Last updated: April 8, 2021. - Fortean Notes

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Last updated: April 8, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1834 to 1835


1834:


1834 Jan 2 / Zeitz, Saxony / Stone fell, ac to Baumhauer. Ac to Chladni, only a piece of granite and mere newspaper humbug. / BA 60. [I; 1860. Greg, 74-75.]


1834 Jan 22 / Peru / great q / [BA] '11. [I; 1861. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1834 Jan. 30 / Gainsborough / E. to W. / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1862. Greg, 74.]


1834 Feb 2 / During torrential rains, part of Mt. Telo Mojo, Java, sank, carrying houses. On Feb. 26, a volc outburst in Palembang. / L.T., July 4-2-c, 1834. [I; 1863. "Earthquake in Java." London Times, July 4, 1834, p. 2 c. 3. The only confirmed volcanic eruptions on Sumatra near to these dates would be the Kaba volcano on November 24 to 25, 1833, and the Talang volcano, which began erupting in October of 1833.]


1834 Feb 2-March 27 / (Polt) / Poltbells in a house / Bealings, near Woodbridge, Suffolk / Jour Soc 9-27, R. Ac 3834/. [A; 107. “Correspondence.” Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 9 (February 1899): 22-32, at 27. "R. Ac 3834" is the British Library shelfmark.]


1834 / Polt / Woodbridge, N.J. / Rogers, Phil Myst Agents, p. 38. [A; 108. Rogers, Edward Coit. Philosophy of Mysterious Agents, Human And Mundane. Boston: J. P. Jewett and Co., 1853, 38-40.]


1834 / The two Woodbridges. [A; 109. See: 1883 Nov 23, 1883, (B: 572 & 573).]


1834 Feb. 2 / Began door bell ringing in home of Major Edward Moor, F.R.S, at Great Bealings, described by him in his book "Bealings Bell." Lasted 53 days. / See 1830. [A; 110. Moor, Edward. Bealings Bells. Woodbridge, England: John Loder, 1841, 66-68. See: 1830 and for 18 months, (A; 92).]


1834 / "Philosophy of Mysterious Agents," by E.C. Rogers (YRD) p. 38 / Town of Woodbridge, N.J., home of Mr. Joseph Barronphe accompanying a servant girl ab 14 years old. At first a loud thumping apparently against the side of the house after all to bed, and at intervals all night. Next evening, the girl passing a window, the house was jarred, the window broke with an explosive sound, and the girl was seized with a violent spasm. Sounds continued and with them the girl had spasms. Thumping ceased at daylight. Each night began a little earlier until at noon. Whatever room girl placed in, there were the thumping sounds 5 or 6 in successionan interval and then a succession. Girl seemed good health and the convulsions stopped. Some phe continued. [A; 111.1 to 111.4. Rogers, Edward Coit. Philosophy of Mysterious Agents, Human And Mundane. Boston: J. P. Jewett and Co., 1853; 38-40.  "YRD" is the call number for this book at the New York Public Library.]


1834 Feb 4 / Upper Silesia / Fireball / BA 60 / = moon. [I; 1864. Greg, 74.]


1834 Feb 12 / Lancaster, Pa. / Shock like explosion of a powder mill / BA 54. [I; 1865. Mallet, 243. The earthquake is listed in Mallet's catalog, ("54"), not Greg's, ("60").]


1834 Feb 13-17 / Shocks / Italy / BA 54. [I; 1866. Mallet, 243-244. The earthquakes are listed in Mallet's catalog, ("54"), not Greg's, ("60"). Milne, 705.]


1834 Feb 20 / midday / Aurora / Westmoreland / L.T. 26-3-c. [I; 1867. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, February 26, 1834, p. 3 c. 3. "This beautiful phenomenon is not often seen in this part of the world during the day, but at mid-day on Thursday we had something very like it. About 1 o'clock three stripes of pale light emanated from a cluster of fleecy clouds resting a few degrees above the horizon, and about a point to the eastward of north, shooting up beyond the zenith till they came in contact with other clouds, when they melted away; one stream was about mid-heaven. the other more eastward. About half-past 1 there shot from the same clouds the most beautiful stream of pale light we ever beheldbroad at the base, but extending in width as it shot upwards, not unlike a noble plume of feathers; its progress to the zenith was rapid, but as it passed this point it melted away in ether.Westmoreland Gazette."]


1834 Mar. 10 / Hirschberg, Silesia / det met / BA '60. [I; 1868. Greg, 74.]


1834 March 27 / Great Bealings Bells stop. / 27th last day of ringings. [A; 112. Moor, Edward. Bealings Bells. Woodbridge, England: John Loder, 1841; 66-68.]


1834 Ap 15 - 17 / Shocks / Italy / and loud explosive sounds / BA 60 / ab March 21 and May 2 - to Aug 2 / See Ap 15, 1835. [I; 1869. The earthquakes are listed in Mallet's, ("54"), not Greg's catalog, ("60"). Mallet, 245.]


[1834 early. Wrong date. See: 1839 Aug 29, (I; 1850).]


[1834 Ap. 19. Wrong date. See: 1839 Aug 29, (I; 1850).]


1834 early in April / Shropshire / shock / L.T., April 14, 18365-e. [I; 1872. "A smart shock...." London Times, April 14, 1836, p. 5 c. 5. "A smart shock of an earthquake was felt through an extensive district in Shropshire about 8 o'clock on Easter Monday."]


1834 May 3 / pollen? / 11:30 - 12 / Very heavy rainfall and sulphur so thick that it was scraped off the pavements. / Mag. Nat Hist 7-304 / Rodelheim, near Frankfort. [I; 1873. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 6 (July 1833): 289-308, at 304. Two rainfalls took place: on May 2, from half-past eleven to twelve, and, on May 3, from twelve to one o'clock." "Shower of Sulphur." Derby Mercury, June 18, 1834, p. 1 c. 6. "By a letter from Rodelheim, near Frankfort, of the 3d May, we hear of the following:It rained brimstone. During a heavy fall of water such a quantity of sulphur fell in combination with it, that as the water flowed down the streets the surface was covered with it, and quantities of sulphur were gathered from the pavement.St. Petersburg Paper."]


[1834 May 14 /] 1834 May 21 / 1:30 a.m. / det met / Hanley, Worcestershire / Mag. Nat. Hist 7-296. [I; 1879. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 296. "Meteor." Wolverhampton Chronicle and Staffordshire Advertiser, May 21, 1834, p. 3 c. 3.]


1834 May 15 / Bunzlau / Meteor / BA 60. [I; 1874. Greg, 74.]


1834 May 16 / In Tuscany / qs and "sub." sounds / See July 4. / BA 54 / See July 18, '31. [I; 1875. Mallet, 246. See: 1831 July 18, (I; 1615), and, 1834 July 4, (I; 1891).]


1834 May 16 / Shock in TuscanyThe evening before, magnetic perturbations had been observed at Parma. [I; 1876. Mallet, 246.]


1834 May 16 / Japan / q / II / BA '11. [I; 1877. A class II earthquake. Milne, 705.]


[1834 May 16 or 17. Wrong date. See: 1833 May 16 or 17, (I; 1774).]


[1834 May 21. Wrong date. See: 1834 May 14, (I; 1879).]


1834 May 23 / Asia Minor / I. [I; 1880. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1834 May 23 / Dry fog / dry fog on Hartz Mts / 21 to 24, at Munster / 25th, at Orleans / Thompson, Intro to Met, p. 120 / In July and Augat Halle, Freiberg and Altenburg / 479. [I; 1881. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 120-121. Kämtz, Ludwig Friedrich. Lehrbuch der Meteorologie. Halle: In der Gebauerschen Buchhandlung, 1831-1836, v. 3, 207-208.]


1834 last of May and first of June / Dry fog / France / Cosmos 14/676. [I; 1882. "Faits de science." Cosmos, 14 (June 17, 1859): 671-679, at 676-678.]


1834 June 7 / Philadelphia / toward s.w. / 8 p.m. / brilliant white meteoric light reaching from zenith to horizon / BA 60. [I; 1883. Greg, 74.]


[1834. Wrong date. See: 1833 June, (I; 1884).]


[1834 June. Wrong date. See: 1833 June, (I; 1885).]


1834 June 9 / Banff / Pollen in rain / Thomson, Met., p. 151 / See June 9, 1879. / 30851. / 0851.44. [I; 1886. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 151. Banff, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. See: 1879 June 8, (IV: 2635 & 2636), and, 1879 June 8, 10-11, (VI; 2634).]


1834 June 12 / Metite / (F) / Charwallas, 30 miles from Hissar, India / A. J. Sci. 2/11/36 / Edin N. P. J. 53/246. [I; 1887. Fletcher, 100. This is the Charwallas meteorite. Greg, 74. Shepard, Charles Upham. "On Meteorites." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 11 (1851): 36-40, at 36-37. Shepard, Charles Upham. "On Meteorites." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 53, (1852): 245-249, at 246.]


1834 ab. June 8 / (June 12) / Metite / near Hissar / detonations heard 1/2 hour before it fell / Jour Asiatic Soc Bengal 3/413 / See Feb 28, 1857. [I; 1888. "Proceedings of the Asiatic Society." Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 3 (1834): 410-413, at 413. See: 1857 Feb. 28, (II; 2032).]


1834 June 12 / (F) / Met stone / Hissar, India / Edin New P. J. 53/246 / 18 / Sept. 8 / Met stones / Sandwich Islands / Edin New Phil Jour 40/204. [I; 1889. Fletcher, 100. This is the Charwallas meteorite. Shepard, Charles Upham. "On Meteorites." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 53, (1852): 245-249, at 246. "Particulars of the Fall of Meteorites in the Sandwich Islands." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 40 (1845): 204-205. This is the Honolulu meteorite, (which fell on September 27, 1825). Bingham, Hiram. "Particulars of the fall of Meteorites in the Sandwich Islands." American Journal of Science, 49 (1845): 407-408.]


1834 June 18 / q. / Island of Cephalonia / (Greece?) / BA 54 / severe shock. [I; 1890. Mallet, 246. Milne, 705. Cephalonia is the largest of the Ionian Islands, in Greece.]


1834 July 4 / 1:45 a.m. / See Oct 4. / Parma, Milan, Genoa, etc. / q / at Milan, a hissing in air / See May 16. [I; 1891. See: 1834 Oct 4, (I; 1922), and, 1834 May 16, (I; 1875).]


1834 July 4 / See Aug 4, '35. / fireball / S. Herefordshire / BA '60. 9:15 p.m. / '52/183. [I; 1892. Greg, 74. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 183. See: 1835 Aug. 4, (I; 2016).]


