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Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1893b

July to December


1893:


1893 July 2 / At Morrison's, near White Haven, Pa., Mr. Charles Boger buried alive. / Hartman, “Buried Alive,” p. 12 / ab July 2. [C; 132. Hartmann, Franz. Buried Alive. Boston: Occult Publishing, 1895, 12-15. “Alive in her Coffin.” New York Herald, July 3, 1893, p. 4 c. 6. Mrs. Catherine Boger, (not her husband).]


1893 July 3 / stones or missiles / London Sun / also in Light / Leybourne-road, Chalk Farm, London / Missiles thrown about the house—part of the ceiling fell down. [C; 133. (London Sun, July 3, 1893; not @ BNA.) “A North London Ghost.” Light, 13 (no. 653; July 15, 1893): 334.]


[Series VII notes skip from May 10 until July 21, 1893. Notes between these dates may be missing or found outside the chronological series.]


[1893 July 15. "The Aurora of July 15, 1893." Nature, 48 (October 12, 1893): 573. Hadden, David Edward. “Auroral Phenomena at Alta, Iowa.” Popular Astronomy, 10 (no. 5; May 1902): 249-251. Howard, W. H. "An Unusual Aurora." Science, s. 1 v. 22 (July 21, 1893): 39. "On Saturday evening, July 15, there occurred an aurora which was unlike any the writer has ever seen, and a brief description of it may contribute something to the aggregate knowledge of those interesting phenomena." "The peculiar feature of this aurora was the movement of a series or succession of whitish flecks across the sky from east to west, resembling somewhat the waves of a body of water." "About 9.30, central time, my attention was first attracted to it. Flecks of white light were forming in the east at an altitude of about 45°, passing in regular succession westward, about 20° north of the zenith, and apparently accumulating in one larger band in the northwest, reaching at times from near the horizon to perhaps 80°. The white flecks or streaks were about 10° in length, strictly parallel north and south, and quite uniform in distance apart. They grew brighter and more distinct as they approached and passed the meridian. Their motion was very regular and quite rapid,—comparable to the swiftest apparent motion of light clouds. If they were as high as the electric theory would suggest, the velocity must have been enormous." "At times similar short bands, like strokes with a paint-brush, were stationary in the north, at about 45° altitude, for several minutes at a time." "A few minutes later a number, perhaps ten or twelve, white bands appeared north of the zenith, all converging towards a point some 10° south of the zenith, but vanishing before reaching the zenith. They remained only a few minutes. About 10 o'clock the moving flecks had disappeared, and one long, straight band extended from the northwest horizon, 50° or 60°, toward a point about 45° south of the zenith. Two or three other short flecks appeared parallel with the main band. About the same time the usual diffused glow appeared in the north horizon and continued till after 11 o'clock, but was not observable while the moving bands were seen. Many more gorgeous auroras have been seen in our latitude, but the rapidly-moving bands gave this one a new interest." Howard's observation was made at Adrian, Michigan. Note missing.]


1893 July 21 / Violent thunder and hail storm—Nova Scotia / Field, July 22. [VII; 915.2. "Storm in Nova Scotia." Field, July 22, 1893, p. 134.]


1893 July 26 / Fsh—(2 falls) / Pub Ledger [of] / “The fall of black bass at Emporia, Kansas, the other day, has been followed by a shower of perch at Middleborough, Ky.” [VII; 915.3. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, July 26, 1893.) “A Shower of Fish.” Wichita Eagle, June 30, 1893, p. 2 c. 1. “Emporia, Kan., June 29.—A heavy rain fell here last night and this morning. During the rain there was a shower of fish. One of the fish, a black bass, three inches long, was preserved by ex-Governor Eskridge, and is now thriving in an aquarium at the latter's home.” “Shower of Sunfish.” Bismarck Weekly Tribune, July 14, 1893, p. 2 c. 5. “Middlesborough, Ky., July 10.—A heavy electric and rain storm visited this section during the night, in which a shower of fish of the sun perch species was precipitated on the town. They
ranged in length from one-half to three inches.”]


1893 July 27 / Nature, p. 296 / Great drought / Europe and N. Amer. [VII; 915.4. “The Great Drought of 1893.” Nature, 48 (July 27, 1893): 295-296.]


1893 July 28 / Sleeper / B. Eagle 29-1-4 / Louis Irig, near Whitney, Neb., who been asleep 3 months, having awakened only twice in that period, died. [C; 134. “Slept Three Months and Died.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 29, 1893, p. 1 c. 4.]


1893 July 29 / Suffern, N.Y. / Aerolites / 2 / Sc Am 69-165. [VII; 915.5. "Fall of a Meteor." Scientific American, n.s., 69 (September 9, 1893): 165.]


1893 July 31 / 9-9:30 p.m. / Zealand / light in sky / Met Zeit 9/387. [VII; 915.6. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 10 (1893): 377-400, at 387-388.]


