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Last updated: July 15, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1896


1896:


1896 / Strange animal reported near La Grange, Ind. / See Ap. 30, 1897. [C; 288. See: 1897 Ap 30, (C; 347), and, 1897 April 30, (C; 348).]


1896 / Have Glb-Dem, Jan-Ap-No Spook Dept. [C; 289.]


1896 / birds / Baton Rouge / (D-240) / See March, 1904. [VII; 1426. The note copies information from page 240 of The Book of the Damned. McAtee, Waldo Lee. "Showers of organic matter." Monthly Weather Review, 45 (May 1917): 217-24, at 223. "A Shower of Birds." Watertown Republican, (Wisconsin), November 4, 1896, p. 3 c. 2. This phenomenon may have occurred in the summer, but the earliest newspaper account found is in early November of 1896.]


1896 / Bound monthly / Pub. Ledger to April / N.G. [VII; 1427.]


1896 / Siberian pine jays in Germany / Sc Am 100/348. [VII; 1428. "Sun Spots and Animals." Scientific American, n.s., 100 (May 8, 1909): 348.]


1896 / about (?) / Report on Barisal Guns / See (Sounds). [VII; 1429.1. See: (Sounds).]


1896 / The Albina, Ore., metite / 10:30 p.m. / luminous / like hard clay / Trib, Nov. 28-2-1 / See late in some preceding year, ab same time. / See Jan 1, 1897. [VII; 1429.2. “The Meteor Fell At His Feet.” New York Tribune, November 28, 1896, p. 2 c. 1. (The same article is in: “A Meteor in Oregon.” Watertown Republican, Wisconsin, November 18. 1896, p. 3 c. 2.) See: 1897 Jan. 1, ab, (VII; 1661).]


1896 Jan 6 / 4 a.m. / Hanover, N.H. / q. / Sc Am 74/41. [VII; 1430. "New Hampshire Earthquake." Scientific American, n.s., 74 (January 18, 1896): 41.]


1896 Jan 6 / Bolide / France / B. Soc A. de F., Feb., 1896. [VII; 1431. “La bolide du 6 janvier.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 10 (1896): 66-67.]


1896 Jan 8 / B. Eagle, 7-5 / House owned by Augustus Gustersin, Fair View Avenue, Rockaway Beach, L.I. Tenants moved out—flat house—saying saw apparition of old man and heard noise. [C; 290. “A Brooklyn Family's Experience With a Rockaway Spook.” Brooklyn Eagle, January 8, 1896, p. 7 c. 5.]


1896 Jan 13 / It Sounds / Massa Martana (Perugia) / rombi / See 1816. [VII; 1432. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 43. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1896 Jan 14 / Memphis / J sign or trail in sky / Nature 53/612. [VII; 1433. “Notes.” Nature, 53 (April 30, 1896): 609-612, at 612.]


1896 Jan 16 / From Ogden, Utah, to Evanston, Wyoming, a distance of 75 miles, a rain of brine. Windows in Evanston encrusted with salt so that impossible to look out. Estimated that at Almy, Wyoming, 27 tons of salt had fallen. Lasted 2 hours. Writer in Nature says been suggested it had come from Great Salt Lake vapor, but salt could not so rise in evaporation, and he explained might been a fine white dust and not salt, / (Nature 54/41) / See Substance / Salt / or June 21, 1894 / July 18, 1895. [VII: 1434.1, 1434.2, 1434.3. “A Remarkable Dust-Storm.” Nature, 54 (May 14, 1896): 41. “A Western Salt Storm.” Electricity, 10 (February 19, 1896): 93. See: 1894 June 21, (VII; 1043), and, 1895 July 18, (VII; 1333).]


1897 Jan 19 / Great det met in N.S. Wales / Rain, River, and Evap. Obs., N.S. Wales, 1896 / 8:45 p.m. / (also Oct 16, 8 p.m.). [VII; 1435. (Results of Rain, River, and Evaporation Observations Made in New South Wales During 1896; not online).]


1896 Jan 24 / metite / Pub. Ledger of—p. 9 / That at Quanicasse, Mich, a few days before, had fallen a meteoric stone weighing 125 pounds. [VII; 1436. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 24, 1896, p. 9.) “Michigan Matters.” Benton Harbor News-Palladium, January 4, 1896, p. 1 c. 3.]


1896 (Jan 24) / Middelkerke / bet 2:30 and 3:30 p.m. / by M. Van Overloop. / 3 series of discharges, each of three detonations / Ciel et Terre 17/99. [VII; 1437. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v. 17 p. 99.]


1896 Jan 26 / 6:50 a.m. / Cornwall / q / Geol Mag 1900-107. [VII; 1438. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107 & 166-167.]


1896 Jan 30 / N.Y. World, Feb 1-10-2 / Tornado and deluge / Queensland, Australia / Rainfall during tornado = 26 inches. [VII; 1439. (New York World, February 1, 1896, p. 10 c. 2; not @ LOC nor Newspapers.com.)]


1896 / (?) / Feb 3 / (Cut) / Body cross sun / N / Sci Gos, about 1896. [VII; 1440. (Science Gossip, ca. 1896; not found.) (If not sun, then moon on June 27 and July 21, 1896; Science Gossip, n.s., 3-135.)]


1896 Feb / Phe of Oct similar / whole month. [VII; 1441. (Refs.???)]


1896 Feb 5 / Great storm Gulf of Mexico and New Orleans, On 6th, reached New York—gale exceeded 80 miles an hour, breaking records at N.Y. / World 7-1-1. [VII; 1442. (New York World, February 7, 1896, p. 1 c. 1; not @ LOC nor Newspapers.com.)]


1896 Feb. 6 / 4:30 p.,. / Waterspout off Long Island / N.Y. World 8-2-7. [VII; 1443. (New York World, February 8, 1896, p. 2 c. 7; not @ LOC nor Newspapers.com.)]


1896 Feb. 7 / Another destructive storm in Florida, moving northward / World 9-1-1. [VII; 1444. (New York World, February 9, 1896, p. 1 c. 1.; not @ LOC nor Newspapers.com.)]


1896 Feb 8 / Put in here elsewhere within this seen signalling. [VII; 1445. (Refs.???)]


1896 Feb 8 / For several days had been reports of a volc eruption of Mt. Taukiquitz, a spur of the San Jacinto Mts, California. / B. Eagle 8-12-2. [VII; 1446.”May Be in Eruption.” Brooklyn Eagle, February 8, 1896, p. 12 c. 2. “Mt. Tauquitch Is Smoking.” Los Angeles Herald, February 5, 1896, p. 10 c. 3. “Telegraphic inquiry of San Jacinto elicited the information that the sight was plainly visible there, and that opinion there was divided as to whether the smoke might come from forest fires or from a volcano. The recent rains and snow would argue against the former.” “Riverside Railroad Men.” Los Angles Herald, February 23, 1896, p. 7 c. 3. “The volcano at Mount Tauquitz, after having drawn a number of artists and descriptive writers from a number of the leading papers of the coast to the spot, proved to be a failure.” Tahquitz Peak is not a volcano.]


1896 Feb, about [Feb 8 and 10] / Lieutenant of Artillery stationed at Port Saint-Phillipé (Bas-Escant) wrote to M Van den Broeck, compiler of the data in Ciel et Terre, that he had heard a series of twenty detonations comparable to distant cannon fire. / C et T 17-212. [VII; 1448. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v. 17 pp. 212-213.]


1896 Feb 9 / N.Y. World, 31-8 / In Orangeburg, S.C.—Negro boy—said that a seeming being in his stomach talked—called herself Josephine. Accepted by Dr. Moorer of Orangeburg. Voice answered questions. [C; 291. (New York World, February 9, 1896, p. 31 c. 8; not @ LOC nor Newspapers.com.) “Voice in His Stomach.” Lexington Dispatch, March 4, 1896, p. 1 c. 4.]


1896 Feb 10 / Writer in Le Naturaliste, March 1, says that he had seen some of the stones [indecipherable] which were of a group of crystalline Chondrites. Stones [indecipherable] had black crusts. [VII; 1449. Calderón, Salvador. “Le Bolide de Madrid.” Le Naturaliste, s. 2 v. 10 (March 1, 1896): 55-56. “J'ajouterai seulement, pour finir, que la météorite, quoique non encore étudiée, appartient, par les caractères extérieurs des échantillons que j'ai vus (car je n'en possède encore point), au groupe des chondrites cristallines. La pâte est gris clair, homogène à l'œil 'nu, avec de petits grains un peu plus foncés, quelques-uns de couleur verdâtre et des points métalliques brillants, les plus visibles ayant l'aspect de la pyrrhotine. Une croûte noire et terne avec des bourrelets et des rides, couvre la surface externe, comme il arrive ordinairement dans les météorites pierreuses. Il ne s'agit pas d'un fer météorique ni d'une matière charbonneuse, comme on le supposa dans les premiers moments du phénomène, lorsqu'on croyait que le bolide s'était résolu entièrement dans l'atmosphère en substances gazeuses.” This is the Madrid meteorite.]


1896 Feb 10 / 9:29 a.m. / Madrid metite. Sun bright in east. Met rushed from S.W. to N.E. / Observatory 19-135. [VII; 1450. “Explosion of a Meteorite over Madrid.” Observatory, 19 (1896): 135. "Two Remarkable Telegrams." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 31 (February 1896): 11. Arcimis, Augusto. "The Great Madrid Meteor." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 31 (March 1896): 25-26. This is the Madrid meteorite.]


1896 Feb 10 / Met of Madrid and sunspot Italy ab. same time? [VII; 1451. See: 1896 Feb 10, (VII: 1450 & 1453).]


1896 Feb. 10 / 2:30 a.m. / Argus (Melbourne) Feb 12-6-1 / At Cranbourne, “A heavy report [was heard] which shook the buildings”. Said that the shock was most pronounced, the first sensation being like the report of a big gun. [VII; 1452. "An Earthquake Shock." Melbourne Argus, February 12, 1896, p. 6 c. 1.]


1896 Feb. 10 / Sun under observation by Tacchini, of the Observatory of Catania. Nothing observed in the disk of the sun on 8th and 9th. On 10th at 11:15 a.m. a cloudy, tree-like protuberance was seen. / There were two on 11th, and on 12th both were gone. Bull Soc. Belge d'Astro 1/72. [VII; 1453.1, 1453.2. Tacchini, Pietro. “Les Protubérances Solaires du 10 et 11 Février 1896." Bulletin de la Société Belge d'Astronomie, 1 (1896): 72-75.]


1896 (Feb) 10 (ab) / 2:30 a.m. Cranbourne = 11:30 Madrid, 10:30 Italy. [VII; 1454. Fort was comparing the time of the Cranbourne shock to the times of the Madrid meteorite, (9:30 AM), and the solar protuberance observed in Italy, (11:15 AM).]


1896 Feb 10 / Exceptional met / Madrid / Sc Am 74/179. [VII; 1455. "Spain's Big Meteorite." Scientific American, n.s., 74 (March 21, 1896): 179. This is the Madrid meteorite.]


1896 Feb. 10 / At town of Guadalajara, 46 miles from Madrid, the explosion strongly felt / Nature 53/348. [VII; 1456. “Notes.” Nature, 53 (February 13, 1896): 348-351, at 348-349.]


[1896 Feb 10 /] 1896 Feb. 12 / at 9:45 a.m. / Detonating meteor at Bordeaux / Les Sciences Populaires 10-49 / from [note cut off] / At Madrid was 9:20 a.m. / from N. to east. [VII; 1460. “Le bolide d'Espagne.” Les Sciences Populaires, s. 2 v. 10 (1896): 49. The Madrid meteorite fell on February 10, 1896, (not February 12).]


