]


1858 June 12 / At Stratford upon Avon, pieces of ice 2 inches long fell. / B.D. Press, 19th. [II; 2198. (Birmingham Daily Press, June 19, 1858; not at BNA.)]


1858 / Birmingham / Hungary / pebbl[e]s / Aug 10, 1841. [II; 2199. See: 1841 Aug 10, (II; 356).]


1858 / Frogs with the Birmingham stones / Birmingham Daily Post, June 9, 1868. [II; 2200. "Shower of Meteoric Stones." Birmingham Daily Post, June 9, 1868, p. 4 c. 6.]


1858 June 12 / (P) / in th storm / Birmingham / stones like Rowley ragstone / Symons Met 4/184. [II; 2201. Hall, Townshend M. "The Supposed Fall of Meteoric Stones in the 'Black' Country." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (December 1869): 184.]


1858 / For Birmingham falls of 1868 and 1858, L.T., June 1, 1868. [II; 2202. "Fall of Meteoric Stones." London Times, June 1, 1868, p. 9 c. 1. Plant, Thomas L. "The Thunderstorm.—Shower of Meteoric Stones." Birmingham Daily Post, May 30, 1868, p. 3 c. 2. "There was an extraordinary phenomenon during the deluge of rain. From nine to ten, meteoric stones fell in immense quantities in various parts of the town. The size of these stones varied from about ⅛th of an inch to ⅜ths of an inch in length, and about half those dimensions in thickness. They resembled in shape broken pieces of Rowley ragstone. A similar phenomenon visited Birmingham ten years ago. On the 12th of June, 1858, during a severe thunderstorm, there fell a great quantity of meteoric stones, in every respect like those discharged this morning."]


1858 June 15 / afternoon / Th. storm and electric manifestation greater than remembered ever at Broseley before / B.D. Post, 18th. [II; 2203. "Severe Thunder Storm," and, "Thunder Storm." Birmingham Daily Post, June 18, 1858, p. 4 c. 5. Both Walsall and Broseley experienced this storm, which  was "unsurpassed in the memory of the oldest person" in Walsall, (not at Broseley).]


1858 June 15 / night / At Stourbridge—"A most awful storm of thunder and lightning, worse than any ever seen or heard of in this county before." B.D. Press, 18th. [II; 2204. (Birmingham Daily Press, June 18, 1858; not at BNA.)]


1858 June 16 / Extraordinary th. storm at Birmingham / B. D. Post, 18th / With flashes of lightning, many balls of fire fell from the sky. [II; 2205. "The Thunder-Storm of Wednesday Night." Birmingham Daily Post, June 16, 1858, p. 1 c. 6.]


1858 June 16 / Ashbourne / Storm and "huge pieces of ice". Gardeners' Chronicle, June 26. [II; 2206. "The Storm of the 16th inst...." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1858 no. 26 (June 26): 510.]


1858 June 16 / At Chatworth, with th storm pieces of ice 6 inches in circumference / Birm Jour, 19th. [II; 2207. "Thunderstorms." Birmingham Journal, June 19, 1858, p. 7 c. 6. "At Chatsworth, pieces of ice, six inches in circumference, fell, smashing all the magnificent conservatories, forcing-houses, &c."]


1858 June 16 / night / Even greater th storm and damage by lightning at Birm / B. D. Press, 18th / but though great elec. storm, not so much rain. [II; 2208. (Birmingham Daily Press, June 18, 1858; not at BNA.)]


1858 June 17 / Villages in the High Peak of Derbyshire flooded by water pouring down the hills. Thought waterspout [h]ad burst. Houses washed away in a few minutes. / Wolverhampton / N. Staffordshire Herald, 26th. [II; 2209. (North Staffordshire Herald (Stoke-on-Trent), June 26, 1858; not at BNA.)]


1858 June 19 / 9 a.m. / One of the severest q's in Mexico / Y. B. 59-271. [II; 2210. "Earthquake in Mexico." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1859, 271.]


1858 June 23 / d fog and met / 23—dry fog / 26—brilliant met / 28—dry fog / Russia / Cosmos 15-88. [II; 2211. "Faits de science." Cosmos, 15 (July 22, 1859): 85-90, at 88.]