1893 Aug / Patches in sky / Eng Mec 74/63. * [VII; 915.7. Packer, David Elijah. "The Great Meteor Shower...." English Mechanic, 74 (no. 1901; August 30, 1901): 63.]


1893 Aug. / Unknown butterflies of 2 species at Worksop. Editor of the British Naturalist thought one was an American moth probably escaped from some entomologist's breeding cage, but did not try to identify the other. / B. Nat—3-203 / Said “nearly as large as birds, one 5½ and other 6 inches across wings. [VII; 915.8, 915.9, 915.10. “Strange Butterflies: A Note for Naturalists.” British Naturalist, 3 (October 1893): 203. One specimen was identified as the Luna moth, (Actias luna), and the other as the Silk Spinning moth (probably one of the Saturniinae subfamily), “natives of the United States.”]


1893 Aug / Great sunspot / See L'Astro. [VII; 915.12. Antoniadi, Eugène Michel. “La grande tache solaire d'août 1893.” Astronomie, 12 (1893): 352. “La Grande Tache Solaire d'Août 1893.” Astronomie, 12 (1893): 380-382.]


1893 / ab 1st Aug / winged ants? / Flies and ants in enormous numbers fall from sky. / Gamlingay, Cambridgeshire / Nature 48/351. [VII; 915.13. “Notes.” Nature, 48 (August 10, 1893): 351-355, at 351. See: 1893 Aug 5, (VII; 915.11).]


1893 Aug 2 / (Cut) / Saint-Aubin-sur-Yonne / Obj reported fell and fragment sent to Flammarion, who said it was iron pyrites and therefore not fallen. / L'Astro., 12-350. [VII; 915.14. “Aérolithe?” Astronomie, 12 (1893): 350-351.]


1893 Aug 2 / N.Y.T., 10-1 / Aurora. [VII; 915.15. “Studying the Aurora.” New York Times, August 2, 1893, p. 10 c. 1.]


1893 Aug 2 / q / I / Ital / Montreale, in Aquila / BA 11. [VII; 915.16. A class I earthquake. Milne, 737.]


1893 Aug 3 / Leitrim, Co. Wicklow, Ireland / Cor saw a star blaze out suddenly in Perseus and disappear. / or met / E Mec 57/564 / (Cut). [VII; 915.17. Rooke, George W. "Star or Meteor?" English Mechanic, 57 (no. 1481; August 11, 1893): 564.]


1893 Aug 4 / Geol Mag 1900-107 / 6:45 p.m. / Leicester / q and loud rumbling sound / Nature 48-351 / (Times 5-5-d / 7-6-e). [VII; 915.18. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, n.s., decade 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107-108. “Notes.” Nature, 48 (August 10, 1893): 351-355, at 351. “Earthquake in Leicestershire.” London Times, August 5, 1893, p. 5 c. 4. “The Leicester Earthquake.” London Times, August 7, 1893, p. 6 c. 5.]


1893 Aug 4 / P.L. of, that “one day last week, meteor exploded at Pompton, N.J. “The whole sky began to glow before the meteor itself came in sight.” [VII; 915.19. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 4, 1893.) “Pompton's Many Colored Meteor.” New York Sun, July 30, 1893, p. 3 c. 1.]


1893 Aug 4-16 / Cygnids plentiful / Observatory, Sept., 1893. [VII; 915.20. Denning, William Frederick. "The August Meteors, 1893." Observatory, 16 (1893): 317-319.]


1893 Aug 5 / ants / Field of / that “recently at village of Gamlingay, Cambridgeshire, a dense cloud was seen—suddenly it burst and down came millions of ants. [VII; 915.11. “Shower of Ants in Cambridgeshire.” Field, August 5, 1893, p. 223. “Shower of Ants in Cambridgeshire.” Liverpool Echo, August 5, 1893, p. 3 c. 6. “Notes.” Nature, 48 (August 10, 1893): 351-355, at 351.]


1893 Aug 5 / Cloudburst in Middle Styria. Houses wrecked and lives lost. / Aug 8, 2 shocks of earthquake in Mur Valley. / Nature 48-351. [VII; 915.21 “Notes.” Nature, 48 (August 10, 1893): 351-355, at 351.]


1893 Aug 6 / clburst / Pic., 4-4 / In Rawlings Co., Kansas, a Mrs Aldrich, in her carriage, was crossing the dry bed of a stream. No sign of a storm. A wall of  water swept down upon them, carrying them away, and drowning the woman. [VII: 915.22, 915.23. The note copies information from page 291 of Lo! "Swept Away by a Flood." New Orleans Picayune, August 6, 1893, p. 4 c. 4. ]


1893 Aug 6 / Snow / night / Violent th storms, Boston. At Haverhill, snow fell and drifted a foot deep. / N.Y. Trib 8-1-5. [VII; 915.24. "Snow a Foot Deep." New York Tribune, August 8, 1893, p. 1 c. 5.]


