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Last updated: July 15, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1898


1898:


1898 / Myst murders of 1897-99 in England. / See Logan, Guilty or not Guilty?, p. 245. [C; 369. (Logan, Guilty or Not Guilty?, p. 245.)]


1898 / Mem. Geol Survey of India, vol 29 / “Barisal Gunssubject examined. Something may be partly truesound of surfbut this could not apply to the sounds heard far inland, / Maybe earthquake sounds [note cut off]way localized [note cut off]lais against [note cut off]t. [VIII; 155.1, 155.2. Oldham, Richard Dixon. “Report on the Great Earthquake of 12th June 1897.” Memoirs of the Geological Survey of India, 29 (1899): i-xxx, 1-379, at 191-207.]


1898, 99, etc. / q's / Mt Pleasant, etc., in Nor. Car. / See Climate and Crops, Nor Car Sect. [VIII; 156.]


1898 / winter / Pawpaw, Mich / black snow / MWR 29/465 / a scaley deposit, entirely metallic. [VIII; 157. “Colored Snow.” Monthly Weather Review, 29 (no. 10; October 1901): 465-466.]


1898 Jan / Floods in Australia / Queensland. [VIII; 158. (Refs.???)]


1898 Jan 1 / (+) / Reading / qs have often shaken windows and doors, but no such other record of many persons who thought there was rapping on their windows and doors as this case. Practical joking excluded: towns some miles apart. / Jour Soc for Psychical Research, 8-238 / ab. 12:30 a.m., Jan 1 / at Wallingford (Berkshire), Appleford, Burcote, Wittenham / R ac. 3834/2 / See Danbury, Jan 14, 1888. / Mill in WisconsinWrightsearly 70's? [C; 370.1, 370.2. "Curious Knockings." Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 8 (May 1898): 233-238. See: 1874 Ap 17 and 18, etc., (A; 922); 1874 Ap 17 and 19 and later, (A; 923); 1874 Ap. 23, (A; 926); and, 1888 Jan 14, (B: 844 to 848).]


1898 Jan 1 / Look for q. sounds here. [C; 371.]


1898 Jan 1 / Rappings at Reading like qs / See other dept. [VIII; 156. See: (“other dept.”).]


1898 Jan 2 / Eagle, 21-6 / Peculiar Owl / L.I. [C; 372. "Queer Species of Owl." Brooklyn Eagle, January 2, 1898, p. 21 c. 6.]


1898 Jan 3 / Vannes, France / 2 united luminous bodies5 or 6 minutesLa Nat 1898/1/127, 130 / color of Mars / Through telescopeseem united bodiesone of them oscillating considerably. [VIII; 160. “Académie des Sciences.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 1 (no. 1286; January 22): 127. Georget. “Observation d’un bolide double, à Vannes, le 3 janvier 1898.” Comptes Rendus, 126 (1898): 295-296.]


1898 Jan 4 / Spot in minimum period / 4 large groups / See Jan 21. / I think 1889 was minimum. 1900 again? [VIII; 161. See: 1898 Jan 21, (VIII; 169).]


1898 Jan.7 / Ec of moon. Thousands of meteors said been seen at Exmouth. / Eng Mec 66/531. [VIII; 162. Besley, W.E. "A Recent Meteor Shower." English Mechanic, 66 (no. 1713; January 21, 1898): 531.]


1898 Jan 7 / 1:20 p.m. / Shock / Malone, N.Y. / Trib 8-3-2. [VIII; 163. "Malone Feels the Earth Tremble." New York Tribune, January 8, 1898, p. 3 c. 2.]


1898 Jan 9, 10 / Crohamhurst, QueenslandMet Mag. 62-292 / Rain / 9th19.415 inches / 10th15.955 / See March 6, 7. [VIII; 164. "Abnormal Rainfalls." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 62 (January 1928): 292. See: 1898 March 6, 7, (VIII; 230).]


[The following two notes were clipped together by Fort. VIII: 165-166.]


1898 Jan 16-Feb17 / Stars / See before and later. / M. Notices, 58/334, Rev T.E Espin says that he saw in Perseus on this night something that looked like a cloudsaw it on Jan 24 and Feb 17. Mr. Heath and Dr Halm saw it, like a cloud and dimming and discoloring the tiny stars [shi]ning through it. [VIII; 165.1, 165.2. Espin, Thomas Henry Espinelle Compton. "A Remarkable Object in Perseus." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 58 (March 1898): 334-335.]


1898 / Obj in Perseus / Monthly Notices, April, 1919 / Dr Espin says, “I never felt the least doubt that the hazy appearance found in 1898 was no delusion.” [VIII; 166. Espin, Thomas Henry Espinelle Compton. "The Dark Markings of the Sky." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 79 (March 1898): 446.]


1898 Jan 20 / at Lick Observatory, Cal. / Bright daylight meteor, ab 1 p.m., in west. / Trib 21-8-2. [VIII; 167. "A Bright Meteor in Broad Daylight." New York Tribune, January 21, 1898, p. 8 c. 2.]


1898 Jan. 21 / 5:34 p.m. / Dalston, etc., Eng. / great met / Sc. Gos, N.S., 4-297. [VIII; 168. "A remarkable meteor was observed...." Science Gossip, n.s., 4 (no. 46; March 1898): 297. (No reference, here, to Dalston??? For the Dalston meteor, see: 1898 July 26, (VIII; 292).]


[1898] Jan 21 / 5 groups of sunspots, though in sunspot minimum / Pop Astro 5-553. [VIII; 169. “Sunspots.” Popular Astronomy, 5 (no. 10; February 1898): 553.]


1898 Jan. 22 / obj / Lieut Blackett, R.N., assisting Sir Norman Lockyer, at Viziadrug, India, during total eclipse of the sun, reported that he saw in the sky a body, between Venus and Mars. / Jour Leeds Astro 1906/23. [VIII; 170. Gregg, Ivo. “The Planet of Romance.”.” Journal and Transactions of the Leeds Astronomical Society, 1 (no. 14; 1906): 16-28, at 23. “...At the eclipse of January 22nd, 1898 , Lieut . Blackett, R.N., who was assisting Sir Norman Lockyer at Viziadrug, in India, reported that he saw during totality some body in the sky between Venus and Mars, which planets were in the immediate vicinity of the Sun. No star down to the 3rd magnitude occurred in this region on a chart showing stars down to the 3rd magnitude and planets in the neighbourhood of the Sun. This observation appears to stand by itself, no other observer at the same eclipse having mentioned seeing this object.”]


1898 Jan 24 / Q, Mexico, followed by a heavy mist at a time of year when mists are usually unknown there. / Nature 79-369. [VIII; 171. Oldham, Richard Dixon. “Recent Earthquakes.” Nature, 79 (January 28, 1909): 368-369.]


1898 Jan 24 / (+) / Q, Mexico, followed by heavy mist, and writer says rainfall so frequently reported as immediate successor of q's that we can no longer reject the hypothesis of a real connection between the two. / Sc Am Sup 67-122. [VIII; 172. Recent Earthquakes.” Scientific American Supplement, 67 (no. 1729; February 20, 1909): 122-123. “The earthquake in Mexico of January 24th, 1898, was similarly followed by a heavy mist, at a time of year when mists are usually unknown, and rainfall is so frequently reported as the immediate successor of an earthquake that we can no longer reject the hypothesis of a real connection be tween the two. Earthquake weather is a common expression in earthquake countries, but is usually applied to a heavy and oppressive feeling in the air which is supposed to precede an earthquake. Mr. Maxwell Hall has attempted to find an explanation in alterations of the barometric gradient by rapid upheaval of the ground, and has shown that uplifts, which are within the range of possibility, would produce the required effects, but whether there is, or is not, an earthquake weather, in the ordinary sense of the words, there seems reason for believing that in another sense they represent a reality, and that, as has been suggested by Prof. Milne, the disturbance of the ground, when transmitted to the overlying air, may determine precipitation, and explain the apparent association of severe earthquakes with mist and rain.”]


1898 / ab. Jan 25 / Great meteor near Boise City, Idaho / M.W.R. '98-20. [VIII; 173. “Bright Meteors.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (no. 1; January 1898): 20.]


[1898 Jan 28. Wrong date. See: 1898 June 28, (VIII; 174).]


1898 Jan 28 / (Sound) / 10:05 p.m. / Rutland / q / Geol Mag 1900-107 / p. 169 / “Wherever the earthquake was observed the sound was a far more prominent feature than the shock.” [VIII; 175. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 108 & 168-170.]


1898 Jan 28 / early morning / 2 very conspicuous spots in north tropical zone of Jupiter, by Brenner / Observatory 21-133 / had been observed by Fauth since Nov. 25, 1897 / p. 205. [VIII; 176. Brenner, Leo. “Conspicuous Spots on Jupiter.” Observatory, 21 (1898): 132-133. Denning, William Frederick. “Dark Elliptical Spots in the North Tropical Zone of Jupiter.” Observatory, 21 (1898): 205-206.]


1898 Jan 29 / Q destroyed town of Balikesser, Turkey. / Levant Herald, Feb. 7. [VIII; 177. (Levant Herald, February 7, 1898.)]


1898 Feb.-Ap. / Pub. Opinion Malta / nothing / also N.G. [VIII; 178. (Refs.???)]


1898 Feb 3 / It. Sounds / Scheggino (Spoleto) / Rombi / regular? / See 1816. / some before. [VIII; 179. (Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 45. Rumbling was heard for several hours after a small shock. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1898 Feb 3 / Especial obs. that no sunspot this day / MWR 1898-19 / (Ver). [VIII; 180. “Dr. Waltemath's Moon.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (no. 1; January 1898): 19-20.]


