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Last updated: March 28, 2018.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1881


1881:


1881 // Frankfort, Kansas / See May 5, 1888. [B; 344. See: (1888 May 5).]


1881 // Body of Mrs. W.I. Peters, Frankfort, Ind. / See Dec. 22, 1888. [B; 345. See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1881 // H.H. / N. 11th St., Philadelphia. / See Ap. 21, 1883. [B; 346. See: 1883 Ap. 21, (B; 495).]


1881 // Particulars of Alaskan auroras / Report of the International Polar Expedition / See Top Cat. / Arctic Expeditions, 1881-5, about. [V; 425. Ray, Patrick Henry. Report of the International Polar Expedition to Point Barrow, Alaska. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1885, 361-441, at 361-369.]


1881 Jan / May / July / Aug / Sept // "Longest and most dreadful seismic periods on record" at Luzon, Philippines / Ref, Feb, 1814. [V; 426. Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 18.]


1881 Jan 1 / S.H. / Insects appear. / Land and Water of / Plague of unknown insects in Italy. "They resemble ants with red bodies, which, as they mature, develop whitish wings and bodies. They have a pungent and disagreeable odor. [V; 427. (Land and Water, January 1, 1881.)]


1881 Jan 2 / [LT], 10-e / Aurora. [V; 428. (London Sunday Times, January 2, 1881, p. 10 c. 5.)]


1881 Jan 3 / [LT], 7-f / Wtchcraft, curious in Elbing. [B; 347. "Witchcraft." London Times, January 3, 1881, p. 7 c. 6. Elbing is now identified as Elblag, Poland.]


1881 Jan 4 / Hun / [LT], 7-f / q / Hungary. [V; 429. “The Earthquakes in Hungary.” London Times, January 4, 1881, p. 7 c. 6.]


1881 Jan 7 / Very bright and well-defined white spot on Jupiter, by Barnard, Nashville, Tenn. / Pubs Astro Soc Pacific 1/97. [V; 430. Barnard, Edward Emerson. "Observations of Jupiter with a 5-Inch Refractor during the Years 1879 to 1886." Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 1 (no. 5; November 30, 1889): 89-111, at 97.]


1881 Jan. 7 / The White Spot as seen by Barnard. Westward drift of about 8 degrees a day. At time so bright as to glisten like a star. Sometimes burying its head in the dusky matter of the belt, with a vast train like a comet's. See 1880-81. [V; 431. See: 1880 Aug 13, (V; 257); 1880 Sept 18, (V; 357); 1880 Oct 11, (V; 375); 1880 Nov 11-24, (V; 396); 1880 Nov. 24, (V; 400); 1881 July 10, (V: 558 & 559); and, 1881 Aug 2-Oct 3, (V; 593).]


1881 Jan 10 and 24 / 10 q, Tyrol / reported Agram—24th / Nature 23-297. [V; 432. "Notes." Nature, 23 (January 27, 1881): 296-298, at 297.]


1881 Jan 13 / 12 h. / Small light spot seen at foot of wall of crater Marius, by A.S. Williams / E Mec 32-494. [V; 433. Williams, Arthur Stanley. “Lunar Crater Marius.” English Mechanic, 32 (no. 827; January 28, 1881): 494-495.]


1881 / ab. middle of Jan / Wiener Neustadt / Meteoric stone that fell near telegraphic office. / Nature, 23/297 / See q., Sept, 1884. / Sc. Am 44/161. [V; 434. "Notes." Nature, 23 (January 27, 1881): 296-298, at 297. “A Meteoric Stone.” Scientific American, n.s., 44 (March 12, 1881): 161. Brezina, Aristides. Die Meteoritensammlung des K. K. Mineralogischen Hofkabinetes in Wien am 1. Mai 1885. Vienna: Alfred Hölder, 1885, 223-224. Brezina provides the date of the meteor as December 27, 1880, and identifies this object as “Eisenschlacke besass,” (iron slag).]


1881 Jan, middle, a few days before / near Vienna / of Agram, etc., series. / See Nov. 9, 1880. / BA '11 list, Agram, Feb 1, 25, 27. [V; 435. Milne, 729. See: 1880 Nov. 9, (V; 395), and, 1881 Jan 10 and 24, (V; 432).]


1881 Jan 19 / Hail / Geneva / C.R. 92-213. [V; 436. “Sur une chute de frésil à Genève, le 19 janvier.” Comptes Rendus, 92 (1881): 213-215.]


1881 Jan 20 / 9:45 p.m. / Bath, Me / q / loud report and rumbling sound / Trib., 23-12-2. [V; 437. “Earthquake Shock in Maine.” New York Tribune, January 23, 1881, p. 12 c. 2.]


1881 Jan 24 / fish / In a paper read by H.C. Russell, before the Roy Soc of N.S. Wales, Aug 3, 1898, quoting the Burrangong Argus, after heavy rainstorm a number of small fish found in the bush. [V; 438. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. “Water-Spouts on the Coast of New South Wales.” Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 32 (1898): 132-149, at 137. “Another instance : The Burrangong Argus reported that on January 24th, 1881, a number of small fish were found in the bush after a heavy rain storm. The creeks in the neighbourhood were all dry, and the only water-hole was much lower down, so that the fish could not have come from there, and they must have been deposited in the bush by the heavy rain, the storm having taken them out of some permanent water-hole.” (Burrangong Argus, ca. January 1881; microfilm.)]


1881 Jan 24 / Victoria, B.C.—It is reported that Mt. Baker (Washington) is in a state of active eruption and is throwing out clouds of smoke and ashes. The phe. is not visible from here." / Trib 25-1-3 / See back in Dec. [V; 439. “An American Volcano.” New York Tribune, January 25, 1881, p. 1 c. 3. See: 1880 Dec., (V; 407). The Baker volcano erupted from September 7 to November 27, 1880.]


1881 Jan 25 / [LT], 5-d / Feb 7-5-d / Mar 5-5-f / q / Agram. [V; 440. “Reported Fresh Earthquake at Agram.” London Times, January 25, 1881, p. 5 c. 4. “Miscellaneous Foreign News.” London Times, February 7, 1881, p. 5 c. 4. “Earthquake in Austria.” London Times, March 5, 1881, p. 5 c. 6.]


1881 Jan, middle, before / See July 30. [V; 441. See: 1881 July 30, (V; 587).]


1880-81 / Dec-Jan // Agram q's / Nature 23/530. [V; 442. “On the Earthquakes at Agram in 1880-81.” Nature, 23 (April 7, 1881): 530-531.]


1881 Jan 31 / Great aurora / [illustration] / France, Eng, Italy / La Nat 1881/1/209 / E Mec 32-516 / L.T., Feb. 1-10-6. [V; 443. “L'Aurore Boréale du 31 Janvier 1881.” La Nature, 1881 pt. 1 (no. 405; March 5): 209-210, (illustration). Gray, T.P. “Aurora at Bedford,” and, “Aurora Borealis.” English Mechanic, 32 (no. 828; February 4, 1881): 516. “The Aurora Borealis.” London Times, February 1, 1881, p. 10 c. 2. “The Weather.” London Times, February 1, 1881, p. 10 c. 4.]


1881 Feb 1 / Milky Sea / See Aug. 22, 1898. / Nature 58/496, 520 / Passenger on P. and O s.s. Sumatra on Feb 1, 1881, 14° N and 53° E—whole ocean looked as if covered with snow. Seemed have origin in a thin layer of mist. Water brought on deck "showed no signs of milkiness, though crowded as usual with various phosphorescent organisms.” [V; 444.1, 444.2. Barrett, James W. “A White Sea.” Nature, 58 (September 22, 1898): 496-497. Pidgeon, Dan. “A White, or Milky Sea.” Nature, 58 (September 29, 1898): 520-521. See: 1898 Aug 22, (VIII; 309).]


1881 Feb. 2, etc. / Polt / Montreal / Sun 3-3-5. [B; 348. "A Haunted House in Montreal." New York Sun, February 3, 1881, p. 3 c. 5.]


1881 Feb 2 / Polt / Nothing, Montreal Herald. [B; 349.]


1881 Feb 3 / 4:30 a.m. / Shocks along Hudson bet Poughkeepsie and Newburg, and in Pa. / N.Y. Times 5-4-7. [V; 445. “Shocks Along the Hudson.” New York Times, February 5, 1881, p. 4 c. 7.]


1881 Feb 3 / 4:30 a.m. / Ulster and Orange Counties—over the Penn border / q / Sun 5-1-4. [V; 446. “Earthquake in Orange and Ulster Counties.” New York Sun, February 5, 1881, p. 1 c. 4.]


1881 Feb 2 / 4 a.m. / Slight q, Boston / Feb 3, 4 a.m., loud rept, Plymouth/ Feb 4, loud report and q in New Hampshire / Am. J. Sci 3-23-258. [V; 447. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 11.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 23 (1882): 257-261, at 258.]


1881 Feb 7 / 10 p.m. / Brooklyn Gas explosion / piece of iron picked up / Sun 8-1-6. [B; 350. “Alarm Caused by an Explosion.” New York Sun, February 8, 1881, p. 1 c. 6.]


