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Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1876


1876:


1876 // Light / Wales / Proc. Eng 19/98. [B; 78. Fryer, A.T. "Psychological aspects of the Welsh Revival." Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, 19 (1905-1907): 80-161, at 98 & 142-145. Fryer refers to Bye-gones articles in his appendix, (one from "1876"), where none exists; however, he is referring to the phenomena observed in 1869, 1875, and 1877. See: 1875 [Feb 28] / ab. March 1, (B; 42).]


1876 // Chili, near Rochester / See Dec. 16, 1876. /// 10 men / 10 / 100 // 1 m. [B; 79. See: 1876 Dec. 16, (B; 123).]


1876 // Lebanon, Ohio. / Burglar shoot here—bullets—See March 6, 1880. [B; 80. See: 1880 March 6, B; 278).]


1876 // Fasting girl of Market Harborough / See Jan 4, 1878. [B; 81. See: See: 1878 Jan 4, (B; 178).]


1876 // A.W. Underwood / Negro boy / Paw Paw / fire breath / See May 1, 1880. [B; 82. See: 1880 May 1, (B; 289), and, 1882 Dec 1, (B; 408).]


1876 // Body of Mrs. W.I. Peters / Frankfort, Ind / See Dec. 22, 1888. [B; 83. See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1876 // H.H. / Philadelphia / See Ap. 21, 1883. [B; 84. See: 1883 Ap. 21, (B; 495).]


1876 // White spot on Saturn discovered by Prof Asaph Hall. [IV; 1793. Hall, Asaph. Saturn and Its Ring, 1875-1889. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1889, 6. See: 1876 Dec 7, (IV; 1963).]


1876 // No marked occurrence of periodic meteor streams, except Perseids (Rept BA 76-150). The Perseids were not extraordinary. [IV; 1794. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 150. "With the exception of the annual reappearances of the Perseids, there have

been no marked occurrences of periodic star-showers during the past year."]


1876 Jan 2 / Nothing local papers. [IV; 1795.]


1876 Jan 2 / evening / "A piece of burnt stone resembling a partially burnt slate coal, with white sparkling specks on it, fell at Ecclefechan." / Nature 15/305 / Scotland / Measured about 4 inches by 2, weighs 9 ounces, and took 20 minutes to cool. A volume of smoke came from it. [IV; 1796.1, 1796.2. "Notes." Nature, 15 (February 1, 1877): 304-306, at 305. "A piece of burnt stone resembling a piece of partially burnt slate coal, with white sparkling specks on it, fell at Ecclefechan on the evening of the 2nd January. Two men, walking on the Glasgow road, heard a noise behind them, and on turning round they found the stone referred to embedded in the ground to the extent of half-an-inch or more. One of them attempted to lift it but got his hand burnt. The stone, which measures about four inches by two, and weighs nine ounces, took twenty minutes to cool. A volume of smoke proceeded from it."]


1876 Jan 4 / [LT], 10-c / State of Vesuvius. [IV; 1797. "Vesuvius." London Times, January 4, 1876, p. 10 c. 3.]


1876 Jan 5 / 10:30 p.m. / Iowa—Missouri / det met / BA 77/104 / 76-171. [IV; 1798. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 171. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 104-105.]


1876 Jan 7 / 2:20 p.m. / q / Contoocook, N.H. / A.J. Sci 3/12/30. [IV; 1799. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes.—No. 6." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 12 (1876): 25-30. at 30.]


1876 Jan 8 / 4:30 p.m. / Lockport, N.Y. / q / R—March 9. [IV; 1800. Refer to: 1875 March 9, (IV; 1616). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes.—No. 6." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 12 (1876): 25-30, at 30.]


1876 Jan 15 / L. and Water / Animal shot in Hampshire identified as Sir Allen Young's Eskimo dog. [B; 85. (Land and Water, January 15, 1876.)]  


1876 Jan 15 / midnight / Severe shock / China, Me. / A.J. Sci 3/12/30. [IV; 1801. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes.—No. 6." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 12 (1876): 25-30, at 30.]


[1876 Jan 19. Wrong date. See: 1876 March 6, (IV; 1802).]


1876 Jan. 19 / [LT], 9-f / q. / Comrie. [IV; 1803. "Earthquake." London Times, January 19, 1876, p. 9 c. 6. "Earthquake at Comrie." Scotsman, January 18, 1876, p. 5 c. 1. "About  three o'clock on Sunday morning, at five in the evening , three distinct shocks of earthquake were felt in the village of Comrie and the neighbourhood. The tremor of the earth was not great, but the shocks were as usual accompanied with a loud rumbling noise, resembling that of distant thunder or the discharge of cannon. The shocks apparently came from the south-west, and proceeded to the north-east. Several slight shocks have recently been felt in the village during the night, but those of Sunday morning were sufficiently severe to awaken the people at Lawers and the farms to the eastward. The weather during the day was extremely mild and settled."]


1876 Jan 27 / 2 q's / Adrian, Mich / A.J. Sci 3-12-30. [IV; 1804. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes.—No. 6." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 12 (1876): 25-30, at 30.]


1876 Jan 29 / a Fancher / (Robson) / Religio-Phil-J, 362-4, copied from New York Mercury—arrival in New York of a remarkable woman, Jennie Robson. Had come under the influence of a hypnotist named Oliver. Once when willed by him had climbed a wall 7 feet high, and fallen and seriously hurt. Returned to consciousness, was blind and deaf for 5 or 6 weeks. She had no recollection of former life. Did not know a letter of the alphabet. Ignorant of use of knives and forks. Parents were strangers to her. Like a newborn infant but acquired knowledge rapidly. Became engaged to young man, George Henderson. They ran away and married in May, 1856—This in Newcastle, England. Several children. At each birth she was unconscious several weeks. One morning she awoke in state of the first character. Had lost all recollection of the four years of married life. Could not reconcile. Hated husband and children. Took up life at the changing point and tried to scale the garden wall where accident had been. Separated from husband. So annoyed at any allusion to the second life that persuaded her parents to let her live in the south of England, near Dartmouth. Fell in love with someone here named Hood. No divorce. Could not marry. She and Hood emigrated to Minnesota. In August, 1875, she and Hood out driving, horse ran away—she was thrown to the ground—unconscious for two weeks. Recovered. Hood could not convince her he was her husband. She accused him of spiriting her from her home. Hood had to agree to take her back to her home in Newcastle. [B; 86.1 to 86.8. "Double Life." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 19 (no. 20; January 29, 1876): 362, (c. 4). Prior to this story's appearance in the New York Mercury, the characters in this story, (Anthony J. Oliver, the prominent mesmerist and lecturer, Jennie Robson, the woman, George Henderson nor Frederick Hood, her husbands), could not be traced in any British or American newspapers; and, no record of a marriage between any George Henderson and any Robson, in Britain, in 1856, could be found.]


1876 Jan 31 / See July 18. / 5:30 pm. / det met / Louisville, Ky / BA 76-171 / Am J. Sci 3/11/458 / And Bath Co, flesh, March 3. [IV; 1805. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 171. Smith, John Lawrence. "On a Bolides of January 31st, that passed over Kentucky." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 11 (1876): 458. See: 1876 July 18, (IV; 1876.), and, (1876 March 3.)]


1876 Feb 1 / 4:30 p.m. / Violent shocks, Samoa. In Dec and Jan, loud reports had been heard. / Nature 14-270. [IV; 1806. Whitmee, Samuel James. "Earthquakes in Samoa." Nature, 14 (July 27, 1876): 270-271.]


1876 Feb 5 / 10:03 p.m. / e to south / Met / Boston / Sc A. Sup 1-235. [IV; 1807. "A Brilliant Meteor." Scientific American Supplement, 1 (no. 15; April 8, 1876): 235.]


1876 Feb. 12 / Faces appear on window glass of house in Norfolk, Va. / Rel-Ph. J., Feb 12, 1876, p. 381. [B; 87. "Manifestations in Portsmouth, Va." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 19 (February 12, 1876): 381, (c. 1). "Virginia." New York Herald, January 24, 1876, p. 6 c. 6. "The latest curiosity in this place is a ghost, or what should be more properly described as a phantom vision. This mysterious apparition is slightly eccentric in its habits. Disdaining to seek protection in the dark shades of night, it appears boldly in the bright sunlight, and, in order that everybody can see it, has located itself in a window of a house in Portsmouth. Looking at it from across the street in a particular light it presents the distinct appearance of a lady holding a child, which as you cross the street gradually fades out of
sight, so that on close inspection the glass presents no strange feature to the vision. Old residents of Portsmouth insist that it has been visible for years, but it is only within the past few weeks that it has attracted public attention. The gentleman residing in the house is much annoyed with his ghostly guest and seriously proposes to demolish the pane of glass, an act of cruelty that would probably diminish the receipts of the ferry company about $25 per day." "The Glass-Ghost in Portsmouth." Alexandria Gazette, January 26, 1876, p. 1 c. 1. "Norfolk seems to be given up to spooks...." Alexandria Gazette, February 1, 1876, p. 2 c. 1.]


1876 Feb 12 / Mauna Loa and Russia / See Jan 15, 1887. [IV; 1808. See: (1887 Jan 15).]


1876 Feb 12 / Russia / Caspian Sea / great q / [BA] '11. [IV; 1809. Milne, 726.]


1876 Feb 13 / Great display / Mauna Loa / Am J. Sci 3/14/68. [IV; 1810. Coan, Titus. "Volcanic Eruptions on Hawaii." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 14 (1877): 68.]


1876 Feb 16 / [LT], 10-a / Sunspot. [IV; 1811. "A Sun Spot." London Times, February 16, 1876, p. 10 c. 1.]


1876 Feb. 16 / Judesegeri, Mysore, India / (F). [IV; 1812. Fletcher, 104. This is the Judesergeri meteorite.]


1876 Feb 27 / q / Detroit, Mich / A.J. Sci 3/12/30. [IV; 1813. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes.—No. 6." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 12 (1876): 25-30, at 30.]


1876 Feb 29 / [LT], 9-f / Rare bird. [B; 88. "A Rare Bird." London Times, February 29, 1876, p. 9 c. 6. A surf scoter, (a sea duck which normally ranges in North America and sometimes in Northern Europe), was shot at Christ Church, Hampshire.]


1876 Mar. 3 / flesh / (D-45) / Bath Co., Ky. ** [IV; 1814. The note copies information from pages 45 and 46 of The Book of the Damned. "A Shower of Meat." Scientific American, n.s., 34 (March 25, 1876): 197. "Flesh Descending in a Shower." New York Times, March 10, 1876, p. 1 c. 6. "The Kentucky Sower of Flesh." Scientific American Supplement, 2 (July 1, 1876): 426. Brandeis, Leopold. "The Kentucky Shower of Flesh." Sanitarian, 4 (May 1876): 222. "The Shower of Flesh." New York Times, March 12, 1876, p. 1 c. 6. Edwards, A. Mead. "The Kentucky Meat-Shower." Scientific American Supplement, 2 (July 22, 1876): 473.]


1876 March 4 / Rel-Ph. J., 401-3 / Ghost / Louisville, Ky. [B; 89. "A Funny Horror." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 19 (no. 25; March 4, 1876): 401, (c. 3).]