1898 Feb 4 / [Greifswald] Pomerania / "Second moon." / E. Mec. 67/545. [VIII; 181. "Scientific News." English Mechanic, 67 (no. 1740; July 29, 1898): 545-546. Georg Waldemath claimed that there was both a second and a third moon, but not readily seen by the naked eye, except when crossing the Sun's disc.]


1898 Feb 5 / Dr Waldemath prediction of second moon be seen Feb 4 or 5. / Reported seen at Wiesbaden and by German officersin China. / E Mec 67-545. [VIII; 182. "Scientific News." English Mechanic, 67 (no. 1740; July 29, 1898): 545-546.]


1898 Feb 8 / Continuing qs at Balikesser and this morning severe and City of Boghadidge destroyed. / Lev. Herald, Feb 28. [VIII; 183. (Levant Herald, February 28, 1898.) Balikesir, Turkey. (Unable to find reference to “Boghadidge.” possibly “Bikhodilchi” but only Lloyd's Weekly 1898/03/20 refers to that name. Many Anatolian places names were changed in Turkey with changes to Latin lettering and Kemalist reforms.)]


1898 Feb 9 / Violent q / Trikkala, Turkey / Levant Herald, 14, p. 79. [VIII; 184. (Levant Herald, February 14, 1898, p. 79.)]


1898 Feb 12-17 / Sand / Cape Verde Islands to Canaries / An. Soc Met de France 1903/70. [VIII; 194. Chauveau, Amyr Benjamin. "Notes sur les Chutes de Poussières." Annuaire de la Société Météorologique de France, 51 (May 1903): 69-82, at 70.]


1898 Feb 13 / Gale and “phenomenal" rains in N S Wales / 6 columns in Sydney Morning Herald of 15th. [VIII; 195. "The Recent Gale." Sydney Morning Herald, February 15, 1898, p. 6 c. 4-8 & p. 6 c. 1.]


1898 Feb 14 / Cape Verde / great dustfall / Sc Am 106-497 / another ship delayed. [VIII; 185. "Counting Grains of Dust in the Air." Scientific American, n.s., 106 (June 1, 1912): 497.]


1898 Feb 14, about / R / Find no sunspot in Nature / See N.Y. Times. [VIII; 186. (Refs.???)]


1898 Feb. 14 / Castle Line steam[ship] S.S. Roslin Castle into a sandstorm 900 miles from Saharadelayed ship 2 days. / Geol. Mag. 1898-240. [VIII; 187. "A Liner in a Duststorm." Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 5 (1898): 240. (London Daily Mail, ca. February 22, 1898.)]


1898 Feb. / See March 30. / North of Ireland. Over almost 500 sq. miles. Black rain. / Nature 63-472. [VIII; 188. “Red Rain.” Nature, 63 (March 14, 1901): 471-472. See: (March 30).]


1898 Feb 14 / Sahara? / off Cape Verde Islands / Roslin Castle met what appeared to be a dense fog, but sand from the Sahara. / The Captain had to work his way in darkness to Madeira, by dead reckoning. / E. Mec 67-34 /  But although a strong east wind was blowing, not until 17th and 18th did the sand reach MadeiraThen such a fog as old residents had never seen before in Madeira—everything covered with falling sand. Sun when occasionally could be seen was as silvery as the moon. / p. 110. [VIII; 189.1, 189.2, 189.3. "Scientific News." English Mechanic, 67 (no. 1718;  February 25, 1898): 33-34. Anderson, William. "Sandstorm in the Atlantic...." English Mechanic, 67 (no. 1721; March 18, 1898): 110.]


1898 Feb 14 / BO / Feb, p. 26 / No notes upon volc eruption of Feb. [VIII; 196. (Check volcanic eruptions for Feb. 1898.) (Check: “BO / Feb., p. 26.”) The Lamongan volcano, in Indonesia, erupted from February 5 to 15, 1898;  the Kirishimayama volcano, in Japan, erupted from February 8 to March 11, 1898; the Klyuchevskoy volcano, in Russia, erupted on February 20, 1898; and, the Semeru volcano, in Indonesia, erupted on February 23, 1898. The Santa Isabel volcano, south of the Sahara, on Bioko Island, in Equatorial Guinea, may also have erupted in 1898.]


1898 Feb 15, etc. / Nothing in Tangier Chronicle. [VIII; 197.]


1898 Feb 15 / evening / Balikesser, Turkeysevere shock / Levant Herald, 21st. [VIII; 190. (Levant Herald, February 21, 1898.) Balikesir, Turkey.]


1898 Feb / Dusts / Nautical Magazine / VXA / 67-496 / Also see [end of note]. [VIII; 191. (Nautical Magazine, 67-496.)]


1898 Feb 15-18 / Canary Islands / Windless and cloudless. Yellowish brown dust falling. / Bull Soc. Astro de FMay, 1898. [VIII; 193. Barba, Aguilino G. “Poussière atmosphérique.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 12 (1898): 188-189.]


1898 Feb 15 / N.Y.T., 11-1 / Sunspots Unusual. [VIII; 198. “Unusual Spots on the Sun.” New York Times, February 15, 1898, p. 11 c. 1.]


1898 Feb 15-18 / Dust fell 3 or 4 days on Roslyn Castle, over a distance of 900 miles off W. coast of Africa. / Nature 57/463. [VIII; 199. Coles, C. St. A. “A Dust Shower.” Nature, 57 (March 17, 1898): 463.]


1898 Feb 15-18 / West coast Africa / Red dust / Nature 57/463, (582). [VIII; 200. Coles, C. St. A. “A Dust Shower.” Nature, 57 (March 17, 1898): 463. Arcimis, Augusto. “Dust Fog in the Canaries.” Nature, 57 (April 21, 1898): 582.]


1898 Feb. 15 / BO / Sands / Nothing in Egyptian Gazette. [VIII; 201.]


1898 Feb. 15 / Cyclone / Reunion and Mauritius / (Paris) Daily Messenger 16-1-2. [VIII; 202. (Daily Messenger, (Paris), February 16, 1898, p. 1 c. 2.)]


1898 Feb 15 / This dust in Sk[yward] Ho attrib to March nova. [VIII; 203. (Check.)]


1898 Feb 15 / at Teneriffe / Nature 57/582 / Report by Prof Calvo, of the Meteorological Station at Teneriffe. From the first hours of the evening there was a light fog. “Neither the strength of the wind (E. gentle breeze) nor any other phenomenon indicated that the supposed condensed vapours could be African dust transported by the air.” Then wind started and reached the value of a moderate gale, subsided, and then again blew due East. Sun pale as moon—fall of a gray dust. [VIII; 204.1, 204.2.  Arcimis, Augusto. “Dust Fog in the Canaries.” Nature, 57 (April 21, 1898): 582.]


1898 Feb 15 / —11:16 a.m. / 18 / 20 / Shocks / Monserrat, W. Indies / 15th, severe / Had been going on since floods of Nov. 29, 1896. / Nature 57-543. [VIII; 205. “Notes.” Nature, 57 (April 7, 1898): 542-546, at 543.]


1898 Feb. [16] / Trance / Elida Wilbur, “a beautiful girl,” went into a trance and never really awakened. Died March 6, 1900. In San Francisco. Found lying on a lounge, with gas turned on in room. Had lost flesh somewhat, but was not emaciated. So found because a young man had called her mother on phone, insisting must speak to her, and mother finally went to the room. [C; 373.1, 373.2. “Death Ends the Trance of Miss Elida Wilbur.” San Francisco Call, March 7, 1900, p. 1 c. 3-5. (Another article regarding the telephone call, in 1900.)]


1898 Feb 16 / 1:35 p.m. / Kilsyth, N.B. / q and loud report / Nature 57-391 / 2 loud reports. [VIII; 192. M'Cubbin, James. “Earthquake in North Britain.” Nature, 57 (February 4, 1898): 391.]


1898 Feb 16 / [LT], 7-c / Terrific gales in Australia. [VIII; 206. “Australia.” London Times, February 16, 1898, p. 7 c. 3.]


1898 Feb. 16 / 1:35 p.m. / Loud report and sharp shock. / Kilsyth, North Britain. / 2 minutes later a sharper report, but no tremors felt. / Nature 57-391. [VIII; 207. M'Cubbin, James. “Earthquake in North Britain.” Nature, 57 (February 4, 1898): 391.]


1898 Feb 16-17 / (Insects) / Found on snow at Tragöss, Austria, on morning of 17th. / (N) / Numerous living larvae. Brownstrong-jawed. 2 or 3 centimetres long. / Bull Soc Belge d'Astro 3-263 / Seems had fallen. in Bull 4/119, says that in another place upon this day the same phe had occurred. [VIII; 208.1, 208.2. "Pluies d'insectes, de foin et de grenouilles." Bulletin de la Société Belge d'Astronomie, 3 (1898): 263-264. "Pluie d'insectes." Bulletin de la Société Belge d'Astronomie, 4 (1899): 119. ]


1898 Feb 17 / Insects / Letter dated then. Dr Klein tells of an insect rain at Tragöss. / Met Zeit 15-112 / See Jan 10 or 16, 1895. [VIII; 209. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 15 (1898): 105-120, at 116-117. "Das Merkwürdige ist aber Folgendes: Die Schneedecke war heute Früh von zahlreichen lebenden Insekten, vermuthlich im Larveuzustande, besäet. Dieser Insektenfall dauert an. Die Gebilde sind 2-3 cm lang, von kaffeebrauner Farbe, etwa 4 mm breit und von gegliedertem Körperbau. Sie tragen 3 Paar Extremitätenstummel und sind mit kräftigen Kauwerkzeugen versehen. Die Oberfläche ist eigenartig sammtähnlich. Wie ich höre, wurde ein ähnlicher Insektenfall mit Schnee vergesellschaftet, dieser Tage in Zwischenwässern (Krain?) beobachtet und ist vielleicht gemeinsamen Ursprunges." See: 1895 Jan 10 or 16, (VII; 1189).]