1896 Feb 10-11 / Solar protuberance, by Tacchini / Bull d'Astro Soc Belge 1-72. [VII; 1447. Tacchini, Pietro. “Les Protubérances Solaires du 10 et 11 Février 1896." Bulletin de la Société Belge d'Astronomie, 1 (1896): 72-75.]


1896 Feb 11 / Gales / N.Y. State / World, 12th. [VII; 1457. (New York World, February 12, 1896.; not @ LOC nor Newspapers.com.)]


1896 Feb. 11 / morning. / Sudden darkness and a blizzard. Snow fell furiously, Stopped 15 minutes later. “The Weather Bureau reports that the flurry was entirely local, and can assign no cause for it. / N.Y. World 12-3-8. [VII; 1458. (New York World, February 12, 1896, p. 3 c. 8; not @ LOC nor Newspapers.com.)]


1896 Feb 12 / 9:45 a.m. / Bolide / Bordeaux / La Nat Sup, Feb 29, last page. [VII; 1459. “Un bolide à Bordeaux.” La Nature, 1896 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1187, supplement; February 29): 52.]


[1896 Feb. 12. Wrong date. See: 1896 Feb 10, (VII; 1460).]


1896 Feb 14 / N.Y. World, 3-7 / Remarkable revival / Poughkeepsie. [C; 292. (New York World, February 14, 1896, p. 3 c. 7; not @ LOC nor Newspapers.com.)]


1896 Feb 14 / Comet / wrong directions but one found anyway / Science, NS, 46-36. [VII; 1461. Campbell, William Wallace. "A Remarkable Coincidence." Science, n.s., 46 (July 13, 1917): 36-37. Campbell, William Wallace. “Discovery of Comet a 1896.” Observatory, 26 (1903): 293-294. Comets C/1895 W1 and C/1896 C1.]


[The following three notes were clipped together by Fort. C: 293-295.]


1896 Feb 17 / Persecution. / Polt? / N.Y. World, 4-5 / Early in the year 1893, John Mack, elderly man, his invalid wife, and crippled daughter, Mary, took up residence, at Bellport, L.I., with a little candy store. Said that they, probably because of their thrift, excited dislike of some of the people of Bellport, and were persecuted. Stories of stones thrown at the house by street gamins, Mary, in a nervous condition, died, ab. middle of Feb. “Large stones were repeatedly thrown upon the roof of the house, and striking above the bed of the dying child, would produce spasms of fright. In one of these fits her young life went out.” / World 19-3-4—Said that other storekeepers had formed a league against him, and had enlisted the aid of their boys, in a hostility to all strangers. / She had died in May, 1895—after that Mack was persecuted. In the street, someone who wore a mask emptied a pail of water on him. Someone threw garbage on his front stoop. Someone tossed a giant firecracker through open doorway. Bricks were tied to ropes—thrown into the house through windows, and hauled out. Several boys had been arrested, but released, no evidence against them. Stories of people doing it indefinite. [C; 293.1 to 293.6. (New York World, February 17, 1896, p. 4 c. 5; not @ LOC nor Newspapers.com.) (New York World, February 19, 1896, p. 3 c. 4; not @ LOC nor Newspapers.com.)]


1896 Feb. 17 / Story of the stones falling on roof, frightening girl to death, is very polt-ish. / She was not a cripple when went there. Said that street gamins threw a stone and she on porch of house and a dog ran at time of a stone, knocked her from her chair, and injured her spine. [C; 294.1, 294.2. (Refs.???)]


1896 Feb. 17 / Looks as if polt phe—and at same time hostility to a new-comer, and phe explained in terms of the hostility. [C; 295. (Refs.???)]


1896 Feb 17 / N.Y. World 18-3-1 / Coldest day in N.Y. City recorded. 6.4 degrees below zero. [VII; 1462. (New York World, February 18, 1896, p. 3 c. 1; not @ LOC nor Newspapers.com.)]


[1896 Feb 17. Wrong date. See: 1896 Feb 25-26, (VII; 1463).]


1896 Feb 17 / Sandstorm in Galizien / Met Zeit 13/140. [VII; 1464. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 13 (1896): 138-160, at 140. Galicia, (then, part of the Austrian Empire), is now divided between southern Poland and the Ukraine.]


1896 Feb 18-19 / night / 20-24 / Chicago / Black snow, brown and yellow. And—suburban towns / Trib 20-8-6. [VII; 1465. "A Freak Storm in Illinois." New York Tribune, February 20, 1896, p. 8 c. 6. (Refs.??? “20-24”).]


1896 Feb 18 / In Chicago, substances in snow. “It looked like a mixture of mud and lampblack. It was moist and sticky and mixed with snow.” Also “soot and sand”. / Chicago Tribune 19-1-1 / Lasted an hour. / Reported from Boscobel, Wis., and Mason City, Iowa. [VII; 1466. “Fall of Black Snow.” Chicago Tribune, February 19, 1896, p. 1 c. 1 & p. 3 c. 6.]


1896 Feb. 18 / Ostend / by N Putzeys, engineer of Brussels / ab. 2 p.m. / series—more than 20. At 2 or 3 minute intervals / C-T 17-218. [VII; 1467. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16: 447-74, 479-501, 516-30, 535-46, 601-16; and, 17: 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-57, 183-91, 208-19, 348-53, 399-407; at 17, 218. Emmanuel Putzeys, (not “N Pulzeys”), was “ingénieur en chef des travaux de la ville de Bruxelles.”]


1896 Feb 18 / Cambrai / bolide / La Nat 1896/1/243. [VII; 1468. “Le Bolide du 16 Février 1896 Observé a Cambrai Halo de Tourgcoing Observé en 1893.” La Nature, 1896 pt. 1 (no. 1190; March 21): 243.]


1896 Feb. 18-19 / Nothing / Toronto Daily Mail. [VII; 1469.]


1896 Feb 19 / Ciel et Terre, 17/101 / by M. [Ed.] Lanszweert, a pharmacist of Ostend. / Ab. 3 p.m., heard a detonation—It was followed by a series of three loud sounds. [VII; 1470. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16: 447-74, 479-501, 516-30, 535-46, 601-16; and, 17: 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-57, 183-91, 208-19, 348-53, 399-407; at 17, 100-101.]


1896 Feb. 19 / See Jan. / Salt storm in Utah / Nature 54/41. [VII; 1471. “A Remarkable Dust-Storm.” Nature, 54 (May 14, 1896): 41. See: 1896 Jan 16, (VII; 1434).]


1896 Feb 19 / Great dynamite explosion / Johannesburg, S.A. / Sc Am Sup 41-16947. [VII; 1472. “The Dynamite Explosion at Johannesburg.” Scientific American Supplement, 41 (no. 1060; April 25, 1896): 16947-16948.]


1896 Feb 20 / 2 or 3 p.m. / Ac to a correspondent to M. Van den B, [indecipherable] Ciel et Terre 17-217, sounds at Ostend, Repeated 4 or 5 times. Repeated in 21st. [VII; 1473. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16: 447-74, 479-501, 516-30, 535-46, 601-16; and, 17: 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-57, 183-91, 208-19, 348-53, 399-407; at v. 17 p. 217.]


1896 Feb 25 and 26 / Fall of dust and snow over a large area in Hungary. Was suggested it came from Egypt, but from Feb 21 to 26 no storm at Alexandria, so it may have come from Servia and N. Hungary. / Jour. Chem Soc. London 72-2-108. [VII; 1474. “Dust which fell [in Austria-Hungary] in February. 1896.” Journal of the Chemical Society of London, v. 72 pt. 2 (1897): 108. Johnesberg, Conrad Heinrich John von. “Ueber die chemische Beschaffenheit und den Ursprung des am 25. und 26. Februar 1893 gefallenen Staubes.Verhandlungen der Kaiserlich-Königlichen Geologischen Reichsanstalt, 9 (1896): 259-264.]


1896 Feb 25-26 / (+) / See before. / Sandfall / Germany, Italy / Belgrade, Budapest, Hungary / Met Zeit 13/105, 409. [VII; 1475. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 13 (1896): 100-120, at 105-107. See: 1896 Feb 17, (VII: 1463 & 1474).]


[1896 Feb 25-26 /] 1896 Feb 17 / In Nature 60/205 / Said the Hungarian substance similar to Nile mud, and the suggestion is made that it came from Egypt. [VII; 1463. “Notes.” Nature, 60 (June 29, 1899): 204-207, at 205. Johnesberg, Conrad Heinrich John von. “Ueber die chemische Beschaffenheit und den Ursprung des am 25. und 26. Februar 1893 gefallenen Staubes.” Verhandlungen der Kaiserlich-Königlichen Geologischen Reichsanstalt, 9 (1896): 259-264.]


1896 Feb 27 / 9 p.m. / Shocks / several places in Queensland / Melb. Argus 29-7-5. [VII; 1476. "Earthquake in Queensland." Melbourne Argus, February 29, 1896, p. 7 c. 5.]


1896 Feb. 27 / Pub Ledger / “A meteorite which fell in Australia recently had a large mass of pure copper embedded in one side. [VII; 1477. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 27, 1896.)]


1896 March 1 / Nature 53/437 / (8:31) / Bootham, York / J.E. Clark / Met falling very slowly and disap just above the moon. [VII; 1478. Clark, James Edmund. “An Unusual Meteor.” Nature, 53 (March 12, 1896): 437.]


1896 Mar 2 / Eagle, 1-2 / q / Kansas. [VII; 1479. “Earthquake in Kansas.” Brooklyn Eagle, March 2, 1896, p. 1 c. 2.]


1896 March 4 / See March 13, 1895. [VII; 1480. See: 1895 March 13, (VII; 1245).]


1896 March 4 / In Worcester many persons thought it was a searchlight from a point in the northwest to the zenith. / Nature 53/444. [VII; 1481. “Notes.” Nature, 53 (March 12, 1896): 443-447, at 444.]


1896 March 4 / Wolverhampton, Oxford, etc. / beam of light / M. Notices 56/332, 335, 336 / 57/73. [VII; 1482. Turner, Herbert Hall. “Note on a Curious Light (the Zodiacal Light) as seen at Oxford, 1896 March 4.” Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 56 (March 13, 1896): 332-336. Robinson, W.H. “Note on the Zodiacal Light of 1896 March 4.” Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 56 (March 13, 1896): 336. Backhouse, Thomas William. “The Aurora of 1896 March 4.” Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 57 (December 11, 1896): 73-74.]


1896 March 4 / Searchlight / streak in sky—but sides definitely parallel. / at Shrewsbury / Knowledge 19/84, 112. [VII; 1483. Browne, W. Lyon, Jr. “Zodiacal Light (?).” Knowledge, o.s., 19 (April 1, 1896):  84. “Zodiacal Light (?).” Knowledge, o.s., 19 (May 1, 1896): 112-113.]


1896 March 4 / Beam / Curious light of Oxford, etc. / Observatory 19/228 / See March 13, '95. / J. BAA 6/295. [VII; 1484. Ellis, William. “On the Curious Light Seen at Oxford and Other Places, 1896 March 4.” Observatory, 19 (1896): 228-231. Cope, E.J. “The Aurora of March 4, 1896.” Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 6 (1895-1896): 295.]


1896 March [4] / Meteor / Nature 53/437 / (Beam). [VII; 1485. O'Reilly, Michael Francis. “The Aurora at Waterford.” Nature, 53 (March 12, 1896): 437.]


1896 / ab March 10 / At Tacoma, Wash, a vessel reported volc dust at a date far back, off Argentine coast. / Pub Ledger 18-9-3 / N.M. [VII; 1486. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 18, 1896, p. 9 c. 3.)]