1858 July 16 / (Cut) / small toads / France / near Dijon / C. Rend- 47/159 / La Sci Pour Tous, 3/312. La Sci 3/288, 304, 312. ** [II; 2212. "M. Duméril communique l'extrait d'une Lettre que lui a adressée de Dijon...." Comptes Rendus, 47 (1858): 159. "Une Averse de Petits Crapauds." La Science Pour Tous, 3 (no. 36; August 12, 1858): 288. "L'Averse de Crapauds de M. Jobard." La Science Pour Tous, 3 (no. 38; August 26, 1858): 304. "La Défense de M. Jobard sur la Pluie de Crapauds." La Science Pour Tous, 3 (no. 36; September 2, 1858): 312.]


1858 July 16 / Tremendous th. storm at Dukinfield Park. After it, thousands of young toads were found. / Manchester Examiner, 20-3-6 / Numbers very great—children scooping up handfuls and filling their pockets with them. [II; 2213. (Manchester Examiner, July 20, 1858, 3-6; not at BNA.)]


1858 July 16 / In Hall-green and Dunkinfield Park, ac to Manchester Examiner, after a heavy th storm thousands of small toads / L.T., July 21-9-d / in Dunkinfield (Manchester). [II; 2214. "Toadstorm at Dukinfield." London Times, July 21, 1858, p. 9 c. 4. "A very heavy shower of rain took place on Sunday, about 1 o'clock, accompanied by vivid flashes of lightning and loud claps of thunder. The lightning struck a tree near the Dukinfield Recreation-grounds, Cheetham-hill-road, and near the premises where considerable damage was done by lightning some years ago. There was also a very heavy shower of rain in Dukinfield on Friday last, and after it was over thousands of small toads were found in Hall-green and about Dukinfield-park. We understand that a couple of handsful were taken out of one small hole, and children were filling their pockets with them. Many are yet to be seen in Dukinfield-park.—Manchester Examiner." (Manchester Examiner July, 1858; not at BNA.)]


1858 July 16 / evening / Shower of small toads at Dijon. / C.R. 47/159. [II; 2215. "M. Duméril communique l'extrait d'une Lettre que lui a adressée de Dijon...." Comptes Rendus, 47 (1858): 159.]


1858 July 16 / (Cut) / Meteor explode near ship / Channel Islands / Countryside Monthly 2/191. [II; 2216. (Country-Side Monthly, 2-191; not online).]


[1858 July 31 /] 1858 Aug 2 / Near Seaford, a host of sawflies  After a while, hosts of ladybirds. / Entomologist's Weekly Intelligencer 4/149. [II; 2218. Douglas, J.W. "Swarm of Insects." Entomologist's Weekly Intelligencer, 4 (August 7, 1858): 149-150.]


1858 - L Aug. 1 / (3) / Manchester, by Mr. Robt. Wilson / a Vulcan / Astro Reg 9/287. [II; 2217. Denning, William F. "The Total Eclipse in December Next." Astronomical Register, 9 (December 1871): 286-287.]


[1858 Aug 2. Wrong date. See: 1858 July 31, (II; 2218).]


1858 Aug 4 / Germany, Berlin, etc. / Met det? / BA '60. [II; 2219. Greg, 95.]


1858 Aug 9-10 / At sea, off Jedo, Japan, hundreds of meteors / BA 65. [II; 2220. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1864-65." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1865, 57-142, at  60-61. In 1858, H.M.S. Furious, (not Fury), was at Yedo, (now, Tokyo), to help establish the first British embassy in Japan.]


1858 Aug 11 / [LT], 6-f, etc. / Donati's Comet / Comet / See Aug. index. [II; 2221. Hind, John Russell. "The Comet." London Times, August 11, 1858, p. 6 c. 6.]


1858 Aug 11 / q / I / India, Simla / BA '11. [II; 2222. A class I earthquake. Milne, 714.]


1858 Aug. 13 / 6:39 p.m. / England. / great meteor / BA 79-108. [II; 2223. Greg, 95. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report of Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1878-79." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1879, 76-131. at 108-109, (illustrations).]


1858 Aug 17 / [LT], 7-f / 20-9-f / Sept 15-9-d / 17-9-c / Mets. [II; 2224. Arnold, J. "Meteors." London Times, August 17, 1858, p. 7 c. 6. "Meteors." London Times, August 20, 1858 p. 7 c. 6. Lowe, Edward Joseph, and others. "Large Meteors." London Times, September 15, 1858 p. 9 c. 4. "The Meteor of Monday Last. London Times, September 17, 1858 p. 9 c. 3.]


1858 Aug 18 / afternoon / near Iowa City, Iowa / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 2225. Finley, 3.]


1858 Aug 19 / "Terrible hurricane and excessive rain." / Piedmont, Italy. Cardiff Times, Aug 28-3-6. [II; 2226. (Cardiff Times, Aug 28-3-6, 1858; not at BNA.)]