1898 Feb 17 / Madeira / dense fog that deposited a red dust / Cosmos, March, 1898, p. 291. [VIII; 210. Schmitz, P. Ernesto. “Brouillard de sable.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 38 (March 5, 1898): 291.]


1898 Feb. 19 / before the 19th / Two minute light / London / E Mec 67/63. [VIII; 211. Garbett, E.L. "The Hamburg Duplicate Moon." English Mechanic. 67 (no. 1719; March 4, 1898): 63. "A week ago, the last clear evening in London before Feb. 19, I was going along a street leading due south, about 6 o'clock, when a man exclaimed to another, 'Look at that shooting-star!' I saw one flying steadily from the western houses till hidden by the eastern ones, in perhaps two minutes. It was utterly unlike any other meteor I have seentoo slow to have any apparent tail; brighter than Rigel, not so bright as Sirius; perfectly steady, with no twinkling, no detached sparks, and kept eastward in a horizontal path, some degrees south of the Equator, for perhaps 50° or 60°, the houses concealing both its beginning and end."]


1898 Feb 21-22 / night / Shocks east of Saratoga / Trib 23-7-4. [VIII; 212. "Earthquake Near Saratoga." New York Tribune, February 23, 1898, p. 7 c. 4.]


1898 Feb 23 / 1:30 p.m. / Province of Denizli, Turkeydisastrous q. / Levant Herald, 28th / Continued and on 24th. [VIII; 213. (Levant Herald, February 28, 1898.)]


1898 Feb. 23 / 3 p.m. / Strong shock / Island of Cerigo, in Greece / D. Messenger (Paris), 24th. [VIII; 214. (Daily Messenger, (Paris), February 24, 1898.)]


1898 Mar-Oct / “Luminous birds” / Eng / LT Index / 1907-1908 / “Birds”. [C; 374. Pigott, Thomas Digby. “A Luminous Owl?” London Times, December 14, 1907, p. 16 c. 5. “A Luminous Owl.” London Times, December 26, 1907, p. 2 c. 6. Pigott, Thomas Digby. “Luminous Owls.” London Times, January 9, 1908, p. 6 c. 3. Rawnsley, Hardwicke Drummond. “Luminous Birds.” London Times, January 14, 1908, p. 6 c. 2. Crawford, Oswald. “Luminous Birds.” London Times, January 18, 1908, p. 7 c. 3. “Luminous Birds.” London Times, January 22, 1908, p. 17 c. 6.]


1898 May 1-15 / Have Chicago Tribune. [C; 375.]


1898 March 1 / Destructive hurricane / New Caledonia / D. Mess. (Paris), 2nd. [VIII; 215. (Daily Messenger, (Paris), March 2, 1898.)]


1898 March 2 / Balikesser / 3 violent shocks / Lev. Herald, 7th. [VIII; 216. (Levant Herald, March 7, 1898.)]


1898 March 4 / (It) / q and phe / See 1805. [VIII; 217.  Refer to: 1805 July 26, (I; 146). Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 403-404.]


1898 March 4-5 / night / shocks / Parma, Florence, etc. / D. Mess, 6th. [VIII; 218. (Daily Messenger, (Paris), March 6, 1898.)]


1898 March 4 / qs / W. Indies and Italy / BA '11 / Sims / See Feb 18, 1889. [VIII; 219. Two class I earthquake. Milne, 740. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1898 March 4 / 9 h, 50 m, P.S. Time / College Park, Cal. / A very bright meteor from 13 h, 40 m and +25° to 15 h, 40; +40°. / Through Bootes between B[eta] and Delta. In next hour several small meteors in almost exactly the same path. / Pubs Pacific 10-79. [VIII; 220. Curtis, H.D. “Very Bright Meteor, March 4, 1896.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 10 (no. 61; April 1898): 79.]


1898 March / Nova found in photograph / Nature 59/473, 561 / (?) / in Sagittarius. [VIII; 221. “New Star in Aquila.” Nature, 59 (March 16, 1899): 473. “New Star in Sagittarius.” Nature, 59 (April 13, 1899): 561.]


1898 March 5-6 / night / 2 shocks / Verona / D. Messenger, Paris, 6th. [VIII; 222. (Daily Messenger, (Paris), March 6, 1898.)]


1898 March 6 / For week of March 5-12, heavy rains for the week reported from Saffi and Rabat. / Tangier Chronicle, March 19 / No dust mentioned. [VIII; 227. (Tangier Chronicle, March 19, 1898.)]


1898 March 6 / also Feb 15-18 / No q's Italy, in Nature. [VIII; 228. (Confirm. Nature, Feb-March, 1898.)]


1898 March 6-7 / Violent destructive storm in Algeria / La Nat Sup., March 19. [VIII; 223. “Informations.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1294, supplement; March 19): 61.]


1898 March 6-7/ Great dustfall / Sicily / Met Zeit 1901-236. [VIII; 226. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 18 (1901): 231-238, at 236.]


1898 March 6-7 / Floods in Queensland and N.S. Wales. Several rivers rising at rate of a foot an hour. “Phenomenal rains” in Queensland. / Syd. Morning Herald, 8th, etc. [VIII; 229. "Queensland." Sydney Morning Herald, March 8, 1898, p. 5 c. 2. "A Flood Expected." Sydney Morning Herald, March 8, 1898, p. 5 c. 3. "Flood at Murwillumbah." Sydney Morning Herald, March 8, 1898, p. 7 c. 1. "Queensland." Sydney Morning Herald, March 9, 1898, p. 7 c. 5.]


1898 March 6, 7 / See Jan 9, 10. / 6th16.23 inches rain / 7th17.07. [VIII; 230. "Abnormal Rainfalls." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 62 (January 1928): 292. See: 1898 Jan 9, 10, (VIII; 164).]


1898 March 7 / Silesia / bet 3 and 5 p.m. / Cosmos, N.S., 38/735 / reddish yellow snow. [VIII; 224. “Neige rouge.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 38 (June 11, 1898): 735. Müller, F. “Rother Schnee in Kärnten.” Wetter, 15 (March 1898): 69-70.]


1898 March 7 / D. Mess. of / Terrible gale off Algerian coast. [VIII; 225. (Daily Messenger, (Paris), March 7, 1898.)]


1898 March 7 / Siciliy / dust / Met Zeit 1901-236. [VIII; 231. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 18 (1901): 231-238, at 236.]


1898 March 7 / Heavy th. storm and 2 “thunderbolts” or aerolites reported fallen. / Tangier Chronicle, March 12 / No dust mentioned. [VIII; 232. (Tangier Chronicle, March 12, 1898.)]


1898 March 8 / (nova) / (+) / In March, 1899, examination of photographic plates at Harvard revealed that the date first appearance of a new star in Sagittarius. / 4.7 mag. / On Ap 3, down to 8.2. / Observatory 22-245. [VIII; 233. “A New Star in Sagittarius.” Observatory, 22 (1899): 245-246.]


1898 March 8 / Nova in Sagittarius was of 5th mag. By Ap. 29 was down to 8th. / Discovered on plates (Draper Mem. photographs) a year later by Mrs Fleming. / Pubs Astro Soc Pac11-87. [VIII; 234. Pickering, Edward Charles. “A New Star in Sagittarius.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 11 (no. 67; April 1899): 87.]


1898 [March 8] / March 8, 1898 / See Aug 10, 1899. [VIII; 235. See: 1899 Aug 10, (VIII; 493).]


1898 March 10 / Violent shocks / Switzerland / D. Mess., 11th. [VIII; 236. (Daily Messenger, (Paris), March 11, 1898.)]


1898 March 11 / Eagle, 5-1 / L.I. met. [VIII; 237. "Meteor at Northport." Brooklyn Eagle, March 11, 1898, p. 5 c. 1.]


1898 March 12 / B.D. / (Gelat) / In La Nat Sup., March 12, 1898, Lieut [Eloi] Malachowsky writes that he addressed the Editor because of two occurrences for which he could find no explanationthat when he was a boy of 12 or 13 he had been shown a mass of gelatinous matter said to have fallen from sky near his home. He had discussed the matter with a physician who told him of a similar fall. [VIII; 238.1, 238.2. The note refers to information from pages 53-54 and 60-61 of The Book of the Damned. "Communications.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1293, supplement; March 12): 58.]


1898 March 12 / Shocks in Turkey / D. Mess, 13th. [VIII; 239. (Daily Messenger, (Paris), March 13, 1898.)]


1898 March 14and 15 / Greatest magnetic storm recorded at Kew Observatory since Aug., 1894 / Nature 57-492. [VIII; 240. Chree, Charles. “A Magnetic Storm.” Nature, 57 (March 24, 1898): 492.]


1898 March 15 / (Cu[t]) / Strong magnetism hurting balloons and no sunspots / Sc Am Sup 67/207. [VIII; 241. (Scientific American Supplement, 67-207.)]


1898 March 15 / Eng. / Aurora and Mag. storm / Nature 57/492, 511. [VIII; 242. Chree, Charles. “A Magnetic Storm.” Nature, 57 (March 24, 1898): 492. Smith, A. George. “The Aurora of March 15.” Nature, 57 (March 31, 1898): 511.]


1898 March 15 / Great aurora / Scotland and n. of England / E Mec 67/129. [VIII; 243. "Aurora Borealis." English Mechanic, 67 (no. 1722; March 25, 1898): 129. Maclachlan, N. "Aurora and Sunspots." English Mechanic, 67 (no. 1722; March 25, 1898): 129.]


1898 March 18 / 3 rumbling sounds at Herefordat Ponhilas Court (Hereford), 3 shocks and sounds / 4, 5:15 and 5:30 a.m. [VIII; 244. (Refs.???)]