1834 July 10-22 / q / III / China / BA '11. [I; 1893. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1834 July 10-22 / or June 28-July 19 / different authorities / III / China. [I; 1894. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1834 July 12 / morning / Near Ripon, England, tremendous explosion heard and a fissure found in a field. / Gents Mag, N.S., 2/205. [I; 1895. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, n.s., 2 (August 1834): 203-206, at 205.]


1834 July 18 - 23 / Aug 23 - 25 / 27 - 29 / Vesuvius / Arc. Sci 1835-272. [I; 1896. "Vesuvius." Arcana of Science,  8 (1835): 271-272. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1834 July 25 / evening / Phe / J. F. Inst. 1834. vol 14222-224. [I; 1897. "Notice of a Meteorological Phenomenon on the evening of the 25th of July, 1834, with an explanation by James P. Espy, Esq." Journal of the Franklin Institute, s. 2 v. 14 (1834): 222-225.]


1834 July 28 / (It) / [L.T.], 5-b / q / Piedmont. [I; 1898. "A serious accident...." London Times, July 28, 1834, p. 5 c. 2. "A serious accident occurred lately at Stradella, in Piedmont. About 6 o'clock in the morning, some persons assembled outside the church, previous to going to mass, observed a quantity of mortar and stone-work which had fallen from the tower. In the course of a few minutes a considerable portio of plastering fell down, and shortly after the whole congregation were seen rushing from the building, shrieking and with terror depicted on their countenances. In a few seconds the earth shook, and the tower suddenly came to the ground, crushing in its fall the half of a house adjoining, and also half of the church."]


1834 Aug 9 / Mussels / N.S. / M.W.R. 45/220. / L.T. / Sept 30, 1834 / Some weighed 2 ounces. [I; 1899. McAtee, Waldo Lee. "Showers of Organic Matter." Monthly Weather Review, 45 no. 5 (May 1917): 217-224, at 220. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 164. "A shower of mussels, some weighing about two ounces, fell during a severe storm, on the 9th of August, 1834. in the United States." "A Shower of Muscles in America." London Times, September 30, 1834, p. 3 c. 6. "Remarkable." Daily Pittsburgh Gazette, (Pennsylvania), August 12, 1834, p. 2 c. 1. "Mr. Montgomery, the jailor of the county, handed us the following communication, which he says was written by one of the prisoners. The falling of stones and muscles, he assures us, was witnessed by many, perhaps all the prisoners, some of whom are in confinement for debt, others charged with crimes.—He, himself, was in the county on that evening, but he declares that he has no doubt of the truth of their story.—He says that he picked up muscles on the next morning." "Remarkable Circumstance! On Saturday evening, the 9th inst., about five o'clock, the southwestern hemisphere became suddenly overspread by heavy dark clouds, which indicated the fast approach of a storm, which was carried swiftly along by the angry wind, which smote the earth as though the very elements were at war with each other—soon the water began to gush from its cistern. During the extreme part of the rain, some of the prisoners in jail observed something falling, resembling the small stones that may be seen on the beach of a river—What first attracted attention was the rattling upon the bricks in the yard. When the storm had subsided, the prisoners were not a little astonished as well as delighted, at finding that, not only the inactive stones were to be found, but that numbers of living muscles had been removed from their native element, and were ready for gathering within the jail walls—the number found is not accurately known, as some went immediately to work on the fresh dainty—opening, salting, and swallowing—until they were consumed: one person, however, picked up ten, before the others were informed that the yard abounded with fresh muscles—some of them, from appearance, must have weighed two ounces; there was also several round stones found, one which would weigh four or five ounces, and which may yet be seen—on the same evening, there were some frogs taken captive, whilst hopping about, apparently rather dissatisfied in finding themselves confined within the jail walls—the ancients cannot recollect of such visitors making their appearance within the walls before." "Mr. Montgomery (keeper of the prison) found some of the muscles outside of the wall. It is requested that some of the learned would cast some light upon this mystery, and solve to us how those emigrants left their watery home, sailed into the air, and landed inside the jail walls." "An Inquirer after Knowledge."]


1834 Aug 9 / Fell into the yard of the jail at Pittsburg, Pa., mussels, little frogs, and several stones. / L.T., Sept 30, 1834. [I; 1900. "A Shower of Muscles in America." London Times, September 30, 1834, p. 3 c. 6.]


1834 Aug 14 / 4:05 p.m. / Utica, N.Y. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [I; 1901. Finley, 3.]


1834 Aug 16-17 / midnight / Norway / shock and brilliant fireballs / BA 54 / At Snassen, no shock felt, but western horizon seemed on fire. / On 23rd, 7 and 9 a.m., shocks at Ilvidsoe, Norway. / Sept 38 p.m., severe shocks. / Night, Sept 4 - 5, slight q., Hardanger, Norway. [I; 1902. Mallet, 247-249.]


1834 Aug 16-17 / Norway succession / q / Ilvidesöe, Norway / See Sept 3. / and met / On 23rd, 7 and 9 a.m., qs at Ilvidesöe. [I; 1903. Mallet, 247-249.]


1834 Aug 18 / Vesuvius began and till 22nd / then 27 - 29, renewed violence. / Gents Mag, N.S., 2/420. [I; 1904. "Foreign News." Gentleman's Magazine, n.s, 2 (October 1834): 419-421, at 420. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1834 Aug 27-29 / Vesuvius renews after subsiding. / L.T., Sept 22-3-a. [I; 1905. "The most afflicting details...." London Times, September 22, 1834, p. 3 c. 1. "In the former account we stated that in August an eruption had taken place, which on the evening of the 26th began to subside. On the 27th, 28th, and 29th, new craters opened, and produced ravages awful to contemplate.... On the 3d inst., at the time of forwarding this account, nothing but stones and cinders were ejected, and every prospect existed of the eruption being soon at a close."]


1834 last of August / Vesuvius / preceded by drying of wells / A. J. Sci 28-199. [I; 1906. "Vesuvius and Etna." American Journal of Science, 28 (1835): 199. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1834 Aug 24 / Vesuvius active and following days. / BA '54. [I; 1907. Mallet, 247. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1834 Aug 26-30 / Vesuvius / Mag Nat Hist 8/130. [I; 1908. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 8 (March 1835): 129-161, at 130. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1834 Aug 26 / Padua / hail with gray powder in / Bib. Univ 57/391. [I; 1909. Casari, Lorenzo."Notice sur une Grêle Remarkable Tombée a Padoue le 26 aout 1834." Bibliothèque Universelle des Sciences, Belles-Lettres, et Arts, Sciences et Arts, 57 (1833): 386-392. Casari, Lorenzo. "Sopra la grandine straordinaria caduta in Padova nel giorno 26 Agosto de quest'anno." Annali delle Scienze del Regno Lombardo Veneto, 4 (1834): 337-344.]


1834 Aug / Brick / Italy / (D-114) / 48. [I; 1910. The note copies information from page 114 of The Book of the Damned. Casari, Lorenzo. "Account of some remarkable Hailstones which fell at Padua, on the 26th of August 1834." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 19 (1835): 83-8, at 87. "The author himself remarked only two hailstones which appeared to enclose any foreign matter."]


1834 Aug 27 / Atmosphere at Chichester, etc., suffocating. / 7 to 8 p.m., thunder heard. "The appearance of the sunset was extraordinary." / BA 54 / Loud report and q. / See BA for Chichester year back. / q's and rains here. [I; 1911. Mallet, 247-248. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 121. See: 1833 Nov. 13, (I; 1832).]


1834 Aug 27 / Chichester / Aug 3, 1835 / metite, Herefordshire / Aug  4. [I; 1912. Mallet, 247. Greg, 75. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1856-57." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1857, Reports on the State of Science, 131-153, at 140. The earthquakes, at Chicester, in 1834, and the meteorite, near Cirencester, in 1835, might have been mistaken by Fort as the same locality; however, Chichester is in West Sussex, and Cirencester is in Glamorganshire. See: 1835 Aug. 3, (I; 2015).]


1834 Aug 27 / Whirlwind near Chichester / 3 hours later, a (q) / Edin N P. J 31/121 / (Cut) / Rept BA, '54/247. [I; 1913. Mallet, 247-248. "The appearance of the sunset was extraordinary." Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 121. "Appearance of sunset extraordinary, and a West India gentleman predicted an earthquake."]


1834 Aug last / BO / L Institut, vol. 2 / Meeting of Fr. Acad., Oct 13, 1834, Col. Marnier, letter from him readhe was near a small village in department of Seine-et-Oise. A rain of innumerable little toads from a great cloud. / BO / Frgs / were innumerable / letter from M. Huard, frgs of Jouysaw them fall and caught on his umbrella / Even M. Gayet not clear that tadpoles as that frgs not yet fully developed. / Says that most of them had the posterior part elongated into a tail; that is to say, in the tadpole state. [I; 1914.1, 1914.2, 1914.3. "Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 2 (no. 77; November 1, 1833): 353-354. Huard was at Jouy, in June of 1833; and, Gayet was in Lalain, in the summer of 1794. See: 1833 June, (I: 1884 & 1885). "Académie des Sciences." Journal des Debats, October 15, 1834, pp. 1-2, at p. 2 c. 1-2. "M. le colonel Marnier écrit que vers la fin d'août de cette année, faisant une promenade dans le département de Seine-et-Oise, par un temps orageux, l'atmosphère étant chargée d'un nuage épais que les vents amenaient du midi, il vit bientôt ce nuage crever et tomber en pluie; en passant dans le lieu qui venait d'être inondé, it fut très étonné de voir une innombrable quantité de petits crapauds. M. Marnier suivit, à la distance de 100 toises environ, la route qu'avait parcourue le nuage; à mesure qu'il s'éloignait, le nombre des crapauds lui semblait moins considérable. Le jour suivant, il revint sur les mêmes lieux; les crapauds qu'il y trouva avaient, dit-il, grossi de moitié! Bien que je n'aie pas présent, poursuit Marnier, au moment de l'apparition de ces reptiles, s'il n'est pas prouvé qu'ils puissent en cinq ou six minutes naître, et prendre le développement qu'ils avaient lorsque je les ai vus, je dois rester convaincu qu'ils ont été apportés par le nuage." A toise, in 1834, would be equal to two meters in length. "Showers of Frogs and Toads." Leisure Hour, 3 (1854): 779-781.]


1834 Sept 3 / Norway / ab. 8 p.m. / See Aug 16 - 17. / Shocks and w. horizon "seemed to be all on fire and constantly lit up by lightning. / BA 54. [I; 1915. Mallet, 248-249. See: 1834 Aug 16 - 17, (I; 1902).]