1858 Sept / Wtch. / East Thorpe, Essex. [A; 396. "The Black Art in Somerset." London Times, September 11, 1858, p. 10 c. 4. "The Black Art in Somerset." Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette, September 9, 1858, p. 3 c. 6. "East Thorpe.—Witchcraft in the Nineteenth Century." Essex Standard, September 17, 1858, p. 2  c. 5.]


1858 Sept 12 / Great increase, Donati's Comet. [II; 2227.]


1858 Sept 13 / det met / 7:15 p.m. / In Bretagne, near Hédé—an enormous meteor, with loud detonations. [II; 2228. De la Haye. "Bolide observé dans les environs de Hédé (Ille-et-Vilaine)." Comptes Rendus, 47 (1858):  500-501.]


1858 Sept 13 / N. of France and Germany / same? / det. met / B.A., 60-94. [II; 2229. Greg, 95.]


1858 Sept 13 / 6:48 p.m. / near Neuilly (Seine) / Remarkable meteor / C.R. 47-800. [II; 2230. "Météore lumineux observé près de Neuilly (Seine), le 13 septembre 1858." Comptes Rendus, 47 (1858): 800-801.]


1858 Sept 15 / Met at Neuilly (Seine) / C.R. 47-800. [II; 2231. "Météore lumineux observé près de Neuilly (Seine), le 13 septembre 1858." Comptes Rendus, 47 (1858): 800-801.]


1858 Sept 28/30 / (+) / (Repeats / Sound or q) / See Nov. / Dartmoor District, at Crediton, no vibration of ground felt but rumbling sound heard and was attributed to a supposed explosion of gun powder. However, no such explosion had occurred. This in evening. About 7 p.m. on 28th, at Druids, near Ashburton, in this district, a rumbling sound was heard and in other places. About 8 p.m., sound and vibration as if of an explosion. In one place was attributed to distant cannonading. Quarterly Jour. Geolog. Soc. London 15 / (See June 22, 1889.) / (1888 / Nov, 1893). [II; 2232.1, 2232.2, 2232.3. Ormerod, George Wareing. "Notice of the Occurrence of an Earthquake along the Northern Edge of the Granite of the Dartmoor District on the 28th of September, 1858." Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London, 15 (1859): "Proceedings," 188-191. All references in this article refer to the date as the 28th of September.]


1858 Sept 28 / 8 p.m. / q. / Dorset / Timbs'  59-271. [II 2233. "Earthquakes in Dorsetshire." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1859, 271.]


1858 Sept 30 / Nottingham / evening / many meteors / BA '58. [II; 2234. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1857-58." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1858, Reports on the State of Science, 137-157, at 150-151.]


1858 Sept. 30 / Met—Beeston / by Lowe—listed by him as "Curious". / Rec. Sci., 1/138. [II; 2235. Lowe, 135, 138.]


1858 Sept 20 to Oct 10 / —great q's, Turkey and Greece / Oct 3—Algeria/ 10—Italy / 16—France / 25—France / BA '11. Sim q's, Feb 18, 1889. [II; 2236. Milne, 714, 735. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1858 Sept 30 / Tremendous sunspot / (NM) / Ast. Reg 7-19. [II; 2237. (Astronomical Register, 7-19). Wrong, not volume 7.) "A Descriptive Account of the Sun and Planets." Astronomical Register, 4 (1866): 2-7, 29-33, 57-62, at 31. Chambers, George Frederick. A Handbook of Descriptive and Practical Astronomy. Oxford: Clarendon, 4th edition, 1889, 17. "On September 30, in the same year [1858], one having a breadth from W. to E. of 5' 21", or 144,450 miles, was observed." Schwabe, Samuel Heinrich. "Sonnen-Beobachtungen im Jahre 1858." Astronomische Nachrichten, 50 (1859): 93-94.]


1858 Oct 2 / Donati's Comet outshone Arcturus. [II; 2238. "Remarks on the Appearance of Comet V. 1858, (Donati's Comet), accompanied by Drawings...." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 19 (November 12, 1858): 12-15, at 12. "Oct. 2, 7h. The night favourable. The comet's head much brighter than Arcturus."]