1876 //winter /// Larvae / Norway / (D-92). [IV; 1815. The note copies information from page 92 of The Book of the Damned. "Showers of Worms." Timb's Year Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1876, 26. As the volume was for 1876, the event would have been in 1875.)]


[1876 March 6 /] 1876 Jan 19 / near Wilkesbarre, Pa. / night of / Explosion of mine gas in—looked like volcano and loud report. / Sc Am 34-200. [IV; 1802. "Remarkable Coal Mine Explosion." Scientific American, n.s., 34 (March 25, 1876): 200. The initial explosion, (on January 19), and fire were ended by flooding the mine over the next three weeks. A second explosion, (on March 6), occurred, while the mine was being emptied of water. "The work of bailing continued until about nine o'clock on the evening of the 6th of March, when suddenly a low, rumbling sound was heard below ground; and in a moment after, an explosion like a hundred earthquakes broke on the air, and sent its terrible echoes along the valley for miles in every direction. The shaft is located on a high hill, and instantly a stream of fire, forty feet long and twelve wide, shot up into the air for a distance of 500 feet. The whole country around for miles was brightly illuminated by this vast column of burning gas. The houses in the vicinity of the shaft shook like reeds at the moment of the explosion, and thousands of people turned out in terror to see what had caused the unusual commotion." "At Wilkesbarre, a little distance in the valley below, the loud report was heard, and the great flame of light, shooting heavenward above the shaft in the mountain, caused the greatest excitement, which grew momentarily as the illumination continued. Those at a distance could only conjecture what the cause of the Vesuvius counterpart was. Many people really believed that a volcano had broken loose, and terror seized upon more than one nervous witness. The tremendous stream of fire shot up from the shaft for three hours, loud explosions occurring every fifteen minutes. In the meantime thousands of excited people from all sections flocked to the vicinity of the shaft, and stood mute witnesses of the greatest sight which any eye had ever looked upon." "Subterranean Pyrotechnics." New York Herald, March 8, 1876, p. 7 c. 4.]


1876 March 7 / Radcliffe Ob., Oxford / small spot on sun suspected to be a planet. / Nature 14/473. [IV; 1816. Main, Robert. "Sun-Spots suspected to be Identical with an Inter-Mercurial Planet." Nature, 14 (September 28, 1876): 473.]


1876 March 12 / Nothing in S. London papers. [IV; 1817.]


1876 March 12 / Red snow / London / Nature 13/414 or 415 / D-287. [IV; 1818. The note copies information from pages 287 to 288 of The Book of the Damned. "Red Snow near London." Timb's Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1876, 89. "On Sunday the 12th of March, 1876, at Forest Hill, near the Crystal Palace, red snow qas found. This red snow resembled nothing so much as strawberry ice, and when melted left a red deposit, which under an ordinary microscope looked like vegetable cells—at least so says a writer who had an opportunity of examining it.." "Notes." Nature, 13 (March 23, 1876): 413-415, at 415. "Red Snow." London Daily News, March 14, 1876, p. 3 c. 5. "Red Snow." London Daily News, March 17, 1876, p. 6 c. 4. Rev. Henry Wright, of Thuxton Rectory, Norfolk, reported that, while rain mixed with sleet wa falling on Sunday morning, water in streams was colored red. "Red Snow." London Daily News, March 20, 1876, p. 7 c. 3.]


1876 March 12 / London / 2 p.m. / Daily News, March 14 / Mr. Edward Hardy writes that upon the snow that fell in his garden in Forest Hill appeared patches of red. "On being taken up in a spoon, the 'red snow' had a very distinctly red tinge, much resembling strawberry ice, and on melting left a red deposit which with a very low-powered microscope has the appearance of vegetable cells." [IV; 1819.1, 1819.2. "Red Snow." London Daily News, March 14, 1876, p. 3 c. 5.]


1876 March 12 / News, March 20 / Hardy writes again. Had learned that the substance had fallen also at Streatham and Reading. / (Reading) / Here the color was of "ironmould marks on linen". Mr Hardy supposed the corpuscles to be protococi but they did not look like specimens figured in the Micrographic Dictionary. [IV; 1820.1, 1820.2. "Red Snow." London Daily News, March 20, 1876, p. 7 c. 3.]


1876 March / Red snow also Thurston, Norfolk. / Nature 13-415. [IV; 1821. Thurston, (which is in Suffolk, not in Norfolk), was probably a typographical error for "Thuxton." "Notes." Nature, 13 (March 23, 1876): 413-415, at 415. "Red Snow." London Daily News, March 14, 1876, p. 3 c. 5.]


1876 March 13 / 3 a.m., high tide from hurricane flooding houses near Southwark Bridge / Marylebone Mercury, 15th. [IV; 1822. "The Snow Storm of Sunday." Cheltenham Chronicle, March 14, 1876, p. 5 c. 5. (Marylebone Mercury, March 15, 1876; not available at BNA.)]


1876 [March 13] / about middle of March // (Fish) / "They varied from one inch to four feet in length, and covered acres of ground, in the neighborhood of the town of Winchester [Indiana]." As to 4 feet, the editorial in N.Y. Times, March 17-4-6, is getting all amusement can from the report. [IV; 1823. "Fish Out of Place." New York Times, March 17, 1876, p. 4 c. 6. "A special dispatch to the Cincinnati Gazette...." Dallas Daily Herald, (Texas), March 17, 1876, p. 1 c. 2. "A special dispatch to the Cincinnati Gazette, dated Winchester, Indiana, March 13th, says: We had the greatest sensation to-day in the history of the county. The people are wild with excitement, and at this writing are visiting the scene by hundreds. About 10 o'clock this day, the sky being clear and the sun shining, there was a rain from the heavens of acres of living fish, some as long as four feet. Mr. Joseph Hulls had a calf killed, and a horse got its back broken by oue of these fish falling on it. I visited the place about 11 o'clock, and the field and creek were full of fish, and men and boys trying to stop up the creek to hold them. I have got one of these fish in my poud that weighs about thirty pounds that I picked up on the field."]


1876 / middle March // Enormous flight of wild pigeons in Sullivan Co., N.Y., 12 miles long. On trees for night. Details of men with lanterns killing them. / N.Y. Herald, April 17-4-7. [IV; 1824. "Flight of Wild Pigeons." New York Herald, April 17, 1876, p. 4 c. 7.]


1876 March 19 / 11:18 p.m. / Paris / Luxembourg / Large met / BA 76-128. [IV; 1825. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 128-129.]


1876 March 29 / [LT], 10-b / Mystery—case of the little boy hunter at Tynemouth. [B; 90. "A Mystery." London Times, March 29, 1876, p. 10 c. 2. The disappearance of the little boy was explained, by his companions, as having fallen down into an abandoned mine shaft.]  


1876 April / Fasting girl / Human Nature of / Ellen Sudworth, aged 16, of Culcheth, near Leigh, took to her bed 5 years before. Ceased to take solid food—occasionally a little water or brandy. Lost voice and eyes closed. In March, 1876, had opened her eyes and recovered speech. [B; 91.1, 91.2. "Another Fasting Girl." Human Nature, 10 (no. 3; April 1876): 190-191. "A Fasting Girl at Culcheth." Manchester Times, February 19, 1876, p. 5 c. 2. "The Fasting Girl in Lancashire." British Medical Journal, 1876, v. 1 (no. 793; March 11, 1876): 329. "During the whole of this period, since July, 1871, she has not partaken of any solid food, but has been supported with soups, milk-puddings; therefore, this case ought not to be called one of fasting."]


1876 April / stone in storm / London / D-103. [IV; 1826. The note copies information from page 103 of The Book of the Damned. "Luminous meteors." Timb's Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1877, 216-217.) This is the Rowton meteorite. See: 1876 Ap. 26, (IV; 1846).]


1876 Ap. 2 / (worms) / NY Times, 2-7, quoting Christiania Morgenblad—after a violent storm, worms crawling on the snow—impossible that could have come from the frozen earth. [IV; 1827. "A Shower of Worms." New York Times, April 2, 1876, p. 2 c. 7.]


1876 Ap 2 and 14 / Shocks / Philippines / Singapore Daily Times, May 19. [IV; 1828. (Singapore Daily Times, May 19, 1876; on microfilm.)]


1876 Ap. 2 / 5:55 a.m. / Sound like a strong detonation and vibrations / Switzerland / La Nat, Ap. 22, p. 336. [IV; 1829. "Tremblement de terre en Suisse." La Nature, 1876 pt. 1 (no. 151; April 22): 336.]


1876 April 2 to May 16 / Shocks in Canton of Neuchatel. Ap. 2, Ap. 30, and 11 more to May 16 / Nature 15-189. [IV; 1830. "Notes." Nature, 15 (December 28, 1876): 188-191, at 189. "Séance du 19 mai 1876." Bulletin de la Société des Sciences Naturelles de Neuchâtel, 10 (1873-1876): 354-373, at 358-373.]              


1876 Ap 4 / Planet ac to Weber, of observations at Peckeloh—denied by other astronomers / Eng. Mec. 24/160/ D-193 / Sc. Am 35/257 / that not so. [IV; 1831. The note copies information from page 193 of The Book of the Damned. (English Mechanic, 24-160.) "The Inter-Mercurial Planet." Scientific American, n.s., 35 (October 21, 1876): 257. "Les planètes entre le Soleil et Mercure...." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 20 (1876): 6-11, at 7. "Par une lettre datée du 26 août 1876, M. Wolf, de Zurich, informait M. Le Verrier qu'à Peckeloh M. Weber avait vu, le 4 avril précédent, à 4 heures 25, temps moyen de Berlin, une tache ronde sur le soleil, qui avait été vu sans tache le matin de cette journée et le matin de la journée suivante, non-seulement par M. Weber, mais aussi par lui (M. Wolf), et par M. Schmidt, à Athènes." Heinrich Weber was an astronomer familiar with sunspots; and, he reported three telescopic meteors slowly crossing the Sun's disk on July 5, 1869. Weber, Heinrich. "Teleskopsches Meteor vor der Sonne, beobachtet am 5. Juli in Peckeloh." Wochenschrift für Astronomie, Meteorologie und Geographie, n.s. v. 12 (1869): 279-280.]


1876 Ap. 5 / 5 p.m. / Salt Lake City. Tremendous powder explosion in Salt Lake City. / N.Y. Herald 6-7-3. [IV; 1832. "A Powder Mill Explodes." New York Herald, April 6, 1876, p. 7 c. 3.]


1876 Ap. 5 / afternoon / Explosion of a tank of anthacene. in Philadelphia / Herald, 6-7-3. [IV; 1833. "An Anthracene Explosion." New York Herald, April 6, 1876, p. 7 c. 3.]


1876 (Ap. 6) // Ap. 21, Medium and Daybreak of, p. 245 / A medium, Theodore Haywood, killed at Portsmouth by an accident at the Government Dockyard, afternoon of Ap. 6. [B; 92. "A Medium Killed." Medium and Daybreak, 7 (no. 316; April 21, 1876): 245.]


1876 Ap 7 / evening / Eperjes, Hungary / det met / BA 76-171. [IV; 1834. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 171.]