1896 March 13 / beams from sun / by Prof Brauner, of University of Prague, at 7:07 p.m., when the sun was about 14 degrees below horizon. / Nature 53-486 / 5 silvery white columns coming evidently from the sun, which had set at 6:01 p.m. [VII; 1487. Brauner, Bohuslav. “Sun Column at Night.” Nature, 53 (March 26, 1896): 486. The Sun was below the horizon about 14 degrees at 7:25 P.M., (three minutes before the phenomenon disappeared).]


[1896 March 13 /] 1896 March 28 / Prague / luminous beams in sky / Pop Astro 10/251 / See Nature, March 26, 1895. [VII; 1491. Hadden, David Edward. “Auroral Phenomena at Alta, Iowa.” Popular Astronomy, 10 (no. 5; May 1902): 249-251, at 251. Brauner, Bohuslav. “Sun Columns at Night.” Nature, 53 (March 26, 1896): 486. Monck, William Henry Stanley. “Some Luminous Appearances in the Sky.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 9 (no. 54; February 1897): 33-36. (Electrician, 27 (1896): 687.)]


1896 March 22 and May 16 / Slight q/ New Brunswick / Sc Amer 74-403. [VII; 1488. "Barisal Guns and Mist Pouffers." Scientific American, n.s., 74 (June 27, 1896): 403.]


1896 March 22 / 8 p.m. / q / Machias and Calais, Maine / q / Sc Am 74/211. [VII; 1489. "Earthquake in Maine." Scientific American, n.s., 74 (April 4, 1896): 211.]


1896 March 24 / Trib, 13-3 / q. / Maine. [VII; 1490. "Earthquake in Maine." New York Tribune, March 24, 1896, p. 13 c. 3.]


[1896 March 28. Wrong date. See: 1896 March 13, (VII; 1491).]


1896 Ap. 6 / Ostend, by Overloop. / detonations / 11:57:30 a.m. / 12., 1. m., 32 s. / Ciel et Terre 17-185. [VII; 1492. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v.17 p. 185.]


1896 April 6 / Two detonations at same time, by M Overloop, at Middelkerke, and M. Van den Broeck, at Ostend, / Ciel et Terre 17/185 / Upon 7th, at Blankenberg, M. V. den Bágain heard two. / Over = heard at same time. [VII; 1493. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v.17 p. 185.]


1896 Ap 7 / Blankenberghe, by Overloop / See 6th. / detonation 2:35 p.m. / 2:51 p.m. [VII; 1494. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v. 17 pp. 185-186.]


1896 Ap. 8, 12 / Brilliant meteors / England—54-27, Nature. [VII; 1495. Denning William Frederick. “Two Brilliant Meteors.” Nature, 54 (May 14, 1896): 27-28.]


1896 Ap. 9 / (F) / Ottawa, Kansas / See B.D. / See 1829. [VII; 1496. Fletcher, 106. (D-???) See: See: 1829 Aug 14, (I; 1493). The “1829” reference is simply to Farrington's list of meteorites. Farrington, Oliver Cummings. "Catalogue of the Meteorites of North America, to January 1, 1909." Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, 13 (1915): 1-513, at 17. This is the Ottawa meteorite.]


1896 Ap. 12 / Meteor / England / from RA 50° / Dec +44 / in Perseus / Sci Gos., NS, 3-107. [VII; 1497. "Meteor of April 12th." Science Gossip, n.s., 3 (no. 28; September 1896): 107.]


1896 Ap. 12 / 8:05 p.m. / Met, London / Isle of Wight / met / Sci Gos, NS, 3-21 /Leicester—p. 49 / Lancashire, p. 107. [VII; 1498. "Meteors." Science Gossip, n.s., 3 (no. 25; June 1896): 21. Turner, George C. "Meteor of April 12th." Science Gossip, n.s., 3 (no. 26; July 1896): 49. "Meteor of April 12th." Science Gossip, n.s., 3 (no. 28; September 1896): 107.]


1896 April 13 / (F) / Namur, Belgium / 5:16, meteorite fell and killed a young man in an orchard. / (?) / Sci Gos, N.S., 3/50. [VII; 1499. Fletcher, 106. "Science Gossip." Science Gossip, n.s, 3 (no. 26; July 1896): 50. “A Five-Pound meteorite, which fell last April in an orchard near Namur, in Belgium, nearly killing a young man who was digging there, has been examined at the University laboratory at Ghent. It consists of a crystalline substance containing iron, trolleite, olivine, bronzite, and chondrodite.” This is the Lesves meteorite.]


1896 Ap. 13 / Metite of Namur / dets / La Nat Sup, May 23, '96. [VII; 1500. “Chute d'une météorite en Belgique.” La Nature, 1896 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1199, supplement; May 23): 100. This is the Lesves meteorite.]


1896 April 15 / [LT], 11-e / Met. [VII; 1501. Stephens, W.R.W. “A Meteor.” London Times, April 15, 1896, p. 11 c. 5.]


1896 April 17 / See Ap. 6. / One heard at Ostend on 10th of April, at 11 a.m. [VII; 1502. See: 1896 Ap. 6, (VII; 1492).]


1896 Ap. 18 / Visalia (Cal.) / “Cloud flag” / Astro Soc Pacific 8/194. [VII; 1503. “Peculiar Pheonmenon Seen at Visalia, April 18, 1896.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 8 (no. 50; June 1896): 194. “Yesterday, at 11:30 A. M., the attention of several people was attracted to a cloud in the southern heavens, wearing the colors of the rainbow. When first noticed, the hues were distinct and bright.” “The sky at the time was partially overcast with light cirrocumuli, traveling eastward at a low altitude. Through and above these could be plainly seen a horizontal stratum of white cloud, which exhibited the effect mentioned. In less than a minute the colors disappeared, and the cloud again became white. Twice again within fifteen minutes the peculiar change of hue was observed, but after the first time red, purple, and a light blue were the only shades that became distinct.”]


1896 Ap. 20 / Eagle, 5-6 / Ghst. [C; 296. “News From the Suburbs.” Brooklyn Eagle, April 20, 1896, p. 5 c. 6-7.]


1896 Ap. 21 / Mauna Loa / See June '32. [VII; 1504. See: 1832 June 20, (I; 1700). Wood, Harry Oscar. "The Seismic Prelude to the 1914 Eruption of Mauna Loa." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 5 (1915): 39-51, at 48.]


1896 Ap. 27 / [LT], 8-e / Visitor from Africa. [C; 297. “A Visitor from Equatorial Africa.” London Times, April 27, 1896, p. 8 c. 5.]


1896 May / Very severe q. / Alaska / BA 1911-43. [VII; 1505. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 43.]


1896 May 6 / [LT], 15-f / Met. [VII; 1506. “A Meteor.” London Times, May 6, 1896, p. 15 c. 6.]


1896 May 7 / (Cut) / 10:15 p.m. to 11:15 / White spot “traversing disk of Saturn, watched by Henry MacEwan. / Jour Astro Soc. Wales 2/70 / Stationary. Not moving across. [VII; 1507. (Journal of the Astronomical Society of Wales, 2-70.)]


1896 May 9 / 7:30 p.m. / Met. / Alexandria, Va / Science, NS, 3-783. [VII; 1508. Casey, Thomas L. "A Meteor." Science, n.s., 3 (May 22, 1896): 783.]


1896 May 13 / Trib, 1-3 / Met / Yale. [VII; 1509. “Telegraphic Notes.” New York Tribune, May 13, 1896, p. 1 c. 3.]


1896 May 14 / (Pat) / Elec phe in Germany / Cosmos, N.S., 35/545. [VII; 1510. “Un singulier phénomène électrique.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 35 (November 28, 1896): 545. (Zeitschrift fur Elektrotechnik, v. 14, ca. May 14, 1896; not online.)]


1896 May 15 / w. spout / Tornado, Sherman, Texas. 120 killed. Same time a waterspout fell upon Howe, Texas. / Nature 54-61. [VII; 1511. “Notes.” Nature, 54 (May 21, 1896): 60-63, at 61.]


1896 May 16 / 55 days apart / See March 22. / q / New Brunswick / See May 25, '94. [VII; 1512. See: 1894 May 25, July 19, (VII; 1025); 1896 March 22 and May 16, (VII; 1488); and, 1896 March 22, (VII; 1489).]


1896 May 18 / Eagle, 4-7—Kansas / 31-1-3-rain Mo. / 20-1-3 / 28, etc., great cyclone Mo. / 16-1-1-Texas / 17-32-1-cyclone. [VII; 1513. “Over 100 Persons Killed.” Brooklyn Eagle, May 16, 1896, p. 1 c. 1-2. “List of Killed Increasing.” Brooklyn Eagle, May 17, 1896, p. 32 c. 1. “Deadly Cyclone in Kansas.” Brooklyn Eagle, May 18, 1896, p. 4 c. 7. “Cyclone Wrecks a Town.” Brooklyn Eagle, May 20, 1896, p. 1 c. 3. “St. Louis Death List Grows.” Brooklyn Eagle, May 28, 1896 p. 1 c. 1-7 & p. 2 c. 1-3. “East St. Louis' Sad Plight.” Brooklyn Eagle, May 29, 1896, p. 1 c. 7. “Estimate of Tornado Losses.” Brooklyn Eagle, May 30, 1896, p. 12 c. 2. “Rainstorm and Cloudburst.” Brooklyn Eagle, May 31, 1896, p. 1 c. 3.]


1896 May 20 / 9:28 p.m. / Shock / Oneida Co, N.Y. / Trib 22-6-6. [VII; 1514. "Oneida Shaken by an Earthquake." New York Tribune, May 22, 1896, p. 6 c. 6.]


1896 May 23 / Eng. Channel / 3:20 p.m., 3:40 / Sounds, detonations / C and T 17-218. [VII; 1515. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v. 17 pp. 217-218.]

1896 May 28, ab / Cyclone / St Louis / Said 523 killed. / See Oct, 1927. [VII; 1516. See: 1927 Sept 29, (XI; 1002), and, (1927 Oct).]


1896 May 29 / 6:55 a.m. / Slight shock, Cornwall. In Dumfriesshire—not said if same time—noise like a distant peal of thunder and a shock. / Nature 54-106. [VII; 1517. “Notes.” Nature, 54 (June 4, 1896): 105-108, at 106.]


1896 May 29 / 4:47 a.m. / Annadale q / See March 8, May 14, '94. / Geol Mag 1900-107. [VII; 1518. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107 & 167-168. See: 1894 March 8, (VII; 979), and, 1894 May 14, (VII; 1019).]


1896 May 31 / Sunspots / Sc Am 74/379. [VII; 1519. "Sun Spots Observed May 31, 1896." Scientific American, n.s., 74 (June 13, 1896): 379.]


1896 June 1 / 10:35 p.m. / Fenton / Curious stream radiating downward from direction of Ursa Major / Jour Astro Soc Wales 2/77. [VII; 1520. (Journal of the Astronomical Society of Wales, 2-77.)]


1896 June 2 / Eagle, 4-4 / Ghst. [C; 298. “News From the Suburbs.” Brooklyn Eagle, June 2, 1896, p. 4 c. 4-7.]


1896 June 5 / early morning / Glen Nevis—q / Geol Mag 1900-107. [VII; 1521. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107 & 168.]


1896 June 14 / 8:48 p.m. / Earthquake felt at Saint-Brieuc—but meteor seen at Portrieux. / Bull Soc Astro de F, July, 1896. [VII; 1522. “Tremblement de terre en France.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 10 (1896): 237-238.]


1896 June 15 / Great q / Japan / BA '11. [VII; 1523. A class III earthquake. Milne, 739.]


1896 June 15 and 16 / Ab 150 shocks, Japan. / Nature 54-182. [VII; 1524. “Notes.” Nature, 54 (June 25, 1896): 182-185, at 182.]


1896 June 15 / 8:30 p.m. / North China Herald, July 3—wave 80 feet high—no known atmospheric disturbances to which to attribute it—length of coast devastated 200 to 225 miles. Ab. 30,000 deaths. Steamships left in fields, / 10,000 houses washed away or wrecked. [VII; 1525. (North China Herald, July 3, 1896.)]