1834 Sept 16 / hot wind / 11 p.m. / "A sudden gust of hot wind, from the east, fierce as if from a furnace," at Dublin, blowing in gusts for a minute. Ab. 2 hours later, it appeared at Carnarvon, from the n.w. / Mag Nat Hist 8-28. [I; 1916.1, 1916.2. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 8 (January 1835): 1-28, at 27-28. "Curious Circumstance." Dublin Evening Packet and Correspondent, September 18, 1834, p. 3 c, 3. "As Peace-officer M'Dowall and the party under his command were walking on the Round-town road, at about eleven o'clock on Tuesday night, a sudden gust of wind from the east, as hot as the air from a furnace, passed over their faces; they started back with much surprise at the sudden heat, and the wind continued to blow at intervals, for about the space of a minute."]


1834 Sept 18 / Violent whirlwind at Breadlow, Bucks / L.T. 22-3-a. [I; 1917. "Dreadful Whirlwind." London Times, September 22, 1834, p. 3 c. 1. "On Thursday evening, about 5 o'clock, the village of Breadlow, Buckingham, was visited by a most dreadful storm. The day, up to that period, had been remarkably fine, when on a sudden the sky became overcast, with thunder and lightning. The whirlwind, which appeared to come from the Chiltern hills, raged for a few minutes with terrific violence."]


1834 Sept 20-21 / night / Hurricane / Dominica / L.T., Nov 11-1-e. [I; 1918. "Hurricane at Dominica." London Times, November 11, 1834, p. 1 c. 5.]


1834 Sept 21 / 11:20 a.m. / (BA 54) / Another shock at Chichesterhad been extraordinary and unseasonable, hot weather. See whole series of Chichester and heat. [I; 1919. Mallet, 249. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 121.]


1834 Sept 29 / 7:15 p.m. / S Herefordshire / Met / BA 52/184. [I; 1920. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 183-184. Greg, 74.]


1834 Sept. 28-Oct 1 / Spalding28th, "very small, black flies" / 29, 30, Oct. 1, at Colchester and Chelmsford (Essex Standard) / 29th, Halifax and York / also in Devonshire, a column 3/4 miles long /

Mag Nat Hist 7-611. [I; 1921.1, 1921.2. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (December 1834): 609-630, at 611. "At the beginning of the week...." Essex Standard, October 3, 1834, p. 2 c. 4. "They have frequently been in such numbers as to have the appearance of a mist."]


1834 Oct or Nov / Lum obj / Oswego, N.Y. / See Lum objs. [A; 113. See: Lum, (SF-IV; 38).]


1834 Oct 4 / 8 p.m. / Parma, etc. / violent shock / loud hissing sound / BA '54 / See July 4. [I; 1922. Mallet, 249. See: 1834 July 4, (I; 1891).]


1834 Oct 4 / Italy / (Bologna) / I. [I; 1923. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1834 Oct 6 / 3 and 7 a.m. / Carthagena, Spain. / Later in same day, a tremendous th. storm. / BA 54. [I; 1924. Mallet, 249.]


1834 Oct / Ref to Fr Acad and frgs = vols of l'Institut 2, 4, 6. [I; 1925. "Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 2 (no. 77; November 1, 1833): 353-354. "Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 2 (no. 81; November 26, 1833): 386. "Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 2 (no. 84; December 17, 1833): 409-410. "Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 3 (no. 87; January 7, 1835): 6. "Dans une lettre adressée à l'Echo du monde savant...." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 3 (no. 120; August 26, 1835): 280. "Meteorologie: Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 4 (no. 166; July 13, 1836): 221-222. "Zoologie: Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 4 (no. 176; September 21, 1836): 314-315. "Meteorologie: Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 4 (no. 178; October 8, 1836): 325. "Aux faits nombreux de pluies de Batraciens...." L'Institut, 6 (June 28, 1838): 212. "Zoologie: Batraciens." L'Institut, 6 (no. 244; August 30, 1838): 281-282.]


1834 Oct. 13 / frgs / frgs. / Case recorded by Col. Marnier / not said where / Rec Sci 3-333 / See Leisure Hour 3/779. [I; 1926. Martin, William Charles Linnaeus. "On the Fall of Frogs, Toads, and Fishes from the Sky." Recreative Science, 3 (1862): 328-334, at 333. "Showers of Frogs and Toads." Leisure Hour, 3 (1854): 779-781. For the original account, in French, see: 1834 Aug last, (I; 1914).]


1834 Oct 15, 16, 17 / in N.N.E. Hungary / It had rained only 3 times since May. Then came "dreadful weather,["] followed by violent shocks. / BA 54. [I; 1927. Mallet, 250.]


1834 Oct 17 / Burlington Sentinel / nothing. [I; 1928.]


1834 Oct 17 / Intense darkness / Quebec / Niles National Register 57/192. [I; 1929. "Chronicle." Niles' Weekly Register, 47 (November 16, 1839): 192, c.v. Darkness at Quebecsingular phenomenon. See: 1819 Nov. 9, (I; 760).]


1834 Oct 17 / Darkness and black rain / Montreal / supposed from forest fires / Mag Nat Hist 8-137. [I; 1930. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 8 (March 1835): 129-161, at 137.]


1834 Oct 20 / Meeting of this date by French Acad Sci., M. Peltier told of great shower of small toads that he had witnessed and felt, years bef[ore] at Ham (Somme). / Leisure Hour 3/779 / felt them hit his hand. [I; 1931. "Showers of Frogs and Toads." Leisure Hour, 3 (1854): 779-781.]


1834 Oct 23 / At Dieppe / in the hurricane / "Many North American birds." / Mag Nat Hist. 8-23. [I; 1932. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 8 (January 1835): 1-28, at 23.]


1834 Oct 28 / (+) / (Tadpoles) / M. Gayet tells of meeting of French Acad Sci of [Oct 28] that in summer of 1794 he had seen shower of little toads, many still in tadpole state. [I; 1933. See: 1834 Aug last, (I; 1914).]


1834 Nov 3 / (P) / (Cut) / Shaft of light in evening skyLiverpool / Mechanics Mag 22/128. [I; 1934. Thayer: "Probably means illustrated." Not illustrated. "Celestial Phenomenon." Mechanics' magazine, museum, register, journal, and gazette, 22, no. 588 (November 15, 1834): 128.]


1834 Nov. 3 / ab. 8 p.m. / at Liverpool / A band of light from a point near the western horizon to a point near Jupiter ab 20 degrees above eastern horizon. / L.T., Nov 7-3-a. [I; 1935. "Remarkable Phenomenon." London Times, November 7, 1834, p. 3 c. 1. "On Monday evening, about 8 o'clock, a singular luminous appearance was seen in the heavens, commencing near the western horizon, and after extending in a continuous line through the meridian of the heavens, finally losing itself near the brilliant planet Jupiter, which then shone with resplendent lustre in the east, about 20 degrees above the horizon. It presented the aspect of a beauteous transparent zone of light, of nearly equal width, from six or seven degrees, throughout the length of the line, and very much resembling the representation we have of the milky way. The stars were distinctly visible through its filmy structure, and here and there a thin vapoury cloud crossed it at right angles, presenting a similar appearance to the telescopic view of the belts of Jupiter.... From the time we first observed it to the period of its disappearance might be from 10 minutes to a quarter of an hour; how long it had previously existed we know not...."]


1834 Nov 12 / See Quads, Jan. 2. [I; 1936. See: 1839 Jan 2, (II: 6 & 7), and, 1840 Jan 2, (II; 145).]


1834 Nov 12 / (Nov) / (volc) / 2 p.m. / s.e. China / Air suddenly darkened and so continued on 13th. / Mag Nat Hist. 8-422 / A dim light, and air appeared to be full of "smoke, without smell". 4 p.m.a brown dust without smell, of a salt tasteno known volcano. [I; 1937. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 8 (August 1835): 417-453, at 422.]


1834 Nov. 12 and 13 / A thick shower of ashes fell near Tsourou Koitou, "on the frontiers between Russia and China". / Tasmanian Journal 1-327. [I; 1938. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On the occurrence of Atmospheric Deposits of Dust and Ashes; with Remarks on the Drift Pumice of the Coasts of New Holland." Tasmanian Journal of Natural Science, Agriculture, Statistics, &c., 1 (1842): 321-342, at 327.]


1834 Nov 12 / See this and following vols. A. J. Sci. / Prof. Olmsted to support his theory gives instances of Leonids this year. [I; 1939. Bache, A.D. "Replies to a Circular in relation to the occurrence of an unusual Meteoric Display on the 13th Nov. 1834, addressed by the Secretary of War to the Military posts of the United States, with other facts relating to the same question." American Journal of Science, 28 (1835): 305-309.]


1834 Nov 12-13 / Nothing unusual reported from N. Eng., N.Y,, Nor Car, S. Car., Florida, La, Mo, etc. / A. J. Sci 28-307 / And yet Prof. Olmsted at New Haven, and Mr. Twining in N.Y., reported them from 1 a.m. till daybreak. [I; 1940. Bache, A.D. "Replies to a Circular in relation to the occurrence of an unusual Meteoric Display on the 13th Nov. 1834, addressed by the Secretary of War to the Military posts of the United States, with other facts relating to the same question." American Journal of Science, 28 (1835): 305-309. "The returns just given, are from eleven posts in the Atlantic States from Maine to East Florida, from six posts in the Western States or frontier, and from five on the northern frontier; they agree in stating, with one exception, that no unusual meteoric display was noticed on the night of the 12th, 13th of November, 1834." "The November-Asteroids." Magazine of Popular Science, 3 (1837): 56-62, at 62. "1834. In the night of the 12th-13th, a large number of shooting stars were seen in several of the United States of America; and their appearance produced a discussion between several physiciens of that part of the world. It was at this time that Professor Olmsted, of Newhaven, U.S., demonstrated the analogy of this phenomenon with that of the preceding year."]


1834 Dec 15, 16 / Marsala and Palermo ab 50 miles apart. [I; 1941.]


1834 Dec 15 or 10 / Many stones / night / Marsala, Sicily / BA 60. [I; 1942. Greg, 74.]


[1834] / BO / "At Marsala, on the southern coast of Sicily, on a serene day there appeared in the sky a small black cloud; which gradually extending, at last disgorged itself in a shower of stones, which broke the slates and roofs of the houses." / Niles Register, Aug 8, 1835. [I; 1943.1, 1943.2. "Natural phenomenon." Niles' Weekly Register, 48 (August 8, 1835): 397.]


1834 Dec 16 / volc and substance / 4 a.m. / Hurricane / an immense shower of yellow hailstones / Mag. Nat Hist 8/143 / At Palermo. [I; 1944. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 8 (March 1835): 129-161, at 143-144.]