1876 Ap. 8 / 3:30 p.m. / A large part of Bragg's Bluff, Lookout Mt., fell the fragments going down the mt side with roars and violent q effects ¼ mile away. / N.Y. Herald 9-11-3. [IV; 1835. "A Thundering Fall." New York Herald, April 9, 1876, p. 11 c. 3.]


1876 Ap. 9 / B Assoc, 77/147 / Met burst over Hungarian towns on flanks of Carpathian Alps. Said to have come from part of sky "almost" in absolute agreement with radiant of Ap. 10, 1874. [IV; 1836. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 146-148.]


1876 Ap 10 / St. Mary's Co., Md.—roaring explosive sound and q. / NY Times 15-1-3. [IV; 1837. "Earthquake in Maryland." New York Times, April 15, 1876, p. 1 c. 3.]


1876 Ap. 11 or (12) / (+) / 3 a.m. / Said, N.Y. Times 17-4-6, loud report at Sugar Loaf Mt, in Highlands, N.Y., near Hudson River. An avalanche of trees, mud, and rocks, and catfish fell down mountain's side. Then it said a crater had formed on mt side. Times 13-5-4—wap, Ap 11, at 3 p.m.—at 7 and again at 8—water pouring from hole in mt. Carrying great trees a distance of a thousand feet. No fishes mentioned. Loud reports. This an editorial. / See 14-7-4. [IV; 1838.1, 1838.2, 1838.3, 1838.4. "An Upheaval in the Highlands." New York Times, April 13, 1876, p. 5 c. 4. "The Sugar Loaf Upheaval." New York Times, April 14, 1876, p. 7 c. 4. "A Stifled Volcano." New York Times, April 17, 1876, p. 4 c. 6-7.]


1876 Ap. 11 / Sugar Loaf Mountain, on the east side of the Hudson, near the northern entrance of the Highlands. / See back to Ap. 5. / (Herald—13-5-7) / A tremendous sound to which powder explosions and thunder were not compared. Upon the hill a chasm 300 feet long and 50 feet deep—from it thousands of tons of earth rolled down the hill carrying along trees and fences. Later reports were heard again and out from the hole in the side of the hill burst torrents of water which flowed for considerable times. "Water and fish" in the headline. / Have the Herald to May 1. [IV; 1839.1, 1839.2, 1839.3. "Upheaval in the Highlands." New York Herald, April 13, 1876, p. 5 c. 7. A railroad flagman "found the railroad track for 500 feet covered with stones and boulders, and sun-fish and perch." No pond or stream was near the site before the land slip. "A Remarkable Eruption." New York Sun, April 13, 1876, p. 1 c. 5. "An Upheaval in the Highlands." Brewster Standard, (New York), April 14, 1876, p. 2 c. 2. "A gardener at the Wade Mansion stated that before the eruption all the land east of the Wade residence was saturated with water, and several streams ran through the grounds, but after the avalanche the streams disappeared, and the ground there was not near as wet as before. This explained the true cause of the colossal eruption. The land at the base of the mountain is of a sandy nature, and the immense quanties of water percolating through it from rains and the the immense water-sheds of Sugar Loaf met at one point and formed an under-ground lake, which increasing in extend and volume daily and hourly, had to have vent at last, and with tremendous force lifted thousands of tons of sandy soil near the tp and hurled it down the hilside, across the cove, and on the railroad track."]


1876 Ap. 12 / 8:30 p.m. / N.W. of Lucknow / in a storm, hailstones size of oranges / La Nat 9/59. [IV; 1840.  "Grêlons Extraordinaire." La Nature, 1876 pt. 2 (no. 212; June 23): 59. "Hailstones in India." Nature, 15 (April 19, 1877): 538.]


1876 Ap. 15 / 8:31—reported by W.F. Denning, from Bristol / (first appeared close to Venus) / (about 8:35 , seen at Hawkhurst, Kent) / passed ab 5 degrees above Venus. / (1876-128, 146) / Rept Brit As. / Said been same meteor. [IV; 1841. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 128-129 & 146.]


[1876 Ap. 15, 24, 25. Wrong date. See: 1880 Ap. 15, 24, 25, (IV; 1842).]


1876 Ap 17 to 23 / (Stat) / (?) / Germany / Red snow / fell all this time? / Zeit Met 11/188. [IV; 1843. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 11 (1876): 183-188, at 188.]


1876 Ap 18 / bet 10 and 12 p.m. / near Bloomington, Indiana / Unusual number of meteors—Lyrids / Nature 14-29. [IV; 1844. Kirkwood, Daniel. "The Meteors of April 20th." Nature, 14 (May 11, 1876): 29.]


[1876 Ap 18] / 1876 Ap. 21 / Meteors said been Lyrids unusually numerous in U.S. / Nature 67/585. [IV; 1845. Henry, John R. "The Lyrid Meteors." Nature, 67 (April 23, 1903): 584-585. The "April 21" date refers to an English observer in 1863, (not to the American observation in 1876).]


1876 Ap. 20 / [LT], 5-d / 21-5-b / May 30-9-f / June 17-6-f / Ballooning. [B; 93. Ross, Richard. "The Perils of Aeronauts." London Times, April 20, 1876, p. 5 c. 4. "France." London Times, April 21, 1876, p. 5 c. 1-3. "Balloon Ascent." London Times, May 30, 1876, p. 9 c. 6. "Balloon on Fire." London Times, June 17, 1876, p. 6 c. 6.]


1876 Ap. 26 / near Wolverhampton / th. stone / in rainfall / lump of metal, 8 lbs. / ab. 3:40 p.m. / near Wrekin / Symons Met XI/57 / D-103 / Year B—'77/246 / B As. '76/166. [IV; 1846. The note copies information from page 103 of The Book of the Damned. Thrustans, John. "Fall of a Meteorite in Shropshire." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 11 (May 1876): 57. "Luminous Meteors." Timb's Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1876, 246.  (BA 76-166.) "Fall of a Meteorolite near Wellington." Wellington Journal, April 29, 1876, p. 5 c. 5. "A most remarkable phenomenon occurred near the village of Crudgington, on Thursday week, which created some alarm amongst the inhabitants in that locality, and has given rise to considerable discussion and inquiry in scientific circles. About 3:40, an unusual rumbling noise in the atmosphere was heard, followed immediately by an explosion resembling the discharge of heavy artillery. About an hour after the report Mr. George Brooks went into a meadow, in the occupation of his step-father, adjoining the Wellington and Market Drayton Railway, about a mile north of the Crudgington Station. Seeing that a hole had been cut in the ground, he probed it, and found a mass of metal of irregular shape, which, upon being dug out, proved to be a meteoric stone weighing about eight pounds. The metal had buried itself to a depth of 18 inches, passing through 4 in. of soil and 14 in. of clay strata down to the gravel. It was quite hot when found', although nearly an hour had elapsed from the time of the explosion being heard. The hole, which has been protected for further examination, is almost perpendicular, and the meteorolite is assumed to have fallen in south-easterly direction." This is the Rowton meteorite.]


1876 Ap. 20 / The Rowton (ab 7 miles n. of Wrekin) metite / details / Nature 14-272. [IV; 1847. Maskelyne, Nevil Story. "The Rowton Siderite." Nature, 14 (July 27, 1876): 272. "Notes." Nature, 13 (April 27. 1876): 530-532, at 531. This is the Rowton meteorite.]


1876 May / Ghost said been seen in church in York. / Med and D-break, May 19, p. 310. [B; 94. "A Ghost at Church." Medium and Daybreak, 7 (no. 320; May 19, 1876): 310-311. "A Ghost at a York Church." York Herald, May 3, 1876, p. 6 c. 6.]  


1876 May and June / White spot on Venus / Sc Am Sup 67/362. [IV; 1848. Gore, John Ellard. "Some Astronomical Curiosities. Celestial Paradoxes." Scientific American Supplement, 67 (no. 1744; June 5, 1909): 362-363. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. "White Spot on Venus." Observatory, 3 (1879-1880): 574-575.]


1876 May 6 / Chicago, Ill / very destructuve tornado // others / Anna, Ill / Hamilton Co, Ind / Carbondale, Ill / Leavenworth, Kansas // (Others This Afternoon) 3:15 a.m. / (F). [IV; 1849. Finley, 5.]


1876 May 11 / The storms continued in utmost severity at Liverpool, tying up vessels there for several weeks before could leave—then "extraordinary shipping spectacle"/ 53 foreign bound vessels and 350 coasters left all at once in a procession took 2 hours in passing. [IV; 1850.1, 1850.2. "Extraordinary Shipping Spectacle at Liverpool." Diss Express, Marc 24, 1876, p. 2 c. 4.]


1876 May 15 / Evening News of (Dunedin, N.Z.) / a phantom boat / Medium and Daybreak. 7-493. [B; 95. "The Phantom Boat." Medium and Daybreak, 7 (no. 331; August 4, 1876): 493. "A Phantom Boat." Marlborough Express, (New Zealand), May 3, 1876, p. 3 c. 2.]


1876 May 20 / Rel-Ph. J, 74-3 / Polts / St. Louis, Mo. / no names but details. [B; 96. "Wonderful and Startling Spiritual Manifestatons." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 20 (no. 10; May 20, 1876): 74, (c. 3).]


1876 May 25 / Waterspout near Tours. / Nature 14-320. [IV; 1851. "Notes." Nature, 14 (August 10, 1876): 320-322, at 320-321.]


1876 May 26 / Stones / (visitor) / Medium and Daybreak of, p. 333, copying from San Francisco Ev. Post—that at San Jose, in the home of Mr. Patrick W. Reardon—day and night large pieces of rock battered windows and shutters. The house had to be abandoned. A medium visited place, went into a trance and said been communicated with by a noted bandit's spirit, who was acting through a medium, a young lady visiting in the house. Said simply before his death had said he was coming back to make things lively. Disturbances stopped. [B; 98.1, 98.2, 98.3. "'The Devil in San Jose' is the title...." Medium and Daybreak, 7 (no. 321; May 26, 1876): 333. ("The Devil in San Jose." San Francisco Evening Post, ca. 1876.)]


1876 May 27 / (Reardon case) / Religo-Ph. J., 82-3, copied from the San Jose Mercury / Patrick W. Reardon, lived first on corner of Santa Clara and Sixth Streets, San Jose. Showers of rocks till Mr. R. moved to Fourth street near the corner of St. John. Showers followed. A girl in his home, Miss Mollie Barry, struck on head, "but not the slightest pain was experienced from the concussion." Other times people in house and rocks falling but strangely no one hit. But windows demolished by the rocks. A medium visited the place and it was his story that were performances of spirit of a bandit. [B; 97.1, 97.2, 97.3. "Curious Manifestations." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 20 (no. 11; May 27, 1876):  82, (c. 3-4 ).]


1876 May 27 / Sc Am dated / N.J., near NY City / great explosion blasting powder. [IV; 1852. "A Great Explosion." Scientific American, n.s., 34 (May 27, 1876): 340.]


1876 June 2 / Overland China Mail, June 17, p. 592 / At Hiogo, Japan, a flight of white butterflies in such incomputable numbers, lasting 2 hours. [IV; 1853. (Overland China Mail, June 17, 1876, p. 592; on microfilm.)]