[1896 June 15 /] 1896 June 17 / Enormous waves on coast of Japan. / L.T., July 6-8-e / Said 27,000 lives lost. q on N.E. coast of Japan (22-10-c ). [VII; 1527. Milne, John. “The Earthquake in Japan.” London Times, July 6, 1896, p. 8 c. 5. “The Earthquake in Japan.” London Times, July 22, 1896, p. 10 c. 3. Milne, John. “The Japan Sea Wave.” London Times, July 24, 1896, p. 5 c. 4. “It should be mentioned that June 15 was given as the date of the wave in the official despatch from Tokio.” Scidmore, Eliza Ruhamah. “The Recent Earthquake Wave on the Coast of Japan.” National Geographic Magazine, 7 (no. 6; September 1896): 285-289.  Scidmore, Eliza Ruhamah. “Reports of Sealing Schooners Cruising in the Neighborhood of Tuscarora Deep in May and June, 1896.” National Geographic Magazine, 7 (no. 6; September 1896): 310-312. Kanamori, Hiroo. “Mechanism of Tsunami Earthquakes.” Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 6 (1972): 346-359. The height of the tsunami along the Japanese coast was given by Scidmore as “80 to 100 feet,” (one modern report gives a height over 38 meters); and, at Hawaii, wave heights were recorded ranging from 3 feet to 30 feet, and, at Santa Cruz, California, 5 feet. Modern reports identify the Sanriku earthquake as an 8.5 magnitude earthquake, with an epicenter in the Japan Trench, (identified as a “tsunami earthquake” by Kanamori, with an 8.2 tsunami magnitude); however, Scidmore also notes hot seawater encountered by sealers near the Tuscarora Deep, (further north), and that, when 250 miles out from Hakodate, the schooner Carlotta Cox had encountered floating pumice for two days, (suggesting an undersea volcano was active in this area).]


1896 June 17 / (Fr) / [LT], 7-c / q. / Brittany. [VII; 1526. “France.” London Times, June 17, 1896, p. 7 c. 3-4.]


1896 June 17 / afternoon / Rarotonga, Australia, or New Zealand / bet 2:30 and 4:30 p.m. / Sea rose and fell in 5-minute periods. / North China Herald, Aug 7, p. 221. [VII; 1528. (North China Herald, August 7, 1896, p. 221.)]


1896 June / (Cloud B.) / in Penn., Colorado, Ky, etc. / NY Tribune, 1896 / July 7, 23, 30 / July 22/1/3 / 25/4/2 / 29/1/4 / Aug 14/1/3 / 21/1/3 / For Minnesota and Kansas and Col., see June 8/3/ / Jul 25-1-6 / 26-1-5 / 27-3-6. [VII; 1529. "Drowned by a Cloudburst." New York Tribune, July 7, 1896, p. 1 c. 2. "Drowned in Their Houses." New York Tribune, July 22, 1896, p. 1 c. 3. "Devastation Widespread." New York Tribune, July 23, 1896, p. 1 c. 5. "Perished in Cloudbursts." New York Tribune, July 25, 1896, p. 4 c. 2. "Sad News for H.M. Warren." New York Tribune, July 27, 1896, p. 4 c. 2. "Drowned in the Flood." New York Tribune, July 29, 1896, p. 1 c. 4 & p. 4 c. 1. "Their All Swept Away." New York Tribune, July 30, 1896, p. 1 c. 3. "Drowned in the Flood." New York Tribune, August 14, 1896, p. 1 c. 3. "Cloudburst Among the Mines." New York Tribune, August 21, 1896, p. 1 c. 3. and, (New York Tribune, 1896: June 8/3 & July 26-1-5, 1896; not found here.)]


1896 June 20 / La Nat Sup, p. 10 / 2 case[s] ball-lightning / near Scondigny and Fontenay and Mouzé / Deux-Sèvres—(q). [C; 299. “Communications.” La Nature, 1896 pt. 2, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1203, supplement; June 20): 10.]


1896 June 26, about / Waterspout at Wuhu—destroying everything in its way for 30 miles, / North China Herald, July 10. [VII; 1530. (North China Herald, July 10, 1896.)]


1896 June 27 / (3) / Dalston, NE [London] / Frank C. Dennett / Across the moon a long black object W to E. May have been a bird. 3 or 4 seconds. No fluttering observed. Elongated form gave idea of bird. / E Mec 64/41. [VII; 1531. Dennett, Frank C. "Telescopic SeeingPeculiar Object." English Mechanic, 64 (no. 1640; August 28, 1896): 41. See: 1896 July 21, (VII: 1537 & 1556).]


1896 June 29 or July 5 / big q / Cyprus / [BA] '11. [VII; 1532. A class III earthquake. Milne, 739.]


1896 June 29 / Listed as a q of greatest magnitude in Cyrpus. / BA '11. [VII; 1533. A class III earthquake. Milne, 739.]


1896 June 29 / 11:30 p.m. / Severe shock / Beyrout / Levant Herald, July 6. [VII; 1534. (Levant Herald, July 6, 1896.)]


1896 June 29-30 / BO / between 11 p.m. and 2 a.m. / Several severe shocks / Cyprus / L.T., July 1-7-e / Dispatch of July 6th, in Times of 7th—violent shocks continuing, Towns deserted and people living in tents. [VII; 1535. “Earthquake in Cyprus.” London Times, July 1, 1896, p. 7 c. 5. “Earthquake Shocks in Cyprus.” London Times, July 7, 1896, p. 5 c. 2.]


1896 June 29 / q / met / q at Cyprus / Ac to Prof. Agamennone the sounds that were heard were subterranean but he adds that a remarkable meteor had been seen in the sky. / Cosmos 53-700. [VII; 1536. “Phénomènes curieux du tremblement de terre de la Calabre.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 53 (December 23, 1905): 700. Agamennone, Giovanni. ”Le tremblement de terre dans l'île de Chypre du 29 juin 1896.” Beiträge zur Geophysik, 6 ( 1904): 108-137, at 109.]


1896 / Summer / S / D-285 / Linville Lights / 159. [C; 300. The note copies information from page 285 of The Book of the Damned. “Notes by the Editor.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (no. 8; August 1898): 358-359, at 358. “Ball Lightning.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (no. 12; December 1898): 565.]


[1896 / summer. Wrong date. See: 1896 July 21, (VII; 1537).]


1896 July / Army-worm devastations / NY and N.J. / Trib Index, Army-worm. [VII; 1538. (New York Tribune Index, 1896; about 21 articles.)]


1896 July 15 / Lightning in storm strikes house, Parishours later, struck again, same place, about. / La Nat. Sup, Aug 15, 1896, p. 42. [C; 301. “Communications.” La Nature, 1896 pt. 2, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1211, supplement; August 15): 42.]


1896 July 19-30 / Siberian fog / Ac to communication by M. Adam Rzyszczewski to the Astronomical Society of France. The inhabitants of many towns on eastern Siberia were astonished to see a thick smoke settling down upon them. It was supposed to be from tremendous forest fires, but ac to dispatches from government officials there were no such known fires. News came from towns in a line over 7,000 kilometres long. The odor of smoke was strong; the sun looked like a red ball. Inasmuch as no forest fires and no volcanic eruptions to attrib to, conclusion was that it came from regions external to this earth or was perhaps the tail of a comet. Then said that it poisoned grasses and killed sheep. / Anouther account by a traveller, M. Safianoff, is includedHe in a smoke so thick that the largest objects became invisible a few hundred yards away (500 pas). This a different part of Siberia but dates of appearance and duration the same. At  same time had come upon far distant points. Then he says that the nights were clearall stars visible. Not a trace of smoke but with sunrise came opaque smoke. [VII; 1539.1 to 1539.6. Rzyszczewski, Adam. "Nuage cosmique en Sibérie." Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 10 (1896): 186-188.]


1896 / [note cut off] days in July / The Siberian haze / Sci Amer 79-55. [VII; 1540. "Possible Passage of the Earth Through a Nebula." Scientific American, n.s, 79 (July 23, 1898): 55. "After collecting a large number of minute details, I am now able to present to the Astronomical Society an account of an immense cosmic cloud that covered the whole of Siberia during eleven consecutive days of the month of July, 1896."]


1896 July / Siberia / In C.R. 49-1011, Prof Wartmann says that in Geneva, Nov 18-26, a profound fog by day, but by night more than ordinarily brightsays was a luminous fog. [VII; 1541. Wartmann, Louis François. "Notice sur un brouillard lumineux observé à Geneve du 18 au 26 novembre 1859." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 1011-1013. The luminous fog in Geneva was observed in 1859. See: 1859 Nov 18-26, (II: 2402 & 2403).]


1896 July / Siberian / [typescript] / Literary Digest, 16-615. [VII; 1542. Typescript note. "Possible Passage of the Earth Through a Nebula." Literary Digest, 16 (May 21, 1898): 615.]


1896 July / Dry fog disap  night. / See forest fire smoke at nightSept. 6, 1881. / lavender note / Over not only lavender notes. [VII; 1543. See: 1881 Sept 6, (V; 667).]


1896 July 19-30 / July 7-18 / C 1 / Cosmos, N.S., 38/479 / From Samara to Chita (in Transbay Kalie). From Sayan Mountains to the polar circle (town of Tourouhansk). At Omsk, Tobolsk (on the Oural). Ichim, Iskoutsk, Yakoutsk. On the Angara and the Baykal to Chita. / The other account in Mongolia mountains of Ergik-Fargak-Faygan. Described by M. Safianoff as an ocean of compact smoke. He thought the world was on fire. He travelled on and still so thick that he could at a short distance of 400 paces distinguish nothing of his camp except the white tent. He learned that the smoke had appeared suddenly upon the 7th of July and had disappeared upon the 18th. / (+) / 7 (Old)-19 (New) and 18 (Old)-30 (New). [VII; 1544.1 to 1544.4. Reyszczewsik, Adam. “Nuage cosmique.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 38 (April 16, 1898): 479-480.]


1896 July 18-30 / New style / not 7-18th / Russian time. [VII; 1545. (Confirm.)]


1896 July / (Siberia) / Smoke day / not night / May 17, 1883. [VII; 1546. See: 1883 May 17, (V: 1271, 1272, 1273, 1276, & 1280).]


1896 July / Siberian phe / See Aug 3, 1831. [VII; 1547. See: 1831 Aug 3, (I: 1625 & 1628).]


1896 July / Siberia / From a star near the sun. (new star). Sun and earth-volcs / Sun and star volcs / But repeats E. France, May, 1883. [VII; 1548. See: (1883 May).]


1896 July / Siberia / Seems, anyway, at first, only sun affected. / Sept., 1883. [VII; 1549. See: (1883 Sept.).]


1896 July 7, 23, 30 / Clbrst in W. Va. / N.Y. Trib. [VII; 1550. "Drowned by a Cloudburst." New York Tribune, July 7, 1896, p. 1 c. 2. "Devastation Widespread." New York Tribune, July 23, 1896, p. 1 c. 5. "Their All Swept Away." New York Tribune, July 30, 1896, p. 1 c. 3.]


1896 July 13 / E. Mec 63/496 / Cor that saw through his telescope, from 10 p.m. [to] 11:15, a luminous [ob]ject moving [to]ward Saturn. He saw it pass several small stars. “It certainly was going toward Saturn at a good rate.” After 11 the planet too near the horizon for good observing. [VII; 1551. “SaturnComet?” English Mechanic, 63 (no. 1634; July 17, 1896): 496.]


1896 July 13 / early morning / Shock / Ontario / Trib 14-4-3. [VII; 1552. “An Earthquake Shock in Ontario.” New York Tribune, July 14, 1896, p. 4 c. 3.]