[1834 Dec 17. Wrong date. See: 1824 Dec 17, (I; 1945).]


1834 Dec 21 / 3 h / Venus Inf Conj Sun / (Al). [I; 1946. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1834, 475.]


1835:


1835 about / The Bell witch (Bell family) / Robertson Co., Alabama / Religio-Ph. J., Oct 9-1-2, 1875. [A; 114. "The Sleeping Preacher." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 19 (no. 4; October 9, 1875): 231, (c. 2-5).]


1835, etc. / Haunted house of Willington, Tyneside / Jour Soc 5/331 / See June 1840. [A; 115. "The Haunted House at Willington.” Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 5 (December 1892): 331-352. See: 1840 period of June, (A; 143).]


1835 / Halley's Comet / Letter received by Littrow (director of Observatory of Vienna) from Sir John Herschell that Halley's Comet, positively expected in August, would not be visible because it had long before changed its orbit. / L.T., Ap. 23-3-d. [I; 1947. "Halley's Comet." London Times, April 23, 1835, p. 3 c. 4. "A letter from Vienna announces that M. Liltrow [Joseph Johann von Littrow], director of the observatory in that city, has received from the celebrated English astronomer Herschell, now residing at the Cape of Good Hope, the remarkable intelligence that Halley's comet, of which so much has been said, and which is positively expected in August this year, will not be visible, because it has long since changed the direction of its course, and now revolves in a different orbit. A report by our astronomers on this important subject it is expected will soon be published.Dutch paper."]


1835 Jan, early in / Vesuvius / An. Reg. '35-1. [I; 1948. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 77 (1835): pt. 2, 1-180, at 1-2, cv. "Eruption of Vesuvius." The Vesuvius volcano.]


1835 Jan 2 / Op Mars / (Al). [I; 1949. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1835, 473.]


1835 Jan. 2 / Extraordinary display of mets at Mornez, near Geneva. / Proc. Amer Phil. Soc 13-501. [I; 1950. Kirkwood, Daniel. "On the Meteors of January 2nd." Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 13 (1873): 501-502.]


1835 Jan 6 / Great q. / Mexico / BA '11. [I; 1951. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1835 Jan 6 / Mexico / III. [I; 1952. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1835 Jan 12 / Breslau / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1953. Greg, 74.]


1835 Jan 13 / (ver) / Ferriginous sand at Lobau, Saxony / CR 83-77. [I; 1954. Tissandier, Gaston. "Analyse micrographique comparative de corpuscles ferrugineux atmosphériques et de fragments détachés de la surface des météorites." Comptes Rendus, 83 (1876): 76-78, at 77.]


1835 Jan 13 / Meteoric dust / Lobau, Saxony / L'Astro 2/84 / following explosion of bolide. [I; 1955. Daubrée, Gabriel Auguste. "Les Pierres Tombées du Ciel.." Astronomie, 2 (1883): 41-48, 81-89, at 84.]


1835 Jan 13 / Berlin / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1956. Greg, 75.]


1835 Jan 18 / Lobau / 4:30 p.m. / A "curious account" in 10th Sup to Chladniin Poggendorf's Annalen, vol. 4. / D-68. [I; 1957. The note copies information from page 68 of The Book of the Damned. Boguslawski, Georg von. "Zehnter Nachtrag zu Chladni's Verzeichnisse der Feuermeteore und herabgefallenen Massen (Wien 1819)." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, Ergänzungsband, 4 (1854): 1-155, 353-456, at 79, 353-354. Finicus, D. "Beobachtung des Falles eines Meteorsteines bei Löbau, in der königl. sächs. Oberlausitz, am 18. Januar 1835." Journal für Praktische Chemie, 5 (1835): 41-42. Greg, 75.]


1835 Jan 19 / [L.T.], 7-a / Vesuvius. [I; 1958. "Vesuvius." London Times, January 19, 1835, p. 7 c. 1. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1835 Jan 19 / Great volcanic eruption / w. coast Central America. / Mag of Pop Sci 2/284 / 20 / 271. [I; 1959. Caldcleugh, Alexander. "Volcanic Eruption in the Bay of Fonseca, on the Western Coast of Central America." Magazine of Popular Science, 2 (1836): 284-287. Caldcleugh, Alexander. "Some Account of the Volcanic Eruption of Cosegüina in the Bay of Fonseca, commonly called the Bay of Conchagua, on the Western Coast of Central America." Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 126 (1836): 27-30.]


1835 Jan 19-23 / at  Coseguine / 13N and 87W, / Great eruption / Mag Pop. Sci 2-287 / Said that the ashes reached as far as Chiapa in the north"upwards of 400 leagues to the windward of the volcano: thus proving the existence of a counter current of wind in the higher regions of the atmosphere." There were deluges of rain. "At this season such an occurrence was extraordinary and almost unprecedented in Central America. [I; 1960.1, 1960.2. Caldcleugh, Alexander. "Volcanic Eruption in the Bay of Fonseca, on the Western Coast of Central America." Magazine of Popular Science, 2 (1836): 284-287, at 287. Caldcleugh, Alexander. "Some Account of the Volcanic Eruption of Cosegüina in the Bay of Fonseca, commonly called the Bay of Conchagua, on the Western Coast of Central America." Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 126 (1836): 27-30, at 30.]


1835 Jan 20 / Eruption of Cosequina, Mexico. After that the same brilliant sunsets and sunrises as those attrib to Krakatoa. / Houston, Volcs and Earthquakes, p. 93. [I; 1961. Houston, Edwin James. The Wonder Book of Volcanoes and Earthquakes. New York: Frederick A. Stokes, 1907, 93. The eruption of the Cosigüina volcano, in Nicaragua, began on January 20th, (and spewed ash clouds until the 25th), 1835, and was the largest in recorded history in Nicaragua. Self, Stephen; Rampino Michael R.; and, Carr, Michael J. 1989. "A reappraisal of the 1835 eruption of Cosiguina and its atmospheric impact." Bulletin of Volcanology, 52 no. 1 (October 1989): 57-65.]


1835 Jan 29 / Volc. / Cent Amer / Column in L.T., June 30-6-a. [I; 1962. "Great Volcanic Eruption." London Times, June 30, 1835, p. 6 c. 1-2. English translations of government reports about the eruption of the Cosigüina volcano are provided.]


1835 Jan 20 / Great q, Chili / and extreme volcanic phe / Mag of Pop Sci 2/278. [I; 1963. Caldcleugh, Alexander. "The Great Earthquake in Chile, in 1835." Magazine of Popular Science, 2 (1836): 279-284. On page 280, "The igneous vents of the whole range of the Cordillera may be said to have been in remarkable activity both preceding and at the moment of the late convulsion."]


1835 Jan 20 / The volc / The shower of dust lasted till the 27th. / Arc of Sci 1836-261. [I; 1964. "Eruption of the Volcano of the Cosiguina, in Nicaragua." Arcana of Science, 9 (1836): 261-262. The Cosigüina volcano.]


1835 Jan 20, etc. / Volc / Nicaragua / A. J. Sci 28-332 (good). [I; 1965. "Volcanic Eruptions and Earthquakes." American Journal of Science, 28 (1835): 332-340, at 332-336. The Cosigüina volcano.]


1835 Jan 20 / Three volcs burst out simultaneously in the Andes, ac to Darwin (Trans. Geolog. Soc., March, 1838). / Osorno, Lat 40S / Aconcagua, 32S / Cosequina, Lat 13N / Os and Cos are 3700 miles apart. [I; 1966. Darwin, Charles. "On the Connexion of certain Volcanic Phenomena in South America; and on the Formation of Mountain Chains and Volcanos, as the Effect of the same Power by which Continents are elevated." Transactions of the Geological Society of London, s. 2 v. 5 pt. 3 (1840): 601-631, at 610-611. Aconcagua is the highest mountain in the Southern and Western hemispheres; but, it has not been an active volcano in historical times. Darwin states: "When I was at Valparaiso some time afterwards, Mr. Byerbache, a resident merchant, informed me, that sailing out of the harbour one night very late, he was awakened by the captain to see the volcano of Aconcagua in activity. As this is a most rare event I recorded the date." As Aconcagua was not erupting, the closest volcanoes that were possibly active, in 1835, would have been: Maipo, Planchon-Peteroa, and Tupungatto, (from the nearest to the farthest from Valparaiso, going north).]


1835 Jan 20-23 / Violent shocks / Honduras / BA 1911-50. [I; 1967. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 50.]


1835 Jan 22-23 / (T) / night / L.T., Ap. 16-3-d / Letters from Belize. Supposed great volc eruption somewhere in Cent Amer. Sounds like gunfire heard and it was supposed that a vessel was in distress. Not known up to Feb. 13 where it was. So like gunfire that guns at fort in Belize fired in answer to the supposed ship. Boats were sent off to find the ship. On 24th, a vessel came in reporting the fall of ashes Truxillo. In Guatemala the sounds heard and thought gunfire and the troops ordered under arms. This second cor had heard that the volc was at San Salvador, ab 90 miles from Belize. Evidently no sand fell at Belize. / L.T., May 5-3 / Eruptions, one at San Salvador and one near Belize (doubtful? I say.) One near Truxillo. [I; 1968.1 to 1968.4. "Great Volcanic Eruption." London Times, April 16, 1835, p. 3 c. 4. "On the 23d ult., about 3 o'clock in the morning, we heard firing like from a vessel in distress, and boats were sent out, but they returned without any intelligence of the noise. His majesty's ship Firefly came in on the 24th, and stated that off the coast of Truxillo the rigging and vessel were covered with ashes. On the 13th (to-day) I had a letter from ——, dated the 31st of January. He tells me that on the morning of the 23d ult. the troops were under arms at Guatemala, in consequence of a continued firing being heard towards Quesaltenango, and the guns were brought to the Plaza, &c. We have since been informed that the noise was caused by an eruption of the volcano of San Vincente, a place close to San Salvador and the Pacific, a distance from this of about 90 leagues in a direct line. 13 or 14 villages and towns have been destroyed. The loss of life is not known. The Jamaica papers say that the vessels in Port Royal were covered on the 23d ult with dust. It cannot have come from San Vincente." "The following is an extract of a letter fro Belize, Honduras, dated Jan. 24...." London Times, March 20, 1835, p. 3 c. 2.]


1835 Jan 23 / (Loc mets) /At Bogota, from 1 to 8 a.m., sounds of meteors. Meteors and the sounds were like firing of artillery and musketry. [I; 1969.]


1835 Jan 23 / Said that the sounds were "produced by the bursting of meteors in the sky". Not said were seen. / Niles Register, May 16, 1835. [I; 1970. "A letter from Bogota...." Niles' Weekly Register, 48 (May 16, 1835): 190.]