1876 June 2 / Typhoon / Shanghai. [IV; 1854. (Ref???)]


1876 June 6 / 3 other tornadoes in Kansas / (F). [IV; 1855. Finley, 5.]


1876 June 6 / afternoon / Very destructive tornado / Pleasant Valley, Kansas / (F). [IV; 1856. Finley, 5.]


1876 June 14 / Greatest rainfall ever recorded, 40.8 inches in 24 hours. Chirapunji, India. C. has the largest annual rainfall in the world, average = 493.2 inches. / Amer Met J. (10-194.)/ Up to ab 1894. [IV; 1857. "A Remarkable Rainfall." American Meteorological Journal, 10 (1893-1894): 194.]


1876 June 15 / 8:05 or 8:15 p.m. / Suez / great det met / BA 76-149 / CR 83-28. [IV; 1858. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 149. "M. De Lesseps communique à l'Académie les renseignements...." Comptes Rendus, 83 (1876): 28.]


1876 June 10, 16 / Meteors / vol. 11 / Ref, Jan 1, 1866. [IV; 1859. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 11 (1876): 221-224, at 224. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 11 (1876): 233-238, at 237-238.]


1876 June 19 / Vavilovka, Kherson, Russia / (F). [IV; 1860. Fletcher, 104. This is the Vavilovka meteorite.]


[1876 June 22-23. Wrong dates. See: 1875 June 24-25, (IV; 1861), and 1877 June 22-23, (IV; 1861).]


1876 June 25 / Metite (?) / St. Louis / See under Objs. [IV; 1862. See: (Objs.).]


1876 June 26 / (Corinth) / Destructive q in Greece, and shocks in Austria / Nature 14-218 / See July 5. [IV; 1863. "Notes." Nature, 14 (July 6, 1876): 217-219, at 218. See: 1876 July 5, (IV; 1866).]

                                                                                                                                                                                         


[1876 June 28] / Met Sound / (first) / (F) / June 28, 1876 / Near railroad station of Ställdalen, heard and then stones seen to fall. / Les Mondes 40/677 / (L) / This is Dalecarlia, Sweden. / See long before. / B. As. 1876-164. [IV; 1864. Fletcher, 104. This is the Ställdalen meteorite. (Les Mondes, 40 (1876): 677; not online.) Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 164 & 171. See: 1829 Mar 19, (I; 1446).]


1876 June 28  Morning, bet 11 and noon. / details of metite of  Ställdalen, Sweden. / Nature 14-300. [IV; 1865. "Notes." Nature, 14 (August 3, 1876): 298-301, at 300. This is the Ställdalen meteorite.]


1876 July / Hair phe and pressing / Ap. 11, 1885. [B; 99. See: (1885 Ap. 11).]


1876 July / Hair cutting / Cor to Medium and Daybreak, July 7, 1876, warns readers against lending a ring to a medium, who keeps up, with it, a rapport, by which he robs a victim of vital power. [B; 100. "Vampirism." Medium and Daybreak, 7 (no. 327; July 7, 1876): 428.]


187- / July // Hair / Dolls in Magic / N.Q. 10/9/168 / 10/10/118, 195, 272. [B; 101. Lovett, Edward. "Dolls in Magic." Notes and Queries, s. 10 v. 1 (February 29, 1908): 168. "Dolls in Magic." Notes and Queries, s. 10 v. 10 (August 8, 1908): 118-119. "Dolls in Magic." Notes and Queries, s. 10 v. 10 (September 5, 1908): 195-196. "Dolls in Magic." Notes and Queries, s. 10 v. 10 (October 3, 1908): 272.]


1876 July 1 / [LT], 11-f / Wtch. [B; 102. "Witchcraft." London Times, July 1, 1876, p. 11 c. 6.]


1876 July 5 / Again violent shocks at Corinth / See June 26. / Nature 14-260. [IV; 1866. "Notes." Nature, 14 (July 20, 1876): 259-261, at 260. See: 1876 June 26, (IV; 1863).]


1876 July 8/ 8:40 p.m. / Chicago / remarkable meteor—train visible 4 minutes / N.Y. Times 12-2-4. [IV; 1867. "A Wonderful Meteor." New York Times, July 12, 1876, p. 2 c. 4.]


1876 July 8 / 8:45 p.m. / Met exploded over Lake Michigan. Train 40 minutes. / A.J. Sci. 3/14/75. [IV; 1868. "Meteoric Fireballs." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 14 (1877): 75.]


1876 July 8 / 8:55 p.m. / Large met, Chicago / q, Lake Mich. / New York City / Sci Amer 35-65 / BA 77-149. [IV; 1869. "Recent Meteors." Scientific American, n.s., 35 (July 29, 1876): 65. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 149-150.]


1876 July 9 / 8:30 p.m. / Meteor / N.Y. City / Hudson, N.Y. / Bridgeport, Conn / NY Times 17-8-4. [IV; 1870. "The Recent Meteor." New York Times, July 17, 1876, p. 8 c. 4.]


1876 July 15 / Large meteor from Cygnus / ac to Denning / E Mec 23-536. [IV; 1871. "July Meteors." English Mechanic, 23 (no. 591; July 21, 1876): 485. Denning, William Frederick. "July Meteors." English Mechanic, 23 (no. 593; August 4, 1876): 536.]


1876 July 13 / Inf conjunction Venus-Sun / (A1). [IV; 1872. (A1).]


1876 July 17 / (+) / q and met / Germany / Zeit Met 11/236. [IV; 1873. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 11 (1876): 233-238, at 236-237.]


1876 July 17 / Austria / q. / from Passan to Pressburg / I // BA '11. [IV; 1874. Milne, 726.]


1876 July 17 / 1:22 p.m. / Violent q at Scheibbs, 40 miles west of Vienna / Nature 14-279. [IV; 1875. "Notes." Nature, 14 (July 27, 1876): 278-280, at 279.]


1876 July 18 / 4 a.m. / Louisville / ac to the Courier-Journal / loud report and stone fell / Sc Am 35-98 / See Jan 31. / had the appearance of dark flint. [IV; 1876. (Louisville Courier-Journal, ca. July 18, 1876???) "Aerolite in Kentucky." Scientific American, n.s., 35 (August 12, 1876): 98. See: 1876 Jan 31, (IV; 1805).]


1876 July 19 / 4 a.m. / Severe shock of earthquake in New Zealand / Jour Roy Soc N S Wales 10-323 / BA 11 / = I. [IV; 1877. "Abstract of the Meteorological Observations Taken at the Sydney Observatory." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 10 (1876): 317-328, at 323. Milne, 726.]


1876 July and Aug / White spots on Venus / Knowledge, NS, 6/121. [IV; 1878. (Knowledge, n.s., 6 (109): 121.) Ertborn, Octave Van. "Observations de la planète Vénus en 1876." Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, s. 2 v. 43 (1877): 20-24.]


1876 July 22 / Religio Ph. J, 1-5 / Ghosts / Kentucky. [B; 103. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, July 22, 1876, 1-5; not online.)]


1876 July 23 / sun / Cor who signs "B.B.", at Montclair, N.J. / Sc Am. 35/257 / Was examining sun through telescope and saw a round spot clear and sharp. He studied it until clouds intervened—does not suggest planet—think a new kind of sunspot. Sent a drawing, which was published. [IV; 1879.1, 1879.2. "The Inter-Mercurial Planet." Scientific American, n.s., 35 (October 21, 1876): 257, (illustration).]


1876 July 23 / Sc Am. 35/304 / Samuel Wilde writes from Montclair, N.J., that about 2:45 he had turned his [note cut off] the sun and had seen the spot or object reported by B.B., looking quite as Venus looks in photos of transit—had watched ab. ½ hour and then came clouds. [IV; 1880.1, 1880.2.

"Was It Vulcan?" Scientific American, n.s., 35 (November 11, 1876): 304. "At about one quarter to three oclock I directed my telescope (a 6¼ inch) toward the sun's disk, and immediately perceived a well defined dark round spot on the lower left portion of the sun, substantially as given in B.B.'s drawing. I watched it 25 or 30 minutes, when, the sun becoming obscured by a passing cloud, I returned to the house. Knowing that the spot was of unusual character, entirely different from any sun spot I had ever seen before, I remarked to my friends that none of the usual spots were visible, but that I had observed a dark round spot, apparently moving, which looked like the photograph of the transit

of Venus.... I used the solar prism, thus having a white light."]


1876 July 25 / 10:05 p.m. / London / great meteor / Nature 14-289. [IV; 1881. "A Brilliant Meteor." Nature, 14 (August 3, 1876): 289.]


1876 July 25 / 10 p.m. / Brighton / Surrey / Norfolk / great met / BA 77-104 / At Brighton, another at 12 p.m. / All S England / BA 76-130 / 77-104, 132. [IV; 1882. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 128-131 & 146-147. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 104-107 & 132-133. The "12 p.m." meteor was observed at Brompton, (not Brighton), and probably about 12 A.M., or midnight, (not "about 12h P.M.," or noon).]


1876 July 26 / (1) / hair cutting / North China Herald, May 20, tells of panic in Nanking and other places spread to Shanghai. People believed  that spirits were cutting off pigtails. Said that however all that might be there was no dobt that a number of pigtails had been cut off that that great alarm existed in consequence. / May 27, Editor writes, "Many Chinamen have lost their tails, and we can hardly admit that the imaginary spirits are real men with steel shears; for it could hardly happen that someone would not have been detected before this, in the act of cutting. The most likely explanation is that the

agents, whoever they are, of the conspirators, whoever they may be, operate by means of some potent acid." By "conspirators" Editor meant that he suspected political motives for making excitement. / Issue of June 3rd, that an extraordinary scare in Singapore. Natives believed that the Government wanted heads, and no servant would go out after dark, and the sampan men took refuge upon the river, at night. Not said if any occurrences for the scare to base on. / Herald of June 4, said that the scare had spread to Hangchow. "Numerous cases are reported, but there are a few authenticated ones." Said that most of the victims were children. "The cases are daily increasing." [B; 104.1 to 104.7. (North China Herald, May 20, 27, June 3, 4, 1876.)]


1876 July 26 / (2) / North China Herald, Aug 5—"The marvellous credulity and superstition of the Chinese mind has been receiving a fresh illustration." That news has spread with a panic throughout the city that men's pigtails were being cut off and that anybody so deprived would die within three days. A man had been arrested and had confessed that it was the work of a secret sect. Was in this way enlisting souls for an army of invisible soldiers. Whatever he confessed, was under torture. Panic in this town; inhabitants were carrying pigtails in their hands in front of them. Quack doctors were advertising charms. The Military Commandant had stationed soldiers in various parts of the city. The account concludes by, "Suffice it to mention that, among much that is untrusworthy, there seems good grounds for beliving that some children have actually lost part of their tails. Said that those may have been cut off by persons interested in various ways, such as the selling of charms, or by other children n mischief. / Aug 12—that in cities on the Yangtse, missionaires were charged with the offense. "It is clearly a Christian device for injuring the people and seizing the country," ac to one placard set up in public places. / Aug 26—p. 191—at Soochow, tail-cutting and at night people were mysteriously crushed to death by weights. Charges of sorcery against Christians. In the Herald, said editorially that it would almost seem as if the tail-cutting was started as anti-Christian and not a rebel movement as at first suggested. And there were agitations at the missionairies in various parts of China. / In issue of Sept 2, of this paper, published in Shanghai, said that the excitement had reached Shanghai and the latest was the throwing of spots of ink into people's faces by invisible agencies. Was believed anyone so treated died unless conscious of it and wiped ink off while wet. Said people at Woosih and Soochow mad with terror and had lynched several suspected persons. People had suspended work and organized themselves into volunteer guards. At Soochow "the crushing to death mania has been at fever heat." People beating gongs to drive awway demons. Cor said knew of a Chinaman tried to get a gong—all sold—had to wait for one to be made. [B; 105.1 to 105.12. (North China Herald, August 5, 12, 26, 1876, & p. 191, September 2, 1876.)]