1898 March 25 to Ap 4 / On 12 occasions [sub]terranean rumblings heard at Constantine, Cornwall. / Quar. J. Geol Soc London 56-1 / near Falmouth. [VIII; 245. Davison, Charles. “On the Cornish Earthquakes of March 29th to April 2nd, 1898.” Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London, 56 (1900): 1-7, at 1.]


1898 March 26 / Town of Koil-Hissar (Sivas), Turkey, destroyed by a q. / Levant Herald, 28th. [VIII; 246. (Levant Herald, March 28, 1898.)]


1898 March 27, 28, 29 / Shocks at Banmark, India / Dublin Daily Express, Ap. 4-6-9. [VIII; 247. "Earthquakes in India." Dublin Daily Express, April 4, 1898, p. 6 c. 9.]


1898 March 29 / Cornwall / 10:25 p.m. / 10:30 p.m. / Shocks and soundsfirst like the low rumble of distant thunderSecond “more like the discharge of distant artillery.” / Q.J.G.S.L. 56-3. [VIII; 248. Davison, Charles. “On the Cornish Earthquakes of March 29th to April 2nd, 1898.” Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London, 56 (1900): 1-7, at 3.]


1898 March 30 / B. rain / Ireland / Lord Rosse's account / Ap. 12, 1889. [VIII; 249. Parsons, Lawrence, (4th Earl of Rosse). “Black Rain.” Nature, 40 (June 27, 1889): 202-203. See: 1889 Ap. 12, VI; 1630).]


1898 March 30-Ap. 1 / B. rain and detonations. [VIII; 250. (Refs.???)]


1898 March 30 / At Kells, Co. [Meath,] Ireland / also at Mullingar / Symons Met Mag. [VIII; 251. Ringwood, John. "Black Rain." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 33 (April 1898): 40-41.]


1898 March 30 / Ac to cor to the Irish Times, there had been seen at Kells, C[o]. Meath, sunsets like those of Nov, 1883. On the 30th came an alarming darknessthen a black rain. Substance like soot fell over an area 16 by 30 miles. Copied in Symons Met Mag 33-40. Said here that their own cor had reported it for 30thsee. [VIII: 252.1, 252.2. Ringwood, John. "Black Rain." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 33 (April 1898): 40-41. Ringwood, John. "Black Rain." Irish Times, (Dublin), April 5, 1898, p. 5 c. 3.]


1898 March 30 / (with N. star) / (R) / Black rain at Belvedere, Mullingar / See other note. [VIII; 253. See: 1898 April 10, (VIII; 264).]


[1898 March 30 /] 1898 April 10 / B. rain / Mullingar. / An. Soc. Met. de France 46/145. [VIII; 264. “Revue et Bulletin Bibliographique.” Annuaire de la Société Météorologique de France, 46 (1898): 144-168, at 145-146. “La pluie noire.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 2 (no. 1306; June 11): 30. The date of the black rain at Mullingar was March 30, 1898, (not April 10, nor April 30, as reported in the French reviews), and was originally reported in Symons’s Meteorological Magazine. Ringwood, John. "Black Rain." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 33 (April 1898): 40-41.]


1898 March 30 / B. rain / Ireland and Wales / Ap. 30, 1887. [VIII; 254. See: 1887 Ap. 30, (VI: 1045 to 1047).]


1898 March 30 / black / Ireland / (11) / (D-30). [VIII; 255. The note copies information from page 30 of The Book of the Damned. Ringwood, John. "Black Rain." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 33 (April 1898): 40-41.]


[1898 March 31 /] 1892 March 31 / night / Shock / California / most violent since 1872. Nature 57-565. [VII; 440. “Notes.” Nature, 57 (April 14, 1898): 565-568, at 565.]


1898 March 30-31 / ab midnight / Severe q / various parts of California / Dublin Daily Express, Ap. 1. [VIII; 256. "Earthquake in California." Dublin Daily Express, April 1, 1898, p. 5 c. 4.]


1898 Ap 1 / 9:55 p.m. / Cornwall / q / Geol Mag 1900-107 / Phil Mag 5/49/32. [VIII; 257. Davison, Charles. “On Earthquake-Sounds." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 5 v. 49 (1900): 31-70, at 32.]


1898 Ap. 1 / ab. 10 p.m. / At Pensanooth, midway between Falmouth and Redruthviolent shocks. / Dublin Daily Express, Ap. 4. [VIII; 258. "Earthquake in England." Dublin Daily Express, April 4, 1898, p. 6 c. 9.]


1898 Ap. 1 / Sounds q. / 9:55 p.m. / Dr. Davison records that in 6 places, sound heard and no q. felt. / Q.J.G.S.L. 56-4 / He lists some descriptions“very near thunder”, “a very heavy peal of thunder”, “a very loud explosion”. [VIII; 259. Davison, Charles. “On the Cornish Earthquakes of March 29th to April 2nd, 1898.” Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London, 56 (1900): 1-7, at 3-6.]


1898 Ap 1 / B Rain, Ireland / and sound-q., Cornwall / See Oct., 1907. [VIII; 260. See: 1907 Oct 8, (IX; 846); 1907 Oct 8 and 9, (IX; 850); and, 1907 Oct 8-9, (IX: 851 & 852).]


1898 April 2 / ab. 3 p.m. / q / Cornwall / Geol Mag 1900-107. [VIII; 261. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177 at 108.]


1898 Ap. 4 / 7:45 a.m. / Constantinople / heavy rain / a torrid wind and fall of mud / La Nat Sup, Ap. 16p. 78col. 1.x / (not in Levant Herald). [VIII; 262. “Communications.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1298, supplement; April 16): 78.]


1898 Ap. 5 / 10:15 p.m. / Meteor exceptional size. Visible 10 seconds, London / Nature 57-588. [VIII; 263. “Notes.” Nature, 57 (April 21, 1898): 587-590, at 588.]


[1898 April 10. Wrong date. See: 1898 March 30, (VIII; 264).]


1898 Ap. 25 / (nova?) / In Bull. Soc. Astro de France, August, 1898, Prof Micheilovitch, of the Observatory of Belgrade, saw, at B., a light equal in size to the planet Venus stationary in (Cocher) 6½ minutes. [VIII; 265. Michaïlovitch, Jelenko. “Curieux bolide.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 12 (1898): 44. “Cocher” is the Auriga constellation.]


1898 Ap. 30 / In times of Spanish War excitement. / Chic. Trib, May 4-7-5 / Dispatch from St Johns, N.F. That the telegraph operator at Trepassey had reported mysterious cannonading off that port at 10 p.m.―—“heavy firing”. / Heard again May 1 before daybreaklast 20 minutes. / Confirmed by the telegraph operator at Cape Race. [VIII; 266.1, 266.2. “Mysterious Shots at Sea.” Chicago Tribune, May 4, 1898, p. 7 c. 5.]


1898 May 1-2 / night from Caen to Caumont / yellow substance / Said, Cosmos, N.S., 39/12, not sulphur as supposed but pine pollensaid to be a bizarre phenomenon. That nevertheless the rain with this pollen did have a strong sulphurous odor. [VIII; 267. “Pluie de Soufre.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 39 (July 2, 1898): 12-13.]


1898 May 6 / ab 12:30 p.m. / q and a waterspout fell at Besancon and another waterspout at Saint-Affrique, Aveyron. / La Nat Sup, May 14 / (N.M.) [VIII; 268. “Informations.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1302, supplement; May 14): 93.]


1898 May 6 / q and waterfall / Besancon / about noon / Q and great fall water / waterspout / La Nat Supplement, May 14 / a little later, q at Bonneville / Haute Savoie. [VIII; 269. “Informations.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1302, supplement; May 14): 93.]


1898 May 6 / Trib, 3-6 / Powder explosions / 5-6-3 (N.J.) / May 1-6-3 / May 10-6-2 (Me) / 28-4-2 / 23-3-4 (Ind) / Ap. 29-3-3 / 14-11-4 / 27-16-4. [VIII; 270. "Explosion of a Powder Mill." New York Tribune, April 14, 1898, p. 11 c. 4. "Powder Mills Blown Up." New York Tribune, April 27, 1898, p. 16 c. 4. "Explosion Kills Six Men." New York Tribune, April 29, 1898, p. 3 c. 3. "Another Powder Mill Blown Up." New York Tribune,  May 1, 1898, p. 6 c. 3. "One Killed, Three Injured." New York Tribune, May 5, 1898, p. 6 c. 3. A boiler explosion at Paterson, New Jersey. "Explosion at a Dewey Celebration." New York Tribune, May 6, 1898, p. 3 c. 6. "Powder Mill Blown Up." New York Tribune, May 10, 1898, p. 6 c. 2. "Fatal Powder Mill Explosion." New York Tribune, May 23, 1898, p. 3 c. 4. "Powder Mill Explosion." New York Tribune, May 28, 1898, p. 4 c. 2.]


1898 May 10 / (See Ap. 30.) / Chic Trib 11-3-4 / Fishermen of Beaufort, Nor. Car., reported heavy cannonading at 10 a.m. 47 detonations were counted. [VIII; 271. “Sounds of Cannon at Sea.” Chicago Tribune, May 11, 1898, p. 3 c. 4. See: 1898 Ap. 30, (VIII; 266).]


1898 May 16 / 20 waterspouts on coast of N.S. Wales, near Eden. / Paper read by H.C. Russell before Roy Soc of N.S. Wales, Aug 3, 1898. [VIII; 272. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. “Water-Spouts on the Coast of New South Wales.” Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 32 (1898): 132-149.]


1898 May 21 / Moore, Arkansas / From a heavy cloud in NW lightning played “and a body, like a large meteor, seemed to burst from the cloud, and float slowly to the east until it passed out of sight.” / MWR 1898-218. [VIII; 273. “Notes from the Reports of the Climate and Crop Sections.” Monthly Weather Review,  26 (no. 5; May, 1898): 217-218, at 218.]