1835 Jan 23-26 / (+) / (volc dust vs trade wind elsewhere) / Volcanoes in Central America. Dust fell 800 or 900 miles away. / Mag Nat Hist 8-428 / But "the dust falling at Jamaica was supposed there to come from the eastward." Writer thinks was carried far beyond Jamaica "and also far above the trade wind["] and then falling to and carried back by the trade wind. [I; 1971.1, 1971.2. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 8 (August 1835): 417-453, at 427-428. Clarke writes of "several volcanoes" erupting but fails to identify any of them, (including the Cosigüina volcano in Nicaragua).]


1835 Jan 24-25 / Sky obscured and ashes falling in Jamaica from volc of 19th. / Mag Pop. Sci 2-287. [I; 1972. Caldcleugh, Alexander. "Volcanic Eruption in the Bay of Fonseca, on the Western Coast of Central America." Magazine of Popular Science, 2 (1836): 284-287, at 287. Caldcleugh, Alexander. "Some Account of the Volcanic Eruption of Cosigüina in the Bay of Fonseca, commonly called the Bay of Conchagua, on the Western Coast of Central America." Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 126 (1836): 27-30, at 30.]


1835 / Chili / Ac to M. Domeiko, of the University of Santiago, the volcanoes of Chile showed no perturbations. There was some activity at the time. Mr. D was at Llanquihué and it smoked with neither increase nor decrease. / The Student 4-147. [I; 1973. "The Great Earthquake of Peru, 1868." Student and Intellectual Observer, 4 (1870): 146-148, at 147. The Osorno volcano.]


1835 Jan 23 / Quito, Ecuador / noises in sky / 7 hours / BA '60 / 1200 miles from the volcano. [I; 1974. Greg, 75. "Noises heard apparently in the air from 1 A.M. till 8 A.M."]


1835 Jan. 29 / Wallachia / Stones that burned like coal / An. Reg 1835/338. [I; 1975. "Shower of Meteorolites." Annual Register, 77 (1835): pt. 2, 338. "Shower of Meteorolites." New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal, n.s., 43 (1835): 263. "The little village of Raffhaten, on the frontiers of Wallachia, was visited early in the morning of the 29th ultimo by this singular phenomenon, About six o'clock in the evening of that day the inhabitants were aroused from their sleep by a noise as of a heavy shower of hail, which was immediately succeeded by a violent crashing of windows. Great was their astonishment, however, to find that the earth for the space of nearly two leagues in circumference was covered with a multitude of small stones, the smallest being about one quarter of an inch in diameter, and the largest about the size of a marble. These stones were of a light slate colour, and very heavy, and when put in the tire burnt like coal, emitting, however, a considerable quantity of gas. A French naturalist, M. Fouchard, who was at the time on a visit to the Hettman of Krunow, has collected an immense quantity of these meteorolites, and is now actively engaged in drawing up a memorial on the subject, to transmit to the different Philosophical Societies of Europe.—Kaiserliche Staats Zeitung." Greg found no further information upon these alleged meteorolites, Fouchard, nor Raffhaten: "1834? November 29? Raffaten, borders of Hungary and Wallachia. More precise information of this fall is wanting, as well as for the locality: it may be the Szala fall, or the Moravian fall of 25 November, 1833; possibly Raffaten is intended for Lake Balaton, another name for the Platten-See." Greg, 74-75.]


1835 Feb 6 / fireball / Tuscany, Italy / BA 60. [I; 1976. Greg, 75. Greg lists a large "fireball," (not an earthquake, "q").]


1835 Feb. 6 / Parma / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 1977. Greg, 75. The fireball is listed in Greg's catalog, ("60"), not Milne's, ("11").]


[1835 Feb 8. Wrong date. See: 1835 March 8, (I; 1978).]


1835 Feb. 9 / See May 19, 1806. / at 0° 57' S and 25° 39' W. / Vessel has a sharp shock as if struck reef. [I; 1979. Mallet, 251-252. "On board the barque 'La Couronne' of Liverpool a shock was felt as if the vessel had struck on and grated along a coral reef. On sounding, no bottom was found with 135 fathoms. The ship was going at the rate of six knots with a fine breeze from the E.S.E." See: 1806 May 19, (I; 182), and, 1806 May or Ap 19, (I; 183).]


1835 Feb. 12 / Shipsevere q. / 10 h 15 m / Lat 18°, 47m N. / Long 61°, 22m W / L.T., March 28 / Lasted ab. a minute but no uncommon ripple on the calm water. [I; 1980. "Earthquake at Sea." London Times, March 28, 1835, p. 5 c. 4. "Extract from the log-book of the James Cruikshank, Captain John Young, on her voyage from Demerara to London:"Feb. 12, 1835, At 10h. 15m. a severe shock of earthquake shook the ship in a most violent manner. Although it lasted about a minute, there was no uncommon ripple on the water. It was quite calm at the time. Latitude 18 deg. 47 min. N.; longitude 61 deg. 22 min. W. Mid. calm and clear."]


1835 Feb 15 / Violent th. storms, destroying churches in Yorkshire and in Germany. Also th storms on 21st and 22nd. / Mag Nat Hist 8-428. [I; 1981. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 8 (August 1835): 417-453, at 428-429.]


1835 Feb 20 / 11:30 a.m. / Great q, Chile / 2 eruptions of dense smoke from the sea. Q followed by rain and windstorms. / BA 54. [I; 1982. Mallet, 252. Milne, 705.]


1835 Feb 20 / 11:30 a.m. / qChile / Tidal wave rolled in 28 feet above high water mark. 2 eruptions of smoke from the sea. / BA 54. [I; 1983. Mallet, 252. Charles Darwin felt this earthquake, at Valdiva, and observed the results from its destruction with Robert FitzRoy. Darwin, Charles. Journal of Researches Into the Natural History And Geology of the Countries Visited During the Voyage of H.M.S. Beagle Round the World : Under the Command of Capt. Fitz Roy, R.N. New edition. London: J. Murray, 1852, 301-312. "In Captain Fitz Roy's excellent account of the earthquake, it is said that two explosions, one like a column of smoke and another like the blowing of a great whale, were seen in the bay. The water also appeared every where to be boiling; and it 'became black, and exhaled a most disagreeable sulphureous smell.'"]


1835 Feb 20 to March 4 / 300 shocks, all over Chile / Geog Mag 4-207. [I; 1984. "The Great Earthquake on the Coast of Peru." Geographical Magazine, 4 (1877): 206-209, at 207, c.v. "1835. Feb. 20."]


1835 Feb. 20 / 11:30 a.m. / Chile / q / Message from town of Concepcion"This town has ceased to exist. Sea rose 33 feet, landed a vessel in the town square. / L.T., July 6-2-d. [I; 1985. "By the arrival at Liverpool...." London Times, July 6, 1835, p. 2 c. 3-4. "The ruin of Conception and Talcahuana is complete. At Conception there remains only one house for the shelter of the inhabitants." At Talcahuana: "The sea rose 33 feet above its ordinary level, and drove into the town-square the national bark Mapocho, and placed other vessels in imminent danger." The following quote refers to Talca, (not Conception): "Two hours ago this town ceased to exist."]


1835 Feb. 20 to March 6, and on 17th / 11 a.m. / q. / Chile / A. J. Sci 28-336 / Attrib to a volc in Lat 36 [S.] and 30 leagues from coast. / sea wave 30 feet. [I; 1986. "Volcanic Eruptions and Earthquakes." American Journal of Science, 28 (1835): 332-340, at 336-340.]


1835 Feb. 24 / See Feb. 8. [I; 1987. See: 1835 March 8, (I; 1978).]


1835 Feb. 26 / Columbia, Haiti, Venezuela / III. [I; 1988. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


[1835 March 8 /] 1835 Feb 8 / 16 qs / Tuscany places of / See Ap 15-17, 1834. / On 24th, at Palermo, "flashes of lightning darted for a particular group of clouds" during shocks. / BA 54. [I; 1978. Mallet, 253.]


1835 March 13, etc. / Vesuvius / Arcana of Science 1836-259 / etc., on L. Times, Ap 8-4-f. [I; 1989. "Vesuvius." Arcana of Science, 9 (1836): 259. "An eruption of Mount Vesuvius...." London Times, April 8, 1835, p. 4 c. 6. "An eruption of Mount Vesuvius took place on the 13th ult., accompanied by remarkable phenomena. A new crater suddenly opened and vomited volumes of smoke and a quantity of stones. On the 14th the bottom of that opening appeared illuminated with flames of different colours, and a frightful noise was heard underneath. Smoke and flames also issued from two fissures of the old crater. These phenomena are considered as the forerunners of a grand eruption." The Vesuvius volcano.]


1835 March 22 / At Fortress Troizkosaffsk, Russian and Prussian frontier, 9 p.m., "a remarkable meteoric appearance and noise". / BA 60. [I; 1990. Greg, 75. Boguslawski, Georg von. "Zehnter Nachtrag zu Chladni's Verzeichnisse der Feuermeteore und herabgefallenen Massen (Wien 1819)." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, Ergänzungsband, 4 (1854): 1-155, 353-456, at 79. Kämtz, Ludwig Friedrich. Lehrbuch der Meteorologie. Halle: In der Gebauerschen Buchhandlung, 1831-1836, v. 3, 301-302. "1835 am 22sten März bemerkte man in der Gränzfestung Troizkosaffsk, bei einer stillen und sehr warmen Witterung, Abends nach 9h am nordwestlichen Himmel in ziemlicher Höhe einen schmalen, schlangenförmigen Feuerstreifen, gleich einem hell leuchtenden Blitze. In einem Nu verwandelte sich die Erscheinung in eine leuchtende Wolke, die mit einer brennenden Garbe Aehnlichkeit hatte, und die sofort mit grosser Geschwindigkeit in schiefer Richtung zur Erde herabzufallen begann, sich aber in demselben Augenblick in einen gewaltigen Feuerstrom umwandelte und so am ganzen nächtlichen Horizonte Tageslicht verbreitete. Endlich theilte sich dieser Feuerstrom in drei Theile und verschwand. Es folgte hierauf ein dumpfer entfernter Donner, der sich, vermuthlich durch das Echo der nahen Berge noch zweimal, jedoch in schwächerem Grade wiederholte, und der eine merkliche Lufterschüttung hervorbrachte, so dafs Fensterladen und Thüren erzitterten. Diefs Alles war das Werk einiger Sekunden." Troitskosavsk was a Russian military outpost near the border town of Kyakhta, Russia, on the Mongolian border, (not in Prussia, which may have been assumed from the account originating in the Allgemeine Preußische Staatszeitung, no. 162).]