1876 July 26 / The crushing story looks like sheer leading away. So other leaders—a vision of soldiers—a light in the sky, undescribed, not told when or where. [B; 106.]


1876 July 16 / (3) / N.C. Herald, Sept 16 / Excitement in Shanghai—all out of a case of mere nightmare—man and wife thought something suffocating them while asleep and had awakened, running into the street, bringing crowds out of houses. / Sept 23—appeared in Hangchow—not attributed to Christians. That in all the places a later development. / Nov 2—at Kiukiang. Note simply that at Kiukiang, two men arrested for tail-cutting. [B; 107.1, 107.2. (North China Herald, September 16, 1876.)]


1876 July 21 / Cutting hair / Spiritualist of, copying from North China Herald. / In Nanking and several other Chinese cities great excitement. Mischievious spirits cutting off pigtails of the Chinese. Said that there was a panic. Invisible forces doing it. [B; 108.1, 108.2. "Marvellous Disappearance of Pigtails." Spiritualist Newspaper, (London), 8 (no. 29; July 21, 1876): 339.]


[1876 Aug. /] 1876 Nov 1, etc. / Family fatality at Hamilton, Ontario / Rel-Phil Jour 25-84-4+. [B; 115. "A Dream Verified." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 21 (no. 11; November 25, 1876): 86, (misprinted as page 84), (c. 4). "A Dream Verified." Hamilton Spectator, (Australia), August 19, 1876, p. 2 c. 8. "Who shall decide when doctors disagree?..." Hamilton Spectator, (Australia), August 23, 1876, p. 2 c. 5-6. "Black or White?" Hamilton Spectator, August 23, 1876, p. 2 c. 7-8. Lindsay, George. "A Correction." Hamilton Spectator, (Australia), August 26, 1876, p. 4 c. 6. "Died." Hamilton Spectator, (Australia), September 2, 1876, p. 2 c. 6. The tragic deaths began with the stillborn twins of Mrs. George Lindsay, who was being cared for by Ann Rankin, (aged 60). Mrs. Lindsay died of a fever on August 6, (a day or two after the birth of the twins). Ann Rankin died of a fever on August 10; and, her husband, Donald Rankin, (aged 61), died on August 16. At Horsham, Victoria, Duncan Rankin, (the eldest son of Donald and Ann), awoke, having "dreamt something bad happened to his mother." "He at once got up, and in spite of all remonstrances about the absurdity of believing in dreams, mounted his horse, and travelled during the balance of the night and next day, until he came to a house a few miles out of Hamilton where his family was well-known. Here he halted to enquire 'How the old folks were at home?' and when told that his mother had died that very day, fell fainting from his saddle. Before this, we are told, except so far as the dream was concerned, he had not received the slightest intimation of his mother being ill." Another son, John Rankin, (aged 17), died on August 20. First reported as pneumonia, the doctors disagreed on whether the disease responsible for the deaths was typhus. Duncan Rankin, (aged 24), and his sisters Lucy, (22), and Kate, (10), were reported as suffering from fever, on September 23. "The fact of Duncan Rankin, the eldest son, being well enough to ride 100 miles from Horsham to Hamilton on Sunday, the 13th, to see his dying mother, and being himself attacked, within a week, is a matter to be regarded, and it would be important to discover whether all three of the patients died from the same causes." The dream occurred at Horsham, and the deaths occurred at Hamilton; both location are in Victoria, Australia, (not in Ontario, Canada).]


1876 Aug 4 / Slag. / France. [IV; 1883. (Refs???)]


1876 Aug 5 / 10:12 p.m.—Bristol / (10:30 same 10:40) (Oxford, Bristol) / Large mets / BA 76-132. [IV; 1884. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 130-133.]


1876 Aug 7 / Bolide / C.R. 83/459. [IV; 1885. "M. E. Ferrières signale l'apparition d'un bolide...." Comptes Rendus, 83 (1876): 459.]


1876 Aug. 8 / Bristol / Stat. met. / Observatory 2/165. [IV; 1886.  Denning, William Frederick. "Meteor Notes for September." Observatory, 2 (1878): 163-165, at 165.]


1876 Aug 10-14 / At York, Perseids considered at their minimum. / Nature 14-331. [IV; 1887. Clark, J, Edmund. "Meteor Observations." Nature, 14 (August 17, 1876): 331.]


1876 Aug 11 / evening / 2 shocks // 12—3a.m. / shocks / Nithsdale, Scotland / Nature 14-369. [IV; 1888. Shaw, James. "Earthquake in Nithsdale, Scotland." Nature, 14 (August 31, 1876): 369.]


1876 Aug 11 / ab. 11 p.m. / Bristol / met train / 5 minutes / BA 76-147. [IV; 1889. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 147-148.]


1876 Aug 11 and 13, 15 / Streak—meteors / Eng. / BA 76-134 / 77-133, 137. [IV; 1890. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 132-137. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 133-134 & 136-137.]


1876 Aug 12 / Severe shock / Athens / Nature 14-369. [IV; 1891. Shaw, James. "Earthquake in Nithsdale, Scotland." Nature, 14 (August 31, 1876): 369.]


1876 Aug 12 / q—Scotland and Greece / Nature 14/369, 454. [IV; 1892. Shaw, James. "Earthquake in Nithsdale, Scotland." Nature, 14 (August 31, 1876): 369. "The British Association." Nature, 14 (September 21, 1876): 451-459, at  454. The latter article is a brief review of a report upon earthquakes in Scotland, with no mention of this quake.]


1876 Aug 13 / Star shower / New Zealand / BA 77-100. [IV; 1894. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 100.]


[ 1876 Aug 15] / 1876 Aug 13 / In Otago Witness (published in Dunedin, N.Z.) of the 19th—that several brilliant meteors been seen recently, especially ab 8 p.m. of the 15th from N.W. to S.E. Another evening one from S.E. Smaller meteors had been numerous, travelling in different directions.[IV; 1893. "Several very brilliant meteors...." Otago Witness, August 19, 1876, p. 15 c. 2.]


[1876 Aug 16. Wrong date. See: 1875 Aug. 16, (IV; 1895).]


1876 Aug 17 / Bodies like Swedish / Roy Met Jour 1887/305 / (Cut). [B; 109. "Note on a Manifestation of Electricity at Ringstead Bay, on the Coast of Dorset." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 13 (1887): 305.]


1876 Aug 17 / The luminous objs—on a cliff, Ringstead Bay, Dorset. / See Lum objs. [B; 110. See: Lum objs.)]


1876 Aug 19 / Abingdon—During th storm, fell ball of fire that cor thought was a meteor. / L and Water, Aug 26. [IV; 1896. (Land and Water, August 26, 1876.)]


1876 (Aug 20) // Sept 30, Religio Phil Jour, 19-2, copying from the Eau Claire (Wis) Free Press—House in Eau Claire, on Pine Street, between 5th and 6th Streets—ab  Aug 20. Home of Martin Griffin—he had moved in. A former tenant had been driven out by phe. Mrs. Griffin had been called away to Minnesapolis—He heard noises—then a wash tub thrown down the stairs—crash in the pantry—broken crockery strewn on floor. Kitchen utensils strewn around. He went to bed and fastened door with a chair against knob. Chair removed and door opened. [B; 111.1, 111.2, 111.3. "Uncanny Intruders." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 21 (no. 3; September 30, 1876): 19, (c. 2). (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, September 2, 1876, p. 1; at Newspapers.com.) (Eau Claire Free Press, ca. September, 1876; at NewspaperArchive.com.)]


1876 Aug 21 / no parallax? / 8:10 pm. / London / Sheerness / Manchester / great met / BA 76-136. [IV; 1897. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 136-137.]


1876 Aug. 31 / Sept. 4 // Qs / Irkutsk, Siberia / Nature 15/18. [IV; 1898. "Notes." Nature, 15 (November 2, 1876): 16-18, at 18.]


1876 Sept 1 or 2 / Serial bolide / Eng / Absent / Cut. [IV; 1899. See: 1871 Sept 1, (IV; 499).]


1876 Sept 7 / Sound / Kent, Surrey, Essex / 11:21 p.m. / det met / 1876/139, B Assoc. [IV; 1900. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 139.]


1876 Sept / Bolides / La Nat 1876/2/314, 407. [IV; 1901. "Les Bolides de Septembre." La Nature, 1876 pt. 2 (no. 176; October 14): 314. "Bolide." La Nature, 1876 pt. 2 (no. 182; November 25): 407. The latter article relates a bolide observed on November 5, (not in September).]


1876 Sept 10-11 / midnight / Ghost of woman on white horse / Bethel, Ohio / Subject treated flippantly in N.Y. Times 14-4-5. [B; 112. "Ghostly Malignity." New York Times, September 14, 1876, p. 4 c. 5-6. "The Bethel correspondent of the Cincinnati Enquirer tells the following story...." Northern Ohio Journal, (Painesville, Ohio), September 16, 1876, p. 1 c. 9. "''This quiet little village was thrown into considerable commotion last night (10th) upon the appearance upon the main street, about twelve o'clock midnight, of a lady, all dressed in white, seated upon a white horse, without saddle or bridle. She first arose, as it were, from the ground, and, on one of the most beautiful horses ever rode by man or woman, she wended her way from house to house, stopping in front of each one, where, for a few moments, she sang the sweetest songs ever before heard by mortal man. Those who approached her,

and they were scores, would atttempt to touch the lady, then her steed, but, touch where you would, nothing tangible could be felt, and yet there she was plain to be seen before us all, singing her beautiful

songs, making the midnight air ring with her melodious voice. Some persons claim to recognize in the lady a beautiful young woman who died here last spring, and who, before her death, was in the habit of visiting from house to house in the night time serenading. For more than one hour this strange, ghost

like phantom was plain to be seen."]


1876 Sept 10-11 / Great storm / Australia / La Nat 8/11. [IV; 1902. "La Tempête du 10-11 Septembre 1876 en Australie." La Nature, 1877 pt. 1 (no. 183; December 2): 11.]


1876 Sept 12 / See Dec 15. [IV; 1903. See: 1876 Dec 15, (IV; 1970).]


1876 Sept 14 / Det / Met large as moon heard in Yorkshire / BA 76-142. [IV; 1904. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 142. "Its diameter was about half that of the moon."]


1876 Sept 16 / [LT], 9-f / Wtchcraft at Warrington. [B; 113. "Belief in Witchcraft." London Times, September 16, 1876, p. 9 c. 6.]


1876 Sept 20, 23, 24 / Remarkable bolides / La Nat 7/314. [IV; 1905. "Les Bolides de Septembre." La Nature, 1876 pt. 2 (no. 176; October 14): 314.]