1893 Aug 6 / evening / Unusual sunset / N.Y. Trib 8-7-1. [VII; 915.25. "Interest in the Sunspots." New York Tribune, August 8, 1893, p. 7 c. 1.]


1893 Aug 6 / Appearance of a new group of sunspots / NY Trib 8-7-1. [VII; 915.26. "Interest in the Sunspots." New York Tribune, August 8, 1893, p. 7 c. 1.]


1893 Aug 6 / Aurora / N.Y. Trib 8-7-1. [VII; 915.27. "Interest in the Sunspots." New York Tribune, August 8, 1893, p. 7 c. 1.]


1893 Aug 7 / Many places near Goldalming, Surrey, air thick with winged ants. / Nature 48-392. [VII; 915.28. Latter, Oswald H. “Numerous Insects Washed up by the Sea.” Nature, 48 (August 24, 1893): 392.]


1893 Aug 8, 9 / At Dymchurch, Kent, on 2 miles of shore, countless ants washed up. Nature 48-370 / Stripes of them for more than 3 miles. [VII; 915.29. Kropotkin, Sophie. “Numerous Insects Washed up by the Sea.” Nature, 48 (August 17, 1893): 370.]


1893 Aug 9 / Rainless thunderstorm / great lightning / near Chepstow / Nature, Sept. 7. / Flashes began at 9 p.m. and last[ed] 5 hours. Estimated 10,000 flashes. [VII; 915.30. Lowe, Edward Joseph. “Drought and Heat at Shirenewton Hall in 1893.” Nature, 48 (September 7, 1893): 436-437.]


1893 Aug 9 / No rain, but more lightning than he (E.J. Lowe) had seen since Aug 9, 1843. / Nature 87-278 / at Shirenewton, near Chepstow / See flashes, 1892. [VII; 915.31. “Rainless Thunderstorms.” Nature, 87 (August 31, 1911): 278. See: 1892 May 27, (VII; 502), and, 1892 Aug 12, (VII; 653); and possibly, (1892 Aug 15-17; VII; 662).]


1893 Aug 9 / During shower of Perseids—astonishing display of lightning—11,540 flashes ac to E.J. Lowe. Denning says lightning was purely atmosph[eric] and local and nothing to do with the meteors. / Symons Met 29/19. [VII; 915.32, 915.33. Denning, William Frederick. "Meteors and Electrical Phenomena." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 29 (March 1894): 18-20, at 19.]


1893 Aug 10 / Nature of, p. 351 / Plague of wasps on S. England. At Heathfield, Sussex, more than 1,000 nests destroyed. [VII; 915.34. “Notes.” Nature, 48 (August 10, 1893): 351-355, at 351.]


1893 Aug 10 / Perseids / Garrett P. Serviss [word  missing] of one with a brief tail “like a short dash in the Morse alphabet. / Sc. Am. 69/134. [VII; 915.35. Serviss., Garrett Putnam. "The August Meteors." Scientific American, n.s, 69 (August 26, 1893): 134. "At about 10:55, while my eyes were fixed in the direction of the radiant, a faint stellar object made its appearance a few degrees northeast of Chi Persei, and quickly brightened until it equaled a third magnitude star, when it vanished It was evidently a meteor coming 'end on' toward my eyes. I had a distinct impression that its light appeared drawn out into an excessively brief trail, like a short dash in the Morse alphabet, which would indicate that the meteor was not moving exactly in the line of sight."]


1893 Aug 11 / Reuter telegram dated 11th / Stromboli violent / Nature 48-376. [VII; 915.36. “Notes.” Nature, 48 (August 17, 1893): 375-379, at 376.]


1893 Aug 12 /  Rel-Ph. J., p. 189 / Note of a Mrs. E.L. Deerborn, of Brooklyn, N.Y., a medium. / See another note. [C; 135. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, August 12, 1893, p. 189; not online.) See: (another note).]


1893 (Aug 17) / Between Ostend and Ramsgate, by Prof Leon Gérard, of Brussels—one p.m., a series of distant explosions—state of sky gave no reason to suppo[se] it was electric. / Ciel et Terre 16-609. [VII; 915.37, 915.38. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v. 16 pp. 608-609.]


1893 Aug 18 / [LT], 3-6 / Th storm. [VII; 915.39. (London Times, August 18, 1893, p. 3 c. 6; not found here; not found in New York Times.)]


1893 Aug 21 / owl / D. Pic of, 4-5 / That a luminous thing had taken up lodgings in an old log cabin near Hameltown, a suburb of Cincinnati. People upon an adjoining dairy farm had often seen it moving about and then going to the cabin, where it remained for hours. Said that it was in the shape of a man. [C; 136.1, 136.2. “A Fiery Ghost.” New Orleans Picayune, August 21, 1893, p. 4 c. 5.]