1835 March 23 / Cuneo, Italy / q / I / BA 11. [I; 1991. The earthquake is listed in Milne's catalog, ("11"), not Greg's, ("60"). A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1835 March 24 / 2:07 a.m., severe shocks / 4:23 a.m."Flashes of lightning darted from a particular group of clouds["]and 3 other shocks. / B.A., '54. [I; 1992. Mallet, 253.]


1835 Ap. 1 / Vesuvius / violent after long quiet / BA 54. [I; 1993. Mallet, 253. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1835 Ap. 2 / Vesuvius / violent eruption / A. J. Sci 28-340. [I; 1994. "Volcanic Eruptions and Earthquakes." American Journal of Science, 28 (1835): 332-340, at 340. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1835 Ap. 9 / Lat. 7N. and Long 99W. / Vessel sailed 50 miles through thinly scattered pumice stones. / Niles Register 51-66. [I; 1995. "Supposed Volcano at Sea." Niles' Weekly Register, 51 (October 1, 1836): 66.]


1835 Ap. 14 / Pribylof Islands, Behring Sea / III. [I; 1996. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1835 Ap 15 / Slight shocks, Borgotaro, Tuscany, place of Ap 15, 1834. On 20th, 2 p.m., severe shock and detonations. / BA 54. [I; 1997. Mallet, 254.]


1835 Ap. 21 / Russia, Bessarabia, Bucharest / I. [I; 1998. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1835 Ap. 25 / 3:45 a.m. / Borgotaro. / Another shock and "very intense noise". / BA 54 / On Aug 1, sound heard here. [I; 1999. Mallet, 254-255.]


1835 May / Cacciatore's planet / Nature 18-261. [I; 2000. "Our Astronomical Column." Nature, 18 (July 4, 1878): 261.]


1835 May 11 and 14 ./ Cacciatore's planet / C.R. 3/141, 424. Details / See Nature 18/261. [I; 2001.  "Sur une nouvelle petite planète dont l'existence a ètè soupçonnées par M. Cacciatore...." Comptes Rendus, 2 (1836): 154-155 ."Sur deux planètes nouvellement soupçonnées," Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 141-143. "Sur le nouvel Astre aperçu par M. Cacciatore." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 424.  "Our Astronomical Column." Nature, 18 (July 4, 1878): 261.]


1835 May / Edinburgh / Polt / "Footfalls," p. 253. [A; 116. Owen, Robert Dale. Footfalls on the Boundary of Another World. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1889, 253-255.]


1835 May 13 / Sumter District, S.C. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [I; 2002. Finley, 3.]


1835 May 14 / afternoon / Macon, Georgia / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [I; 2003. Finley, 3.]


1835 June 13 / Königsberg / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 2004. Greg, 75.]


1835 June 15 / 12:29 a.m. / June 17 / 12:29 a.m. / June 20 / exact time not given / loud detonations and slight shocks / Majorica / An Reg '35-94. [I; 2005. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 77 (1835): pt. 2, 1-180, at 94, cv. "Earthquake in Majorca."]


1835 June 19 / Waterspout / New Brunswick [N.J.] / A. J. Sci 36-115 / 5:30 p.m. [I; 2006. Beck, Lewis C. "Note on the New Brunswick Tornado, or Water Spout of 1835." American Journal of Science, 36 (1839): 115-118.]


1835 June 19 / 4 p.m. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [I; 2007. At Kinderhook, New York. Finley, 3.]


1835 June 19 / 5:12 p.m. / New Brunswick, N.J. / Tornado / Finley's Rept / Tornado and w. spout. [I; 2008. No mention of a waterspout in Finley's catalog. Finley, 3. Beck, Lewis C. "Note on the New Brunswick Tornado, or Water Spout of 1835." American Journal of Science, 36 (1839): 115-118.]


1835 July 16 / 22 h / Mercury / Inf conjunction sun / (Al). [I; 2009. Inferior conjunction of Mercury. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1835, 475.]


1835 July 17 / Milan and Wirtemberg / 8:30 p.m. / S.E. to N.W. / detonating meteor / exploded over Wirtemberg / seen at Stutgardt and other places / no stones mentioned / BA 60. [I; 2010. Greg, 75.]


1835 July 18 / Aerhaus and Berlin / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 2011. Greg, 75.]


1835 July 20 / Russia / I. [I; 2012. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1835 July 30 or 31 or Aug 1. / 2:30 p.m. / Dickson Co, Tenn. / Loud detonations / iron found later / BA 60-75. [I; 2013. Greg, 75. Greg gives the date as July 30.]


1835 July 31 or Aug. 1 / Met iron / Charlotte, Dickson Co, Tenn. / (on other notes) "F" = Fletcher's Intro to Study of Mets. [I; 2014. Fletcher, 68. This is the Charlotte meteorite.]


1835 Aug. 3 / Chichester / bet. 11 - 12 p.m. / 2 shocks / L.T., Aug 11, 1835. [I; 2015. "Shock of an Earthquake at Chichester." London Times, August 11, 1835, p. 5 c. 5.]


1835 Aug. 4 / Great concussion / air / S. Herefordshire / stone of Aldsworth probably from / Rept BA 1860-75 / See July 4, '34. [I; 2016. Greg, 75. This is the Aldsworth meteorite. See: 1834 July 4, (I; 1892).]


1835 Aug 4 / 4:30 p.m. / South Herefordshire / Tretire, Herefordshire / explosive sound / thought meteoric / BA 52-184. Also at Malvern / The Analyst, 1835-175. [I; 2017. "Meteorological Report." The Analyst: A Quarterly Journal of Science, Literature, Natural History, and the Fine Arts, 3 (1836): 175. "On the 4th of August, hardly a cloud to be any where discernedthe air calm and hotabout four or half-past, p. m., a loud clap, apparently of thunder, burst over us, quite near, with a continued rumbling as if the sound reverbrated among clouds. We were out of doors at the time and the noise seemed to come from somewhere over-head." Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 184.]


1835 Aug 4 / Ab 1/2 mile from where the met fell, there was a shower of small pieces. Children thought it a shower of black beetles and held out hands to catch the supposed insects. Was 4:30 p.m. / BA 57-140. [I; 2018. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1856-57." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1857, Reports on the State of Science, 131-153, at 140. This is the Aldsworth meteorite.]


1835 Aug 4 / Gloucester / "an extraordinary concussion of the air felt and heard" / ab. 3:30 a.m. / Like a report of heavy ordnance / L.T. 24-3-d. [I; 2019. "Earthquake in Lancashire." London Times, August 24, 1835, p. 3 c. 4. "An extraordinary concussion of the air was felt and heard on Tuesday, the 4th instant. It has been described as a report as of heavy ordnance, and followed by a reverbrating heavy sound for some seconds. A great peculiarity attending it, and most strongly showing the immensity of its distance, is the impression it made on all those who heard it, as if it was immediately in their vicinity."]


1835 Aug 4 / Sound / ab. 4:30 p.m. / S. Herefordshire / "Most extraordinary concussion in the air." / BA '52/184. [I; 2020. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 184.]


1835 Aug 4 / Aldsworth, near Circencester / Metite / (F) / Nature 94-258 / C.R. 125-896. [I; 2021. Fletcher, 100. This is the Aldsworth meteorite. Denning, William Frederick. "A Meteoritic Fall in Lancashire." Nature, 94, (November 5, 1914): 258-259. Meunier, Stanislas. "Sur quelques circonstances particulières qui paraissent avoir avoir accompagné la chute d'une météorite le 9 avril 1891 à Indarck, en Transcaucasie." Comptes Rendus, 125 (1897): 894-897, at 896.]


1835 Aug. 7, etc. / L.T. Index / Halley's Comet. [I; 2022. "Halley's Comet," London Times, August 7, 1835, p. 5 c. 4. "The Comet." London Times, August 8, 1835, p. 5 c. 3. "Halley's Comet." London Times, August 24, 1835, p. 3 c. 2.]


1835 Aug 19 / q and sea waves / Japan / III. [I; 2023. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1835 Aug 20 / q / Lancashire / See March 10, 1843. [I; 2024. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 121.]


1835 Aug 20 / q. / Manchester / M. Post, Oct 9, '63 / 1863. [I; 2025. "Earthquakes in Manchester." London Morning Post, October 9, 1863, p. 8 c. 3.]


1835 Aug 20 / q / Clitheroe, etc., Lancashire / ab. 3:30 a.m. / LT 24-3-d. [I; 2026. "Earthquake in Lancashire." London Times, August 24, 1835, p. 3 c. 4.]


1835 Aug 23 / Volc eruption / Mt. Ardscheh, in Cappadocia / BA 54 / Gentleman's Mag. gives date Aug 25. [I; 2027. Mallet, 255-256. "Foreign News." Gentleman's Magazine, n.s., 5 (February, 1836): 195-196, at 195. "The Journal of Odessa describes the ravages of a dreadful earthquake, which occurred on the 25th of August, at Kaisarich, (the ancient Cæsarea in Cappadocia,) and the surrounding villages" The Gentleman's Magazine does not mention anything regarding a volcanic eruption. "Météorologie." Comptes Rendus, 1 (1835): 231-233. The Journal de Smyrne, quoted in the Comptes Rendus, gives the date of the smoke, flames, and detonations of the volcano, and the earthquake as August 13, with details of the damaged villages. Garnier, Jean-Guillaume. Traité de météorologie, ou Physique du globe. Brussels: Société Belge de Libraire, 1837, 175-176. Garnier gives the date as August 25. Huot, Jean-Jacques-Nicolas. Nouveau cours élémentaire de géologie. Paris: Roret, 1837, v. 1, 118. Huot gives the date as August 13. Ponton, Mungo. Earthquakes and Volcanoes. London: T. Nelson, 1868, 66-67. Revised ed. London: T. Nelson, 1870, 61. Ardschih Dagh, (or Mount Ardscheh), is another name of the Erciyes Dagi volcano, (which is now said to possibly have most recently erupted in 253 B.C.).]


1835 Aug 23 / Asia Minor / III. [I; 2028. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1835 Aug 25 / 5. p.m. / Mount Kassarich, near Odessa / thick smoke and flames from mt and q's till Sept. 1 / q's in Oct / An Reg 35-143. [I; 2029. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 77 (1835): pt. 2, 1-180, at 143, cv. "Earthquake.Odessa." There is no mention of earthquakes in October in this article.]


[1835 Aug 30. Wrong date. See: 1835 Sept 14, (I; 2030).]


1835 Sept. 3 / Hurricane / Barbadoes / L.T. 23-2-f. [I; 2031. "Dreadful Hurricane at Barbadoes." London Times, September 23, 1835, p. 2 c. 6.]