1898 May 23 / pollen / Munster / Alsace / A greenish yellow dust, said been pine pollen / Rept Soc Astro de F, Aug, 1898. [VIII; 274. Léonhart, Jacques. “Poussière verte.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 12 (1898): 367.]


1898 June 2 / Eagle, 1-5 / q's / N.Y. and Canada. [VIII; 275. "Earthquake at Malone." Brooklyn Eagle, June 2, 1898, p. 1 c. 5.]


1898 June 3 / Great met and reports of its fall in West Virginia / M.W.R. '98-318. [VIII; 276. “Bright Meteors.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (July 1898): 318.]


1898 June 3 / Malone, N.Y. / q / Trib / See Jan 8. [VIII; 277. (New York Tribune, June 3, 1898; not found here.) See: 1898 Jan 7, (VIII; 163).]


1898 June 6 / 10 p.m. / Ac to Johannesburg Star, fall of tremendous meteorite near Grahamstown, S. Africa / Cosmos 39/163. [VIII; 278. Noël, E. “Chute d'un aérolithe au sud de l'Afrique.Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 39 (August 6, 1898): 163.]


1898 June 7 / Trib, 12-1 / Kentucky / q. [VIII; 279. "An Earthquake in Kentucky." New York Tribune, June 7, 1898, p. 12 c. 1.]


1898 June 11 / Light of / Rumbling sounds in Bayhall Manor, Tunbridge Wells. [C; 376. A Haunted House in Kent.” Light, 18 (no. 909; June 11, 1898): 285. “Mysterious noises, which are said to occur nightly at Bayhall Manor House on Lord Camden's estate at Pembury, a small village on the outskirts of Tunbridge Wells, have caused intense excitement for miles round. The old manor, with its moss-grown roof, its broken doors and windows, its old moat, can be traced back to the reign of King John. For several weeks past persons residing in the immediate neighbourhood have been startled by unearthly noises and groans, and many of the villagers have been heard to declare that they have seen ghostly figures walking about. Such has been the sensation caused in Tunbridge Wells that a number of well-known gentlemen have visited the house and heard what they believe to be ‘true spirit noises.’ The investigators were armed with heavy sticks, and for upwards of an hour awaited the first sound which was to signalise the presence of ghosts. According to the story told by one of them, they were straining eye and ear, when suddenly a rumbling noise like the dragging of some heavy body across the floor broke the silence of the night. One or two of the explorers were paralysed with fear, but the rest were sufficiently courageous to enter the house. In the cellar below there was a succession of thuds, followed by groans, and the result was that the party beat a hasty retreat. Visits have been paid to the house by other parties, who have reported the groans as terrible.” Bayhall Manor was unoccupied, (in a ruined state, in 1898), and, (after its demolition), only its footings remain today. (Western Daily Mercury, ca. June 11, 1898; not @ BNA.)]


1898 June 11 / Look for quake sounds here. [C; 377.]


1898 June 15 / Trib, 6-3 / Mississippi Valley / q. [VIII; 280. "Earthquake in Mississippi Valley." New York Tribune, June 15, 1898, p. 6 c. 3.]


1898 June 23 / Eagle, 4-1 / Another L.I. met. [VIII; 281. "Meteor at Northport." Brooklyn Eagle, June 23, 1898, p. 4 c. 1.]


1898 June 26 / Eagle, 34-5 / Fist on a roof. [C; 378. "Human Foot Found on a Roof." Brooklyn Eagle, June 26, 1898, p. 34 c. 5. ]


1898 June 26 / Trib (Sup), 15-1 / Comets of 1898. [VIII; 282. "This Year's Comet Crop." New York Tribune, Supplement, p. 15 c. 1-2.]


[1898 June 28 /] 1898 Jan 28 / It / Det met/ ? / See 1805. [VIII; 174. Refer to: 1805 July 26, (I; 146). Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 404-405.]


1898 June 30 / Nova Ophiuchi at 7.8 Had gone up 3 magnitudes since May 31. / Knowledge 1905-157. / [Illustration]. [VIII; 283. “A Probable New Star, R.S. Ophiuchi.” Knowledge, n.s., 2 (July 1905): 157.]


1898 July 1 / Red object (2) / Sedbergh / Nature 58/224 / D-289. [VIII; 284. The note copies information from page 289 of The Book of the Damned. Martyn, A.J.K. "A Monochromatic Rainbow." Nature, 58 (July 7, 1898): 224.]


1898 July 2 / Hungary / big q / [BA] '11 / small, July 31. [VIII; 285. A class III earthquake and a class I earthquake. Milne, 740.]


1898 July 5 / 8:50 p.m./ Great det. meteor / Ontario / Nature 58-604. [VIII; 286. “Notes.” Nature, 58 (October 20, 1898): 602-605, at 604.]


1898 July 5 / Met train / Canada / Science, N.S., 24-594 / refers to Trans Astro and Phys Soc Toronto 1898-74. [VIII; 287. Chant, Clarence Augustus. “An Unusual Meteor.” Science, n.s., 24 (November 9, 1906): 594.  “Seventeenth Meeting.” Transactions of the Astronomical and Physical Society of Toronto, 1898, 69-78, at 71-78, (illustrations).]


1898 July 8 / S / Obj sky / Kiel / 133 / D-250. [VIII; 288. The note copies information from page 250 of The Book of the Damned. Thomas, N.W. "Curious phenomenon." Nature, 58 (July 28, 1898): 294.]


[1898 July (?). Wrong date. See: 1897 Aug 4-7 (?), (VIII; 289).]


1898 July 12 / St. Elmo's in a thick fog / Mt. Elbert, Colorado / Cosmos, NS, 42/547. [VIII; 290. “Météores électriques.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 42 (May 12, 1900): 575-576.]


1898 July 18 / (Sound) / at Puys north-east of Dieppe / Ciel et Terre 19/431 / Cor writes that for 15 minutes in morning ofhe heard many detonations. [VIII; 291. Rocquigny-Adanson, Guillaume-Charles. “Correspondance.” Ciel et Terre, 19 (1898-1899): 431-435.]


1898 July 26 / 9:11 p.m. / Met / France and Eng / Sci Gos, N.S., 5-122. [VIII; 292. "A Brilliant Meteor...." Science Gossip, n.s., 5 (no. 52; September 1898): 122.]


1898 Aug. 1 / (Cut) / Bull Astronomique 15/479 / Cor writes of a clear brilliant light [note cut off] the polar regions. the flash of a moment [note cut off]eien at Bourg-d'Ault (Somme), evening of Aug 1, 1898. Says superior to Venuswas motionless. [VIII; 293. Rozé, C. “Sur un Phénomène Céleste Instantané.” Bulletin Astronomique, 15 (1898): 479-480. Rozé observed the light from Bourg-d'Ault, Somme, France, a little south of Polaris,  and two or three degrees to the east, (“deux ou trois degrés à l'est et sans doute un peu vers le sud de la Polaire”); and, he thought that it may have been a nova.]


[1898 August 1. Monck, William Henry Stanley. "AerolitesPerpetual Motion.” English Mechanic, 79 (no. 2045; June 3, 1904): 383-384. This is the date of the fall in Spain of the Quesa meteorite. My note.]


1898 Aug ? / pebbles / Jamaica / (93). [VIII; 294. (Refs.???)]


1898 Aug 3 / Eagle, 5-3 / Alligator at Flushing. [C; 379. "A Live Alligator." Brooklyn Eagle, August 3, 1898, p. 5 c. 3.]


1898 Aug 5 / 4th stone to fall in south of Maine / others: Nobleboro1823 / Castine1848 / Searsmont1871 / This at Andover / Am. J. Sci 4-15-395. [VIII; 295. Ward, Henry Augustus. “The Andover Meteorite.” American Journal of Science, s. 4, v. 15 (1903): 295-296. See: 1823 Oct. 11, (I; 1082); 1848 May 20, (II; 1220); and, 1871 May 21, (IV; 420 & 421). These are the Nobleboro, Castine, Searsmont, and Andover meteorites.]


1898 Aug 6 / See Aug 14, 1888. [VIII; 296. See: 1888 Aug 14, (VI; 1425.1).]


1898 Aug 6 / 2:33 a.m. / Severe shock / Messina / Nature 58-352. [VIII; 297. “Notes.” Nature, 58 (August 11, 1898): 351-356, at 352.]


1898 Aug 10 / Japan and Italy / qs / BA '11 / Sims / See Feb. 18, 1889. [VIII; 298. A class II earthquake and a class I earthquake. Milne, 740.  See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1898 Aug 11 / (Cut) / Aug. 11, 1894 / Remarkable bolides at Rome / Bull Astro 17/154, 232. [VIII; 299. (Bulletin Astronomique???, 17-154, 232; not found here.)]


1898 Aug 11 / Mets unusually brightnot said where / Nature 66-407. [VIII; 300. Denning, William Frederick. “The Perseid Meteoric Shower of 1902.” Nature, 66 (August 21, 1902): 406.]


1898 Aug 14, 19 Sept 12 / Vesuvius great / Trib. 25 (Sup) 10-4 / 19-1-1 / 16-1-7. [VIII; 301. "Vesuvius Again Active." New York Tribune, September 25, 1898, Supplement, p. 10 c. 4 & p. 11 c. 1-3. "Afraid of Vesuvius." New York Tribune, September 19, 1898, p. 1 c. 1. "Eruption of Mount Vesuvius." New York Tribune, September 16, 1898, p. 1 c. 3.]


1898 Aug 14, 19 / Vesuvius / Trib. [VIII; 302. (New York Tribune, ca. August 14-19, 1898; nothing found for August eruptions.)]


1898 Aug. 15 / Projection near N. end of terminator of Mars, reported by Capt. Molesworth, who considered it no illusion“actual not optical”. / Mem. BAA 9/73. [VIII; 303. “Section for the Observation of Mars.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 9 (1901): 63-106, at 73.]