1893 Aug 21 / Maritime Provinces of Canada / most terrific hurrricane in 30 years / Nature 48-398. [VII; 915.40. “Notes.” Nature, 48 (August 24, 1893): 397-401, at 398.]


1893 Aug 23 / Cyclone/ Atlantic coast. [VII; 915.41. (Refs.???)]


1893 Aug 24 / Nature of, p. 394 / Insect prevalence and drought / See summer of 1922 / or 23? [VII; 915.42. Ormerod, Eleanor Anne. “A Few Remarks on Insect Prevalence During the Summer of 1893.” Nature, 48 (August 24, 1893): 394. See: (1922 or 1923, summer).]


1893 Aug. 27 / Mirage of unknown land over sea, at Ballycotton, Cork, Ireland / E Mec 58/62. [VII; 915.43. Murray, E.J. "Mirage." English Mechanic, 58 (no. 1485; September 8, 1894): 62-63. The sky was covered with dense clouds, but, below these clouds, the sky was clear. Murray and his family observed for some minutes a conical hill about 250 feet above the sea level. The closest point on the Welsh coast of Britain would have been about 185 km., (or about 115 miles), distant to the east of Ballycotton, and about 250 km., (or about 155 miles), distant from Penzance and the coast of Cornwall.]


1893 Aug 28 / Hurricane / great damage / Azores / Nature 48-445. [VII; 915.44. “Notes.” Nature, 48 (September 7, 1893): 444-447, at 445.]


1893 Aug 29 / Cyclone / Southern States / great damage / S. Atlantic States / Nature 48-421. [VII; 915.45. “Notes.” Nature, 48 (August 31, 1893): 421-425, at 421.]


1893 Aug 30-31 / Cal. / Ab. 11 p.m., great met at San Andreas—seemed to emanate from Cassiopeia—31st—2 am.—great detonating met at Ukiah. / Pubs-Pacific, 5-185. [VII; 915.46, 915.47. “Brilliant Meteors, August 30-31, 1893.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 5 (no. 31; September 1893): 185-186.]


1893/ (last) Aug / [S]ee flashes before. / (Switzerland) / Knowledge, 16-234—Cor writes that upon a moonlight night, last of August, a photographic plate from a negative that had been exposed for an hour, irregular marks as if of lightning, but there had been none known to him. [VII; 915.48, 915.49. “Lightning Photographs or Photographic Defects.” Knowledge, o.s., 16 (n.s., 8; December 1, 1898): 234-235. Ranyard's opinion was that the marks were due to an accidental exposure of the camera's film.]


1893 Sept. / K-bug in Philadelphia. Number of cases. Persons bitten and great swelling. / D. Pic., Sept 23 / See June. [C; 137. “A Dangerous Fly.” New Orleans Picayune, September 23, 1893, p. 4 c. 5. See: 1893 June 29, (C: 131).]


1893 Sept 2 or 9th / Frg. / evening, at Pawtucket / ac to Providence Journal, copied in St [L] Glb Dem, Sept 16. A hailstorm. In one large hailstone a little frog or toad. Ac to some persons pebbles, too, fell. [VII; 915.50, 915.51. “Live Toad in a Hailstone.” St. Louis Globe Democrat, September 16, 1893, p. 13 c. 6.]


1893 Sept 5 / manna / P.L. of / “A supposed miraculous fall of manna in Mardin and Diarbekar, Asiatic Turkey, has been found to be due to deposits of a species of lichen, which was carried by winds.” [VII; 915.52, 915.53. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, September 5, 1893.) (Miners Journal, Pottsville, Pennsylvania, September 6, 1893, p. 2 c. 6.)]


1893 Sept 5 / Middelkerke / loud sounds of remarkable intensity / Ciel et Terre 17-210. [VII; 915.54. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v. 17 pp. 209-210.]


1893 Sept 7 / See Sept. 17. / P.L. of / “A blazing meteor struck and set fire to a barn at Delevan, Wis., last week. [VII; 915.55. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, September 7, 1893.) (Grant County Witness, Platteville, Wisconsin, September 6, 1893, p. 5 c. 2.) See: 1893 Sept 17, (VII; 915.64).]


[1893 Sept 7. No note here regarding a boa constrictor on Long Island. See: Watch for the note, (A; 8).]


1893 Sept. 8 / ab 5:45 p.m. / Ciel et Terre, 16-609 / Prof Gérard, on Eng. Channel near Dover / explosive sound. [VII; 915.56. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v. 16 pp. 609-611.]


1893 Sept 8 / Streamer in sky / E Mec (Eng Soc) 58/90. [VII; 915.57. Meachen, G.N. "Peculiar Phenomenon." English Mechanic, 58 (no. 1486; September 15, 1893): 90.]