1881 Feb. 10 / Colder than ever known before in Guatemala / Ciel et Terre 2-200. [V; 449. “Gelée au Guatemala.” Ciel et Terre, 2 (1881-1882): 200.]


1881 Feb 11 / Myst murder of Lieut Percy L.O. Roper, Brompton barracks, Chatham. "As if by a revolver fired by a ghostly hand" ac to a writer in Lloyds W. News, 1907, Nov. 24-21-1. [B; 351. (Lloyds Weekly News, November 24, 1907, p. 21 c. 1; not at BNA.)]


[1881 Feb 15]/ Myst disap / in 1877 / Sun, 1881, Feb 15-3-3 // but of a bankrupt // another case / 16-1-2. [B; 352. “Recalling a Mysterious Disappearance.” New York Sun, February 15, 1881, p. 3 c. 3. “Mysterious Disappearance.” New York Sun, February 16, 1881, p. 1 c. 2.]


1881 / middle of Feb // Azores / great q / [BA] 11. [V; 448. Milne, 729.]


1881 Feb. 17 / Enormous protuberance on sun / R—Sept 26, '79. [V; 450. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 215-223, at 221-222, (figure 65).]


1881 Feb 20 / Trib, 9-3 / q. / Switzerland. [V; 451. “Earthquakes in Switzerland.” New York Tribune, February 20, 1881, p. 9 c. 3. The earthquakes occurred on January 27 and 28, 1881.]


1881 / ab. Feb 24 // Shock in Montgomery, N.Y. / See March 18. [V; 452. See: 1881 March 18, (V; 458).]


1881 Feb. 23 / Saturn, Venus. Jupiter close together / E Mec 45/32 / On 25th they were points in triangle about equilateral. [V; 453. Markwick, Ernest Elliott. "Planetary Configurations." English Mechanic, 45 (no. 1146; March 11, 1887): 32-33, at 32.]


1881 Feb. 26 / 10:55 p.m. / Augusta, Me / q. / Am J. Sci 3/23/258. [V; 454. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 11.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 23 (1882): 257-261, at 258.]


1881 Feb 26-March 12 / q's in Europe, as listed by Prof orel / Malta Standard, Ap. 30 // Feb 26—3:55 a.m.—Agram / 27—5:30 a.m.—Agram / 28—2:20 a.m.—Austria / March 3—3:35 a.m.—Switzerland / March 4—1:30 p.m.—Ischia / March 7—3 a.m.—Switzerland. [V; 455. (Malta Standard, April 30, 1881.)]


1881 Feb 28 / Toulon / trombe / La Nat 1881/1/257. [V; 456. Zurcher, Frédéric. “Trombe Observées à Toulon le 28 Février 1884.” La Nature, 1881 pt. 1 (no. 408; March 26): 257.]


1881 March 14 / M Notices 41/444 / Met—Rail / Yorkshire / L'Astro 1882/30 / (F) / Observatory 4/155. [V; 457. Fletcher, 105. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. “Fall of a Meteorite on March 14, 1881.” Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 41 (July 14, 1881): 444. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. “Chute d'un uranolithe en Angleterre.” Astronomie, 1 (1882): 30. “Fall of a Meteorite.” Observatory, 4 (1881): 155. “Fall of a Meteorite near Middlesbrough.” Middlesbrough Daily Gazette, March 30, 1881, p. 3 c. 5-6. This is the Middlesbrough meteorite.]


1881 March 18 / 9:30 p.m. / Schnectady / q and rumbling sounds / See Feb. 24. / NY Times 24-4-7. [V; 458. “General Notes.” New York Times, March 24, 1881, p. 4 c. 7. See: 1881 / ab. Feb 24, (V; 452).]


1881 March 23 / Large group of sunspots / E Mec 33/88. [V; 459. “A Large Sunspot.” English Mechanic, 33 (no. 836; April 1, 1881): 88.]


1881 / ab March 24 // Trance / Religio-Phil. Jour, Ap. 30-4-2 / Ab. March 24, a stranger, thought to be a German, aged about 46, arrived at the village inn of Fogelsville, Pa. He took a seat and for 5 weeks had been in a trance, doctors unable to arouse him. [B; 353. "Trance." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 30 (no. 9; April 30, 1881): 4, (c. 2).]


1881 March 26 / Sun pillar / Hertford / Times, March 13, 1902. [V; 466. “The Solar Phenomeon.” London Times, March 13, 1902, p. 15 c. 1.]


1881 March 26-27 / Sydney Morning Herald / nothing. [V; 460.]


1881 March 27 / At Catania, Sicily, a shower of meteoric dust yellowish-red / LT, Ap 6-7-3. [V; 461. “Miscellaneous Foreign News.” London Times, April 6, 1881, p. 7 c. 3.]


1881 March 26, 27 / Catania / rain of meteoric dust / See Fassig. / Boll. Mens. Oss. Carlo Alb., Torino 1/71 / See March 29, 1880. See April, 1881. / See Oct 14, 1885. [V; 462. Fassig, Oliver Lanard, ed. Bibliography of Meteorology. Part II: Moisture. Washington: Signal Office, 1889, 391. (Silvestri, Orazio. "Pioggia di polvere meteorica osservata il 26-27 Marzo 1881 a Catania." Bollettino Mensuale pubblicato per cura dell' Osservatorio Centrale del Real Collegio Carlo Alberto in Moncalieri, s. 2 v. 1 (1880-1881): 71-72; not online.) See: 1880 March 29, (V: 135 to 138); 1881 Ap, (V; 467); and, (1885 Oct 14).]


1881 March 27 / In the Malta Standard, it is said that the sand that had been considered in Sicily, as meteoric, by Prof Silvestri had fallen all day of the 27th in Malta—it was a reddish-yellow powder. [V; 463. (Malta Standard, ca. March 27, 1881.)]


1881 March 29 / Sun, 1-4 / Spon Comb. / no outcry. [B; 354. “Mysterious Tragedy.” New York Sun, March 29, 1881, p. 1 c. 4.]


1881 March 30 / Constantinople Messenger of / Not far from Barcelona, the village of Puigcercos. Ab a month before, ground in fields subsided. Then a chasm 12 yards wide opened and out of that, day after day came a violent wind. [V; 464. (Constantinople Messenger, March 30, 1881.)  Vidal, Luis M. "Nota Acerca de los Hundimientos Ocurridos en la Cuenca de Tremp (Lérida) en Enero de 1881." Boletin de la Comisión del Mapa Geológico de España, 8 (1881): 113-129. "En la noche del 13 de Enero último despertó sobresaltada á la población un fuerte estruendo, acompañado de una violenta sacudida del suelo, que estremeció los edificios, cuarteó muchas paredes y trajo á la mente de los atribulados vecinos la idea de una acción volcánica, idea que por lo demás no estaba enteramente fuera de lu gar, puesto que se babia esparcido por la atmósfera un pronunciado olor sulfuroso." Vidal, Luis M. "El Hundimiento de Puigcercos en 13 de Enero de 1881." Boletin de la Comisión del Mapa Geológico de España, 8 (1881): 349-355. The massive landslide, (about 5 million cubic meters), at Puigcercos, on January 13, 1881, resulted in the relocation of the village and, now, displays a rock scar about 25 meters in height and 150 meters in width.]


1881 April / Dust / Catania / [LT], 1881, Ap. 6/7/c. [V; 465. “Miscellaneous Foreign News.” London Times, April 6, 1881, p. 7 c. 3.]


1881 Ap / Met. dust. / See Feb 24, 1879. / See Ap. 15, 1880. [V; 467. See: 1879 Feb 24, (IV; 2549), and, 1880 Ap. 15, (V: 169 & 170).]


1881 Ap. 5 / q in Chio[s] / N.Y.T., 1-7 / 14-8-5 / 18-2-4 / 17-14-3 / 19-8-2 / 20-8-3 / 22-8-3 / 23-8-4 / 26-8-4 / 30-8-4 / May 8-5-3. [V; 468. “An Earthquake at Chio.” New York Times, April 5, 1881, p. 1 c. 7. “The Destruction of Chio.” New York Times, April 14, 1881, p. 2 c. 2-3. “Aid for the Chio Sufferers.” New York Times, April 22, 1881, p. 8 c. 3. “The Earthquake at Chio.” New York Times, April 25, 1881, p. 5 c. 4. (New York Times: 1881 April: 18-2-4 / 17-14-3 / 19-8-2 / 20-8-3 / 23-8-4 / 26-8-4 / 30-8-4 / May 8-5-3.)]


1881 Ap. 10 / NY Times, 6-6 / Meteor in Wisconsin / See May 21-2-2. [V; 469. “Notable Meteor Seen in Wisconsin.” New York Times, April 10, 1881, p. 6 c. 6. See: 1881 May 21, (V; 502).]