1896 July 13 / 9:25 p.m. / Brilliant bolide from Hercules at Prèchova, Albania / Bull. Soc Astro de F, Oct, 1896. [VII; 1553. Basile, Isisdoridi. “Brillant bolide.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 10 (1896): 329.]


1896 July 14 / At Tatavla, in a whirlwind, columns of dust that looked like smoke and alarmed the inhabitants. / Levant Herald, July 20. [VII; 1554. (Levant Herald, July 20, 1896.)]


1896 July 19-30 / fog / Moon little affected / See May fog, France, 1883. [VII; 1555. See: (1883 May).]


1896 July 20 and 21 / Tidal wave / the Yalu river districts of Antung and Tatungkou, Manchuria / Violent rains, followed by tidal wave that swept away whole villages. / North China Herald, Sept 4. [VII; 1557. (North China Herald, September 4, 1896.)]


1896 July 21 / Prof. William Brooks, Smith O[bservatory], Geneva, N.Y. / saw a dark round object pass slowly across moon from E to W. / E Mec 64/12. [VII; 1556. "Transit of a Meteor Across the Moon." English Mechanic, 64 (no. 1639; August 21, 1896): 12. Dennett, Frank C. "Telescopic SeeingPeculiar Object." English Mechanic, 64 (no. 1640; August 28, 1896): 41. See: 1896 June 27, (VII; 1531).]


[1896 July 21 /] 1896 / summer / The Brooks obj / D-200. [VII; 1537. The note copies information from page 200 of The Book of the Damned. "New Astronomical Discovery." New York Herald, July 23, 1896, p. 6 c. 6. "Scientific Notes and News." Science, n.s., 4 (July 31, 1896): 138-141, at 140. Chapman, Frank M. "Meteor or Bird?" Science, n.s., 4 (September 4, 1896): 316-317. “Astronomical.” Scientific American, n.s., 75 ( August 1, 1896): 126. Hopman, Frits. "On Dark Meteors." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 8 (1897-1898): 127-131. Celliée Muller, André Marine du. "Dark meteors." Scientific American, n.s., 75 (September 26, 1896): 251. Celliée Muller, André Marine du. "Observation de Méteores Hors de l’Atmosphère Terrestre." Bulletin de la Société Belge d'Astronomie, 1 (no. 8; May 31, 1896): 169-173. “Remarkable Observations.” Science Gossip, n.s., 3 (no. 29; October 1896): 135. “The 'New York Herald' records that on July 21st, Prof. W.K. Brooks, of the Smith Observatory, Geneva, N.Y., whilst observing the moon with the 10-inch equatoreal, saw a round, dark object pass slowly before it. It appears to have been a meteor too far from the earth to have been rendered incandescent by its atmosphere. The object moved horizontally from east to west, the transit occupying three or four seconds. The apparent diameter was about one-thirtieth that of the moon. The real distance from the earth being unknown, it is, of course, quite impossible to give the real diameter of the meteor. On June 27th, at 1 o'clock in the morning, the writer of these notes was looking at the moon with a 2-inch achromatic, power 44, when a tiny black object, slightly elongated, slowly sailed past from west to east, the transit occupying three or four seconds. This object was believed to be a bird of large size at a considerable distance. There was, however, nothing like fluttering observed.” See: 1896 June 27, (VII; 1531).]


1896 July 22 / N.Y. Trib, 1-5 / clbrst / Ky. [VII; 1558. "Drowned in Their Houses." New York Tribune, July 22, 1896, p. 1 c. 3.]


1896 July 22 / 8:50 p.m. / Tientsin / shock of q. / North China Herald, Aug. 7. [VII; 1559. (North China Herald, August 7, 1896.)]


1896 July 22 / 8:52 p.m. / At Peking, rumbling sounds and concussions. Peking and Tientsin Times, July 25 / Severest since 1888. [VII; 1560. (Peking and Tientsin Times, July 25, 1896.)]


1896 July 22 / Trib, 1-3Ky. / July 7-23, 30W. Va. / 29-1-4W. Penn, / Cl. bursts. [VII; 1561.  "Drowned by a Cloudburst." New York Tribune, July 7, 1896, p. 1 c. 2. "Drowned in Their Houses." New York Tribune, July 22, 1896, p. 1 c. 3. "Devastation Widespread." New York Tribune, July 23, 1896, p. 1 c. 5. "Drowned in the Flood." New York Tribune, July 29, 1896, p. 1 c. 4 & p. 4 c. 1. "Their All Swept Away." New York Tribune, July 30, 1896, p. 1 c. 3.]


1896 July 24 / Metite if great size seen to strike a mountain in State of Chihuahua, Mexico. / Nature 54-324. [VII; 1562. “Notes.” Nature, 54 (August 6, 1896): 324-327, at 324.]


1896 July 25 / N.Y. Trib, 4-2 / Clbrst / Colorado. [VII; 1563. "Perished in Cloudbursts." New York Tribune, July 25, 1896, p. 4 c. 2.]


1896 July 27 / Trance / Oregon / See Sept. 20. [C; 302. See: 1896 Sept. 20, (C; 313).]


1896 July 27 / Fish in hailstone size of hen's egg / in the 1921 paper a Nat Sci periodical. [VII; 1564. Gudger, Eugene Willis. "Rain of Fishes." American Museum Journal, 21 (1921): 607-619, at 616. "Fisch-Hagel." 24. Jahresbericht des Westfälischen Provinzial-Vereins für Wissenschaft und Kunst, 24 (1895-1896): 25. "Herr Joseph Grimberg in Essen a. d. Ruhr schrieb uns am 27. Juli: Bei dem gestrigen Hagelwetter wurde in einer Schlosse von der Grösse eines Hühnereies beifolgendes Fischchen eingefroren gefunden. Das Unwetter dauerte ca. 10 Minuten. Die Schlössen kamen aus S.S.W. Das Fischchen ist in meiner Gegenwart aufgehoben worden, sodass die Thatsache nicht zu bezweifeln ist. Der Fisch ist eine Karpfkarausche, Carpio Kellari Heck., von etwa 40 mm Länge. Wir haben ihn bisher in Westfalen nur in geschlossenen Gewässern beobachtet. (Vgl. Westfalens Tier-leben, Band III, S. 247).Das Fischchen muss mit einem Wirbelsturme aus einem Teiche oder Tümpel zu Wolkenhöhe gehoben und dort in einer Hagel-schlosse eingefroren sein.Froschregen, Fischregen und Muschelregen sind schon häufiger beobachtet worden, aber ein Fischhagel meines Wissens noch nicht."]


1896 July 27 / [LT], 9-f / Missing balloonist. [VII; 1565. “The Missing Parachutist.” London Times, July 27, 1896, p. 9 c. 6.]


1896 July 29 / N.Y. Trib, 1-4 / Clbrst / W. Pa. [VII; 1566. "Drowned in the Flood." New York Tribune, July 29, 1896, p. 1 c. 4 & p. 4 c. 1.]


1896 Aug / Amnesia / Herbert Spencer, amnesia student, returned to school, in Lawrence, Kansas, / See Aug., 1894. [C; 303. See: 1894 Aug., (C; 177).]


1896 Aug 3 / Haichou, China / Huge tidal wave. Estimated 4,000 lives lost. / North China Herald, Aug 7. [VII; 1567. (North China Herald, August 7, 1896.)]


[1896 Aug 8 /] 1896 Aug 9 / Total solar eclipse / Nova Zembla / C. [VII; 1568. The total solar eclipse occurred on August 8, 1896, (not August 9).]


1896 Aug. 11 / Ottawa / That the Indian Department had received a telegram stating that Andrée's balloon had been seen by two parties of Indians, Lat 55.15, Long 127.40, pursuing a nearly northerly course. / Trib 12-4-6. [VII; 1569. "Andree's Balloon Sighted." New York Tribune, August 12, 1896, p. 4 c. 6.]


1896 Aug 13 / [LT], 3-f / Street Explosion. [C; 304. “Street Explosion.” London Times, August 13, 1896, p. 3 c. 6.]


1896 Aug 13 / N.Y. Trib., Aug 22 / [Typescript]. [C; 305. Typescript Note. (New York Tribune, August 22, 1896.)]


1896 Aug 14, 15 / Trib / Ship without a crewthe Herbert Fuller / Can't find. [C; 306. “No Crew To Man the Fuller.” New York Tribune, August 14, 1896, p. 7 c. 3. “The Fuller Still Without a Crew.” New York Tribune, August 15, 1896, p. 1 c. 2.]


1896 Aug. 15 / Disap from sleeping car / near Rome, N.Y. * [C; 307. (Refs.???)]


1896 Aug 19 / Study of waterspouts off coast of Mass., in M.W.R., July, 1906. [VII; 1570. Bigelow, Frank Hagar. “Studies on the Thermodynamics of the Atmosphere: VI.—The Waterspout Seen Off Cottage City. Mass., in Vineyard Sound, on August 19, 1896.” Monthly Weather Review, 34 (no. 7; July 1906): 307-315.]


1896 Aug 19 / Waterspoutseems was falling water. / Sc Am 75-255. [VII; 1571. Vom Saal, F.C.V.H. "Waterspout Off Cottage City, Martha's Vineyard." Scientific American, n.s., 75 (September 26, 1896): 255.]


1896 Aug 20 / Trib, 11-4 / Ghost / Coney Island Creek. [C; 308. "Said To Be a Ghost." New York Tribune, August 20, 1896, p. 11 c. 4.]


1896 Aug 22 / (Vulc) / Reported that Mr. Gathmann, an American astronomer had observed a body crossing the sun's diskab. 8 secondsHis esti[mate] was 45 miles in diameter and 1000 from earth. / E Mec 64/37 / (Sc Am Sup 67/363). [VII; 1572. "Scientific News." English Mechanic, 64 (no. 1640; August 28, 1896): 37-39, at 37. Gore, John Ellard. "Some Astronomical Curiosities. Celestial Paradoxes." Scientific American Supplement, 67 (no. 1744; June 5, 1909): 362-363, at 363. "What a Chicago Man Saw." Indianapolis Journal, August 24, 1896, p. 1 c. 6. Louis Gathmann claimed to have observed this Earth's satellite at 9:12 A.M., on August 16, 1896. "May Have Satellites." Worthington Advance, (Minnesota), September 17, 1896, p. 7 c. 4. The satellite's passage across the Sun's disc changed from about 8 seconds down to only 5 seconds. Hopman, Frits. "On Dark Meteors." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 8 (1897-1898): 127-131.]


1896 Aug 24 / ab. 3 p.m. / Myst explosions heard at Lake Constance, Switzerland. / Bull Soc. Belge D'Astro 4-193 / 3 or 4 with intervals of a minute or more. [VII; 1573. Vincent, Jean. "Les Bruits Mystérieux en Suisse." Bulletin de la Société Belge d'Astronomie, 4 (1899): 191-198, at 193.]


1896 Aug 26 and 27 / Severest qs in Iceland since 1784. / Nature 54-446 / no eruptionp. 518 / See p. 574. [VII; 1574. “Notes.” Nature, 54 (September 10, 1896): 445-448, at 446. “Notes.” Nature, 54 (September 24, 1896): 517-519, at  518. Stefansson, J. “The Recent Earthquakes in Iceland.” Nature, 54 (October 15, 1896): 574-575.]


1896 Aug. 27 / Bright prominence on Mars / Nature 54/427, 487. [VII; 1575. “New Features on Mars.” Nature, 54 (September 3, 1896): 427. “New Features on Mars.” Nature, 54 (September 17, 1896): 487.]


1896 Aug 29, 31, Sept 1, 13, 25, 29 / Loud explosions and slight q's / Wanganui, N.Z. / See Aug 31, 1895. / Not only Aug but in Feb, etc., more. [VII; 1576. See: 1895 Aug 31, (VII; 1351).]