1893 Sept 11 / B. Eagle, 4-6 / Long drought in Illinois. [VII; 915.58. “Little Rain for 106 Days.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 11, 1893, p. 4 c. 6.]


1893 Sept. 13 / Sk Ho / P.L. of / “It is reported to have rained alligators in the lake region of Florida recently. [VII; 915.59. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, September 13, 1893.)]


1893 Sept 14-15 / clbrst / town of Villa-Canas, Toledo, Spain / A deluge in which trees battered down the houses. / P.L. 16-10-3 / Swept upon the people while they were asleep. Inhabitants awakened by the tottering of their battered houses. Many drowned—40 known. [V; 915.60, 915.61. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, September 16, 1893, p. 10 c. 3.)]


1893 Sept 15 / This great sunspot on to Nov 16, etc? [VII; 915.62. (Refs.???)]


1893 Sept 15, etc. / Near eastern limb a large spot. On 17th, very much larger. / Pop Astro 1-91. [VII; 915.63. Martin, K.S. “Remarkable Sun Spot.” Popular Astronomy, 1 (no. 2; October 1893): 91.]


1893 Sept 17 / Forest fires and the week before—Wood, Marathon, and Lincoln Cos., Wisconsin. / See Sept 7. / P.L., Sept 11. [VII; 915.64. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, September 11, 1893.) See: 1893 Sept 7, (VII; 915.55).]


1893 Sept 19 and 20 / Two remarkable sun-flames / L Astro 13-172. [VII; 915.65. Fényi, Jules. “Flammes Solaires de 360,000 et 500,000 kilomètres de hauteur.” Astronomie, 13 (1894): 172-177. Buss, Albert Alfred. "List of 25 exceptional Eruptive Prominences." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 18 (1907-1908): 326.]


1893 Sept. 21 / (Met) / at Cypress, La. / (D. Pic, of 23rd) / 7 p.m. / Brilliant meteor with a detonation that shook buildings. [VII; 915.66. “A Brilliant Meteor.” New Orleans Picayune, September 23, 1893, p. 4 c. 6.]


1893 Sept. 21 / [LT, 7-f / Curious story. [C; 138. “A Curious Story.” London Times, September 21, 1893, p. 7 c. 6.]


1893 Sept 22 / Zabrodje, Vilna, Russia. / (F). [VII; 915.67. Fletcher, 106. This is the Zabrodje meteorite.]


1893 Oct 1 / Flames and Lightning / St Louis Globe-Democrat of / That at Reuver (Germany) an electrical storm without thunder. During it a fire started up in a room in a brewery. It was put out, but there were other fires in the same place, a dozen times a day, starting up in a trunk, in a curtain, in a file of papers, beginning with a gentle hissing, never occurring during the night. [C; 139.1, 139.2. “Spirit Incendiaries.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 1, 1893, p. 33 c. 4.]


1893 Oct 1 / B. Eagle, 24-5 / In Brooklyn, at the 17th precinct station house, Cornelius W. Coman, a builder, living at 180 Reid Ave, complained that he and his children had been hypnotized by a medium, Harlow Davis, of 173 New Jersey Ave. [C; 140. “Under a Medium's Influence.” Brooklyn Eagle, October 1, 1893, p. 24 c. 5.]


1893 Oct 11 / P.L. of—Stone found on the grounds of R.H. Harris, Yarmouthport, Mass. Twice the size of a hen's egg—2 human faces carved on it. [MB-I; 5. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 11, 1893.) “Cape Cod's Antiquity.” Boston Post, October 9, 1893, p. 6 c. 6, (illustration).]


1893 Oct 14 / House / B. Eagle, 10-2 / A year before, Martin Diet, an “eccentric” watch repairer, disappeared from his house in Rockville Center (L.I.?). Families that followed him, as tenants, moved out, in a hurry. Early in Oct., 1893, Constable Pearsall and his family moved in. A week later they moved out. Said that heard mysterious noises. A white figure was seen. [C; 141.1, 141.2. “A Ghost with Modern Ideas.” Brooklyn Eagle, October 14, 1893, p. 10 c. 2.]


1893 Oct. 18 / P.L. of / “A huge snake, '30 feet long and as thick as a barrel,' is causing much fright in the vicinity of Brookville, Indiana. [C; 142. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 18, 1893.) “That Dearborn County Snake.” Logansport Pharos-Tribune, October 14, 1893, p. 17 c. 6. “Mr. Stevens, not being armed, did not care to attack the monster single-handed, but he hastened to announce the discovery. He described the snake as being fully thirty feet iu length, and as thick us his thigh. It was of a dark blue color.”]