1881 Ap 2, etc. / See May 20-21. / 1:30 p.m. / LT 9-7-a—the first shock and falling houses at Chio—again afternoon and night / detonations and shocks / "explosion-like sound" / 30,000 persons without shelter. / Up to 8th, continuing. / Then violent on 11th. / And, 12th, said that 45 villages been destroyed—The ground subsided. / Another heavy shock on 19th—gale and rain—21-5-e. [V; 470.1, 470.2. “The Earthquake at Chio.” London Times, April 9, 1881, p. 7 c. 1. “The Earthquake at Chio.” London Times, April 21, 1881, p. 5 c. 5.]


1881 Ap. 3 / Morning before the shock at Chio, thick mist and dark blotches of clouds in sky and flashes, but inhabitants thought th. storm coming. At 1:50 p.m., the shock. / Trans. Seis. Soc. Japan 11-96. [V; 471. Milne, John. "Earthquake Effects, Emotional and Moral." Seismological Journal of Japan, 11 (1887): 91-113, at 96. "The morning dawned dull and heavy. The heavens were hidden by thick mist, clotted here and there with dark blotches of cloud. The temperature was heavy and oppressive, and the horizon was broken by broad flashes of light that seemed to denote a coming storm. In all this atmospheric disturbance, however, the inhabitants saw nothing extraordinary, and were far from being alarmed by what they fancied would result in a thunderstorm."]


1881 Ap. 3 / Asia Minor / great q / 4,000 lost / [BA] '11. [V; 472. Milne, 729.]


1881 Ap. 3 / BO / 1:30 p.m. / Constantinople Messenger of 6th / Violent q's / Chio / of the 13th—q violently renewed on night of 11-12 / Description in Messenger of 13th—heavens hidden in a thick mist, clotted with dark clouds in blotches—broad flashes of lightning on horizon—before the q.—avalanches down the hillsides—villages looked like disused stone quarries, no trace of construction in the piles. Other towns robbed of their minarets. [V; 473.1, 473.2. (Constantinople Messenger, April 6, 1881.)]


1881 Ap. 10 / q and flashes / Great q / Chio / and flashes in the sky / Ponton, Earthquakes, p. 171. [V; 474. (Ponton, Mungo. Earthquakes and Volcanoes. Revised ed. London: T. Nelson, 1885. 171; not online.)]


1881 Ap. 11 / Myst, murder(?) of Mrs Reville at Slough, Buckinghamshire. / Logan, Guilty or not Guilty?, p. 169 / SLN. [B; 355. Logan, Guy B.H. Guilty or Not Guilty? London: Stanley Paul, 1928, 166-180. “SLN” is the call number for this book at the New York Public Library.]


1881 Ap. 12  morning / Ferruginous sand / Catania / L'Annee Sci 25-55. [V; 475. “Pluie de Sable en Sicile." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 25 (1881): 55-56.]


1881 Ap 19-28 / Lurgan / Great swarm of flies / Sci Gos 1881-262. [V; 476. “Insect Swarms.” Science Gossip, 17 (no. 203; November 1881): 262.]


1881 Ap. 20 / Smyrna / severe q. / followed by a hurricane / Constantinople Messenger, Ap 27, p. 805. [V; 477. (Constantinople Messenger, April 27, 1881, p. 805.)]


1881 April 12 / Jagged pieces of ice resembling broken river ice—4 to 6 inches wide and 2 to 2½ wide fell after a "violent tornado" in Arkansas, 12th April, 1881. / MWR '81-13 / Ap. 18. [V; 478. “Winds.” Monthly Weather Review, 9 (no. 4; April 1881): 12-13.]


1881 Ap. 21 / 11:30 a.m. / Port Jefferson, N.Y. / heavy shock and rumbling noise / Am J. Sci 3-23-259. [V; 479. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 11.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 23 (1882): 257-261, at 259.]


1881 Ap. 23 / N.Y. Times, 2-7 / Dark day of Canada, 1819, described / (noted). [V; 480. “The Dark Day in Canada.” New York Times, April 23, 1881, p. 2 c. 7. See: 1819 Nov. 8, etc., (I; 755).]


1881 Ap 22 / Conj / Saturn and Jupiter / Others are Oct 15, 1861 / Jan 26, 1842 / Observatory 24/158. [V; 481. Johnson, Samuel Jenkins. "Planetary Conjunctions." Observatory, 24 (1901): 156-158, at 158.)]


1881 Ap 24 / NY Times, 5-6 / Meteor explodes twice. [V; 482. “A Meteor Explodes Twice.” New York Times, April 24, 1881, p. 5 c. 6.]


1881 Ap. 28 / Shock / Sicily and Calabria / Nature 24-17 / Ap. 26 / 4:55 p.m. / n to s / in Carniola / p. 65. [V; 483. “Notes.” Nature, 24 (May 5, 1881): 15-18, at 17. “Notes.” Nature, 24 (May 19, 1881): 63-65, at 65.]


1881 May, ab. / Phe began in Grimsby. / See March 13, 1882. [B; 356. See: 1882 March 13, (B; 397).]


1881 May, about / Polt begin at Grimsby. / See March 13, 1882. [B; 357. See: 1882 March 13, (B; 397).]


1881 May-Aug 15 / NY World, May to Sept (Inc) bound together. [V; 484.]


1881 May / qs / Philippines / See Jan. [V; 485. See: 1881 Jan / May / July / Aug / Sept, (V; 426). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 18.]


1881 May / Ac to Birt / (Astro Reg, 19/123) / 10 of the spots watched in the first series were missing. / Plato / (Cut). [V; 486. Birt, William Radcliffe. “Lunar Work for May.” Astronomical Register, 19 (May 1881): 123.]


[1881 May 2. Wrong date. See: 1881 May 22, (V; 487).]


1881 May 2 / Inf conjunction Venus-Sun. [V; 488.]


1881 May 4 / Light seen in Eudoxus, by Trouvelot, of Ob. of Meudon / L'Astro 1885-213. [V; 489. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Murs Énigmatiques Observés à  la Surface de la Lune." Astronomie, 4 (1885): 212-216, at 213.]


1881 May 9 / moon / 9 h. 30 m / A.S. Williams, West Brighton. / Mare Crisium "covered with a close network of innumerable streaks, and spotted with countless numbers of light specks... I have never seen anything like the number of spots and streaks.” / See back ab. 50 years. / Astro Reg 20-166. [V; 490.1, 490.2. Williams, Arthur Stanley. "Mare Crisium." Astronomical Register, 20 (July 1882): 165-166. See: 1832 July 4, (I; 1705).]


1881 May 10 and 11 / "Remarkable obscuration" in north-west part of Plato / by A S. Williams / Astro Reg, 19-181. [V; 491. Birt, William Radcliffe. “Lunar Work for July, 1881.” Astronomical Register, 19 (July 1881): 180-181.]


1881 May 11 / Supposed new streak of light on floor of Plato, by Williams / Astro Reg 19-180. [V; 492. Birt, William Radcliffe. “Lunar Work for July, 1881.” Astronomical Register, 19 (July 1881): 180-181.]


1881 May / Comet of Sept 20, 1881, makes for Beta Aurigae. [V; 493. See: 1881 Sept 20, (V; 716).]


1881 May 11 / German war schooner Nautilus, from Tahiti to Sydney / Toronto (Ont.) Mail, Sept 9-10-3 / Black clouds and a storm of lightning—thunder deafening. Afternoon but intense darkness. Bolts of lightning striking all around the vessel. [V; 494. (Toronto Mail, September 10, 1881 p. 10 c. 3; Queen's Microfilm AN5.6.T67 D34.) "An Extraordinary Storm." Sydney Morning Herald, July 1, 1881, p. 7 c. 6. "The German war schooner Nautilus, from Tahiti, reports having experienced a very tempestuous voyage. During the passage the vessel fell in with an extraordinary atmospheric disturbance. On May 11 the whole heavens, in the afternoon of that day, appeared enveloped in black, inky clouds, making it so dark that they could scarcely see the length of the ship. The thunder became almost deafening and the lightning ncarly blinding. Those on board expected each moment to be struck by a bolt, as the lightning was striking the water all round the veseel, which made a grand and most singular sight. The continuous streaks of fork lightning gave the vessel the appearance of being in flames in a dozen different places at once. In several instances bolts struck the water within a radius of twenty to forty yards of the vessel. During the storm very little rain fell, and the sea was almost calm. This terrible battle of the elements is said to have been a magnificent sight, but was not enjoyed by any one on board. It was so uncommon a phenomenon that the crew were nearly frightened to death."]


1881 May 14 / Religio-Phil Jour, 4-4 / Ghost / Auburn, N.Y. [B; 358. "An Auburn Ghost." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 30 (no. 11; May 14, 1881): 4, (c. 4).]


1881 May 18  Saturn, Venus and Jupiter again / like Feb 25 / See Feb. 23. [V; 495. See: 1881 Feb. 23, (V; 453).]  


1881 May 18 / 12:20 a.m. and bet 3 and 4 a.m. / Contoocook, NH / qs / Am J. Sci 3/23/259. [V; 496. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 11.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 23 (1882): 257-261, at 259.]


1881 May 19 / Sun, 3-3 / Myst Animal, Florida[, New York]. [B; 359. “A Mysterious Beast.” New York Sun, May 19, 1881, p. 3 c. 3.]