1896 Aug 31 / [LT], 4-d / Strange story. [C; 309. “A Strange Story.” London Times, August 31, 1896, p. 4 c. 4.]


1896 Aug 31 / Very weak eruption / Mayon Volc, Philippines / Ref, Feb 1, 1814. [VII; 1577. Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


1896 Aug 31 / Extensive damage in south of Japan by a typhoon / Nature 54-446. [VII; 1578. “Notes.” Nature, 54 (September 10, 1896): 445-448, at 446.]


1896 Aug 31 / evening / N.E. Japan / disastrous q. / Nature 54-446. [VII; 1579. “Notes.” Nature, 54 (September 10, 1896): 445-448, at 446.]


1896 Sept / Have Herald, ab Sept 15 to Oct 5 / Nov 1, etc., have. [C; 310.]


1896 Sept 3 / Aug 4 / Nov 10 / Jack the Strangler in N.Y. / NY Herald, Nov 13-5-1. [C; 311. “Jack Strangles Another Woman.” New York Herald, November 13, 1896, p. 5 c. 1-4.]


1896 Sept 4 / [LT], 7-f / 5-7-d / 8-4-f / 11-4-a / 14-7-f / 16-7-e / 22-4-b / 24-5-e / q. Iceland. [VII; 1580. “Earthquake in Iceland.” London Times, September 4, 1896, p. 7 c. 6. “The Earthquake in Iceland.” London Times, September 5, 1896, p. 7 c. 4. “The Earthquake in Iceland.” London Times, September 8, 1896, p. 4 c. 6. “The Earthquakes in Iceland.” London Times, September 11, 1896, p. 4 c. 1. “The Earthquakes in Iceland.” London Times, September 14, 1896, p. 7 c. 6. “The Earthquake in Iceland.” London Times, September 16, 1896, p. 7 c. 5. “The Earthquakes in Iceland.” London Times, September 22, 1896, p. 4 c. 2. “The Earthquakes in Iceland.” London Times, September 24, 1896, p. 5 c. 5.]


1896 Sept 6 / night / Another q. / Iceland / Nature 54-518. [VII; 1581. “Notes.” Nature, 54 (September 24, 1896): 517-519, at  518.]


1896 Sept 8 / [LT], 9-c / Three Earthquakes. [VII; 1582. Milne, John. “Three Earthquakes.” London Times, September 8, 1896, p. 9 c. 3. “For the Japan earthquake of June 15, which was accompanied by the loss of some 30,000 lives, seismographic records showed that the news furnished to the public involved an error of two days.” See: 1896 June 15, (VII; 1527).]


1896 Sept 5 / 11:30 p.m. / Another shockIceland / See Aug 26. / Severe again Sept. 10. [VII; 1583. See: 1896 Aug 26 and 27, (VII; 1574), and, (Sept 10).]


1896 Sept 6 / 7:57 p.m. / Bright met (Lick Observatory) close under Epsilon Pegasi and moved slowly toward B. Cassiopeiae, disappearing 2 degrees from that star. / Pubs-Pacific 8-267. [VII; 1584. Aitken, R.G. “A Bright Meteor Seen September 6, 1896.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 8 (no. 52; October 1896): 267.]


1896 Sept 10 / 2 brilliant meteors / 9:03 p.m., S.W. England / 10:26 p.m., S.W. England / Observatory 19-377. [VII; 1585. “Large Meteor.” Observatory, 19 (1896): 377-378.]


1896 Sept 10 / (noon) / Hatfield, Peverlel, Witham, Essex / Standard, Sept 12 / Cor writes of explosion of an aerolite in rainstorm but described effects like those of lightning, damage to trees, etc. / (E Mec 64-112, 136) / A meteor at 10:26 p.m. [VII: 1586.1, 1586.2. "Meteors and Aerolites." London Standard, September 12, 1896, p. 2 c. 3. The meteor at 10:26 P.M. was observed by Denning at Birmingham. Battersby, T. Preston. "Maintenance of Physical Life...." English Mechanic, 64 (no. 1643; September 18, 1896): 112. "An Earthquake or an Aerolite?" English Mechanic, 64 (no. 1644; September 25, 1896): 136.]


1896 Sept 10 / Paris / trombe / La Nat 1896/2/255. [VII; 1587. “Académie des Sciences.” La Nature, 1896 pt. 2 (no. 1216; September 19): 255. Angot, Alfred. “Sur la trombe observée à Paris le 10 septembre 1896.” Comptes Rendus, 123 (1896): 460-461. Jaubert, Joseph. “Sur la trombe du 10 septembre 1896 à Paris.” Comptes Rendus, 123 (1896): 461-463.]


1896 Sept / (Sound) / near Cazadero (Cal?) / “A tremendous explosion, presumably in the air. / Sc Am Sup 75-48. [VII; 1588. Talman, Charles Fitzhugh. “Brontidi, Mistpoeffers, or Barisal Guns.” Scientific American Supplement, 75 (no. 1933; January 18, 1918): 47-48. “A Remarkable Acoustic Phenomenon.” Scientific American, n.s., 97 (October 19, 1907): 279. Alippi, Tito. “Nuovo Contributo all'Inchiesta sui Brontidi.” Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 15 (1911): 65-77, at 74-77. “A tremendous explosion, presumably in the air, occurred in September 1896 near Cazadero heard by the dwellers of the mountain region over an area of 900 square miles. This was the beginning of my investigations. In interviewing the hill people I learned that similar explosions had been heard not infrequently.” Madeira, George. “Brontidi.” Santa Rosa Republican, (California), April 4, 1910, p. 2 c. 1-2. Cazadero, California.]


1896 Sept 12 / 10:25 / North Devon to Yorskhire / met / Sci Gos, n.s., 3-134. [VII; 1589. "Science Gossip." Science Gossip, n.s., 3 (no. 29; October 1896): 134.]


1896 Sept 13 / (Swarm) / Ocean City, MdSept 13. / “About three o'clock to-day, during a northeasterly wind, the heavens became almost black with swarms of huge-red-winged butterflies. They moved in a southerly direction. It was fully an hour before the last ones passed over.” / Entomological News, 7-285. [VII: 1590.1, 1590.2. “A Swarm of Butterflies.” Entomological News, 7 (November 1896): 285.]


1896 Sept 16 / N.Y. Herald 19-11-4 / Forest City, Pa. / Martin Westcott, aged 16He and other boys had seen performance of a professional hypnotist, who had hypnotized him. The boys tried it. One of them hypnotized Westcott. He was carried home in a state of unconsciousness and convulsions. Soon recoveredSee Nov. 24. [C; 312.1, 312.2. (New York Herald, September 19, 1896, p. 11 c. 4; not found here, nor Sept. 18 p. 11.) See: 1896 (Nov 24), (C; 325).]


1896 Sept. 20 / Trance / N.Y. Herald, 15-6 / Mrs Mary Albertson, of Columbus Slough, Oregon, in several trances on July 27. Narrowly escaped burial alive, a friend of hers insisting she not dead. No respiration perceptible. Told that her astral body had travelled in celestial regions. [C; 313.1, 313.2. “Nearly Buried Alive.” New York Herald, September 20, 1896, s. 4 p. 15 c. 6.]


1896 Sept 20, 21 / (Ch) / 2 objects near sunby Swift / California / Astro Jour. 17/8, 103. [VII; 1591. “Note from Dr. L. Swift.” Astronomical Journal, 17 (1897): 8. Hussey, William John. “Search for Comet or Comets Reported by Swift, Sept. 20.” Astronomical Journal, 17 (1897): 103.]


1896 Sept 24 / N.Y. Herald, 8-6 / Incendiary in Rockville Center. Servant girl, Carrie Eckert, aged 12, said to have read of him, and set her employer's house afire twice with kerosene. [C; 314. “Child Is A Firebug.” New York Herald, September 24, 1896, p. 8 c. 6.]


1896 Sept 26 / Hypnotism? / N.Y. Herald 30-9-2 / A Vernon, Conn, farmer, aged man, named Consider A. Risley.  stranger came to his place and talked to him an hour and persuaded him to give him $6,000 for a business transaction and disappeared with it. Risley said been known as a shrewd man. His housekeeper questioned him about what he had done and he could only answer in “a dreamy way”. He and his housekeeper went to Hartford to consult a lawyer, and he was still in a dazed condition. [C; 315.1, 315.2. “Hypnotism Used By the Swindlers.” New York Herald, September 30, 1896, p. 9 c. 2.]


1896 Sept 28 / Hypnotism / N.Y. Herald, 7-5 / William McDonald, New York, arrested for holding up a man and stealing his watch, pleaded that he had been impelled by a voice to do so. Several months before he had been arrested for thefts, but had been released, by intervention of Prof. Wines, of Brooklyn, who said that at time he was in a hypnotic state, in which the Professor had placed him. [C; 316.1, 316.2. “Hypnosis Made Him A Thief.” New York Herald, September 28, 1896, p. 7 c. 5.]


1896 Sept 28-29 / 24 hours / Valparaiso, Chile / greatest rainfall in 50 years / NY Herald 30-11-3. [VII; 1592. “Big Rainfall in Chili.” New York Herald, September 30, 1896, p. 11 c. 3.]


1896 Sept 29, 30 / West Indian Cyclone across E. and S. U.S. / Nature 54/577. [VII; 1593. “Notes.” Nature, 54 (October 15, 1896): 576-579, at 577.]


1896 Sept. 29 / Devast[at]ing whirlwind from West Indies up along Atlantic Coast, U.S.A. / N.Y. Herald, Oct 1-5-1-page. [VII; 1594. “Death and Destruction In Its Wake.” New York Herald, October 1, 1896, p. 5. A hurricane.]


1896 Oct / Herald not read. [C; 317.]


1896 Oct / q's in Iceland. 120 farms devastated. Many persons camping out and suffering. / NY Herald 15-12-5. [VII; 1595. (New York Herald, October 15, 1896, p. 12 c. 5; not found here.)]


1896 Oct. 1 / People in Berrien Co., Indiana, waiting for end of world on that date. / N.Y. Herald, Sept 20-2-6. [C; 317. “All Ready To Die.” New York Herald, September 20, 1896, s. 4 p. 2 c. 6. A divine revelation in a dream convinced W.W. Gouche that the world was about to end, and he convinced a score of followers to prepare for it with him.]


1896 Oct 1 / Hypnotism / N.Y. Herald 2-3-2 / New Haven, Conn. / Dr. J. Edward Lee accused by Bird M. Palmer, aged 19, of having hypnotized and seduced her. / 3-4-1a column to this case. Girl's name Bird Maud Palmer. [C; 319. “Says He Hypnotizes Her.” New York Herald, October 2, 1896, p. 3 c. 2. “Is Dr. J.E. Lee A Mephisto?” New York Herald, October 3, 1896, p. 4 c. 1-3.]


1896 Oct. 9 / Aberysywyth, Wales / by R. Renrickluminous obj going upward slowly, with a screw-like motion / Jour Astro Soc Wales 2/111. [VII; 1596. (Journal of the Astronomical Society of Wales, 2-111.)]


1896 Oct. 10 / (+) / Sounds / (3's) / Heard by Dr. J.W Kales driving on the Cuba road toward Franklinville, N.Y. Ab. 9 a.m., a loud explosive sound, another, another, intervals ab 5 minutes. Sounds attributed by another hearer to cannonading in Cuba, but Dr K says there was no cannon in Cuba. / M.W.R. 1897-393. [VII; 1597.1, 1597.2. Kales, John W. “Explosive Noises at Franklinville, N.Y.” Monthly Weather Review, 25 (no. 9; September 1897): 393. “Single sounds, like those described, are heard in the hills about here, but so far as the writer knows no series of sounds have been so closely located as those of October 10, 1896, in East Hill; they appear to be due to breaking of the strata of underlying rocks.”]