1898 Aug 16 / det met / Pensacola, Fla / 8:42 p.m. / “tremendous explosion” / MWR '98-363. [VIII; 304. “Not Ball Lightning.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (no. 8; August 1898): 363-364.]


1898 Aug 19 / 8:48 or 8:57 p.m. / Met / Germany / Zeit Met 15/357. [VIII; 305. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 15 (1898): 342-360, at 357-358.]


1898 Aug. 19 / Seeming projection from Mars reported by Capt. Molesworth but considered “optical” by him / Mem. B.A.A., 9/73. [VIII; 306. “Section for the Observation of Mars.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 9 (1901): 63-106, at 73.]


1898 Aug 20 / [Letter to Fort from Mrs. Fray, Sep 30th, 1925] / [Letter to Mrs. Fray from C.A. Matley, 18th June 1924] / [Letter to Fort from Corsair Foster, 28th June 1925]. [VIII; 307.  [Letter to Fort from Mrs. Fray, Sep 30th, 1925] / [Letter to Mrs. Fray from C.A. Matley, 18th June 1924] / [Letter to Fort from Corsair Foster, 28th June 1925].]


1898 Aug 21 / Same as 19th. [VIII; 308. (Refs.???)]


1898 Aug 22 / milky sea / Indian Ocean / 10° 35 N / 65° 25 E / Seen first at 1:30 a.m. / Nature 58/497 / See Feb 1, 1881. / Passenger on P and O S.S. India“The whole sea was milk-white, much more luminous than the clear, starry sky, and there was a very definite horizon.” A bucket of water “showed nothing unusual”. Brightened and faded and brightened again until daylight (4:15 a.m.); had then been traversed 50 miles. Slight recurrence next night. [VIII; 309.1, 309.2. Barrett, James W. “A White Sea.” Nature, 58 (September 22, 1898): 496-497. See: 1881 Feb 1, (V; 443).]


1898 Aug 22 / ab. 7:15 a.m. / Comrie / q / Geol Mag. 1900-107 / Knowledge, n.s., 6/145. [VIII; 310. (Geological Magazine, 1900-107.) Davison, Charles. “The Earthquakes of Comrie, in Perthshire.” Knowledge, n.s., 32 (April 1909): 143-146.]


1898 Aug 25 / R with sunspot, Sept 9 / Nature of / Vesuvius in active eruption / also Nature, Sept. 22. [VIII; 311. “A Large Sun-Spot.” Nature, 58 (September 8, 1898): 463. “Notes.” Nature, 58 (September 22, 1898): 512-515, at 513.]


1898 Aug 29 / Observatory, 21-354 / That Mr A. A.C. Merlin, British Vice-Consul at Volo, Greece, had telegraphed under this date that he had seen a star near the nucleus of the nebula in Andromeda. Not findable in a photo plate of 31st. / See Dec 3. See Sept 20; Ap. 25. [VIII; 312.1, 312.2.”A Supposed New Star in Andromeda.” Observatory, 21 (1898): 354. See: 1898 Ap. 25, (VIII; 265); 1898 Sept 20, (VIII; 342, 343, & 344); and, 1898 / from Dec 3 to Jan 7, (VIII; 382).]


1898 Aug 29 / See Dec 3. [VIII; 313. See:1898 / from Dec 3 to Jan 7, (VIII; 382).]


1898 (?) / Sept 3 / bullets / 55+. [C; 380. (Refs.???)]


[1898 Sept 3. Wrong date. See: 1899 Sept 3, (C; 381).]


1898 Sept 3 / Great sunspot appears. / Central on 9th. / Appears again, 30th. / Nature 58/463, 553, 630 / See Vesuvius at this time. [VIII; 314. “A Large Sun-Spot.” Nature, 58 (September 8, 1898): 463. “The Large Sun-Spot.” Nature, 58 (October 6, 1898): 553. “The Large Sun-Spot.” Nature, 58 (October 27, 1898): 630. See: (Vesuvius, ca. 1898).]


1898 Sept 3 / Unusually large spot came over eastern limb of sun. Was central on 9th. / Nature 58-491. [VIII; 315. “The  Aurora of September 9.” Nature, 58 (September 15, 1898): 490-491.]


1898 Sept 4 / 8:35 p.m. / Lille / obj in Little Bear / [illustration] / Cosmos, NS, 39/356 / verified. [VIII; 316. Chustremant. “Curieux météore.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 39 (September 10, 1898): 356.]


1898 Sept. 4 / (oj) / (3) / Cosmos, NS, 39/356 / Cor. writes from Lille, Francesaw a red star like Marssteady like a planet but in the position of no known planet. He examined it through a telescope. It was a rectangular object, with a violet colored band on one side and the rest striped with black and red. First seen 8:35 p.m. At 8:45 it cast out sparks and disappeared, having been stationary all [indecipherable] time. / Stationary. [VIII; 317.1, 317.2. Chustremant. “Curieux météore.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 39 (September 10, 1898): 356.]


1898 Sept 4 / Object / Lille / New star? [VIII; 318. Chustremant. “Curieux météore.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 39 (September 10, 1898): 356.]


1898 Sept 5 / (hail) / Nodaway Co, Missouri / Hail with “a deep rumbling noise”. Chunks of ice. At one place a lane was closed for 2 weeks. At one point still some on Oct 27, 52 days after fell. / U.S.W.B. Rept. (Cal. Section, Nov, 1898). [VIII; 319. (U.S. Weather Bureau Report, Cal. Section, Nov, 1898.) “A Remarkable Hailstorm.” Monthly Review of the Iowa Weather and Crop Service, 10 (no. 1; January 1899): 6. Hackett, Arthur E. “Severe Hailstorm in Missouri.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (no. 9; September 1898): 409-410. “Pieces of ice had been picked up at the time of the storm of a cylindrical form of about four inches long by about two and a half in diameter.”]


1898 Sept 9 / repeats / Mag. storm and aurora / La Nat. 26/99, 275 / Jour. B.A. 9/28 / E Mec 68/115. [VIII; 320. “Académie des Sciences.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 2 (no. 1320; September 17): 255-256. Moureaux, Th. “L’Aurore Boréale et la Perturbation Magnétique du 9 Septembre 1898.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 2 (no. 1322; October 1): 275. Smart, David. "The Aurora of September 9." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 9 (1898-1899): 28. "Aurora." English Mechanic, 68 (no. 1747; September 16, 1898): 114-115.]


1898 Sept 9 / Central passage of enormous sunspot and sharp magnetic disturbance and aurora. / Observatory 21/387 / Knowledge 21/228 / Astrophys Jour 10/333 / 2 “21's” ac to Clerke, His Astro, p. 161. [VIII; 321. “A Magnetic Disturbance.” Observatory, 21 (1898): 387. Maunder, Edward Walter. “The Great Sunspot and the Aurora.” Knowledge, o.s., 21 (October 1, 1898): 228-229. Fénvi, J. “The Great Sun-Spot of September 1898.” Astrophysical Journal, 10 (1899): 333-336. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 4th ed., (1902), 161.]


1898 Sept 9 / Aurora described / Nature 58-490. [VIII; 322. “The Aurora of September 9.” Nature, 58 (September 15, 1898): 490-491.]


1898 Sept 9 / Aurora / Finland / Nature 58-569. [VIII; 323. Kaulbars, Nikolaj Reinhold Fredrik Vasiljevitj. “The Aurora Borealis of September 8.” Nature, 58 (October 13, 1898): 569.]


1898 Sept 9 / Great sunspots / E Mec 68 /sunspots / (+) / and aurora. [VIII; 324. Dierckx, Henry. "A Phenomenal Naked-Eye Sunspot." English Mechanic, 68 (no. 1747; September 16, 1898): 114. "The Great Sunspot." English Mechanic, 68 (no. 1747; September 16, 1898): 114. "Aurora." English Mechanic, 68 (no. 1747; September 16, 1898): 114-115. Bottone, S. "The Aurora, As Seen at Wallington at 9 P.M., Friday, Sept. 9, 1898." English Mechanic, 68 (no. 1748; September 23, 1898): 138. Smith, Charles F. "Aurora of September 9, 1898." English Mechanic, 68 (no. 1748; September 23, 1898): 138-139. Kempthorne, Philip Henry. "MeteorAurora." English Mechanic, 68 (no. 1748; September 23, 1898): 139. "Sunspots." English Mechanic, 68 (no. 1748; September 23, 1898): 139.]


1898 Sept 9 / Projection or “slight bulge” suspected” on terminator of Mars. Reported by Capt. Molesworth. / Mem B.A.A. 9/73. [VIII; 325. “Section for the Observation of Mars.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 9 (1901): 63-106, at 73.]


1898 Sept 9 / Sunspot Central / Great Aurora / See Nature, vol 58, 59. [VIII; 326. “A Large Sun-Spot.” Nature, 58 (September 8, 1898): 463. “The  Aurora of September 9.” Nature, 58 (September 15, 1898): 490-491. “The Large Sun-Spot.” Nature, 58 (October 6, 1898): 553. “The Large Sun-Spot.” Nature, 58 (October 27, 1898): 630. Purnell, Charles W. “The Aurora of September 9, 1898.” Nature, 59 (February 2, 1899): 320.]


1898 Sept 9 / Aurora and sunspot. Crossing center of sun. / CR 127/ aurora. [VIII; 327. Deslandres, H. “Observation d’une aurore boréale.” Comptes Rendus, 127 (1899): 407-408. “L'aurore a coïncidé avec le passage, au méridien central du Soleil, d'un fort amas de taches (une grosse et deux moyennes).” Violle, B. “Observation d’une aurore boréale à Gőttingen (Hanovre), le 9 septembre 1898.” Comptes Rendus, 127 (1898): 452-453. “M. V, Desjardins adresse quelues indications sur une aurore boréale....” Comptes Rendus, 127 (1898): 534.]