[1881 May 19] / Myst disap Editor Barron / Sun, 1881, May 19-3-4. [B; 360. “Editor Barron's Strange Disappearance.” New York Sun, May 19, 1881, p. 3 c. 4.]


1881 May 20-21 / Another strong shock / Chio / LT, 23-7-f. [V; 497. “Earthquake at Chio.” London Times, May 23, 1881, p. 7 c. 6.]


1881 May 22 / Another new star by Birmingham / May 12, 1866. [V; 498. See: 1866 May 12, (III: 846,  847, and 849).]


1881 May 22 / ab 3 degrees north of Alpha Cygni, a crimson star not in the Bonn Catalog, found by John Birmingham. / Nature 24/164 / 9th mag / increased to 8th on June 6 / then decreased—p. 285. [V; 499. Birmingham, John. “New Red Variable.” Nature, 24 (July 28, 1881): 285.]


1881 May / New comet in Andromeda. [V; 500. Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 May 22 / Sydney Morning Herald / John Tebbutt writes that the comet was discovered by him night of 22nd between Columba and Eridanus. He points out how remarkable that time differed by only nine days and this comet only 15 degrees east of comet of 1861 when it was discovered. / was quite conspicuous to naked eye / rose ab 2 hours before the sun / Herald, 13th Jun, Charles Todd, Govt Astronomer of South Australia, gives his opinion.—"I think it most probable that it is a return visit of the fine comet of 1861, and is possibly identical with the comet (No.  2) of 1819." / (ver) / Says that even though to the comet of 1861 a period of 419 years had been assigned, he thinks "little doubt can exist as to their identity". / No more found in Herald. /// 20 / 23. [V; 501.1, 501.2, 501.3, 501.4. “The Comet.”  Sydney Morning Herald, May 26, 1881, p. 5 c. 6. “Mr. Charles Todd, Government astronomer....” Sydney Morning Herald, June 13, 1881, p. 5 c. 3-4. Comets C/1861 J1 and C/1881 K1.]


[1881 May 22 /] June 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 / July 1, 9 // New Comet // Trib  [V; 487. “The New Comet.” New York Tribune, June 27, 1881, p. 4 c. 3-4. “Comets' Tails.” New York Tribune, July 8, 1881, p. 4 c. 6. “The Comet of 1881.” New York Tribune, July 9, 1881, p. 5 c. 3. “The Spectrum of the Comet.” New York Tribune, July 10, 1881, p. 7 c. 2. “Results of Watching the Comet.” New York Tribune, July 13, 1881, p. 2 c. 2. Wright, Arthur Williams. “The Comet's Light Polarized.” New York Tribune, July 18, 1881, p. 2 c. 3-4. “Schæeberle's Comet.” New York Tribune, July 26, 1881, p. 5 c. 2. “The Second Comet of 1881.” New York Tribune, July 31, 1881, p. 9 c. 3. Comets C/1881 K1 and C/1881 N1.]  


1881 May / The comet / Orbit very like that of 1807, but for that the astronomers had given a period of 1700 years. / Nature 24-198. [V; 502. “The Comet.” Nature, 24 (June 30, 1881): 197-201, at 198. “Prof. Newcomb said that as all the observations made on the comet of 1807 showed it to have a period of nearly 1700 years, it seems out of the question that under any circumstances the same comet could have returned in so short a time as seventy-four years, unless it has passed in the vicinity of some larger planets, which it could not have done. From Dr. Gould's telegram it may be inferred that the comet was very near the orbit of that of 1807 when he observed it. Prof Newcomb is inclined to think that it is a case of two comets moving in nearly the same orbit, rather than the return of the same comet.” Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 May 21 / N.Y. T., 2-2 / Traces of terrestrial life on meteorites. [V; 502. “Life in Other Worlds.” New York Times, May 21, 1881, p. 2 c. 2. “Two interesting problems which have long perplexed the scientific world....” London Daily Telegraph and Courier, May 4, 1881, p. 5 c. 5.]


[1881 May 22] / Myst death of a spiritualist / 1881, Sun, May 22-1-2. [B; 361. “Dr. Fishbough's Singular Death.” New York Sun, May 22, 1881, p. 1 c. 2.]


1881 May 25 / Sun, 3-4 / Boy transported? [B; 362. (New York Sun, May 25, 1881, p. 3 c. 4; not found here.)]


1881 May 26 / (night) / Shock / La Salle, Ill. / southwestern part of town. Small fissures in ground. / World, 28-1-3. [V; 504. (New York World, May 28, 1881, p. 1 c. 3.)]


1881 May 28 / 9:50 p.m. / Cheltenham / large met / E Mec 33/306. [V; 505. Hume-Rothery, J.H. “Very Bright Meteor.” English Mechanic, 33 (no. 845; June 3, 1881): 306.]


1881 May 28 / Sun Australia / Very large spot first appears upon the sun. / H.C. Russell, Govt Astronomer. / Sydney M. Herald, June 1. [V; 506. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. “Curious Astronomical Discovery.” Sydney Morning Herald, June 1, 1881, p. 5 c. 4.]


1881 May 28 / Periwinkles and Crabs of Worcester / "See." [V; 507. “Severe Thunderstorm.” Worcestershire Chronicle, June 4, 1881, p. 3 c. 6. “The most extraordinary occurrence to be mentioned in connection with the storm, is the fall of a shower periwinkles on the Comer Gardens-road and land adjoining! The rumour prevailing in the city on Saturday was generally sneered at as an invention, but from inquiries made on the spot there can be no doubt of the fact. Shortly after four o'clock Mr. Ranford, who keeps the Gardener's Arms, Comer Gardens, was walking alone the road between the residence of the Misses Binyon and his house, when, to his astonishment, he saw amongst the mud and water what appeared to be periwinkles. A closer investigation revealed the fact that these shell fish were really lying about in considerable quantities. Mr. Ranyard picked up about half-n-peck of the little strangers "all alive, oh!" and many of his neighbours also collected large numbers; Mrs. Stanton who lives in the neighbourhood, finding a small crab as well. The news soon spread, and in the evening hundreds of people were in the road picking up periwinkles brought to Worcester probably for the first time, by cloud instead of by rail or road. The scene of this remarkable fall was visited on Sunday by a great many people, who diligently searched for some of the shell-fish to keep as evidences of the wonderful phenomenon. The area over which the periwinkles were found extended for a considerable distance, but the fall was greater on the west side of the road, the direction from which the storm came. Several the shell fish can be seen in the shop window of Mr. Allies, St. Nicholas-street. There is only one explanation of how they came where they were found, namely, that they had been taken up by a waterspout, very likely at the Mumbles, in the Bristol Channel, some 80 miles away, and carried along in the cloud of water until it burst in the midst of the thunderstorm.”]


1881 May 28 / BO / Periwinkles. / Nothing of waterspout in Symons. [V; 508.]


1881 May 28 / Periwinkles / [Letter from G.C. Boroughs, September 28/26]. [V; 509. (Pabst: See file.)]


1881 May 31 / N.Y. Times, 4-5 / Cobra killed on Long Island. [B; 363. “Our Cobra.” New York Times, May 31, 1881, p. 4 c. 5.]


1881 / last of May / Periwinkles of Worcester. [B; 364. See: 1881 May 28, (V; 507).]


1881 / ab. June 1 // BO / Periwinkles / Land and Water, June 4th—That near Worcester had fallen tons of periwinkles covering fields and roads for about a mile. Crabs were with them. People came with baskets and carried them to Worcester. It was in a tremendous th. storm. Issue of June 11, specimens forwarded to L and W. and identified as periwinkles. The editor notes the fall of living things but the absence of other shells, sand and seaweed. [V; 510.1, 510.2. (Land and Water, June 4, 1881.)]


18881 May 28 / (Periwinkles) / In Worcester Evening Post, May 30. / In th. storm at 3 p.m. Said news reached Worcester of a wonderful fall of periwinkles on Cromer Gardens road and adjoining land. Some people of Worcester investigated and returned with periwinkles and some were exhibited in a shop window. The next day many people with baskets went to the place and found a considerable area covered. The finding by someone of one small crab is mentioned. / Periwinkles all alive. [V; 511.1, 511.2. (Worcester Evening Post, May 30, 1881; not at BNA.)]


[1881] // In Worcester Ev. Post, June 13, cor who signs self W.E. Tucker writes that Mr. Philip Baldwin, a friend of his, had driven over thr road two hours before the storm and had seen the periwinkles on the road—says that all the stories of prodigious numbers nonsense; argues that if had fallen been sand and seaweeds. As for great bulk: had heard of someone who had a prodigious quantity; found he had only nine. / Bozward, in Post of 16th, calls upon his opponents to reveal where the shells came from, because had been no live ones in W for a week, and only several bushels of cooked ones. / End the cor. in Post. / Mention in all the correspondence only once of pebbles falling. / Only one alleged witness of the fall. [V; 512.1, 512.2, 512.3, 512.4. (Worcester Evening Post, June 13, 1881; not at BNA.) (Worcester Evening Post, June 16, 1881; not at BNA.)]