1893 Nov. 2 / 5:45 p.m. / Various parts of Wales and W. of Eng—place 10 miles n east from Wales—loud sound but no shock felt / Nature 49-245. [VII; 915.68. Allen, Frank James. “The Mendip Earthquake of December 30-31, 1893.” Nature, 49 (January 11, 1894): 245-246. Shepton Mallet, Draycott, and the Mendip Hills are south of Wales.]


1893 Nov. 3 / [LT], 10-e / 4-11-e / 6-7-e / 9-2-f / 13-13-b / q / Cornwall and Wales. [VII; 915.69. “Earthquake in Wales and Cornwall.” London Times, November 3, 1893, p. 10 c. 5. “The Earthquake.” London Times, November 4, 1893, p. 11 c. 5. “The Earthquake.” London Times, November 6, 1893, p. 7 c. 5. “The Earthquake.” London Times, November 9, 1893, p. 2 c. 6. “The Earthquake.” London Times, November 13, 1893, p. 13 c. 2.]


1893 Nov. 3 / Steamship Saltram, 300 miles from Gibraltor. In a gale, pieces of ice suddenly began to fall upon the vessel. Size of a man's fist. “They were not rounded pieces, like hailstones, but rough, jagged pieces, as if someone was chopping ice up aloft." / Trib 22-8-1. [VII; 915.70, 915.71. "The Saltram Tells of Hailstones." New York Tribune, November 22, 1893, p. 8 c. 1.]


1893 Nov. 4 / 11 p.m. / Berwick-upon-Tweed / supposed met / heavens brilliantly lighted one minute. / E Mec 58/263 / p. 439—was seen at Birmingham (?) [VII; 915.72. Fleming, L.T. "A Brilliant Meteor." English Mechanic, 58 (no. 1494; November 10, 1893): 263. Wood, J.T. "Jupiter." English Mechanic, 58 (no. 1495; November 17, 1893): 284. A meteor "as bright as Capella" was observed at Nottingham at this time. Packer, David Elijah. "The Great Meteor of 1893, Nov. 4...." English Mechanic, 58 (no. 1502; January 5, 1894): 439. Packer acknowledges seeing the meteor but disputes Fleming's claim of its duration. "It left a broad train of a most brilliant emerald green fully 30° long, which immediately vanished. The entire duration did not exceed one second, yet Mr. Fleming gives its period of duration as two minutes."]


1893 Nov. 5 / 9 a.m. / Punjab / severe q / Nature 49-106 / Also Russian Turkestan / p. 159. [VII; 915.73. “Notes.” Nature, 49 (November 30, 1893): 106-110, at 106. “Notes.” Nature, 49 (December 14, 1893): 158-162, at 159.]


1893 Nov 12 / Chic. Citizen of 12th tells of the collapsed balloon, name “Jane” painted on car, found in forest in Haute Marne, France, says the car was stained with blood. No trace of the aeronauts. [VII; 915.74, 915.75. (Chicago Citizen, November 12, 1893.)]


1893 Nov 15 / 2:50 a.m. / Chicago / met train 30 minutes / MWR 07-391. [VII; 915.76. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (no. 9' September 1907): 390-397, at 391.]


1893 Nov. 16-28 / Great sunspot appeared. / Meridian central 22nd / passed western limb 28th. / L'Astro 13-114. [VII; 915.77. “La grande tache solaire équatoriale de novembre 1893.” Astronomie, 13 (1894): 114-115.]


1893 Nov. 17 / At Worcester, Leonids so numerous as to been mistaken for fireworks / Nature 49-81 / Verified. [VII; 916. “Notes.” Nature, 49 (November 23, 1893): 80-84, at 81.]


1893 Nov 17 / Kashan, Western Asia / Disastrous q. / Nature 49-81. [VII; 915.78. “Notes.” Nature, 49 (November 23, 1893): 80-84, at 81.]


1893 Nov. 17 / 8:23 a.m. / Russian Turkestan / big q. [VII; 915.79. A class III earthquake. Milne, 737.]


1893 Nov. 17 / Kuchan, Persia, destroyed by q. / again Jan. 17, 1895 / N.Y. World, Jan. 21. [VII; 915.80. “Lives Lost by Earthquake.” New York Evening World, November 21, 1893, p. 4 c. 4. (New York World, January 21, 1895; not @ Newspapers.com.) See: 1895 Jan 17, (VII; 1213.)]


1893 Nov. 18 / P.L., 24th / “A comet with a perceptible tail” / (in the eastern sky) / reported from Farmland, Ind. [VII; 917. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, November 24, 1893.) “Probably a Barn Burning.” Indianapolis Journal, November 19, 1893, p. 2 c. 5. “Farmland, Ind., Nov. 18.A comet with a tail about sixty feet long and emitting fiery red rays, made its appearance in the eastern sky to-night. After an hour the celestial sight gradually died away. It was a grand sight to those who never witnessed anything of the kind before.” “The local cloud inspector was called up at his station in the watch tower, and said he had seen no comet last night.”]