1898 Sept 10 / evening / Nature 59-320 / Canterbury, N. Zealand / Aurora in whole southern heavens. [VIII; 328. Purnell, Charles W. “The Aurora of September 9, 1898.” Nature, 59 (February 2, 1899): 320.]


1898 Sept 10 / Great aurora / N. Zealand / On 9th in north and great sunspot / Bull Soc Astro de F. 1899-279. [VIII; 329. “Aurore australe.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 13 (1899): 279.]


1898 Sept 10 / evening / Aurora in southern heavens / Canterbury, N. Zealand / Nature 59-320. [VIII; 330. Purnell, Charles W. “The Aurora of September 9, 1898.” Nature, 59 (February 2, 1899): 320.]


1898 Sept 10 / morning, ab 10 o'clock / Herne Bay, England / daylight aurora / Sci Gos, N.S., 5-253. [VIII; 331. Dennett, Frank C. "Daylight Aurora." Science Gossip, n.s., 5 (no. 56; January 1899): 253.]


1898 Sept 11 / Appearance like an oval white cloud, but translucent, in Capricornmoved some in ½ hour. / Science, N.S., 8-410. [VIII; 332. Newcomb, Simon. "An Unusual Aurora." Science, n.s., 8 (September 23, 1898): 410-411.]


1898 Sept 11 / W. Indies / most destructive hurricane / Nature 58-512. [VIII; 333. “Notes.” Nature, 58 (September 22, 1898): 512-515, at 512.]


1898 Sept 12 / Arizona / Yarnell, Ariz. / “A loud deep thundering noise was heard on Sept. 12th, during the day, between 12 and 1 o'clock. The noise proceeded from the Granite Range, this side of Prescott. From all accounts a large meteor struck the earth at this time. / U.S. Weather Bureau Rept (Ariz. Sec.), Sept., 1898. [VIII; 334.1, 334.2. "Notes from the September reports of the climate and crop sections." Monthly Weather Review, 26 (October 1898): 463-464. (U.S. Weather Bureau Rept (Ariz. Sec.), Sept., 1898.)]


1898 Sept 12 / Trib 16-1-3 / 19-1-1 / 25 (Sup) 10-1 / Vesuvius. [VIII; 335. "Eruption of Mount Vesuvius." New York Tribune, September 16, 1898, p. 1 c. 3. "Afraid of Vesuvius." New York Tribune, September 19, 1898, p. 1 c. 1. "Vesuvius Again Active." New York Tribune, September 25, 1898, Supplement, p. 10 c. 4 & p. 11 c. 1-3.]


1898 Sept 12 / “Minute white point “suspected” close to terminator of Mars. Reported by Capt. Molesworth. / Mem B.A.A. 9/73. [VIII; 336. “Section for the Observation of Mars.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 9 (1901): 63-106, at 73.]


1898 Sept. 15 / 9 p.m. / Haubourdin (Nord) / in direction du Cocher / Ball of light illuminated sky. / Cosmos, NS, 39/419. [VIII; 337. “Un bolide.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 39 (October 1, 1898): 419.]


1898 Sept 16 / [LT], 4-a / 19-4-a / 26-6-a / Vesuvius. [VIII; 338. “An Eruption of Vesuvius.” London Times, September 16, 1898, p. 4 c. 1. “The Eruption of Vesuvius.”London Times, September 19, 1898, p. 4 c. 1-2. “The Eruption of Vesuvius.”London Times, September 26, 1898, p. 6 c. 1.]


1898 Sept 16 / Eagle, 16-1 / S Dakota / q. [VIII; 339. "Earthquake in South Dakota." Brooklyn Eagle, September 16, 1898, p. 16 c. 1.]


1898 Sept 18 / Trib, 5-5 / Maine / q / Eagle18-4-3 / NY and Canada. [VIII; 340. "Earthquakes in Maine." Brooklyn Eagle, September 18, 1898, p. 4 c. 3.]


1898 Sept-Oct / Great Sunspot / Bull Soc Belge D'Astro 4-129 / ac. 4156. [VIII; 341. Fievez, Charles. "La Grande Taches Solaire de septembre-octobre 1898." Bulletin de la Société Belge d'Astronomie, 4 (1899): 129-134.]


1898 Sept 20 / (Nova) / See Aug 29. / A star in the Andromeda nebula announced by Seraphimoff of Poulkova. / Observatory 21-462 / Ac to Prof. Pickering, photographs taken on 20th and 21st failed to show it. But Dr Espin announced that on Nov. 10 he saw it closely following the nucleus. [VIII; 342. “In Wolsingham Circular, No. 48, Rev. T.E. Espin reports....” Observatory, 21 (1898): 462. See: 1898 Aug 29, (VIII; 312).]


1898 Sept 20 / By Seraphimoff at Kiel, change near the center of the nebula of Andromeda. / Nature 58-515 / Said be starp. 605. [VIII; 343. “The Nebula of Andromeda.” Nature, 58 (September 22, 1898): 515. “The Andromeda Nebulae.” Nature, 58 (October 20, 1898): 605-606.]


1898 Sept. 20 / New star-like near center Andromeda nebula. / E. Mec 68-371 / See Aug 29. [VIII; 344. Espin, Thomas Henry Espinelle Compton. "The Star in the Nucleus of the Andromeda Nebula...." English Mechanic, 68 (no. 1758; December 2, 1898): 370-371. See: 1898 Aug 29, (VIII; 312).]


1898 Sept 21 / At South Kensington Observatory nucleus of Andromeda seemed more elongated and star-like than usually. / Nature 58-515. [VIII; 345. “The Nebula of Andromeda.” Nature, 58 (September 22, 1898): 515.]


1898 Sept 24 / (+) / 5:30 p.m. / Oullons, near Lyons. / Sky turned yellowish. Air “absolument calme”. Ac to M. Lortet, he heard a hail of small bodies falling around him. He collected them and found them to be shells of a small crustacean identified by him as a fossil species. Said that some of these little “Ostracodes” are living to this day in the marshes of lower Egypt. Said that others now fossils very abundant in Egyptian desertsso supposed that these had been caught up in a whirlwind. Said that several times, notably July 24, 1862, sands of small organisms had fallen at O. / C.R. 127/1231. [VIII: 346.1, 346.2, 346.3. Lortet. "Chute de Crustacés ostracodes fossiles observée à Oullins, près de Lyon, le 24 septembre 1898." Comptes Rendus, 127 (1898): 1231-1232.]


[The following two notes were folded together by Fort. VIII: 347 to 348.]


1898 Sept 24 / Shells / Quillons / Al-Moghreb. (Tangier) / nothing / Egyptian Gazette / nothing (p. 33). [VIII; 347. ]


1898 Sept 24 / BO / No mention of whirlwind or anything else that could account for the phe, in the Egyptian Gazette. [VIII; 348.]


1898 Sept 28 / Reappearance of the enormous sunspot. / E Mec. 68/187, etc. [VIII; 349. Dierckx, Henry. "A Phenomenal Naked-Eye Sunspot." English Mechanic, 68 (no. 1747; September 16, 1898): 114.]


1898 Oct / A ghost or light in the Isle of Wight. / Observatory 21-424. [C; 382. “Sometimes on eclipse expeditions....” Observatory, 21 (1898): 424. “A Ghost at Shide.” Isle of Wight County Press and South of England Reporter, October 22, 1898, p. 5 c. 7.]


1898 Oct-Dec / Have Sun. [VIII; 350.]


1898 Oct 4 / 8 p.m. / Bursting meteor by J.D. Mathews. Not said where. / Pop Sci News 33-40. [VIII; 351. Mathews, J.D. “A Meteor.” Popular Science News, 33 (February 1899): 40.]


1898 Oct 4 / Great bolide / Calcutta / La Nat Sup, Dec 24, p 16. [VIII; 352. “Un bolide rare.” La Nature, 1899 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1335, supplement; December 24): 16.]


[1898 Oct 19 /] 1898 Oct. (?) / S / Obj sky / Ireland / (D-249). [VIII; 353. The note copies information from page 249 of The Book of the Damned. "Notes." Nature, 58 (October 27, 1898): 625-629, at 626. "The object was visible in the south-west, and looked like a three-quarter moon. It was moving gradually from south-east to north-west, and appeared to the observer to go down behind the Croghan Kinsella mountain. It was of a golden colour, and was seen for four or five minutes."]


1898 Oct 17 / Sun, 5-4 / Keyport, N.J. / Oct. 16 / A ghost, vaguely described as white, is said to be haunting Kearney St. [C; 383. "A Ghost in Keyport." New York Sun, October 17, 1898, p. 5 c. 5.]


1898 Oct 22 / Isle of Wight County Press of. / Ghost at Shide (I of W). Excitement there. Said been chased through meadows, but always vanished. Said that people of a more practical turn explained that “simply an appearance produced by a scientific apparatus, on which [some] practical jokers [in the neighbourhood] have been experimenting”. [C; 384.1, 384.2. “A Ghost at Shide.” Isle of Wight County Press and South of England Reporter, October 22, 1898, p. 5 c. 7.]


1898 [Oct 26] / R / Met. / [LT], Oct 26/4/c / Nov 15/10/c / 23/9/f / (obj meteor, Oct 26). [VIII; 354. “A Remarkable Meteor.” London Times, October 26, 1898, p. 4 c. 3. “The Meteor Showers.” London Times, November 15, 1898, p. 10 c. 3. “The Anticipated Meteor Displays.” London Times, November 23, 1898, p. 9 c. 6.]


1898 Oct 27 / [LT]. 4-c / Sunspots. [VIII; 355. “Sunspots.” London Times, October 27, 1898, p. 4 c. 3.]


1898 Oct 29 / Eagle, 3-2 / q / Cleveland, Ohio. [VIII; 356. (Brooklyn Eagle, October 29, 1898, p. 3 c. 2; not found here, cited here in Eagle’s index; correct year.)]