1881 May 28 / Periwinkles / [handwritten] / W. Daily Times, May 30. [V; 513. (Pabst: See File.) (Worcester Daily Times, May 30, 1881; not at BNA.)]


1881 May 30 and morning 31 / 3 great swarms of dragon-flies fr[om] 5 to 10 miles wide, in Germany. / See Aug 12. / Sci Amer 45/119. [V; 514. “Remarkable Swarms of Dragon Flies.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (August 20, 1881): 119. See: 1881 Aug 12, (V: 599 & 600).]


1881 (May 30) / (30) // Kamenz, Germany / Enormous swarms of dragon-flies—in dense masses, from five to ten miles in breadth. Occupied 2 hours. / Evening, another swarm. / 31st, another in the morning. / Seen at Dresden, too. / Sci Amer 45/119. [V; 515. “Remarkable Swarms of Dragon Flies.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (August 20, 1881): 119.]


1881 June 1 / Sun, 2-6 / Remarkable sunspots. [V; 516. “Sun Spots.” New York Sun, June 1, 1881, p. 2 c. 6.]


1881 June 2 / [LT], 11-b / 3-8-a / Myst. disap. [B; 365. "A Mysterious Disappearance." London Times, June 2, 1881, p. 11 c. 2. Scott, Thomas. "The Mysterious Disappearance of a Girl at West Ham." London Times, June 3, 1881, p. 8 c. 1.]


1881 June 4 / Religio Phil Jour, 2-3 / Ghost / home of Wesley Smith, Camden, N.J. [B; 366. "South Camden Excited Over a Mysterious Apparition." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 30 (no. 14; June 4, 1881): 2 (c. 3-4).]


1881 June 6 / Ice in hailstorm / Deadwood, Dakota / MWR, June, 1881, p. 17. [V; 517. "Winds." Monthly Weather Review, 9 (no. 6; June 1881): 16-17, at 17. "Deadwood, Dakota, 6th, during the afternoon hail stones, size of hen's eggs, fell for over two hours; one stone was reported to have measured twenty-one inches in circumference."]


1881 June 8th / At Cape Observatory comet predicted to be near Beta Aurigae on 27th. / LT 9-7-f. [V; 518. “Discovery of a Comet.” London Times, June 9, 1881, p. 7 c. 6.]


1881 June 8 / Like blood / In Amer Naturalist, 15-736, cor writes that he had received from C.L. Garretson, of Salem, Iowa, a small vial containing a composition of living creatures, looking like blood that had covered the ground after a heavy rainfall. Cor writes that he examined the specimen of rain water, and found it swarming with "Cyclops quadricornis, or what I took to be that species". Their bodies were full of bright red corpuscles, which gave them their blood-like appearance. He looked at other specimens of C. quad. and found each to contain a few red corpuscles, not a hundredth. / In the half a teaspoonful sent to him there were ab. 500 of the C. quad. His the everlasting problem—What aggravated them? He thinks may have fallen in water that drained and left them. [V; 519.1 to 519.4.  Beal, Foster Ellenborough Lascelles. "A Shower of Cyclops Quadricornis." American Naturalist, 15 (no. 9; September 1881): 736-737. Cyclops Quadricornis is a freshwater copepod, also known as water fleas.]


1881 June 9 / 10 p.m. / Solomon Valley, Kansas / small pebbles in hailstones larger than walnuts / Sun 11-1-6. [V; 520. "A Cyclone in Kansas." New York Sun, June 11, 1881, p. 1 c. 6. "Hailstones came down very thickly, and some of them were larger than walnuts, and contained in the centre small pebbles."]


1881 June 9-12 / Storm / Kansas / Review 5-158. [V; 521. "A Remarkable Spell of Weather—June 9th to 12th, 1881." Kansas City Review of Science and Industry, 5 (no. 3; July, 1881): 158-169.]


1881 June 8 / June 10 // Obj near a comet. / See Nature. [V; 522. “Our Astronomical Column.” Nature, 24 (August 11, 1881): 342. See: 1881 June 11, (V; 525). Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 June 10 and 12 / (Cut) / Australia / immense body near comet / M Notices 42/106. [V; 523. Bone, William. “On an Object seen near Comet b, 1881, on June 10, 1881.” Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 42 (January 1882): 105-106. “On more careful inspection I found it was somewhat discoid, but its light, although bright, was diffused and hazy. It moved through 6' of arc in 34m 34s of time, in a northerly direction.” Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 June 10 / qs / Asia Minor and Formosa / BA '11 / Sims / See Feb 18, 1889. [V; 524. Milne, 729. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1881 June 11 / (Ch) / Unidentified object / Cordoba / Observatory 5/18, 229, 363. [V; 525. Tebbutt, John. “Dr. Gould's Observation (June 11th) of Comet b 1881 (Astr. Nachr. No. 2384).” Observatory, 5 (1882): 18-20. Gould, Benjamin Apthorp. “Dr. Gould's Observation (June 11th) of Comet b 1881.” Observatory, 5 (1882): 229-231. Tebbutt, John. “Dr. Gould's Observation of Comet 1881, III, on June 11 (Astr. Nachr. No. 2384.” Observatory, 5 (1882): 363-365. “Had Dr. Gould's object been in existence near the comet at the time of my search for a companion star I could not have failed to pick it up. As regards Dr. Gould's asssertion that it was evident from the first that the object was not a fixed star, I can only say that such a statement appears strange when viewed in the light of his original communication.” Gould, Benjamin Apthrop. “Zwei Schreiben des Herrn Dr. B.A. Gould....” Astronomische Nachrichten, 100 (1881): 113-116. Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 June 12 / 12:15 a.m. / Ec. moon / NY / Sun 12-1-4. [V; 526. “The Eclipse.” New York Sun, June 12, 1881, p. 1 c. 4.]


1881 June 12 / Whirlwinds / Kansas / Iowa / Sun 15-3-1. [V; 527. “Whirlwinds in the West.” New York Sun, June 15, 1881, p. 3 c. 1.]


[1881 June 17] / Disap Myst. Sea Captain from ship. / (9) / Sun, 1881, June 17-1-6 / See col. 7, another land case. [B; 367. “A Mystery of the Sea.” New York Sun, June 17, 1881, p. 1 c. 6. “Mme. Maden's Disappearance.” New York Sun, June 17, 1881, p. 1 c. 7.]


1881 June 17 / Gabes, Tunis / Sounds like cannon and q. Lasted 6 minutes, and 32 seconds apart. / La Nat 17/126. [V; 528. Meunier, Stanislas. “Académie des Sciences.” La Nature, 1881 pt. 2 (no. 425; July 23): 126. “Aprés la lecture du procès-verbal, M. Boussingault donne communication de la Note suivante....” Comptes Rendus, 93 (1881) 105-106.]


1881 June [12] / Ice / Iowa / D-176. ** [V; 529. The note copies information from page 176 of The Book of the Damned. "Winds." Monthly Weather Review, 9 (no. 6; June 1881): 16-17, at 17.  The "mass of ice, 21 inches in circumference that fell with hail," (described by Fort), was a hailstone that fell at Deadwood, Dakota, on June 6, 1881; the hail at Avoca, Iowa, on June 12, was "the size of man's fist." See: 1881 June 6, (V; 517).]


1881 June 16 / Tebbutt's Comet discovered May 22 in New South Wales, at perihelion—visible in Europe June 22. Greater than any star June 24, etc. Vanished July 1—temporary reappearance July 22—Same orbit as comet of 1807. / Clerke, Hist Astro/352 / Was seen later. [V; 530.1, 530.2. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1st ed., (1885), 392-394; 4th ed., (1902), 352-353. Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 June 17 / Worcester Daily Times of / Great clouds of insects. A plague near Clitheroe, Lancashire. [V; 531. (Worcester Daily Times, June 17, 1881; not at BNA.)]


1881 June 19 / Le Petit Journal, copied in Medium and Daybreak, July 1—children of a family at Pledran, possessed by impulses to climb, performing ext. feats. [B; 368. Leroy, Mortimer. "A Possessed Family in France." Medium and Daybreak, 12 (no. 587; July 1, 1881): 405. "Départements." Le Petit Journal, (Paris), June 19, 1881, p. 4 c. 2.]


1881 June 18 / Pacula, Hidalgo, Mexico. / (F). [V; 532. Fletcher, 105. This is the Pacula meteorite.]


1881 June 19 / 3:35 a.m. / Newburyport, Mass. / q and rumbling. / N.M. / Sun 20-1-6. [V; 533. “Earthquake Shock in Massachusetts.” New York Sun, June 20, 1881, p. 1 c. 6.]


1881 June 19 / See June, 1871. [B; 369. See: 1871 June, (A; 677 & 679 to 681).]


1881 June 22 / Moon, Mars, Saturn, Venus, Jupiter close together / E Mec 45-32. [V; 534. Markwick, Ernest Elliott. "Planetary Configurations." English Mechanic, 45 (no. 1146; March 11, 1887): 32-33, at 32.]