1835 Sept. 6 / Gelat / Germany / Gotha / 20 / D-49. [I; 2032. The note copies information from page 49 of The Book of the Damned. Greg, 75. Greg notes: "...fell leaving a jelly-like mass on the ground," and, "Fell 3 feet from the observer on the ground with a loud noise." Hoff, Karl Ernst Adolf von. "Zur Geschichte der Sternschnuppen." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, s. 2 v. 36 (1835): 315-317.]


1835 Sept. 13 / Mauduit said he saw whirlwind take up, at Caux, all the water and living fishes in a "mare". / Cosmos 3/4/697. [I; 2033. "Sur les pluies de crapauds." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 4 (June 19, 1869): 696-697, at 697. Meunier, Victor. Les Animaux à Métamorphoses. Tours: Alfred Mame, 1867, 87. Becquerel, Antoine César. Traité expérimental de l'électricité et du magnétisme. Paris: Firmin Didot Frères, 1840, v. 6, 189. "Physique." Echo du Monde Savant, v. 1 no. 83 (October 30, 1835): 414. "M. Mauduyt nous écrit pour nous fournir quelques nouveaux détails sur la trombe que nous avons signalées dans notre numéro 80. 'Ce phénomene, dit-il, n'a pas seulement exercé ses ravages dans la commune de Caux, mais il les a étendus dans celle de Champagné-Saint-Hilaire, où, entre autres faits remarquables, il a mis à sec une grande mare dans laquelle se trouvait du poisson, et a transporté l'eau et ce qu'elle contenait à une distance d'une lieue et demie, au grand étonnement des personnes qui ont été témoins de cette pluie icthyologique.'" Thus, L. Mauduyt's own account may simply have been another example of the phenomena of whirlwinds, (rather than the one observed at Caux, in 1835), which, at Champagné-Saint-Hilaire (Vienne), took up a large pond and the fish therein, over a distance of a mile-and-a-half, before depositing it as a shower of fishes.]


1835 Sept 14 / q's / France / BA 54. [I; 2034. Mallet, 256.]


[1835 Sept 14 /] 1835 Aug 30 / q / Dept. Drôme, France / B Assoc 256/1854 / See Sept 14, 1836. [I; 2030. Mallet, 256. See: 1836 Sept 14, (I; 2127).]


1835 Sept 20 / Near Bristol / Army in sky / Cosmos, N.S., 13/264. [I; 2035. Maze, Camille-Modeste. "Les Armées Météores." Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 13 (May 25, June 8, June 15, June 22, and June 29, 1889): 213-215, 263-268, 287-288, 311- 316, 350-353, at 264. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, n.s., 4 (November, 1835): 543-544, at 543, cv. "Sept. 20." "That interesting natural phenomenon, the Mirage, was witnessed on Agar, one of the Mendip hills. It was first observed about 5 o'clock in the evening, and represented an immense body of troops, mounted and fully accoutred, which appeared to move along sometimes at a walking pace, and at other times at a quick trot, with drawn swords at the 'carry.' The phenomenon was observed for upwards of an hour, and was doubtless occasioned by the Bath troop of yeomanry cavalry, which was assembled on the day in question at Twerton, a distance of 15 miles from the place where it was witnessed." Garnier, Jean-Guillaume. Traité de Météorologie, ou Physique du Globe. Brussels: Société Belge de Libraire, 1837, 404. "Le 20 du mois septembre 1835, les habitants des campanes voisines de l'Agar, l'une des collines du Mendio, en Angleterre, furent témoins de ce singulier spectacle: vers 5 heures du soir, on aperçut dans le ciel couvert de vapeurs assez épaisses, un immense corps de troupes à cheval, qui semblait défiler, tantôt au pas, et tantôt au grand trot: les cavaliers, le sabre en main, étaient tous uniformément équipés, et l'on distinguait presque jusqu'aux brides et aux étriers. Pendant quelque temps, on les vit manœuvrer six de front, puis se former par deux rangs ou par files. Pendant plusieurs jours, ce spectacle extraordinaire a fait le sujet de toutes les conversations dans la ville de Bristol." The Mendip Hills and Twerton are in Somerset county. "A Touch of the Supernatural." Taunton Courier and Western Advertiser, October 7, 1835, p. 2 c. 3. "A Touch of the Supernatural"; "That interesting natural phenomenon, the Mirage...."; and, "With respect to the cause of these strange appearances...." Salisbury and Winchester Journal, October 12, 1835, p. 2 c. 6. "Mr. C. Tomlinson, of Salisbury, has obligingly furnished us with the following explanation...." Salisbury and Winchester Journal, October 12, 1835, p. 3 c. 2. "An interesting natural phenomenon...." Devizes and Wiltshire Gazette, October 8, 1835, p. 3 c. 4.]


1835 Oct 2 / [L.T.], 3-c / etc. / Halley's Comet. [I; 2036. "The Comet." London Times, October 2, 1835, p. 3 c. 3. "According to the calculations of the ephemerides of the comet, that erratic globe must become perceptible to the eye in a few days."]


1835? / 1834 / Oct 6 / [L.T.], 1-f / etc. / Halley's Comet visible / See Aug. Index. [I; 2037. "Comet." London Times, October 6, 1834, p. 2 c. 6. The article copied from the New York Commercial Advertiser claims the appearance of Halley's Comet, in 1834, (a year before its 1835 appearance).]


1835 Oct 12-13 / (It?) / Flashes, q and whirlwind / See 1805. [I; 2038. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 352-354. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]

1835 Oct. 12 / Great q. / Calabria / BA 54. [I; 2039. Mallet, 256. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1835 Oct 12 / glass / Ab. 6 p.m. at Lambeth a large square of plate glass in a draper's shop Westminster-road. / Three bullet holes in glass. Not said bullets found but attributed to an air-gun. / See Oct. 31. [A; 117. "Air Guns." London Standard, October 15, 1835, p. 1 c. 4. See: 1835 Oct. 31, (A; 118).]


1835 Oct 14 / Intense darkness / Quebec / Niles Nat. Register 57-192. [I; 2040. "Chronicle." Niles' Weekly Register, 47 (November 16, 1839): 192, cv. Darkness at Quebecsingular phenomenon. See: 1819 Nov. 9, (I; 760).]


[1835 Oct 24. Wrong date. See: 1835 Nov (end), (I; 2042).]


1835 Oct 27 / ab. 4 a.m. / St. Bertrand de Comminques / sharp shock and rumbling sound / Another an hour later. [I; 2043. Mallet, 257.]


1835 Oct 27 / B.A. 54 / ab. 4 a.m. / very severe q in Haute-Garonne and rolling sound / See Jour des Deb., Nov 5. / Moniteur, Nov. 6. [I; 2044. Mallet, 257. "On écrit de Tarbes, 29 octobre." Journal des Débats, November 5, 1835, p. 3 c. 1. (Moniteur, November 6, 1835.)]


1835 Oct 27 / q and phe / ab. 4 a.m. / q in Haute-Pyrénees / the Cirque de Troumouse in the mountain enveloped in a burning sulphurous column. / CR 1-469. [I; 2045. "Lettre de M. Philippe à M. Cordier, sur un phénomène singulier qui, at Cirque de Troumouse, a accompagné le tremblement de terre du 27 octobre dernier." Comptes Rendus, 1 (1835): 469.]


1835 Oct. 28 / 3:45near Baréges / and 4:30Tarbes / shocks and sounds like thunder / BA 54. [I; 2046. Mallet, 257.]


1835 Oct 29 / qmeteors / ab. 4 a.m. / St. Gall, Appenzell, etc., Switz., and Bâle, 3:47 a.m. / Shocks. / sound like report of a cannon / Meteors. / BA 54. [I; 2047. Mallet, 258.]


1835 Oct. 29 / 3:47 a.m. at Bâle4 a.m. other parts of Switzerland / Violent shocksdull sound like distant cannon. "Luminous meteors were observed." / BA '54. [I; 2048. Mallet, 258.]


1835 Oct. 31 / Glass breaking / Home of Mr. Archbold, barrister, 4 Lindengrove, Kensington Gravel pits a large conservatory in his gardencrash and part of the glass roof fell. / Day after day glass fell. Police could find out nothing. Mr. A suspected someone but nothing found out. No missiles mentioned.  / Glass broke while constables on watch. / (See Oct 12.) [A; 118.1, 118.2. "Extraordinary Occurrence." Preston Chronicle, November 21, 1835 p. 2 c. 3. The police inspector placed constables "outside of the premises , whilst Mr. Archbold's foot-boy watched from a balcony at the back of the house overlooking the conservatory." "While at their posts," another loud crash of glass occurred. "Mysterious Glass Breaking." Preston Chronicle, November 28, 1835, p. 2 c. 1-2. The "footboy" in service at this household confessed to damaging the bellows of an organ and throwing stones into the air so as to descend upon and break the glass on the roof of the conservatory. "Mysterious Glass Breaker." Hull Packet, November 27, 1835, p. 1 c. 6. See: 1835 Oct 12, (A; 117).]


1835 Nov. 1 / Attrib this to terrestrial volcbut none in Ky. [?]. etc. [I; 2049.]


1835 Nov. 1 / qdry fog / q. / Moluccas / for 3 weeks had been preceded by a heavy sulphurous fog. There was a volc eruption on the island of Banda. / B.A., 54. [I; 2050. Mallet, 258. "Netherlands India." Asiatic Journal and Monthly Miscellany, s. 2 v. 20 pt. 2 (July 1836): 173. The severe earthquake occurred at Amboyna. The Banda Api volcano.]


1835 Nov. 7 / Trans Merc. [I; 2051. Transit of Mercury. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1835, 469.]


1835 Nov 11 / q / Concepcion, Chile / 2 volcs, 400 miles away, were in violent action. / BA '11. [I; 2052. Darwin, Charles. "On the Connexion of certain Volcanic Phenomena in South America; and on the Formation of Mountain Chains and Volcanos, as the Effect of the same Power by which Continents are elevated." Transactions of the Geological Society of London, s. 2 v. 5 pt. 3 (1840): 601-631, at 604. "Mr. Douglas states, that on the night of November 11th (ten months after the overthrow of Concepcion), Osorno and Corcovado both burst out in violent action, throwing up stones to a great height, and making much noise. He subsequently heard, that on the same day, Talcahuano, the port of Concepcion, little less than 400 miles distant, was shaken by a severe earthquake. This latter statement has since been confirmed to me by a gentleman, who was at the time resident in Chile. Here, then, we have a repetition of the same connected action, which was displayed in so remarkable a manner on the 20th of February." The Corcovado and the Osorno volcanoes. No reference to this was found in Milne's nor Hope-Jones' lists in the Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911.]