1876 Sept. 20 / 7 a.m. / Digne, France. / q. / Nature 14-517. [IV; 1906. "Notes." Nature, 14 (October 5, 1876): 516-518, at 517.]


1876 Sept 21 / Chelmsford, Essex / shower for 2 hours from Pegasus / BA 77-100. [IV; 1907. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 100 & 160.]


1876 Sept 21 / ab. 11:30 p.m. / Rumbling sound and slight shock / New Bedford, Mass / Fall River, Mass / N.Y. Times 24-2-3. [IV; 1908. "The Earthquake in New England." New York Times, September 24, 1876, p. 2 c. 3-4.]


1876 Sept 21 / 11:30 p.m. / RI, Mass / q / Am J Sci 3-15-22. [IV; 1909. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 22.]


1876 Sept 22-27 / Near Palermo, destructive q's. / Nature 14-561. [IV; 1910. "Notes." Nature, 14 (October 19, 1876): 559-562, at 561.]


[1876 Sept 23 /] 1876 Oct 21 or 14 / At New Plymouth, New Zealand, loud report and q. / Sydney Morning Herald 26-6-3. [IV; 1935. "Earthquake in New Zealand." Sydney Morning Herald, October 26, 1876, p. 6 c. 3. "New Plymouth, Sept 25." Wanganui Herald, September 25, 1876, p. 2 c. 4.]


1876 Sept 24 / First Eng / 6:30 p.m. / Great met burst over English Channel. / Streak / Ipswich, etc. / and France / BA 77-108, 134-138 / flash mistaken for lightning / "large as the sun". [IV; 1911. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 108-111 & 138-141.]


1876 Sept 24-25 / ab midnight / 2 qs, ab 15 minutes apart / Am J. Sci 3-15-22 / Ill, Ind, Mo, Ky / Another on 26th, at Friendsville, Ill. [IV; 1912. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 22.]


1876 Sept / Repeats / See Sept, 1875. [IV; 1913. See: (1875 Sept.???).]


1876 Sept 24 / N.Y.T., 2-3 / q. / New England. [IV; 1914. [IV; 1908. "The Earthquake in New England." New York Times, September 24, 1876, p. 2 c. 3-4.]


1876 Sept 26 / NYT, Oct 2-2-1 / q. / Ky and Indiana. [IV; 1915. "The Earthquake in Indiana." New York Times, October 2, 1876, p. 2. c. 1.]


1876 Sep 28-29 / Met shot up—stationary—fell, dissolving like a rocket. / Denmark / cut / Liverpool Astro Soc Jour 7/157. [IV; 1916. Köhl, Torvald. “Fireballs.” Journal of the Liverpool Astronomical Society Journal, 7 (no. 6; March 1889): 157-162, at 157.]


1876 Oct 7 / (Ice) / Moss Vale district / Large, angular pieces of ice. At Burrawang, one piece 18 inches in circumference. / Sydney Morning Herald 14-5-5. [IV; 1917. "Severe Hailstorm." Sydney Morning Herald, October 14, 1876, p. 5 c. 5. "The Scrutineer states that at Mount Ashby," the residence of Mr. H. Throsby, J.P., the hail, or rather large angular pieces of ice, fell with such force, that in two or three places they pierced right through the zinc roof of the residence, the holes being large enough to admit a man's hand; the whole side of the roof exposed to the storm is completely destroyed, being pierced in about two hundred places. The splendid flower garden attached to the residence, which was in full bloom, was also greatly damaged, scarcely a flower remaining. At Burrawang a gentleman picked up a piece of ice, eighteen inches in circumference."]  


1876 Oct. 8 / N.Y. Times 13-2-2 / Providence, R.I. / Boston, Mass, etc. / evening / Brilliant meteor. [IV; 1918. "A Brilliant Meteor." New York Times, October 13, 1876, p. 2 c. 2.]


1876 Oct. 9 / Dust said been meteoric / Boulogne sur Mer / CR, 83-76, 1184. [IV; 1919. Tissandier, Gaston. "Analyse micrographique comparative de corpuscles ferrugineux atmosphériques et de fragments détachés de la surface des météorites." Comptes Rendus, 83 (1876): 76-78. The former article does not include the dust from Boulogne sur Mer, as its publication predates its fall. Tissandier, Gaston. "Sur une pluie de poussière tombée à Boulogne-sur-Mer, le 9 octobre 1876, et sur le mode de formation des pluies terrestres en général." Comptes Rendus, 83 (1876): 1184-1186. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 36 (July, 10, 17. 24, and 31, 1903): 241-285, at 248.]


1876 Oct. 9 / like wood-ashes / Boulogne / C.R. 83/1184 / (N). ** [IV; 1920. Tissandier, Gaston. "Sur une pluie de poussière tombée à Boulogne-sur-Mer, le 9 octobre 1876, et sur le mode de formation des pluies terreuses en général." Comptes Rendus, 83 (1876): 1184-1186.]


1876 Oct 12 / Dry fog of Tamworth. "For many hours a perfectly dry, dense dusty looking mist enwrapping every object in obscurity for miles around." No dust observed to fall from it. / Chem News 88-43 / Nothing like it been seen there before.  Ac to another account, "an apparently heavy wide spreading cloud of smoke. Nothing like it ever seen before at Murrurundi. [IV; 1921.1, 1921.2. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 88 (July, 10, 17, 24, and 31, 1903): 16-18, 32-34, 41-45, 55-58; at 42-44. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 36 (July, 10, 17. 24, and 31, 1903): 241-285, at 259-266. "Mr. Armstrong is a native of South Australia, of which colony his father and uncle were amongst the earliest pioneers, and he has therefore the benefit of at least forty years' clear knowledge of the seasons and phenomena witnessed in these colonies. According to his account, these dry fogs, though not common, have occurred several times within his recollection, but have never had nearly so wide a range as that of last month. Many years ago he encountered one of these fogs at the head of the Wilson River, in the meridian of Capricorn, he was then engaged in driving stock, I think, and when approaching the Valley of Lagoons, witnessed a phenomenon similar to those under notice, but of a comparatively local character. More recently, while travelling with a large flock of sheep, he noticed a dry fog at Goonoo Goonoo, a station of the Peel River Company, near Tamworth, but this also was of limited extent. The most notable of these occurrences, he says, occurred in South Australia in 1836 in the month of April." See: 1836 April, (I; 2099).]


1876 Oct. 12 / Murrurundi / Australia / remarkable rapid dry fog. / Roy Soc N S Wales Jour and Proc 36/285. [IV; 1922. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 36 (July, 10, 17. 24, and 31, 1903): 241-285, at 259-266.]


1876 Oct 12 / d. fog / Extraordinary dry fog near Tamworth. Whether could be traced to bush fires could not be decided. / Jour Roy Soc of N.S. Wales 10-288. Jour Roy Soc of N.S. Wales 10-288. [IV; 1923. "Wednesday, 25 October 1876." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 10 (1876): 288.]


[IV; 1924. Pabst: "Void—combined with IV-1921." See: 1876 Oct 12, (IV; 1921).]


1876 Oct 12 / Dry fog / N.S. Wales / "An apparently heavy, wide-spreading cloud of smoke." / R—Dec 15, 1880 / Looked as if from an immense bush fire. Found to have no such origin. In other places dust and mud fell. [IV; 1925. Refer to: Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 36 (July, 10, 17, 24, and 31, 1903): 241-285, at 260-266.]


1876 Oct 13 / a Fancher / Religio-Philosophical Jour, Sept 1, 1877, copied from N.Y. World / Home of Elijah Nicholas, blacksmith of the Glendon Iron Co, at Hurdtown, Morris Co., N.J. His daughter aged 15 on the 13th—she had predicted evil on her 15th birthday. Since that day been paralyzed and bed-ridden. At times there appeared under the counterpane of her bed "a presence", as if of a small animal, swiftly moving from place to place. Said that Mr Richards, Mayor of Dover, had held hat over the "presence" , as if of a small animal, swiftly moving from place to place. Said that Mr Richards, Mayor of Dover, had held hat over the "presence" and received a blow that crushed it. Girl had abstained from food, sometimes 15 days at a time, taking a little milk sometimes. [B; 114.1, 114.2, 114.3. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, September 1, 1877; not online.) (New York World, ca. 1876-1877; on microfilm.)]


1876 Oct 13 / N.Y. Times, Oct 22-12-2 / Meteors. [IV; 1926."Thursday Morning's Meteor." New York Times, October 22, 1876, p. 12 c. 2.]


1876 Oct 14 / 6 a.m. / morning / Brisbane Courier, Oct 16. / At Brisbane—enormous flocks of green leeks, blue mountain parrots, and leatherheads—"myriads so dense that they darkened the sky completely. Flew so low, many caught in branches of trees, where cats got them. No drought or hurricane known to account for the hordes. [IV; 1927.1, 1927.2. "A correspondent furnishes us with the following...." Brisbane Courier, October 16, 1876, p. 2 c. 7. "They can only be described as in myriads, and so dense that they completely darkened the sky, and they flew so low that numbers were caught in the branches of the trees about the residences in their line of flight, which the cats in some instances caught, and properly disposed of, and the noise they made was something to remember."]


1876 Oct, middle / Ext. flight of birds over Brisbane "darkened the sky." Australian birds. Flying in S.W. direction. Came from North. / ? / ac to cor to Brisbane Courier / Sydney Morn. Herald 21-5-3. [IV; 1928. "A correspondent furnishes us with the following...." Brisbane Courier, October 16, 1876, p. 2 c. 7. "Remarkable Flight of Birds." Sydney Morning Herald, October 21, 1876, p. 5 c. 3.]


1876 Oct 17 / Saline Co., Nebraska / Prairie fire 8 miles square / N.Y. Times 22-5-2. [IV; 1929. "Eight Miles Square of Fire." New York Times, October 22, 1876, p. 5 c. 2.]


1876 Oct 17 / Dortmund, Germany / q. / I / BA '11. [IV; 1930. Milne, 726.]


1876 Oct 18-19 / Mets from between Tarus and Auriga / BA 77-100. [IV; 1931. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 100.]


1876 Oct 18 / At Bloomington, Ind, ac to Prof. Kirkwood, a shower of mets from 6:45 to 9 p.m., from point between Taurus and Auriga. / Trib 27-3-2. [IV; 1932. Kirkwood, Daniel. "A Meteoric Shower." New York Tribune, October 27, 1876, p. 3 c. 2.]


1876 Oct 18 / 6:45 to 9 p.m. / Bloomington, Ind. / unusual abundance of meteors from point between Auriga and Taurus / Pop. Sci Mo., 10-253. [IV; 1937. "October Meteor-Shower." Popular Science Monthly, 10 (December 1876): 253. See: 1876 Oct 18, (IV; 1932).]


1876 Oct 19 / 2 a.m. / Numerous met. stones supposed to have fallen at Ledyard, Conn., ac to N.Y. Observer, Nov. 9. / BA 1877-110. [IV; 1933. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 110-111. (New York Observer, November 9, 1876; on microfilm, State Library, at Albany.) ]


1876 Oct 19 / (Stones) / (See Oct 27.) / 2 a.m. / Mass and Conn. / met / "Numerous meteoric stones at Ledyard (Conn.) are supposed to have fallen from it." / BA 77-110 / 77-98. [IV; 1934. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 98-99 & 110-111. See: (1876 Oct 27; there is no note for this date; possibly for Oct 21, but no meteoric stones in New York Times article).]