[1893 Nov 17] / 1893 Nov. 18 / Op. Jupiter. [VII; 918.1. Opposition of Jupiter, Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1893, 469.]


1893 Nov. 18 / Well-defined red streak in sky / Pop Astro 1/191. [VII; 918.2. Sackett, Robert Lemuel. “Peculiar Phenomena.” Popular Astronomy, 1 (no. 4; December 1893): 191. No location is given in this article, however Sackett was probably in Richmond, Indiana, (where he taught at Earlham College).]


1893 Nov. 19 / B. Eagle, 20-4 / Story from Freeport, L.I., of an apparition, human in form, but 8 feet tall, running through the streets. / Eagle 25-5-4, that ghost been caught—Louis Friedman had rigger self up with poles and an old sail. Friedman said he had not started the scare. Someone else, named Lott, had played similar tricks and started the scare. [C; 143.1, 143.2. “Saw a Ghost Eight Feet Tall.” Brooklyn Eagle, November 19, 1893, p. 20 c. 4. “They Caught the Ghost.” Brooklyn Eagle, November 25, 1893, p. 5 c. 4.]


1893 Nov 23 or 27 / No Andromed showers noted in Nature. [VII; 918.3.]


1893 Nov. 26 / ghst in black / B. Eagle 28-7-4 / That in 26th Ward of Brooklyn, stories of a black ghost. Night  of 26th, ab 9 o'clock, 2 brothers named Beadley saw the black figure dancing up and down in front of a terrified young woman, At their approach the figure fled, and leaped over a fence. They said had on trousers under the skirt. Said that a mustache been seen under the black veil. [C; 144.1, 144.2. “A Black Ghost in Trousers.” Brooklyn Eagle, November 28, 1893, p. 7 c. 4.]


1893 Nov. 26 / Similar to the story of Sept. 15, 1892. / Terrifying women and a fence handy. [C; 145. See: 1892 Sept 12, (C; 53).]


1893 Nov. 27 / ab. 11:45 a.m. / Severe q / Montreal and northern NY and Vt. / NY Trib 28-1-3 / New Hampshire and Mass. [VII; 919. "Montreal Badly Shaken." New York Tribune, November 28, 1893, p. 1 c. 3.]


[1893 Nov. 27 /] 1892 Nov. 27 / Montreal / q / BA '11. [VII; 776. A class I earthquake. Milne, 737.]


[1893 Nov 27 /] 1894 Nov 27 / about noon / N. New England and E Canada / q / Sc Am. 70-26. [VII; 1168. "The Earthquake of November 27, 1893." Scientific American, n.s., 70 (January 13, 1894): 26.]


1893 Nov 28 / N.Y.T., 1-4 / 29-1-4 / q / N.Y. / Vermont / Canada. [VII; 920. “Shaken by an Earthquake.” New York Times, November 28, 1893, p. 1 c. 4. “What Caused the Earthquake.” New York Times, November 29, 1893, p. 1 c. 4.]


1893 Dec 3 / D. Pic., 16-2 / On railroad near Clarksville, Tenn, in daylight, headless ghost terrorizing residents. [C; 146. “A Headless Ghost.” New Orleans Picayune, December 3, 1893, p. 16 c. 2.]


[1893 Dec 6. Wrong date. See: 1892 Dec 6, (VII; 921).]


1893 Dec 7 / D. Pic of, 4-5 / At Hart's Corners, near Alliance, Ohio, a man named Culp believed to be a witch. [C; 147. “Trouble About a Witch.” New Orleans Picayune, December 7, 1893, p. 4 c. 5.]


1893 Dec 9 / 9 p.m. / Met / Nor. Car. and Va. / Sc Am 68-226 / See BSA 4/152. / if q in Charleston. [VII; 922. "A Remarkable Meteor." Scientific American, n.s., 68 (April 15, 1893): 226. Taber, Stephen. "Seismic Activity in the Atlantic Coastal Plain near Charleston, South Carolina." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 4 (1914): 108-160, at 155. There were no earthquakes listed between December 3 and 27, 1893, in this article.]


1893 Dec. 11 / ab 3 p.m. / Glen Garry / q / Geol. Mag 1900-107 / Low rumbling sound and no perceptible movement of the ground. [VII; 923. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, n.s., decade 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107 & 109.]


1893 Dec 12 / B. Eagle, 1-5 / 3 sisters, Susan, Millie, and Elizabeth Bassett, sent to the lunatic asylum on Blackwell's Island., They were triplets. Said that not long before, 2 sisters, who were twins, had been sent to the asylum, from Bellevue Hospital, New York. [C; 148.1, 148.2. “All Three Bereft of Reason.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 12, 1893, p. 1 c. 5.]