1835 Nov. 13 / Met set fire to barn. / Ain, France / Rept. B.A. 1865-128. [I; 2053. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1864-65." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1865, 57-142, at 128.]


1835 Nov 13-14 / Great fall of mets seen in U.S. and by Sir John Herschel at Cape of Good Hope. Ac to Arago. / Mag Pop Sci 3/62 / (P). [I; 2054. "The November-Asteroids." Magazine of Popular Science, 3 (1837): 56-62, at 62.]


1835 Nov. 13 / Simonod (Ain), France / Oldham's Cat of Meteorites / (F?). [I; 2055. The Natural History Museum has the "Simonod" stone, but "probably not a genuine meteorite," according to its website; and, it was not included in Fletcher's catalog. (Oldham, Thomas. Catalogue of the meteorites in the Museum of the Geological Survey of India. Calcutta. Calcutta: Geological Survey of India, 1866.).]


1835 Nov. 13 / 9 p.m. / Belley (Ain) / Brilliant meteor seen and loud detonations heard. At the same time, a fire broke out on roof of a farm house and attrib to the meteor. / C.R. 1-414 / 2 strange stones found and thought been meteoric / had black crust / (2-66). [I; 2056.1, 2056.2. "Extrait d'une lettre de M. Millet Daubenton à M. Arago, sur un météore lumineux." Comptes Rendus, 1 (1835): 414-415. "Envoi de quelques portions de l'aérolithe qui tomba près de Belley le 13 novembre 1835, et mit le feu à une grange de Samonod." Comptes Rendus, 2 (1836): 66.]


1835 Nov 13 / loud detonations / near Belley (de l'Ain), France / Meteor said to have set fire to a barn. A stone was foundresembled obsidian but no nickel in it; so not meteoric. / (BA 60-75). [I; 2057. Greg, 75.]


1835 Nov 13 / This meteorite in the Museum of the Geological Survey, Calcutta, ac to Oldham. [I; 2058. (Oldham, Thomas. Catalogue of the meteorites in the Museum of the Geological Survey of India. Calcutta. Calcutta: Geological Survey of India, 1866.)]


1835 Nov. 13 / (Fr) / Near Belley (Ain), loud detonations. Stone resembling obsidian was found, "but no nickel, and is not meteoric." / BA '60-75 / 65-128. [I; 2059. Greg, 75.]


1835 Nov. 13 / (+) / (Fr) / Belley / 9 p.m. / Belley  (Ain) / Det met / C.R. 1/414 / 2 stones thought might have fallen were found. / 2/66 / and set fire to a "grange". [I; 2060. "Extrait d'une lettre de M. Millet Daubenton à M. Arago, sur un météore lumineux." Comptes Rendus, 1 (1835): 414-415. "Envoi de quelques portions de l'aérolithe qui tomba près de Belley le 13 novembre 1835, et mit le feu à une grange de Samonod." Comptes Rendus, 2 (1836): 66.]


1835 Nov (end) / (Fr) / Pau (Basses, Pyrénees) / q and loud explosive sounds / B.A., '54 / (See Oct 24.) [I; 2061. Mallet, 258. See: 1835 Nov (end), (I; 2042).]


[1835 Nov (end) /] 1835 Oct 24 / (Fr) / Pau / Sounds or qs / B Assoc 54/258 / See Nov. [I; 2042. Mallet, 258. For 1835, Mallet only records an earthquake at Pau at the "End of the month" of November. Fort may have copied "24" from the previous item and "Oct." from the top of the column, (on page 258). See: 1835 Nov (end), (I; 2061).]


1835 Nov or Dec / Snails / Montpellier. ** [I; 2062.]


1835 Nov. 16 / Comet passed perihelion. / Newcomb, "Astronomy for Everybody, p. 262, tells only of successful predictions. "So exact was their work that two of them hit the time within five days: Professor Rosenberger assigned November eleventh as the date of return, and Pontécoulant predicted it for November thirteenth." / (ver.). [I; 2063.1, 2063.2. Philippe Gustave Doulcet, (1795-1874), was the "Comte de Pontécoulant." Newcomb, Simon. Astronomy for Everybody. New York: McClure, Phillips, 1903, 262. Stratford, William Samuel. On the Elements of the Orbit of Halley's Comet: At Its Appearance in the Years 1835 and 1836. London: Nautical Almanac, 1837, 4. "From a comparison of observations made at the latter end of August with the double Ephemeris, it was estimated that the Comet would arrive at its perihelion about 8.5 days later than the time stated by M. de Pontécoulant." When re-calculated from "roughly reduced observations, made between Aug. 20 and Oct. 19, 1835," the perihelion passage was again obtained as: "1835, Nov. 15.93546, Mean Astronomical Time at Greenwich."  Pontécoulant. "Détermination du prochain retour au périhélie de la Comète de 1759." Connaissance des Temps, 1833, "Additions," 104-113, at 112-113. Pontécoulant states: "Instant du passage au périhélie, 7 novembre 1835"; and, he notes Damoiseau's similar prediction for "4 novembre 1835," (however, Pontécoulant and Damoiseau used different masses for the planets in calculating the perturbations). Forbes, George. History of Astronomy. New York: Putnam, 1909, 80-81. "When Halley's comet reappeared in 1835, Pontecoulant's computations for the date of perihelion passage were very exact, and afterwards he showed that, with more exact values of the masses of Jupiter and Saturn, his prediction was correct within two days, after an invisible voyage of seventy-five years!" "Halley's Comet." Sidereal Messenger, 2 (July 1848): 94-96. "The perihelion passage was predicted to within nine days of its actual occurrence, a most astonishing approximation to the truth, when it is remembered that this body, far as it penetrates into space, never, even at the remotest point of its orbit, escapes from the sensible influence of the planet Jupiter. Moreover, at that time, the new planet, Neptune, was unknown, and its influence over the comet could not be taken into account." Pontécoulant. "Sur la détermination du prochain retour de la comète de 1759." Connaissance des Temps, 1837, "Additions," 102-104. Pontécoulant re-calculated the effects of Jupiter, with a different mass, and obtained: "Instant du passage au périhélie, 12',6 novembre 1835" (computing the time for the meridian of Paris). Thus, (without taking into account the undiscovered planet of Neptune), Pontécoulant's prediction of its perihelion passage was refined to closely match the telescopic observations of Halley's comet, after it had, again, disappeared from view (in 1836).]   


1835 Nov 17 / Perihelion passage of Halley's Comet. Pontecoulant and Rosenberger had calculated it to be on 14th. / W. T. Lynn, in N and Q 10-1-152. [I; 2064. Lynn, William Thynne. "Halley's Comet." Notes and Queries, s. 10 v. 1 (February 20, 1904): 152. "Pontécoulant, who died in 1874, had previously calculated the position of the comet at the preceding return. His first determination was that the date of return to perihelion would be 14 November, 1835. Rosenberger came to a similar conclusion. The perihelion passage actually occurred about noon on the 17th of that month...."]


1835 Nov. 17 / Aurora / Nima / C.R. 1/499. [I; 2065. "Aurore boréale observée à Nimes." Comptes Rendus, 1 (1835): 499.]


1835 / Conjunctions with the moon / Nov 18Saturn / 19Mercury / 20Mars / 21Venus / Observatory 23/58 / solar eclipse on 20th. [I; 2066. Johnson, S.J. "Appulses of Jupiter, Saturn, and Venus." Observatory, 23 (January 1902): 57-59, at 58. Quoting Old Moore's Almanack for 1835: "It is rather a remarkable coincidence that Saturn will be in conjunction with the Moon on the 18th, Mercury on the 19th, Mars about midnight of the 20th, and Venus on the morning of the 21st. Hence where the eclipse is central these four planets, though so near the Sun, will be, most probably, visible." The path of totality for this solar eclipse was across the continent of Africa; and, going away to the east of the Sun, Mars and Venus would have been visible, and going away to the west of the Sun, Mercury and Saturn would have been visible, for example, in the morning sky, at Accra. Ghana.]


1835 end of Nov / shocks / loud explosions / Rather severely cold weather turned and a hot, suffocating south wind blew. / BA 54. [I; 2067. Mallet, 258.]


1835 Nov. 18 / morning / Red glare in northern sky. Dome of St. Paul's brilliantly illuminated. Engines of the Fire Establishment called out repeatedly. / L.T., Nov. 19. [I; 2068. "The Northern Lights." London Times, November 19, 1835, p. 3 c. 2. "Nearly 60 of the men and 12 of the large engines belonging to the Fire Establishment were kept in almost incessant motion from 11 o'clock in the night till 6 o'clock yesterday morning, pursuing a number of false alarms of fire, which were caused by a succession of those brilliant phenomena, scientifically known as the aurora borealis...." "The southern side of the dome of St. Paul's was brilliantly illuminated by a reflected light, and no doubt existed of the correctness of the call." Baddeley, William. "London Fires in 1835." Mechanics' Magazine, 24 (February 6, 1836); 354-366, at 356.]


1835 last of Nov / At Pau (Basses Pyrénées), either shocks or sounds at time of a hot, suffocating south wind. / BA 54. [I; 2069. Mallet, 258.]


1835 Dec. 11 / A / Canada / Kingston, etc. / AJS 30/131/. [I; 2070. Bonnycastle, Richard Henry. "Account of an Aurora Borealis, with a notice of a Solar Phenomenon." American Journal of Science, 30 (1836): 131-137.]


1835 Dec / A / dets / Am J. Sci 32/217. [I; 2071. Twining, Alexander C. "Observations upon certain Auroral and Optical Phenomena." American Journal of Science, 32 (1837): 217-229, at 217-220.]


1835 Dec 12-13 / ab. midnight / Berlin and Magdeburg / large meteor / BA 60. [I; 2072. Greg, 75.]


1835 Dec 22 / (moon) / Light like a star in Aristarchus / Proctor, Myths and Marvels / 329 / by Baily.  [I; 2073. Proctor, Richard Anthony. Myths and Marvels of Astronomy. London: Longmans, Green, 1903, 329-330. Smyth, William Henry. "A Letter from Captain Smyth to Mr. Baily...." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 3 (January 8, 1836): 141-142. The observer was William Henry Smyth, at Bedford, (not Francis Baily). "Directed the telescope to the moon, and pointing it in the dark part for the vicinity of Aristarchus, soon saw the outline of that mountain very distinctly, formed like an irregular nebula. Nearly in the centre was a light, resembling that of a star of the 9th or 10th magnitude; it appeared by glimpses, but at times was brilliant, and visible for several seconds together."]

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