[1876 Oct 21 or 14. Wrong date. See: 1876 Sept 23, (IV; 1935).]


1876 Oct 14 or 21 / Nothing in Otago Witness. [IV; 1936.]


1876 Oct 21 / NY Times, 8-3 / Met / Hartford, Conn / page missing. [IV; 1938. "A Meteor." New York Times, October 21, 1876, p. 8 c. 3-4.]


1876 Oct. 24 / More of this Vulc / Sci Am Sup 6-2296. [IV; 1939. Goddard, A.F. "Vulcan's Year." Scientific American Supplement, 6 (no. 144: October 5, 1878): 2296-2297. "Vulcan Again." Scientific American, n.s., 35 (November 18, 1876): 321, (illustration).]


1876 Oct 21 / Strange insect / Albany Argus of / Toronto Globe, June 15, 1877 / "A very destructive insect, new to this continent," appeared different parts of N.Y. State—several places in western N.Y. and in Schnectady. (See the Country Gentleman.) The larvae especially infested and destroyed carpets—the mature insects were small beetles, wing cases marked on inner margins with a red lines—spotted white and black. Said been Anthrenus Scrophulariae. Well known in Europe, never before seen in America. / See Rural New Yorker. [IV; 1940.1, 1940.2. (Albany Argus, October 21, 1876; on microfilm.) "The New Carpet Pest." Toronto Globe, June 15, 1877, p. 2 c. 7. (Rural New Yorker, 1876, ab. v. 35???) (Country Gentleman, 1876???) Lintner, Joseph Albert. "The New Carpet Beetle—Anthrenus Scrophulariæ." American Naturalist, 12 (no. 8; August 1878): 536-544.]


1876 Oct. 24 / W.G. Wright—Sc Am 35-321—writes that he had been reading about Vulcan. Decided to search. At 3 p.m. saw through telescope. Dark round body crossing the sun. He estimates time occupied by transit at 15 hours. San Bernardino, Cal. [IV; 1941. "Vulcan Again." Scientific American, n.s., 35 (November 18, 1876): 321, (illustration). "I was reading last night in the Scientific American

about the transit of Vulcan, and was so interested that I decided to make search myself during these clear, unclouded days. So this afternoon at 3 o'clock I got out my tube (4 inch lens); and at the very first focus the transit stood before me just as distinctly as it is printed in your paper (page 257). I was so astonished and delighted that I had to look and look again to satisfy my wondering eyes. Then I called my family, and they all saw it as plainly as I had done. Having satlsfied myself by a half hour's observation that it had motion, I at once telegraphed to Professor Davidson (of the U.S. coast survey) at San Francisco: 'Transit of Vulcan this afternoon; look for it.' Then I went to the photograph rooms and used every effort to get a negative of it; but as we had no appliances, no facilities, and no knowledge how to take such a negative, it is not surprising that the one plate exposed is not of much value. The transit, however, was seen by four persons; others I did not summon, as I was more anxious to get a photograph. Had it been earlier in the day, I would have telegraphed to some eastern observers, but at

the time I saw it first (3 P. M.) the sun was already set to eastern people; but I did the best I could by telegraphing to San Francisco, and then trying to get a photograph. The apparent path of the planet, as near as my observations show, for the two hours time before sunset, was as indicated on this diagram; and the time occupied in its transit I judge to be from about sunrise till 9 in the evening, about fifteen

hours. In this diagram, I have drawn Vulcan's appearance too large; the relative size is perfectly shown in your diagram, page 257, this current month."]


1876 Oct. 31 / One of the most destructive cyclones in India / Nature 15-89. [IV; 1942. "Notes." Nature, 15 (November 23, 1876): 87-90, at 89.]


1876 Oct. 31 / Cyclonic tidal wave, Bay of Bengal. 215,000 (ver) perished. / LT—Aug. 30-4-a, 1883. [IV; 1943. "The Cyclone Wave in Bengal." London Times, December 12, 1876, p. 4 c. 4-5. "Volcanic Eruptions and Tidal Waves." London Times, August 30, 1883, p. 4 c. 1.]


[1876 Nov 1, etc. Wrong date. See: 1876 Aug., (B; 115).]


1876 Nov, about 1st / Westville, Ind / Met said found next spring / Sci Amer 42-320. [IV; 1944. "Two Meteorites." Scientific American, n.s., 42 (May 22, 1880): 320.]


1876 Nov 5 / (Fr) / Repeat / See 6, 8. / bet 8:40 and 9 p.m. / France / dets at Clerey, Aube / Nature 15-69 / C.R. 83/862. [IV; 1945. "Notes." Nature, 15 (November 16, 1876): 67-72, at 69. Meunier, Stanislas. "Observation d'un bolide, dans la soirée du 5 novembre 1876." Comptes Rendus, 83 (1876): 862-863.]


1876 Nov 6 / (Fr) / 5:45 p.m. / BA 77-112 / Orsay, near Paris / great met a minute on a short course / "bright, but smaller than the moon's disk / (CR 83/922). [IV; 1946. (BA 77-112.) Guillemin, Amédée. "Observation d'un bolide, le 6 novembre 1876." Comptes Rendus, 83 (1876): 922.]


1876 Nov 8 / Ky, Ill, etc. / met train visible more than ½ hour / MWR, Nov. [IV; 1947. (Monthly Weather Review, November 1876; not reported in this issue.)]


1876 Nov. 8 / 5:35 p.m. / France and Switz / met / BA 78-276. [IV; 1948. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the Year 1877-78." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1878, 258-377, at 276-277.]


1876 Nov 9 / [LT], 10-d / 10-8-f / Dec 15-7-e // Mets. [IV; 1949. "The Weather." London Times, November 9, 1876, p. 10 c. 3-4. "The Weather." London Times, November 10, 1876, p. 8 c. 6. "The Weather." London Times, December 15, 1876, p. 7 c. 5.]


1876 Nov 11 / Yarn that a paper balloon 12 feet long and 10 wide had fallen in a quarry nrar Franklin, N.Y., and ac to card on it had been sent up by someone in London. / NY Times 17-8-6. [IV; 1950. "Fishy Story from Cheapside Street." New York Times, November 17, 1876, p. 8 c. 6.]


1876 Nov 15 / [LT], 10-a / Plague flies / India. [IV; 1952. "A Plague of Flies." London Times, November 15, 1876, p. 10 c. 1.]


1876 Nov 20 / 1 p.m. / Eastport, Me / q / Am J. Sci 3-15-22. [IV; 1951. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 22.]


1876 Nov. 24 / See Cygnus shower, Jan 5, 17, 20. [IV; 1953. See: 1877 Jan 17, (IV: 2005 & 2006).]


1876 Nov 20-28 / Met shower in Leo Minor / 155° + 36 / at Bristol, by Denning / 21 meteors / Nature, Dec 21, 1876—p. 158. [IV; 1954. Denning, William Frederick. "Radiant Points of Shooting Stars." Nature, 15 (December 21, 1876): 158.]


1876 Nov. 24 / Nova Cygni / New star in Cygnus, by Prof. Schmidt, of Athens. On the 20th, the latest preceding clear night, it had not been visible. Third mag. and about midnight well toward second. By Dec 2, to 5th mag; and by the 12th, down to 7th. / E. Mec 24-565. See Jan 17, 1877. [IV; 1955.1, 1955.2. Young, Charles Augustus. "The New Star in Cygnus." English Mechanic, 24 (no. 622; February 23, 1877): 565-566. See: 1877 Jan 17, (IV; 2005).]


1876 Nov. 24 / Schmidt sure this star not here on 20th. / Ball, Story of the Heavens, p. 426, thinks at maximum sometime between 20th and 24th. [IV; 1956. Ball, Robert Stawell. The Story of the Heavens. London: Cassell, 1893, 426.]


1876 Nov. 24 / Nov. Cygni discovered by Dr. Schmidt, at Athens. News not reach England till Dec. 9th, when sky overcast, but there had been 8 favorable nights between the 2 dates and the star not seen. / A.J. Sci 3/13/396. [IV; 1957. "The New Star in Cygnus." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 13 (1877): 395-397, at 396.]


1876 Nov. 24 / News of star reach U.S., Dec 18th. / New York Times, Jan 15-4-5. [IV; 1958. "The New Star." New York Times, January 15, 1877, p. 4 c. 5-6. "It is a pity that the information was not more widely diffused; the English and German astronomers do not seem to have been notified, and the news did not reach this country till Dec. 18, long after the star had ceased to be visible to the naked eye."]


1876 Nov 24 / Planetary spot this time? / See July 25-Aug 6, 1885. / See Dec 7, 1876. [IV; 1959. See: 1876 Dec 7-13, (IV; 1964), and, (1885 July 25-Aug 6).]


1876 Nov. 26 / Great eruption, Mt Tacbacon, (Luzon), Philippines / Nature 18-265. [IV; 1960. "Earthquakes on the Philippines in the Year 1876...." Nature, 18 (July 4, 1876): 265. The Mayon volcano.]  


1876 Nov. 27 / night / Slight shock Manila / Singapore D. Times, Dec 13. [IV; 1961. (Singapore Daily Times, December 13, 1876.)]


1876 Nov. 29 / Meteor that began its course at the lower edge of the moon / A.S. Herschel / Newcastle-on-Tyne / Astro Reg 15-16 / BA 77-114. [IV; 1962. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. "Meteor." Astronomical Register, 15 (January 1877): 16-18. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 114-115.]


1876 / ab last Nov. // Trance / Rel-Ph. J., Dec. 2-94-2 / Swedish girl, aged 22, named Anna Froben, of 137 Delancy street, Chicago—in a trance—saved from burial alive. [B; 116. "A Remarkable Case of Trance." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 21 (no. 12; December 2, 1876): 94, (c. 2-3). "A Remarkable Case of Trance." Grange Advance, (Red Wing, Minesota), November 1, 1876, p. 2 c. 6. The city was New York, (not Chicago).]


1876 Dec 2 / Chorley Guardian of / Stone-throwing at railway station from about Nov. 10. Said that police could not find the perpetrators, though at one time their presence caused a temporary cessation. "A large staff of watchmen have been posted outside the building, but strange to say the annoyance has been greater than ever." Mostly between 11 p.m. and 3 a.m. / Guardian of 9th, that the stone-throwing has stopped. [B; 117.1, 117.2. "A Mystery at the Railway Station." Chorley Standard, December 2, 1876, p. 2 c. 6. "The Stone Throwing at the Railway Station." Chorley Standard, December 9, 1876, p. 2 c. 4. (Chorley Guardian, December 2 & 9, 1876; not online.)]


1876 Dec 7 / "Very white spot on the disc of Saturn, just below the ring," by Prof Hall, Naval Observatory, Washington / seen on 7, 10, 13th / Nature 15/243. [IV; 1963. "Our Astronomical Column." Nature, 15 (January 11, 1877): 243-244.]