1858 Oct 3 / q / Algeria / BA '11. [II; 2239. A class I earthquake. Milne, 714.]


1858 Oct 6 / [LT], 10-d. / Comet and the Astronomers. / See Oct index, Comet. [II; 2240. (London Times; index for Comet Oct 1858). "Astronomers and the Comet." London Times, October 6, 1858, p. 10 c. 4. "There is much cometary information tht philosophers could easily impart if they possess it, and which the public will most gratefully welcome. What, for instance, has become of the comet that was expected last year? When may we look for the reappearance of the comet that performed such extraordinary vagaries in 1846, and should return in 1858 or 1859?" Palmer's Index to the Times Newspaper offers many items about comets for this month, but only a few provide useful information about Donati's comet. Hind, John Russell. "The Comet. London Times, September 29, 1858, p. 8 c. 6. "Will Not the Comet Be Very Near Venus on the 21st of October?" London Times, October 4, 1858, p. 9. c. 6. A correspondent cakculates that Venus may pass thru the tail of the comet. "The Comet." London Times, October 28, 1858, p. 8 c. 5. Chacornac's observations of the comet from September 10 to October 9 are described. Hind, John Russell. "The Comet." London Times, October 19, 1858, p. 7 c. 1-2. Hind indicates that Venus escaped passing thru the denser portion of the comet's tail and more accurately describes its orbit,]


1858 Oct 8 / evening / Many meteors / B.A., '58. [II; 2241. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1857-58." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1858, Reports on the State of Science, 137-157, at 150-151.]


1858 Oct 16 / Fr / Vosges / (q.) / Remiremont / C.R. 47/669. [II; 2242. Laurent, P. "Tremblement de terre ressenti dans les Vosges le 16 octobre." Comptes Rendus, 47 (1858): 669.]


1858 Oct 16 / Q. at Remiremont in the Vosges, France, and sounds like thunder / La Sci Pour Tous 3-392. [II; 2243. "Le Tremblement de Terre du 16 Octobre." La Science Pour Tous, 2 (no. 49; November 11, 1856): 392.]


1858 Nov. 5 / (Oct. see.) / M Standard of 16 / Cor writes that the "mysterious noise" heard at Bude must been from explosion at Devonport Harbor where a sunken rock had been blown up. [II; 2244. "The Mysterious Sounds in Cardiganshire." London Standard, November 16, 1858, p. 4 c. 5. See: 1855 / autumn, (II; 1877).]


[1858] Nov 9 / (Script 207) / Cardiganshire Sounds / L.T. 1858 / Nov 9/10/a / 12/8/f / 13/6 or 8/? / 20/12/c / Dec 1/9/f. [II; 2245. "Mysterious Phenomenon." London Times, November 9, 1858, p. 10 c. 1. "The 'Mysterious Phenomenon' in Cardiganshire." London Times, November 12, 1858, p. 8 c. 6. "To the Editor of the Times" London Times, November 13, 1858, p. 8 c. 6. "To the Editor of the Times" London Times, November 20, 1858, p. 12 c. 3. "To the Editor of the Times" London Times, December 1, 1858, p. 9 c. 6.]


1858 Nov 11 / Violent q. Lisbon. Preceded by 2 days incessant rain. The Geologist 2-32. [II; 2246. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. "Foreign Correspondence." Geologist, 2 (January, 1859): 32-37, at 32. "This is said to have been the most violent earthquake experienced in Lisbon since the great one of 1755...." "The earthquake was preceded by two days of almost incessant rain."]


1858 Nov 11 / Beeston Observatory / many small meteors / BA, '59. [II; 2247. (BA 59. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1858-59." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1859, Reports on the State of Science, 81-95.)]


1858 Nov 12 / [LT], 10-a / Aeroliths. [II; 2248. "Aeroliths." London Times, November 12, 1858, p. 10 c. 1.]


1858 Nov 14 to Nov. 28 / Male convulsionary / Religio-Phil. J., Ap 8, 1876 / William Hutchinson, a well-to-do farmer, about a mile from Springfield, Erie Co., Pa., taken with convulsions. Had been unusually healthy man. Most violent fit every evening, about the same time. No more until anniversary of the 1st fit—same hour and lasted till about the 28th. Ten years went by and each anniversary the same seizures. He travelled tour of Europe, Australia, West Indies to shake off the seizures, but each anniversary they returned. (This copied from the N.Y. Herald) / Seems to me his fears before these dates brought on phe. [A; 397.1, 397.2, 397.3. "A Pennsylvania Farmer's Trouble...." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 20 (no. 4; April 8, 1876): 28, (c. 1-2). His fits occurred each year, starting on the same date, for eighteen years.]