1881 June 23 / 11 p.m. / Austria / met / Zeit Met 16-346. [V; 536. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 16 (1881): 340-356, at 346-347.]


1881 June 23 / 10:11 a.m. / Fall of a met stone in Pickens Co., Ala, reported. / M.W.R, June. [V; 537. "Miscellaneous Phenomena." Monthly Weather Review, 9 (no. 6; June 1881): 23-24, at 24. "Green Springs, Ala., 23d, 10.11 a. m.; an explosion was heard at different places, some of the points being as far as 50 miles apart; observers report it as being a double explosion; a gentleman living in Pickens county, 26 miles west, reported that a meteoric stone fell at his place and buried itself in the ground." This was not the Pickens County meteorite, found in Georgia, in 1908.]


1881 June 23 / 20 to 1 a.m. / Near Capella, the comet appears in England. / LT 24-10-e / Outshone Capella. [V; 540. “The Comet.” London Times, June 24, 1881, p. 10 c. 5. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1st ed., (1885), 393; 4th ed., (1902), 352. (The comet was not seen in Europe until June 22 or 23; check if “20 to 1 a.m.” would be “22.”) Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 June 24 / Comet discovered near Capella. / Nucleus brighter than Jupiter. / Ac to Prof Henry Draper, could not possibly be the comet discovered by Dr. Gould in the Argentine—he could no more

have seen it than the North Star. / World 25-5-3 / World, 26 / He corrects this. Then he said could not be seen so far north in Argentine and NY City. [V; 541.1, 541.2. (New York World, June 25, 1881, p. 5 c. 3.) (New York World, June 26, 1881.) Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 June 24 / comet / Great new comet near Capella /a controversy June 22 / Sun 25-1-3 / 27-3-3 / (etc) / and see 24, editorial. [V; 542. “The Flying Comet in the Sky.” New York Sun, June 24, 1881, p. 2 c. 3. “Watching the Big Comet.” New York Sun, June 25, 1881, p. 1 c. 3. “All Eyes on the Comet.” New York Sun, June 27, 1881, p. 3 c. 3.  Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 June, last / Comet visible, early morning, latter part of June, at Malta, but after 26th "was visible between 9 and 11 in the evening and after midnight. / Malta Standard, June 29. [V; 543. (Malta Standard, June 29, 1881.) Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 June 24 / NY Times, 5-5 / Red spot / Jupiter. [V; 538. Hough, George Washington. “The Red Spot on Jupiter.” New York Times, June 24, 1881, p. 5 c. 5.]


1881 June 24 / N.Y.T., 1-4 / 25-5-2 / 26-1-4 / 27-8-1 / 28-8-1 / 29-5-5 / 30-2-6 // See Sept 20 (Auriga). / Comet discovered near Capella. [V; 535. “A Comet Which Can Be Seen.” New York Times, June 24, 1881, p. 1 c. 4. “A Stranger in the Skies.” New York Times, June 25, 1881, p. 5 c. 2. “The Honor of Discovery.” New York Times, June 25, 1881, p. 5 c. 2. “The Comet Near Capella.” New York Times, June 26, 1881, p. 1 c. 4-5. “The Comet Photographed.” New York Times, June 27, 1881, p. 8 c. 1. “Observing the New Comet.” New York Times, June 28, 1881, p. 8 c. 1. “Prof. Draper's Observations.” New York Times, June 28, 1881, p. 8 c. 1. “The Comet Changes Form.” New York Times, June 29, 1881, p. 5 c. 5. “Studying the Big Comet.” New York Times, June 30, 1881, p. 2 c. 6-7. See: 1881 Sept 20, (V: 715 & 716). Comet C/1881 K1.]


[1881 June 24] / Ghosts in house in N.Y., 14th St. / Sun, 1881 June 24-1-7. [B; 370. “A House Full of Ghosts.” New York Sun, June 24, 1881, p. 1 c. 7.]


1881 June 25 / NY Times, 4-5 / Comet. [V; 539. “The New Comet.” New York Times, June 25, 1881, p. 4 c. 5-6. Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 June 26 / 5 a.m. / Severe shock / New Zealand / Sydney Morn. Herald 27-5-6. [V; 544. “Severe Shock of Earthquake in New Zealand.” Sydney Morning Herald, June 27, 1881, p. 5 c. 6.]


1881 June 27 / NY Times, 4-4 / Ghosts / 14th St / 24-8-1 / 25-2-5. [B; 371. “Two Spectral Lodgers.” New York Times, June 24, 1881, p. 8 c. 1-2. “The Fourteenth-Street Ghosts.” New York Times, June 25, 1881, p. 2 c. 5. “Local Ghosts.” New York Times, June 27, 1881, p. 4 c. 4-5.]


1881 June 27 / Remarkable changes in appearance of the Comet 1881.b / Fan-like but suddenly twisted about like a whiplash. / See July 6. [V; 545. See: (July 6). Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 June 30 / "A large fire on the other side of Rockaway Inlet causes quite a scare here.” (Brighton Beach). Later dispatch—no fire could be traced. N.Y. Times, July 1-5-2. [V; 546. “Where Was the Fire?” New York Times, July 1, 1881, p. 5 c. 2.]


1881 July-Aug / The Comet period. [V; 547.]


1881 July, Aug, Sept / Have "General Notes" / N.Y. Times. [V; 548.]


[1880 July 1. Wrong date. See: 1880 Aug 11-14, (V; 549).]


1881 July 3 / (+) / Sun of, 3-3, Ac to Mr. John Kee, of Talbot Co, Georgia, a sticky, sweet substance found on leaves on ground and on his porch, trees and shrubbery. In evening a mist was seen in sky and a closer examination revealed that we were having a repetition of the phe, and that, too, from  cloudless sky. / See Nov. 21, 1857. [V; 550.1, 550.2. “Honey Dew in Georgia.” New York Sun, July 3, 1881, p. 3 c. 3. “Mr. John Kee, of Talbot county, is responsible for the following: 'It was early Sunday morning. My daughter was engaged in sweeping off the front porch, when her attention was attracted by the plaintive cries of young chickens and the distressed clucking of a hen. The sound came from a pile of leaves uuder some poplar-trees in the yard, and hurrying to the spot, she found the little chicks all stuck up with leaves, rolling about trying to free themselves, and two of the little sufferers were stuck together. She picked these two up, and coming to the house called me. On examination we found them covered with a sticky substance, which seemed to have come off the leaves, and. tasting, was surprised to find it honey. Looking around, I could see it glistening in the sunshine like diamonds on every leaflet, and on the porch for two or three feet were splotches of it. Several neighbors dropped in during the day whom 1 told of the honey shower, supposing it had been general, but they were incredulous until shown evidences of it. In the evening of the same day I noticed a mist between me and the sun, and a closer examination disclosed the fact that we were having a repetition of the phenomenon, which was witnessed by a dozen people. While it did not run off the house either morning or evening, it covered the leaves of the trees and shrubs, and was, without doubt, honey dew, and that, too, from a cloudless sky.'” See: 1857 Nov 21, (II; 2104).]


1881 July 4, etc. / Heckmondwike, Yorkshire / Polt / Religio-Phil. Jour, Sept 3-6-3. [B; 372. Dent, John. "Startling Phenomenon in England." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 31 (no. 1; September 3, 1881): 6, (c. 3).]


1881 July 6 / 11:30 p.m. / Ac to Professors Stone and Watson, Comet 1881.b broke up then into 2 parts. Sketches published in Sidereal Mess, 2-305. [V; 551. “Comet 'B' 1881.” Sidereal Messenger, (January 1884): 305-307, (illustration). Payne, William Wallace. “The Study of Recent Comets.” Bulletin of the Minnesota Academy of Natural Sciences, 2 (December 1882): 328-358, (illustrations), at 350-358. Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 July 6 / The comet seen to divide / Sc Am 45-48 / Sees so comet, June 10. [V; 552. “Separation of the Comet.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (July 23, 1881): 48. See: 1881 June 10 and 12, (V; 523). Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 July / Comet also from Auriga. [V; 553.  Comet C/1881 N1.]


1881 // summer / our winter /// Cor to New Zealand Jour. of Sci., 2-169, says that in a Botanic Garden (Wellington?) N.Z., he had caught an English butterfly, the Red Admiral, and had seen several others, and had caught specimens of another English species, the Small Tortoise-shell. Thinks came with plants and seeds from England. [V; 554.1, 554.2. Kirk, Thomas William. “Note on the Occurrence of English Butterflies in New Zealand.” New Zealand Journal of Science, 2 (July 1884): 169.]


1881 July / q's / Philippines / See Jan. [V; 555. See: 1881 Jan / May / July / Aug / Sept, (V; 426). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 18.]


1881 July 6 / and on to Aug, 1882 // but weak /// Mayon Volc—Philippines / Ref, Feb 1, 1814. [V; 556. Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14. The Mayon volcano.]