1896 Oct 11 / Balmain / beams radiating from a point / J. BAA 7/145 / Same as 18? [VII; 1598. McDonall, Francis K. "Peculiar Atmospheric Phenomenon." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 7 (1896-1897): 145. The "Oct. 18" date was that of McDonall's letter, (not the date of the phenomenon).]


[1896 Oct 11 /] 1896 Oct. 18 / (Cut) / Balmain / Beams of light radiating from point in constellation Scorp. / Jour. B.A.A. 7/145. [VII; 1604. McDonall, Francis K. "Peculiar Atmospheric Phenomenon." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 7 (1896-1897): 145.]


1896 Oct 16 / At “Rydal water”, near Windermere, a whirl / Nature 55-5. [VII; 1599. Anderson, Henry J.C. “Whirlwind on Rydal Water.” Nature, 55 (November 5, 1896): 5.]


1896 Oct 16 / 7:18 a.m. / Slight shook / Liguria and Piedmont, Italy / Nature 54-597. [VII; 1600. “Notes.” Nature, 54 (October 22, 1896): 596-599, at 597.]


1896 Oct 16 / q / See May 17, 1907. [VII; 1601. See: 1907 May 17, (IX; 762).]


1896 Oct 16 / Italy / W. Liguria / I / q. / BA '11. [VII; 1602. A class I earthquake. Milne, 739.]


1896 [Oct 16] / Oct 16, 1896 / q's / Rhondda Vaalley, Glamorganshire / Geol Mag, 1900-174 / June 22, 1889 / Ap 11, '94 / May 2, '94 / Ab. 11 p.m.a loud boom like the muffled sound of blasting. Miners rushed to surface fearing an explosion. [VII; 1603. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 174-175. See: (June 22, 1889 / Ap 1, '94 / May 2, '94).]


[1896 Oct. 18. Wrong date. See: 1896 Oct 11, (VII; 1604).]


1896 Oct. 19 / mist poeffers / ab. noon / near Lake Hallwyl, Switzerland / Bull Soc. Belge D'Astro, 4/197 / Detonations sharp and some prolonged. Intervals of 1 to 5 minutes. / That evening the detonations were heard at Reimach, near the lake. [VII; 1605. Vincent, Jean. "Les Bruits Mystérieux en Suisse." Bulletin de la Société Belge d'Astronomie, 4 (1899): 191-198, at 197.]


1896 Oct 21 / Rain of ink in the Canton of Trévières. Equally observed at Bayeux and at Longues. Writer in La Nat., Sup., Dec 5. says was a great fire at Caen that day, and that the smoke from this had been precipitated in rain. If black rain from a fire, why not innumerable such rains? Caen was in the center of a barometric depression, a day of absolute calm, atmosphere saturated with humidity. [VII; 1606.1, 1606.2. “Une pluie d'encre à Bayeux.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1227, supplement; December 5): 4.]


1896 Oct 22 /  Trévières (Calvados) / black rain / Cosmos, Oct, '96, p. 419 / An. Soc. Met. 45/14. [VII; 1607. Guilbert, G. “Sur une pluie d'encre.” Annuaire de la Société Météorologique de France, 45 (January-February-March 1897): 14-16. Marguerie, A. “Pluie d'encre.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 35 (October 31, 1896): 419.]


1896 Oct 22-23 / night / Black rain and black hail other towns in a zone of more than 20 kilometres. / Les Sciences Populaires 2/10/355. [VII; 1608. Sauvegrain, Jules. “Un phènomène météorologique oeu common.” Les Sciences Populaires, s. 2 v. 10 (1896): 355.]


1896 Oct 22 / 6:10 p.m. / Nevada, Cal. (sic) / 3 meteors in a row, connected with a fiery train. In view half a minute. / Also at San Francisco. / Pubs-Pacific 8-326 / p. 324-26. [VII; 1609. “Notices From the Lick Observatory.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 8 (no. 53; December 1896): 319-334, at 324-326. “Three Meteors in Line.” San Francisco Examiner, October 23, 1896, p. 7 c. 3.]


1896 Nov / Jules Naton, New York, dreamed that a salesman of his, also a friend of his, had committed suicide. At his office next day this man, Michael Herschberger, not appear. Learned of a suicide in Rahway. Went there and identified his body. / N.Y. Herald 18-5-4. [C; 320.1, 320.2. “Warned in a Dream.” New York Herald, November 18, 1896, p. 5 c. 4.]


1896 Nov. / Mt deaths / N.Y. Trib, 1896, Nov. 18/V/5/5. [C; 321. (New York Tribune, November 18, 1896, s. 5 p. 5 c. 5; not found here; possibly New York Times???)]


1896 / ab 1st Nov / Shower of fish in western Colorado / Trib, Nov 12-6-4. [VII; 1610. "Showers of fish...." New York Tribune, November 12, 1896, p. 6 c. 4.]


1896 ab Nov 1 / Raps and suicide / N.Y. Herald, Nov 29, section 6, p. 16, col 6 / Barracks of 4th Regiment of Infantry, at Toulon, France. Corporal Orleac committed suicide and was buried. Then one night soon afterward, at midnight, raps heard in his room, some slight and some loud. Soldiers investigated and could find no explanation. Noted that raps came in series of fifteens. Noted that first letter in his name is 15th in alphabet, but nothing developed from that. The Colonel of the regiment investigated, suspecting a practical joke, and threatened 60 days imprisonment for hoaxes, but nothing found out and the sounds went on. [C; 322.1, 322.2, 322.3. “Terrified by Raps.” New York Herald, November 29, 1896, s. 6 p. 16 c. 6.]


1896 Nov. 2 / 11 p.m. / Borde (Côte-d'Or) / violently det. met / La Nat Sup., Nov 21, '96, p. 98. [VII; 1611. “Communications.” La Nature, 1896 pt. 2, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1225, supplement; November 21): 98.]


1896 Nov. 3 / Meteoric / Cloud seen in Utah, California, Arizona / Cosmos, Aug 1, 1908. [VII; 1612. Les trainées lumineuses météoriques.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 59 (August 1, 1908): 111-112.]


1896 Nov. 3 / “Apparent projection” from Mars / (Phillips) / Mem. B.A.A., 6/67. [VII; 1613. “Section for the Observation of Mars.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 6 (1898): 55-122, at 67.]


1896 Nov. 4 / 8 to 10 a.m. / Bizerte, Tunis / Red rain / Les Sciences Populaires 10-428. [VII; 1614. “Une pluie rouge tombée à Bizerte (Tunisie).” Les Sciences Populaires, s. 2 v. 10 (December 1896): 428-429. Ginestous.Sur une pluie rouge tombée à Bizerte (Tunisie).” Comptes Rendus, 123 (1896): 1093-1094.]


1896 / latter part / (N) / Veg substance in Cochin, China, and Red sand in Tunis / La Nature 1897/1/46. [VII; 1615. Académie des Sciences.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 1 (no. 1229; December 19): 47. Ginestous.Sur une pluie rouge tombée à Bizerte (Tunisie).” Comptes Rendus, 123 (1896): 1093-1094.]


1896 / latter part / Cochin, China / fall of veg. substance—given local interpretation—grains of rice—black—said blackened by air and moisture / La Nat 1897/1/46. [VII; 1616. “Académie des Sciences.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 1 (no. 1229; December 19): 47.]


1896 Nov. 7 / N. eye sunspot / Paris / Bull. Soc. Astro de F., Dec., 1896. [VII; 1617. “Tache solaire visible à l'œil nu.” Bulletin de la Societe Astronomique de France, 10 (1896): 394.]


1896 (Nov 9) / Hypnotism / Nov 15, Third section of N.Y. Herald / Alvah Baker, of Hyde Park, near Poughkeepsie, N.Y., said that by occult influences he had on 9th been compelled to marry Rachael A. Schryver. [C; 323. “Married, He Says, While Hypnotized.” New York Herald, November 15, 1896, s. 3 p. 5 c. 3.]


1896 Nov. 11 / Numerous shocks / Lima, Peru / N.Y. Herald 12-9-2. [VII; 1618. “Many Earthquakes in Lima.” New York Herald, November 12, 1896, p. 9 c. 2.]


1896 Nov. 13 / [LT], 9-c / Met Shower. [VII; 1619. “To-Night's Meteor Shower.” London Times, November 13, 1896, p. 9 c. 3.]


1896 Nov. 14 / 3 a.m. / Cor. looking for November meteors saw “very bright star" in a position where no known star. / E. Mec 64/329, 347, 365. [VII; 1620. "Astronomical." English Mechanic, 64 (no. 1652; November 20, 1896): 347. "Astronomical." English Mechanic, 64 (no. 1653; November 27, 1896): 347. Besley, W.E. "Astronomical." English Mechanic, 64 (no. 1653; November 27, 1896): 347. Noble, William. "Mercurial Thermometer...." English Mechanic, 64 (no. 1654; December 4, 1896): 365-366, at 366. "I suppose that 'Astro' (query 89373, p. 312) knows Jupiter when he sees him, and can distinguish a star from a planet; and further, that he is sure about his points of the compass? I say all this, because at 3 o’clock in the morning of November 14 Jupiter was between 25° and 26° high, between 17° an 18° to the south of east, and this may have been your correspondent's object. If, however, it was not, then, almost certainly, what 'Astro' saw was Arcturus, which at the hour specified was about 11° high, half-way between E. by N. and E.N.E. I have calculated these details for the latitude of London; but they are sufficiently close, for such a purpose, to answer for any part of England." As Jupiter was about 18° below the radiant of the Leonids, over the eastern horizon, Arcturus best accounts for this "very bright star" rising above the horizon in the northeast.]


1896 Nov 15 and 18 / Settle, N. Car. / very bright meteors moving northward / Clm and Crops, Nor Car. Sect, Nov., '96. [VII; 1621. “Observers' Notes.” U.S. Department of Agriculture. North Carolina Section of the Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau, 1 (no. 3; November 1896): 8.]


1896 Nov 17-18 / midnight / Trib, Dec 2-1-2 / Atlantic / steamer Wilkommen, from Dantzic / huge meteor / 50 minutes later huge tidal wave. [VII; 1622. "A Wonderful Meteor Seen At Sea." New York Tribune, December 2, 1896, p. 1 c. 2.]


1896 Nov 20 / Trib, 12-2 / Face explodes. / (Can't find) / See Trib index. [C; 324. (New York Tribune index may have listed article, but it's not found in this location; not Herald, 20-12-2.)]


1896 Nov. 22 / A bright projection and a bright spot Mars (Maw) / Mem. B.A.A. 6/67. [VII; 1623. “Section for the Observation of Mars.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 6 (1898): 55-122, at 67.]


1896 (Nov 24) / Hypo / See back. / N.Y. Herald, Nov 24-5-3 / Henry Westcott, Forest City, N.Y., after having been hypnotized by Prof. A.S. Lowe, a travelling hypnotist, (revived and then operated upon by companions) 2 months before still under the influence, and could not again be revived. Paroxysms4 men to hold him. Snarled and barked like a dog. / See Sept 16. [C; 325.1, 325.2. “Hypnotism’s Victim.” New York Herald, November 24, 1896, p. 5 c. 3. See: 1896 Sept 16, (C; 312).]


1896 Nov. 24 / Intensely white spot that seemed [to] project from [te]rminator [of] Mars / by Molesworth / Mem. B.A.A. 6/67. [VII; 1624. “Section for the Observation of Mars.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 6 (1898): 55-122, at 67. “An intensely white spot was seen on the limb, appearing to project and to distort the curve of the limb,” (not on the terminator).]