1893 Dec. 12 / B. Eagle, 1-5 / At Farmington, near Ronkonkoma, L.I., cottage of Mrs Mary Jackson burned down. Her charred body was found in the cellar. Not known how the fire started. [C; 149. “Found Her Body in the Cellar.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 12, 1893, p. 1 c. 5.]


1893 Dec. 20 / early morning / Brilliant meteor left train that lasted ½ hour, Petersburg, Va. / P.L., 23rd. [VII; 924. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 24, 1893.)]


1893 Dec 20 / morning / Luminous mass with shaft from / Raleigh, N.C. / Astro Soc Pacific 6/47 / Same as preceding. [VII; 925. “Bright Meteor (?) in North Carolina, December 20, 1893.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 6 (no. 34; January 1894): 47.]


1893 Dec. 20 / (D-262) / Wheel / Virginia and Carolina. [VII; 926. The note copies information from page 262 of The Book of the Damned. “Un phénomène extraordinaire." Astronomie, 13 (1894): 157. "Was This A Comet?" Richmond Daily Dispatch, (Virginia), December 21, 1893, p. 3 c. 7. "Professor Charles H. Winston, of Richmond, who is probably as well posted on astronomical matters as any one in Virginia, was seen by a Dispatch reporter last night in regard to the heavenly conundrum. After having been told of the thing as reported by persons in both this State and North Carolina, the Professor declared that the description did not fit any of the celestial bodies, and he did not feel like guessing as to what the object really was. It was, he said, improbable that it was a comet, as these bodies are usually sighted by the astronomists before they are visible by the naked eye. It could hardly be a meteor, the scientist continued, as they seldom remain in sight more than a minute. Professor Winston remarked that he saw about fifteen years ago a meteor which left a train which assumed a sort of zigzag shape. This was late in the afternoon, and before the sun had sunk in the horizon the trail could be seen for something like an hour, but it had no ball of fire for a head. This was one of the features of this astronomical curiosity that Professor Winston could not account for. He had not seen the body, and thought it possible that those who had observed it had to some extent exaggerated its proportions. He felt more inclined to believe it a meteor train than anything else, but said such an enormous one as this must have been would have caused a heavenly display that could not have escaped greater notice." "A Brilliant Meteor." Washington Evening Star, (D.C.), December 20, 1893, p. 2 c. 2.]


1893 Dec. 24 / D. Pic, 4-4 / That the time of the  tornado several days before, at Louisville, Ky., “a terrible roaring” was heard. No effects of a wind in the city, but the railroad bridge was lifted from its piers and dropped into the river. [VII; 927. “It Was a Tornado.” New Orleans Picayune, December 24, 1893, p. 4 c. 4.]


1893 Dec. 25 / ab 3:20 a.m. / Huntingdon, Penn / slight q / (N.M.) / NY Trib. 26-5-4 / See Ap. 27. [VII; 928. "Earthquake Shock in Pennsylvania." New York Tribune, December 26, 1893, p. 5 c. 4. See: (???April 27).]


[1893 Dec 29] / Sleeper / B. Eagle, 1893, Dec 29-10-1 / At Frankfort, Ind, George Woodruff, a wealthy farmer, had gone 30 days without sleep. About a year before, had gone 65 days. “He is, to all appearances, healthy and works each day.” [C; 150. “Thirty Days Without Sleep.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 29, 1893, p. 10 c. 1.]


1893 Dec 30 / early morn / At Paulsboro, N.J., missing man and his house burned down. / P.L., Jan 1-11-6. [C; 151. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 1, 1894, p. 11 c. 6.) (“His Bones Not Found.” Philadelphia Inquirer, January 1, 1894, p. 2 c. 6.) (“Now They Think He Is Hiding.” Camden Morning Post, January 6, 1894, p. 1 c. 2.)]


1893 Dec 30 / night / Shepton Mallet and Wells / q / Times, Jan 1, 1894 / Nature 49-245. [VII; 929. “Earthquake Shock.” London Times, January 1, 1894, p. 6 c. 6. Allen, Frank James. “The Mendip Earthquake of December 30-31, 1893.” Nature, 49 (January 11, 1894): 245-246.]


1893 Dec 30 / 11:20 p.m. / 31—12:28 a.m., ab. 4 a.m. / q. / Somerset / Geol Mag 1900-107 / Like rolling peal of thunder or a terrific explosion. To others, fainter sound. [VII; 930. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, n.s., decade 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107 & 109-112.]


1893-94 / winter / Larvae found on snow, near Whitby, Ontario. Insect Life 7-53—said Tipulid larvae which probably tempted out of ground on warm day—freeze—not able to get back. [VII; 931. “Living Larvæ on Snow.” Insect Life, 7 (September 1894): 53.]


                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

[1893. Farrington, Oliver Cummings. "Catalogue of the meteorites of North America, to January 1, 1909." Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, 13 (1915): 1-513, at 345-346, c.v. "Oroville." This is the Oroville meteorite.]

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