1881 July 7 / night / Whole horizon, Richmond, Va, lighted up for a few moments. / NY Times 10-7-5. [V; 557. “All the Work of the Comet.” New York Times, July 10, 1881, p. 7 c. 5. “The phenomenon observed in the sky night before last, when the whole horizon for a few moments seemed to have been lighted up by all the varied tints of the rainbow, caused a great deal of excitement among the race here, and thousands of them left their houses and came out into the street to witness the remarkable illumination, pointing to it as another result of the comet, and say that 'the comet has done bust.'”]


[1880 July 9. Wrong date. See: 1880 Aug 11-14, (V; 549).]


[1881 July 10] / Lightning strikes steeple during funeral. / sun shining / 1881, Sun, July 10-6-7. [B; 373. “Lightning's Freaks.” New York Sun, July 10, 1881, p. 6 c. 7. “In the course of the funeral services over the body of F.S. Barnes in the Methodist Church at Forsyth, Ga., lightning struck the steeple, but the rod conducted it to the ground. The sun was shining brightly, and the event created a profound sensation in the congregation.” The name “Barnes” could be “Burnes”; and, no date for this event was provided in this article.]


1881 July 10 / White spot of Jupiter—followed by a darker mass and another. but smaller, white spot / Observatory 5-303. [V; 558. Williams, Arthur Stanley. "A Remarkable White Spot on Jupiter." Observatory, 5 (1882): 300-303, at 302.]


1881 July 10 / Jup. / 14 h., 45 m / Brilliant white spot on Jupiter, by Denning. Darker mass and another white spot behind it. Saw again July 17. / Observatory 4-244. [V; 559. Denning, William Frederick. “The Markings on Jupiter.” Observatory, 4 (1881): 244.]


1881 July 10 / NY Times, 5-4 / Red snow on a mt. in Colorado. [V; 560. “Red Snow in Colorado.” New York Times, July 10, 1881, p. 5 c. 4.]


1881 July 11 / In their book, "The Cruise of the Bacchante," published by MacMillan, the 2 young princes, sons of H.R.H., the Prince of Wales, published in June, 1886, tell that, at 4 a.m. of 11th, between Melbourne and Sydney, "a strange red light, as if of a phantom ship all aglow," masts and sails distinctly visible, was seen and reported by the lookout. 13 persons saw this. At 10:45 a.m. the lookout fell from a crosstree and was killed. [B; 374.1, 374.2. The Cruise of Her Majesty's Ship Bacchante 1879-1882. London: Macmillan, 1886, v. 1, 551.]


1881 July 11 / Sydney Morning Herald of 15th tells of accident to sailor and his death at 10:30 a.m. of 11th. No mention of phantom ship. [B; 375. “The Detached Squadron.” Sydney Morning Herald, July 15, 1881, p. 6 c. 3.]


1881 July 11 / [LT], 5-f / Mirage in coast of Kilkenny. [V; 561. (London Times, July 11, 1881, p. 5 c. 6; not found here; index says here. At Killiney, (not Kilkenny).) (“A Mirage.” English Mechanic, 33 (no. 851; July 15, 1881): 462.)]


1881 July 11 / 2 p.m. / St Joseph, Mo, Herald of 12th / NY Times 16-4-6 / At St. J., “a bright cluster of stars which changed its shapes every minute or two, assuming several different shapes, and then disappeared finally from view." [V; 562. “General Notes.” New York Times, July 16, 1881, p. 4 c. 6-7. (St. Joseph Herald, Mo., July 12, 1881.)]


1881 July 11 / Light or ph. ship / Australia / See / 1881. [V; 563. See: 1881 July 11, (B; 374).]


1881 July 11 / Brilliant protuberance from sun, rising from a group of small spots. / R—Sept 26, '79. [V; 564. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 215-223, at 222.]


1881 (July 12) / Typhoon at Manila / on 16th at Ningpo / 14 and 15th, Amoy / at Chinkiang 16-17 / China Mail, July 28. [V; 565. (China Mail, July 28, 1881.)]


1881 July 14 / Comet 1881 (IV) / n.e. in Aug / Clerke, Hist Astro, p. 355 / Last seen southern hem., Oct 19, 1881. [V; 566. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1st ed., (1885), 397-398; 4th ed., (1902), 355-356. Comet C/1881 N1.]


1881 July 14-15 / Typhoon / Shanghai / China Mail, July 22. [V; 567. (China Mail, July 22, 1881.)]


1881 July 18 / [LT], 5-f / 20-9-f / 11-6-e / 29-12-c // Comet / See July. [V; 568. “The Comet.” London Times, July 11, 1881, p. 6 c. 5. “The United States.” London Times, Jul 18, 1881, p. 5 c. 6. Graham, Andrew. “The Comet.” London Times, July 20, 1881, p. 9 c. 6. Beechey, St. Vincent. “The Rival Comets of 1881.” London Times, July 29, 1881, p. 12 c. 3. Comet C/1881 K1, and, Comet C/1881 N1.]


1881 July 18 / NY Times, 4-5 / Comets alleged split. [V; 569. “The comet did not split in two....” New York Times, July 18, 1881, p. 4 c. 5. Comet C/1881 K1.]


1881 July 18 / Brilliant meteors, ab 8 p.m., Petersburg, Va / ab 7:30 p.m., Morgantown, W. Va / N.Y. Times 20-4-7. [V; 570. “General Notes.” New York Times, July 20, 1881, p. 4 c. 7.]


1881 July 18 / (D-224) / Illuminated sulphurous cloud of tornado / Georgia. [V; 571. The note copies information from pages 224 to 225 of The Book of the Damned. “Winds.” Monthly Weather Review, 9 (no. 7; July 1881): 17-19, at 19.]


1881 July 18 / Supposed waterspout burst over Wellington, N. Zealand. / Sydney Morning Herald, 19th. [V; 572. “Severe Flood in New Zealand.” Sydney Morning Herald, July 19, 1881, p. 5 c. 5.]


1881 July 20 / q-phe / (See Sept 6.) / In Nature 26-176, M. Decheviers, Director of the Observatory near Shanghai, China, on 20th, ab 9 p.m., at town of Tchong-kin, capital of the Province of Szechuen, Long 104° E of Paris, a strong earthquake. Immediately afterward the town was enveloped in a fog (or smoke) so dense that one could not see 10 feet away. Its sulphurous odor was strong. It was supposed to be the smoke of some great fire, but there was no such fire anywhere findable in China. [V; 573.1, 573.2. Dechevrens, Marc. “Earthquakes in China.” Nature, 26 (June 22, 1882): 175-176, at 175. See: 1881 Sept 6, (V; 662). “Tchong-kin” is now identified as Chongqing, Sichuan Province, China.]


1881 July 20 / Splendid meteor at Munich / Nature 24-314 / ab. midnight. [V; 574. “Notes.” Nature, 24 (August 4, 1881): 313-315, at 314.]


1881 July 21 / Nothing in North China Herald. [V; 575.]


1881 July 21 / Nothing in the China Mail (Hong Kong) up to Aug 8. [V; 576.]


1881 July 21-22 / midnight / Brilliant meteor / NY City / Sun 23-1-2. [V; 577. “A Dazzling Meteor Flight.” New York Sun, July 23, 1881, p. 1 c. 2.]


1881 July 22 / France and Italy / q—BA '11. [V; 578. Milne, 729.]


[1881 July 22 /] 1882 June 22 / qs / France / Switz / Italy / I / BA '11. [V; 888. Milne, 729).]


1881 July 23 / Hot wind / afternoon / Pomeroy, Tyrone, a scorching whirlwind, but water / great commotion in sky / Sci. Gos. 1881-237. [V; 579. “Aerial Disturbances.” Science Gossip, 17 (no. 202; October 1881): 237.]


1881 July 25 / 8:30 p.m. / St Paul, Min / great met and train creeping like a fiery serpent as if from Altair / NY Times 30-4-7 / Sci Amer 45-116. [V; 580. Simonton, Thomas Davis. “The Minnesota Meteor.” New York Times, July 30, 1881, p. 4 c. 7. “A Minnesota Meteor.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (August 20, 1881): 116.]


1881 July 25 / Sunspot sudden / At Dehra-Doon, India, an astronomer took a photo of sun at 3:58 p.m., after which sun invisible behind clouds. / Took another at 4:35 p.m. Here shown clearly a group of spots above center of sun that not there first photo. / They appeared in a third photo taken 47 minutes later. / Les Mondes 3/1/297. [V; 581.1, 581.2. “Apparition subite des taches solaires.” Cosmos, s. 3 v. 1 (February 25, 1882): 297. “Outburst of Sun-Spots, July 25, 1881.” Nature, January 12, 1882): 241. “Dehra-Doon” is now identified as Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India. The Dallmeyer photoheliograph at Dehradun was used to photograph the Sun on a daily basis to supplement the solar photographs taken at Greenwich, (where many more cloudy days interfered with these observations).]


1881 July 26 / Two protuberances on sun, transforming rapidly—rising from a group of spots / R—Sept. 26, '79. [V; 582. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 215-223, at 221-222, (figure 67).]


1881 July 27 / morning / Was a fire at Coney. [V; 583. “A Blaze on Coney Island.” New York Sun, July 28, 1881, p. 3 c. 3.]