1896 Nov. 25 / 5:20 a.m. / Belgrade / Brilliant meteor from Gemini toward Andromeda / Bull Soc Astro de F, Jan, 1897. [VII; 1625. Michaïlovitch, Jelenko. “Brillant bolide.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 11 (1897): 44.]


1896 Nov. 29 / Great floods followed by innumerable q shocks / Montserrat, W. Indies / Nature 57-543 / See Feb 15, 1898. [VII; 1626. “Notes.” Nature, 57 (April 7, 1898): 542-546, at 543. See: 1898 Feb 15, (VIII; 205).]


1896 Nov. 30 / Trib, 6-6 / Vesuvius. [VII; 1627. "Vesuvius...." New York Tribune, November 30, 1896, p. 6 c. 6. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1896 Dec 1 / 1:20 p.m. / Cairo, Ill / q / Trib 2-1-6. [VII; 1628. "An Earthquake in Illinois." New York Tribune, December 2, 1896, p. 1 c. 6.]


1896 Dec. 1 / [LT], 13-2 / Met. [VII; 1629. “A Meteor.” London Times, December 1, 1896, p. 13 c. 2.]


1896 Dec 1 / C.R. [of] / M Tarry reads paper on red rain at Croisic (Loire, Inf). / B / Saigon / Cochin, China. [VII; 1630. "M. H. Tarry adresse une Note...." Comptes Rendus, 123 (1896): 853.]


1896 Dec. 1 / It. sounds / Pontebba (Udine) / rombi / See 1816. [VII; 1631. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 43. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1896 Dec 2 / NY Times of / Met-ship. [VII; 1632. (New York Times, December 2, 1896; not found here.)]


1896 Dec. 2 / q preceded by sound near d'Arras / La Nat Sup, Dec. 12, p. 5. [VII; 1633. “Informations.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1228, supplement; December 12): 5.]


1896 Dec 4 / Raps / N.Y. Herald 9-14-4 / Tenants of house, 173 Marion St, Brooklyn, said house was haunted from this day, when tenant of house across the street, No. 178, Mrs Boley, who was a friend of theirs, died on 2nd and buried on 4th. Sounds on stairs as if someone walking on a crutch and sighing sounds, a groan, swishing sounds. [C; 326.1, 326.2. “’Tis the Ghost of Mrs. Boley.” New York Herald, December 9, 1896, p. 14 c. 4.]


1896 Dec 4 / Met / Am J. Sci 4/3/81. [VII; 1634. (American Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 3 p. 81.)]


[1896 Dec 6. 5. Wrong date. See: 1895 Dec 6, (VII; 1635).]


1896 Dec 10 / Op. Mars / (Al). [VII; 1636. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1896, 491.]


1895 Dec 11 / N.Y. Herald 27-V-6-2 / Rouen, France / House, 32 Rue Damiette. Behind it, a house occupied by Mme. Prevost, and her little daughter. Sounds began ab 11 p.m. and ended ab 1 a.m. Noises described as pandemonium. Chief of police investigated but sounds in his presence and went on. [C; 327.1, 327.2. “Rouen Scared By a Ghost.” New York Herald, December 27, 1896, s. 5 p. 6 c. 2.]


1896 Dec 12 / Holiday prob = Dec 26. [VII; 1637.]


1896 Dec 12 / I don't get it 12th. / See 27th. / As to Melb Argus on 27th spots on dressed described. Nothing of the 12th. [VII; 1638. The date of red rain at Melbourne was on December 27, 1896, (not December 12, the date given by Phipson). Phipson, Thomas Lamb. “Composition and Nature of the Red Rain.” Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 83 (April 4, 1901): 159-160. See: 1896 Dec. 27, (VII: 1651 to 1656).]


1896 Dec 12 / The Melbourne dustfall / On a holiday many persons dressed in whitethey were stained a deep red. / Symons. Mo. Met Mag 32-27. [VII; 1639. "Phenomenal Weather in Victoria." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 32 (March 1897): 27. The date given here is "a fortnight ago" from January 17, 1896. See: 1896 Dec. 27, (VII: 1651 to 1656).]


1896 Dec. 12 / Dust / Melbourne / Dr Phipson's opinion, after analyzing, that it was meteoric. / Chem News 83-159 / p. 253He says rich in feldspar and in his opinion volcanic. / (If so, see Dec 15, 1880, etc.) [VII; 1640. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. “Composition and Nature of the Red Rain.” Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 83 (April 4, 1901): 159-160. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. “Analysis of the Red Rain Deposit Which Fell in Victoria, Australia....” Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 83 (May 31, 1901): 253. See: 1896 Dec. 27, (VII: 1651 to 1656).]


1896 Dec. 12 / Melbourne dust “precisely similar”, ac to Dr. T.L. Phipson, Chem News 83-159, to that in Europe, March 13, 1901. [VII; 1641. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. “Composition and Nature of the Red Rain.” Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 83 (April 4, 1901): 159-160. See: 1896 Dec. 27, (VII: 1651 to 1656).]


1896 Dec 15 / 3:30 a.m. / Plainfield, N.J. / Sky cloudy. Ball of fire fell and struck a tree. / N.Y. Herald 16-7-5. [VII; 1642. “Saw a Ball of Fire.” New York Herald, December 16, 1896, p. 7 c. 5. The object “appeared to explode into a thousand fragments” with an intense light, yet only a “slight hissing” noise was heard, with no apparent damage to any of the trees.]]


1896 Dec 17 / qSymons 31-183 / Widnesfollowed by th. storm / Rhyl, Flint., followed by hail / Liverpoolth. storm / 15 minutes later herehail terrific. [VII; 1643. "The Earthquake of December 17th, 1896." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 31 (January 1897): 178-185, at 183.]


1896 Dec 17 (?) / Worcester shocks / 3:35 a.m. and 5:31 a.m. / Nature 55/179 / Persons whose bedrooms faced the north, saw a great light accompanying the earthquake. A (second shock severe.) “The peculiarity [is] by some attributed to lightning, by others to the effect of a large meteor”said that seven miles from W a great blaze for several seconds in the northern horizon. This Dec. shock. [VII; 1644.1, 1644.2. “The Earthquake of December 17.” Nature, 55 (December 24, 1896): 178-179.]


1896 Dec 17 / Davison records hundreds of obs upon sound like explosion, crash, or thunder. [VII; 1645. (Davison, refs.???)]


1896 Dec. 17 / Worcester / 3:35 a.m., a feeble Q. / At 5:31a great blaze of light in northern skymay have been a meteor and the q. its explosionIf so, very violent. Crockery and window glass broken. / Nature 55/179. [VII; 1646. “The Earthquake of December 17.” Nature, 55 (December 24, 1896): 178-179.]


1896 Dec 17 / 11 a.m. / Darkness / Paris / fog? / La Nat, Sup, Dec 26, p. 13. [VII; 1647. “Informations.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1230, supplement; December 26): 13.]


1896 Dec 21-24 / The Govt. Astronomer, H.C. Russell, at Sydney, N.S.W., heard that a comet had been seen by a great many persons in South Australia and New South Wales, He wrote to the post master of the town of Hungerford and received word that upon the 21st comet with a tail “5 feet long” and nucleus fairly bright had been seen about an hour after sunset. On 22nd much brighter. 23rd and 24th appeared with greater brilliancy almost immediately after sunset almost level with the horizon and soon disappeared. / M. Notices 56-337. [VII; 1648.1, 1648.2, 1648.3. "Letter from H.C. Russell. Supposed Observation of a Comet." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 56 (March 13, 1896): 337.]


1896 Dec 27 / Dust / Melbourne / Thos. Steel, in Rept. Australasian Assoc. Ad of Sci 7-334, gives analysissays that agrees closely with volcanic soils of Australia. Nothing to imply that originated outside Australia. [VII: 1649. Steel, Thomas. “On Red Rain Dust.” Report of the Australian Association for the Advancement of Science, 7 (1898): 334- 335.]


1896 Dec 27 / Diatoms in the dust / Victorian Naturalist 20-21. [VII; 1650. Chapman, Frederick, and, Grayson, Henry J. “On 'Red Rain,' with Special Reference to Its Occurrence in Victoria. With a Note on Melbourne Dust.Victorian Naturalist, 20 (June 4, 1903): 20-32, at 20-21.]


1896 Dec 27 / In Melbourne Argus, 28th / fallen at Castlemaine / evening / Dec. 25 / Broken Hill, N.S. Wales / “An immense bank of lurid red dust” seen northward / toward evening / Argus (Melbourne) Dec. 28 / Argus of 29thtowns Broadford, Dunolly, Geelong, Kilmore, Parkenham, etc. [VII; 1651.1, 1651.2. "The Weather." Melbourne Argus, December 28, 1896, p. 5 c. 3-4. "The Weather." Melbourne Argus, December 29, 1896, p. 6 c. 5-6.]


1896 Dec 27 / at Melbourne / Argus, 28 / Streetsa light coffee color, Ac to one observer, fell with “a peculiar metallic ring”. Said been only one similar occurence; ab 20 years beforeAnother that it stained like iron-mould. [VII; 1652. "The Weather." Melbourne Argus, December 28, 1896, p. 5 c. 3-4.

"Many thousands of people were caught in the rain, especially at the seaside, and their summer costumes displayed its peculiar characteristic in a remarkably graphic manner. Dresses of a light colour

were found to be covered with tiny red spots; gentlemen's ties and shirt-fronts had the same appearance; the streets of the city and suburbs were transformed from the asphalt black to a light coffee colour; the locomotives on the suburban railways looked as if they had just come out of a mud deluge; and everywhere there were indications of a rare occurrence so far as Melbourne is concerned. It was what meteorologists call 'the rain of blood.'" "Mr. P. Moloney, who takes a deep interest in meteorology, has taken the trouble to collect some of the red substance for microscopic and chemical examination. He says he noticed that the patter of the rain had not the usual sound, and that it fell

on some thin paper which he exposed to it with a peculiar metallic ring."]

1896 Dec 27 / Red rainlarge area in Victoria, Australia / Victorian Naturalist 20/21. [VII; 1653. Chapman, Frederick, and, Grayson, Henry J. “On 'Red Rain,' with Special Reference to Its Occurrence in Victoria. With a Note on Melbourne Dust.Victorian Naturalist, 20 (June 4, 1903): 20-32, at 20-21.]


1896 Dec 27 / Rain of bld in Melbourne / Scottish Notes and Queries 1-10-71, quoting the M. Argus / No analysis given. Said covered clothing with little red spots. [VII; 1654. "Black Rain." Scottish Notes and Queries, s. 1 v. 10 (April 1897): 171. See: 1896 Dec 27, (VII; 1652).]


1896 Dec 27 / (Dust) / Melbourne, Australia / Sc Am 82/343 / Cut. [VII; 1655. "Science Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 82 (June 2, 1900): 343.]


1896 Dec. 27 / Uncommon brush fires reported in each issue of Argusbut no one attrib the red rain to them. [VII; 1656. "Painful Bush Tragedy." Melbourne Argus, December 24, 1896, p. 5 c. 6. "Bush and Grass Fires." Melbourne Argus, December 26, 1896, p. 7 c. 4. "Bush Fires." Melbourne Argus, December 29, 1896, p. 6 c. 1.]


1896 Dec 29 / A tornado“The most disastrous storm ever known in N[ew] S[outh] Wales". / Argus (30th) / Destroyed the town of Nevertirepreceded by a storm of dust. [VII; 1657. "Tornado at Nevertire." Melbourne Argus, December 30, 1896, p. 5 c. 4-5.]


1896 Dec. 31 / 6:07 p.m. (P.S.T.) / Moun at San Francisco / from Epsilon Tauri to Epsilon Ceti / brilliant meteor / Pubs-Pacific, 8-44. [VII; 1658. Moses, William S. “A Brilliant Meteor.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 9 (no. 54; February 1897): 44.]

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