1858 Nov. 23 / [LT], 6-f / q. / Portugal. [II; 2249. "Portugal." London Times, November 23, 1858, p. 6 c. 6.]


1858 Nov. 25 / 11:43 p.m. / Cork, Ireland. / detonating meteor. Meteor seen and sound like a loud clap of thunder / Nat. Hist Rev. 6-26. [II; 2250. "Royal Irish Academy." Natural History Review, 6 (1859): pt. 2, 1-27, at 26-27.]

 

1858 Nov. 29 / ab 1 p.m. / Biarritz / q in a thick fog / Cosmos 13-700. [II; 2251. "Nouvelles de la Semaine." Cosmos, 13 (December 10, 1858): 697-703, at 700-701. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. "Foreign Correspondence." Geologist, 2 (January, 1859): 32-37, at 32-33. "At about one o'clock in the afternoon, a dark fog floated heavily in the air, giving to the horizon an unusual tint that made M. de Monfort suppose that something extraordinary was about to happen." "An hour afterwards the dark fog had disappeared, and the sun's rays darted down with all the fierce heat of an August day, although the thermometer had not varied."]


1858 Nov. 29 / q / I / Basses Pyrénées / BA '11. [II; 2252. A class I earthquake. Milne, 714.]


1858 Nov. 30 / Pas de Calias / Met streak / BA 60-106. [II; 2253. Greg, 106.]


1858 Nov. 30 / 8:45 p.m. / Boscastle / Jabez Brown / BA 58/156 / See 1857. [II; 2254. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1857-58." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1858, Reports on the State of Science, 137-157, at 156.]


1858 Dec 6 / [LT], 9-f / 10-9-c / Met in broad day. [II; 2255. Lingen, Charles. "A Meteor in Broad Day." London Times, December 6, 1858, p. 9 c. 6. Giles, J.D. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, December 10, 1858, p. 9 c. 3.]


1858 Dec 7 / [LT], 6-f / 8-10-c / 10-7-f / Brilliant Aurora. [II; 2256. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, December 7, 1858, p. 6 c. 6. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, December 8, 1858, p. 10 c. 3. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, December 10, 1858, p. 7 c. 6.]


1858 Dec 8 / Island of Reunion / volc in full eruption. Geologist 2-86. [II; 2257. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. "Foreign Correspondence." Geologist, 2 (February, 1859): 80-88, at 86. On December 8th, the Island's Governor sent a dispatch: "The volcano of this island is now in full eruption. Since last week a torrent of burning lava has been seen flowing towards the sea, and all communication with the Arrondissement du Vent has been cut off; the lava having crossed the high road for an extent of 400 yards, and to the depth of from nine to twelve feet."


1858 Dec 9 / Fr / Aussun, Haute Garonne / Metite / B.A. 1860 / (near Spain / See Dec 24.) [II; 2258. Fletcher, 102. Greg, 95. These are the Ausson meteorites.]


1858 Dec. 9 / (F) / Montrejeau / 2 stones fall. / C.R. 47/1053 / 48/index, Aerolite / 7:30 a.m. Montrejeau in C.R. 48-193. [II; 2259. Petit. "Sur l'aérolithe du 9 decembre." Comptes Rendus, 47 (1858): 1053-1055. Filhol, and, Leymerie. "Note sur l'aérolithe de Montrejean." Comptes Rendus, 48 (1859): 193-198. (48: 16, 267, 348, 446, 479, 578, 798, 920.) Montréjeau is the correct spelling.]


1858 Dec 9 / Metite of Montrejeau (Haute-Garonne) / L. An. Sci 1860/16 / or M-Jean? / 7 a.m. [II; 2260. "L'aérolithe de Montrejeau." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 4 (1860): 16-21.]


1858 Dec 14 / [LT], 8-f / Astro phe. [II; 2261. "Astronomical Phenomena." London Times, December 14, 1858, p. 8 c. 6.]


1858 Dec. 23 / qs / Jamaica and Philippines / BA '11. [II; 2262. Two class I earthquakes. Milne, 714.]


1858 Dec. 24 / Molina, Murcia, Spain / (F) / CR 66-639. Near place of Dec. 9 / (CR 66-639). [II; 2263. Fletcher, 102. This is the Molina meteorite. Daubrée, Gabriel-Auguste, and, St. Meunier. "Météorite tombée à Murcie, Espagne, le 24 décembre 1858." Comptes Rendus, 66 (1868): 639-642.]


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

1858 Dec. 29 / Venus Inf Conjunction Sun / (Al). [II; 2264. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1858, 512.]

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