1898 Oct. 30 / Trib, (II)-1-4 / Cleveland, Ohio / q. [VIII; 357. “Slight Earthquake in Cleveland.” New York Tribune, October 30, 1898, s. 2 p. 1 c. 4.]


1898 Nov 6 / Fr / 2 luminous columns at Cantal / B. Soc Ast. de F, Feb., 1899. [VIII; 358. Marty, Pierre. “Phénomène lumineux.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 13 (1899): 92-93.]


1898 Nov. 7 / 5:15 p.m. / Great meteor. / Andover, N.J. / Trib 14-7-3. [VIII; 359. Clement, Elbert. "A Remarkable Meteor." New York Tribune, November 14, 1898, p. 7 c. 3-4.]


1898 Nov 7 / 5:20 p.m. / Det met / N. Pennsylvania / Bull S.A. de F., Feb, 1899. [VIII; 360. Ragot, Louis. “Explosion d’un bolide.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 13 (1899): 137-138.]


1898 Nov 10 / See Sept. 20. [VIII; 361. See: 1898 Sept 20, (VIII: 342 to 344).]


1898 Nov. 12 / Belfastno mets. 13th, six seen. / Nature 59-78. [VIII; 366. Denning, William Frederick. “The November Leonids of 1898.” Nature, 59 (November 24, 1898): 78.]


1898 Nov. 13 / See Nov 10. / New red variable in Perseus / E Mec 68/371. [VIII; 362. Espin, Thomas Henry Espinelle Compton. "The Star in the Nucleus of the Andromeda Nebula...." English Mechanic, 68 (no. 1758; December 2, 1898): 370-371.]


1898 Nov. 13 / Report of fall of metite / Perry, Okla / said be false / MWR '98-569. [VIII; 363. “Recent Meteors.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (no. 12; December 1898): 569.]


1898 Nov 13 and 14 / At the Cape Observatory, Dr. Gill had arranged 5 cameras, but no photographic effects obtained. And to the eye, meteors were not out of the ordinary. / Nature 59-279. [VIII; 369. “The Leonids of 1898.” Nature, 59 (January 19. 1899): 279.]


1898 Nov 14 / Faint comet photographed, by Dr. Chase, of Yale College Obs., near the Leonid rains “by a[n almost] fantastic coincidence”. / Clerke, Hist Astro/p. 338 / (Astroph. Jour 9/22). [VIII; 364. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 4th ed., (1902), 338. Elkin, William Lewis. “Photographic Observations of the Leonids at the Yale Observatory.” Astrophysical Journal, 9 (1899): 20-22, at 22.]


1898 Nov. 14 / ab. 11 p.m. / Great met / Michigan / M.W.R. '98-569. [VIII; 365. “Recent Meteors.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (no. 12; December 1898): 569.]


1898 Nov. 14 / morning / Observations in France from a balloon to overcome effects of cloudy weather. In 2 hours only 25 Leonids recorded. / At Lyons, weather clear, in 7 hours ab 165 seen. / Nature 59/107. [VIII; 367. “November Meteors.” Nature, 59 (December 1, 1898): 107.]


1898 Nov 14 / At Harvard College, 800 meteors recorded, but by 30 observers. / Nature 59-157. [VIII; 368. “November Meteors.” Nature, 59 (December 15, 1898): 157-158.]


1898 Nov. 14 / 10 p.m. / Met shower, Island of Jersey / Nature 59-62. [VIII; 370. “The Leonids.” Nature, 59 (November 17, 1898): 62.]


1898 Nov. 15 / Saline, Kansas / See 1829. / See Dec 2. / (4th to fall) / June 25, '90 / Sept 2, 1905 / 1896, Ap. 9. [VIII; 371. See: 1829 Aug 14, (I; 1493); 1898 Dec. 2, (VIII; 381); 1890 June 25, (VI: 2031 & 2032); 1896 Ap. 9, (VII; 1496); and, 1905 Sept 2, (IX: 21 & 24). The “1829” reference is simply to Farrington's list of meteorites. Farrington, Oliver Cummings. "Catalogue of the Meteorites of North America, to January 1, 1909." Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, 13 (1915): 1-513, at 17.]


1898 Nov 15 / [LT], 10-c / 23-9-f / Met Showers. [VIII; 372. “The Meteor Showers.” London Times, November 15, 1898, p. 10 c. 3. “The Anticipated Meteor Displays.” London Times, November 23, 1898, p. 9 c. 6.]


1898 March 11 / Eagle, 5-1 / Nov 16-3-2 / Mets. [VIII; 373. "Meteor at Northport." Brooklyn Eagle, March 11, 1898, p. 5 c. 1. "Shower of Flashing Meteors." Brooklyn Eagle, November 16, 1898, p. 3 c. 2.]


1898 Nov. 16 / Trib, 7-2 / Mets / 19 and 20. [VIII; 374. "The Mid-November Meteors." New York Tribune, November 16, 1898, p. 7 c. 4.]


1898 Nov. 16 / N.Y.T., 7-4 / Met. Shower. [VIII; 375. “Meteor Shower About Over.” New York Times, November 16, 1898, p. 7 c. 4.]


1898 Nov 21 / (D-61) / Cobwebasbestos / Montgomery, Alabama. ** [VIII; 376. The note copies information from page 61 of The Book of the Damned. "Floating Spider Webs." Monthly Weather Review, 26 (December 1898): 566-567.]


1898 Nov. 25 / 3:30 p.m. / q / preceded by roaring noise / Virginia. / Trib 26-1-5 / in North Car. at 3:05 and 3:10. [VIII; 377. "Earthquake Felt in the South." New York Tribune, November 26, 1898, p. 1 c. 5.]


1898 Nov. 27 / No Andromedids. [VIII; 378. (Refs.???)]


1898 Dec. 1 / Inf conjunction Venus-sun. [VIII; 379. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1898, 563.]


1898 Dec 1 / Trib, 7-4 / 3-5-5 / Volc Alaska. [VIII; 380. "Alaskan Volcano Reported." New York Tribune, December 1, 1898, p. 7 c. 4. "Working by Volcano Light." New York Tribune, December 3, 1898, p. 5 c. 5. The Atlin Volcanic Field is in British Columbia, Canada, (not in Alaska).]


1898 Dec. 2 / Trib, 2-2 / Sea. [C; 385. "Tragic Tales From Gay Head." New York Tribune, December 2, 1898, p. 2 c. 2.]


1898 Dec. 2 / evening / Metite / Randall, Kansas / report not confirmed / MWR '98-569. [VIII; 381. “Recent Meteors.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (no. 12; December 1898): 569.]


1898 / from Dec 3 to Jan 7 / See Aug 29. / Change in a star in Andromeda noted by Dr T. D Anderson. Ab 6/10th of a mag down in ab a month. / Nature 59/303. [VIII; 382. “New Variable Star in Andromeda.” Nature, 59 (January 26, 1899): 303. See: 1898 Aug 29, (VIII; 312).]


1898 Dec 7-8 / ab. midnight / Great detonating met in Ky. / Sun 11-6-2 / Seemed size of moon. [VIII; 383. "Unhorsed by a Meteor." New York Sun, December 11, 1898, s. 2 p. 6 c. 2.]


1898 Dec 8 / Eagle, 1-7 / Myst arson / See March 19, '99. [C; 386. "Trouble in California Town." Brooklyn Eagle, December 8, 1898, p. 1 c. 7. See: 1899 March 19, (C; 392).]


1898 Dec. 8 / Havre de Grace, Md. / Strange bird, goose-like, but spot of red feathers upon white breast, killed after a heavy gale. Following day, 2 others seen. / Sun 18-3-5. [VIII; 384. "Shot a Feathered What-Is-It." New York Sun, December 18, 1898, s. 3 p. 3 c. 5.]


1898 Dec 9 / [LT], 6-d / Sea Story. [C; 387. “A Story of the Sea.” London Times, December 9, 1898, p. 6 c. 4.]


1898 Dec 9-12 / Geminids unusually active / Sci Gos, N.S., 5-261. [VIII; 385. "The Geminids." Science Gossip, n.s., 5 (no. 57; February 1899): 261.]


1898 Dec 12 / London / Sky cleared for ½ hour, and 24 Geminids recorded, 4 of them brighter than 1st mag. stars. / Nature 59-157. [VIII; 386. “The Geminids.” Nature, 59 (December 15, 1898): 157.]


1898 Dec 18 / ab. 6:50 a.m. / Glen Garry q / See Sept 10, '94. / Jan 25, '94 / Dec 11, '93 / Jan 2, '93. [VIII; 387. See: 1893 Jan 2, (VII; 815); 1893 Dec. 11, (VII; 923); 1894 Jan 25, (VII; 951); and, 1894 Sept 18, (VII; 1129).]


1898 Dec 21 / 7:25 p.m. / Rio de Janeiro / Met from near Taurus visible more than a minute. / Fr. Ac. Sci, Jan 16, 1899see M. Vert. [VIII; 388. “M. Vert adresse une Note relative à un aérolithe....” Comptes Rendus, 128 (1899): 190.]


1898 Dec. 25 / Eva Roach of Montreal went into a sleep of 38 days. / See Dec. 24, 1899. [C; 388. See: 1899 Dec 24, (C; 438.1).]


1898 Dec 25 / 1:50 a.m. / France / great met / B. Soc Astro de F, Feb., 1899. [VIII; 389. “Le bolide du 25 décembre.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 13 (1899): 89-90.]


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

1898 Dec 29 / Eagle, 14-2 / H. House. [C; 389. "It Is Not Haunted." Brooklyn Eagle, December 29, 1898, p. 14 c. 2.]

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