1876 Dec 7-13 / Brilliant spot on Saturn / Observatory 3-655. [IV; 1964. Denning, William Frederick. "Bright Spot on Saturn." Observatory, 3 (1879-1880): 655. Asaph Hall utilized this spot to determine the "rotation-period" of Saturn as "10h 14m 28s.8"; and, while this measure of its rotation speed is still used for its equatorial zone and System I, the rotation of Saturn continues to be a mystery with various measures recorded of its magnetic field and different atmospheric regions. "Prof. Asaph Hall...." Living Age, 136 (s. 5, v. 21, no. 1752; January 12, 1878): 128. "Prof. Asaph Hall has succeeded in obtaining a number of observations of a bright spot which he had noticed on the night of December 7th, 1876, on the ball of Saturn, and thereby deducing a value of the period of the planets rotation, which is probably more accurate than any previous determination. The spot in question was two or three seconds in diameter, round and well defined, and of a brilliant white color. Besides Washington, it was, at Prof. Halls request, observed at several other American observatories, and the time of rotation concluded (assuming the spot to have no proper motion on the surface of the planet) is 10h. 14m. 23.8s. mean time. Sir William Herschel's determination (given in the Philosophical Transactions for 1794) was 10h. 16m. 0.4s., and was derived from the different appearances of a quintuple belt in the winter of 1793-4. Prof. Hall points out a curious mistake, which had been copied into nearly all books on astronomy, assigning 10h. 29m. 16.8s. as Herschel's value of Saturn's rotation—this being in fact the time of rotation of Saturn's ring, not that of the planet itself."]


1876 Dec 7, to Jan 2, 1877 / White spot on Saturn / Nature 68/229 / Cut. [IV; 1965. (Nature, 68-229.) Denning, William Frederick. "The Markings and Rotation Period of Saturn." Popular Astronomy, 12 (January 1904): 40-45, at 41.]


1876 Dec 8 / The Spiritualist (of +) / At the railway station at Chorley, on the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway, Late at night stone falling in the engine shed. / Note—this not in a place occupied by people. [B; 118. "Mysterious Stone-Throwing." Spiritualist Newspaper, (London), 9 (no. 19; December 8, 1876): 228.]


1876 Dec 11-12 / Geminids / most important shower of the year, France and England / BA 77-100. [IV; 1966. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 100.]


1876 Dec 12 / Slight q / Charleston / Bull Seis A 4/118. [IV; 1967. Taber, Stephen. "Seismic Activity in the Atlantic Coastal Plain near Charleston, South Carolina." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 4 (1914): 108-160, at 118.]


1876 Dec 13 / 4:30 p.m. / Large fireball / Cricklewood, London / BA 77-114. [IV; 1968. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 114-115. "The Weather." London Times, December 15, 1876, p. 7 c. 5.]


1876 Dec 13 / 4:45 p.m. / Met equal to Jupiter / St James' Square, —London / Nature—15-178. [IV; 1969. Sclater, P.L. "Meteor." Nature, 15 (December 28, 1876): 178.]


1876 / ab middle Dec // Trance / R.-P. Jour., Dec. 30. / copying from Louisville Sunday Argus / Girl, Laura Rathsfield, aged 17, Living in Green St, Louisville—fits—supposed to have died. But members of the family thought they saw signs of life. In opinion of physicians she was dead, but relatives continued to believe not. / Outcome not stated. [B; 119.1, 119.2. "In a Trance." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 21 (no. 16; December 30, 1876): 12, (c. 5).]


1876 (Dec. 13 ) / 7:30 / Ac to L.T. 16-5-f, ab. 14 miles S.S.W. of Portland the brigantine Anemone, 141 tons register, collision with the Norweigan bark, the Hannah Parr. The crew took to a small boat. The bark went on her way. Said that the Anemone was supposed to have floated more than 12 hours, then exploding by pressure of air in her hold, thus causing the explosion which the Portland coast guard reported, though it was strange that no fragments of wreckage were found. [B; 120.1, 120.2, 120.3. "Disasters at Sea." London Times, December 16, 1876, p. 5 c. 6.]


1876 Dec 13 / In the Dorset Co., Chronicle,says that 10 a.m. morning of 14th the coast guards of Portland sent a telegram stating that a vessel under jury masts was coming in from the S.S.W. Very soon another telegram that the vessel had suddenly blown up and disappeared. A tug was sent out. The steamer "scoured the Channel for miles" but could not find a fragment of wreckage. The Editor writes that he had received a letter from a cor. saying that he had seen off Portland something that had looked like a long low shop with short, stumpy jury masts, with something like smoke or steam arising amidships. These he learned were jets of water thrown up by a big fish with fins that looked like short masts. Suddenly it hardened with air and then disappeared. The reporter of the Chronicle learned that others had seen an immense monster throwing up jets of water. However the Editor writes that the coast guard ship that had exploded and that it must have been the Anemone which had been run down off Portland. / See Times. [B; 121.1 to 121.5. (Dorset County Chronicle, ca. December 1876; not at BNA.) "Disasters at Sea." London Times, December 15, 1876, p. 6 c. 4.]


1876 Dec 15 / night / Bark Solomon run down by an unknown vessel off Portland. / L.T. 19-6-3. [B; 122. "Disaster at Sea." London Times, December 19, 1876, p. 6 c. 3.]


1876 Dec 15 / See Sept 12. / Italy red rain. Pioggia rossa / D. Ragona in his Communicazioni alla R. Acad, di Modena / (Fassig). [IV; 1970. (Ragona, Domenico. "Pioggia rossa del 12 settembre 1876 e del 15 dicembre 1876." Comunicazioni alla Reale Accademia di scienze, lettere ed arti di Modena. Modena, 1876.) (Memorie della Reale Accademia di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti in Modena, 1876 or 1877; possibly vol. 17???) Fassig, Oliver Lanard, ed. Bibliography of Meteorology. Part II: Moisture. Washington: Signal Office, 1889, 388. See: 1876 Sept 12, (IV; 1903).]


1876 Dec. 16 / Chile—See Dec. 23, 1873. [B; 123. See: 1873 Dec. 23, (A: 875 & 876).]


1876 Dec 16 / Sounds / Rel. Ph. J., 112-4, quoting Rochester (N.Y.) Express / About 7 o'clock every morning, at North Chili, Monroe Co., N.Y.—a soft, soughing sound, like music of an Eolian harp—a weird music that seemed to pervade the air for miles. The recurrence was regular. It was not like the sound of wind against telegraph wires, as some explainers had thought. [B; 124.1, 124.2. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, 20 (possibly June 17, 1876): 112, (c. 4); not online, story dates from March, not from December.) "A Strange Sound Heard in the Air." Spiritual Magazine, s. 3 v. 3 (no. 3; March 1877): 139-140.]


1876 Dec 18-19 / I find no q in French pubs and BA '11. [IV; 1971.]


1876 Dec 18-19 / (Fr) / towns in Lozère / 1st concussion, 11 p.m., on 18th. At 5 a.m. (19th), violent concussion preceded by detonations. At 5, at same time see in the northwest a bright reddish light. / See 1805. [IV; 1972. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146). (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448.)]


1876 Dec 20 / Mobile, Ala / 3½ inches of snow—heaviest recorded there up to Jan, 1892 / N.Y. Sun, 1892, Jan 21-6-7. [IV; 1973. "Sunbeams." New York Sun, January 21, 1892, p. 6 c. 7.]


1876 Dec 21 / 10:30 a.m. / Wytheville, Va / q / Am J. Sci 3/15/22. [IV; 1974. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 22.]


1876 Dec 21 / Meteors seen in Ill, Mo., Iowa / N.Y. Times 26-1-6. [IV; 1975. "The Western Meteor." New York Times, December 26, 1876, p. 1 c. 6.]


1876 Dec 21 / ab 9 p.m. / The meteors in Ohio, from 40 to 60 in the flock. / N.Y. Times, 25-2-2 / from W to E. / different sizes / In Indiana, smaller followed one large one—Prof Kirkwood estimated ab 100. [IV; 1976. "Thursday Night's Meteor." New York Times, December 25, 1876, p. 2 c. 2.]


1876 Dec. 21 / 8:30 p.m. / Ill, Mo, Ind, Kansas / met / BA 77-153 / Am J. Sci 3/13/166, 243. [IV; 1977. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 116-117 & 149-153. "Meteor of Dec. 21st, 1876." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 13 (1877): 166-167. Smith, John Lawrence. "Note of the the recent fall of three Meteoric Stones, in Indiana, Missouri, and Kentucky." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 13 (1877): 243. These are the Rochester, Warrenton, and Cynthiana meteorites.]


1876 Dec 21 / See 1877 Jan 3 and 27. / (F) / Cut. [IV; 1978. See: 1877 Jan 3, (IV; 1989), and, 1877 Jan 27, (IV; 2011). Fletcher, 104. This is the Rochester meteorite.]


1871 Dec 21 / Geese meteors / America / J.B.A.A. 24/168 / or B. Assoc 1877. [IV; 1979. Cook, Alice Grace. "An Extraordinary Meteoric Display in 1876." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 24 (1913): 168. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 116-117 & 149-153.]


1876 Dec 21 / ab. 9 p.m. / Napoleon, Ohio / ab 20 meteors / w. to e. / ab. 15 seconds / loud detonations / Trib Jan 6-2-3. [IV; 1980. Crockett, E. "Remarkable Meteoric Display." New York Tribune, January 6, 1877, p. 2 c. 3.]


1876 Dec 21 / Great met from w to e. / Lawrence, Kan—8:15 p.m. / Burlington, Ill—9. / NY Times 26-1-6 / 24-6-7 / 28-4-5 / 25-2-2. [IV; 1981. "A Wonderful Meteor." New York Times, December 24, 1876, p. 6 c. 7. "Thursday Night's Meteor." New York Times, December 25, 1876, p. 2 c. 2. "The Western Meteor." New York Times, December 26, 1876, p. 1 c. 6. "The Meteor." New York Times, December 28, 1876, p. 4 c. 5.]


1876 Dec 21, etc. / Cut / 3 falls / Rochester, Indiana / Warrenton, Missouri / Cynthiana, Kentucky. [IV; 1982. Fletcher, 104. These are the Rochester, Warrenton, and Cynthiana meteorites. See: 1876 Dec 21, (IV; 1978); 1877 Jan 3, (IV; 1989); and, 1877 Jan 27, (IV; 2011).]


1876 Dec 22 / evening / Explosion / Boston / Sc Am 34-41 / Gas it seems. / See '75. [B; 125. "A Strange Explosion in Boston." Scientific American, n.s., 34 (January 15, 1876): 41. See: 1875 Dec. 22, (B; 77).]


1876 Dec 27 / Dust / Red sun column in 3 provinces in France; Côte-d-'Or, Doubs, and Savoie. Night of 29-30, a rain of intense red fell. / A.J. Sci 28-46 / (Verify this.) [IV; 1983. (American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 28 p. 46; not found here.) Lamey, P. "Sur les lueurs rouges de l'hiver doux de 1876-1877." Comptes Rendus, 98 (1884): 498.]


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

1876 Dec. 29-30 / Rain tinged with red fell at St. Jaen, in the Cotes-du-Nord. / Nature 15-266. [IV; 1984. "Notes." Nature, 15 (January 18, 1877): 265-267, at 266.]

 
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