1881 July 27 / [LT] 5-d / Village of La Praz destroyed by lightning. [V; 584. “Switzerland.” London Times, July 27, 1881, p. 5 c. 4.]


1881 July 29 / NY Times, 3-4 / 30-4-7 / Aug. 8-2-4 // Met / Minnesota. [V; 585. “Minnesota's Queer Heavenly Visitor.” New York Times, July 29, 1881, p. 3 c. 4. Simonton, Thomas Davis. “The Minnesota Meteor.” New York Times, July 30, 1881, p. 4 c. 7. Rhame, Mitchell Davison. “The Minnesota Meteor.” New York Times, August 8, 1881, p. 2 c. 4.]


1881 July 29 / [LT], 5-e / q / Agram / See other Times Indexes. [V; 586. “Earthquake at Agram.” London Times, July 29, 1881, p. 5 c. 5.]


1881 July 30 / 8:15 p.m. / At Castrop, Westphalia, meteoric stone weighing 5 pounds. / Nature 24-427 / On July 28, q at Agram and detonations (subterranean sounds) p. 341. / Shocks at Agram had continued. [V; 587. “Notes.” Nature, 24 (August 11, 1881): 339-342, at 341. “Notes.” Nature, 24 (September 1, 1881): 425-428, at 427. Brezina, Aristides. Die Meteoritensammlung des K. K. Mineralogischen Hofkabinetes in Wien am 1. Mai 1885. Vienna: Alfred Hölder, 1885, 225. After several local inquiries, Brezina determined the Castrop meteorite was a newspaper hoax.]


1881 July 31 / 9:45 p.m. / Bangor, Me / low rumbling sound and q / NY Times, Aug 4-4-7. [V; 588. “General Notes.” New York Times, August 4, 1881, p. 4 c. 7.]


1881 Aug 1 / [LT], 4-c / 10-8-b / 25-8-b // Sept 26-7-e / 30-10-c /// Comet. [V; 589. “The Late Comet.” London Times, August 1, 1881, p. 4 c. 3. Denning, William Frederick. “Schaeberle's Comet.” London Times, August 10, 1881, p. 8 c. 2. “Another Comet.” London Times, September 26, 1881, p. 7 c. 5. Hind, John Russell. “The Comet of the Bayeux Tapestry.” London Times, September 30, 1881, p. 10 c. 3. Comets 1P/1066 G1, C/1881 K1, C/1881 N1, and C/1881 S1.]


1881 Aug-Sept / q's / Philippines / See Jan. [V; 590. See: 1881 Jan / May / July / Aug / Sept, (V; 426). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 18.]


1881 Aug 2 / 5 p.m. / Germany / great flame from the sun / L'Astro 1/274. [V; 591. “Disparition rapide d'une immense flammeur sur le Soleil.” Astronomie, 1 (1882): 274.]


1881 Aug. 3 / J / Small, white / R—Jan 7. [V; 592. Refer to: 1881 Jan 7, (V; 430). Barnard, Edward Emerson. "Observations of Jupiter with a 5-Inch Refractor during the Years 1879 to 1886." Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 1 (no. 5; November 30, 1889): 89-111, at 97.]


1881 Aug 2-Oct 3 / Denning's obs on white spot of Jupiter—Observatory 4-332. [V; 593. Denning, William Frederick. “The White Spot on Jupiter.” Observatory, 4 (1881): 332-333.]


1881 Aug 2 / 4:30 a.m. / Stone fell from sky at Springfield, Ohio. / NY Times 5-4-7. [V; 594. “General Notes.” New York Times, August 5, 1881, p. 4 c. 7.]


1881 Aug 8 / 4 p.m. / Cloudburst / Col / on 6th in Arizona / M.W.R. p. 25. [V; 595. “Navigation.” Monthly Weather Review,  9 (no. 8; August 1881): 25-26.]


1881 Aug 6 / Trance / Religio-Phil Jour, 6-4 / from Virginia City (Nevada) Enterprise / Case of Miss Mary Kennedy of Va. City, aged ab. 18. Ab 6 weeks before time of writings, she told her mother that a great calamity would befall her and she be stricken blind, deaf and dumb. A few days later, she was so stricken. Also legs paralyzed. She read handwriting, though eyelids closed. In Gold Hill, ab ½ a mile away, two persons, a man and a boy, in some sympathetic relation, were seized with convulsions at time she so affected. [B; 376.1, 376.2, 376.3. "A Psychological Wonder." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 30 (no. 23; August 6, 1881): 6, (c. 4).]


1881 Aug. 9 / Volcano in Idaho—or smoke and fire seen in distance / Sun 17-1-6. [V; 596. “A Volcano in Idaho.” New York Sun, August 17, 1881, p. 1 c. 6.]


1881 Aug 9 / Volc? / Dispatch from Lewiston, Idaho—that 20 miles east of Mt Idaho column of fire and smoke, from a mountain and a rock fell several miles from the eruption. / NY Times 17-5-6 / N.Y. Times, Sept 2-3-3 / Column of black smoke reported still visible on 20th. / Walla Walla (Washington) Union, Aug 20  [V; 597.1, 597.2. “An Active Volcano in Idaho.” New York Times, August 17, 1881, p. 5 c. 6. “Volcanic Fires in Idaho.” New York Times, September 2, 1881, p. 3. c. 3. “An Imposition—Who Is Responsible?” Lewiston Teller, (Idaho), September 15, 1881, p. 1 c. 5. “At the date of this telegram [August 23] no such account of the renewal of the eruption was known or heard of in Lewiston. The account of the first two or three days' appearance of things in the vicinity of the Buffalo Hump, had been telegraphed, and also published in the Teller, and the names of the parties who witnessed the scene. But no such account as the above had been given, and none was credited here by citizens, nor by citizens of Mt. Idaho with whom we were in daily communication.” (Washington Union, August 20, 1881.)]


1881 Aug 10 / from Nov 5, 1880 // Mauna Loa / See. [V; 598. The Mauna Loa volcano.]


1881 Aug 12 / See May. / dragon-flies. [V; 599. See: 1881 May 30 and morning 31, (V; 514).]


1881 Aug 12 / after a rain / Leavenworth, Kansas / millions of dragon-flies / NY Times 16-4-7. [V; 600. “Millions of Dragon Flies.” New York Times, August 16, 1881, p. 4 c. 7.]


1881 Aug 13 / early morn / q / Contoocook, N.H. / Am J. Sci 3-23-260. [V; 601. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 11.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 23 (1882): 257-261, at 260.]


1881 Aug 14 / Aeronaut from Montpelier / nothing heard from / supposed lost at sea / France / (NM) / Sun 20-1-5 // Mutilated body found. / 25-1-5. [B; 377. “An Aeronaut Missing.” New York Sun, August 20, 1881, p. 1 c. 5. “An Aeronaut Killed.” New York Sun, August 25, 1881, p. 1 c. 5.]


1881 Aug 14 / Aeronaut at Montpelier, France, not heard from. / B. Eagle 20-2-8 / Eagle, 24th / Body found. [V; 602. “Current Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 20, 1881, p. 2 c. 8. “Body of a Balloonist Found.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 24, 1881, p. 4 c. 1.]


1881 Aug. 16 / Earth to / ignition of petroleum in Prussia / Nature 24/427. [V; 603. “Notes.” Nature, 24 (September 1, 1881): 425-428, at 427. A smouldering coal seam fire at Brennender Berg, (Burning Mountain), near Remscheid, Westphalia, Germany, has been burning since 1688.]


1881 Aug. 16 / B. Eagle, 2-8 / "Almost simultaneous outbreaks of terrible forest fires in various mountain districts of Spain." That "recently" forest fires in the south of France had been attributed to incendiaries. So were the fires in Spain. [V; 604. “Current Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 16, 1881, p. 2 c. 8.]


1881 Aug 17 / Trib, 5-2 / Volcano / Idaho. [V; 605. “Volcanic Eruption in Idaho.” New York Tribune, August 17, 1881, p. 5 c. 2. See: 1881 Aug 9, (V; 597).]


1881 / ab. Aug 19 // Object seen by someone in Dallas, Texas—in Ursa Major / like a comet / Sun 20-1-5. [V; 606. “Is It Another New Comet?” New York Sun, August 20, 1881, p. 1 c. 5. “Dallas.” Galveston Daily News, August 20, 1881, p. 1 c. 7. “Mr. A.F. Hensley claims that he is the discoverer of a comet which is visible from about 9 to 10 o'clock. It is in the constellation of Ursa Major and is plainly seen through a small telescope which Mr. Hensley has, and indistinctly visible to the unaided eye. He claims that it has not yet attracted the attention of astronomers.” “The New Comet.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (August 13, 1881): 104. Comet C/1881 N1 was in Ursa Major on this date. See: 1881 July 14, (V; 566).]


1881 Aug 21 / insects / B. Eagle, 2-8, quoting Leavenworth (Kan) Times. / At Leavenworth, millions of dragon flies "after a rain". [V; 607. “A Cloud of Dragon Flies.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 21, 1881, p. 2 c. 8. (Leavenworth Times, ca. August 21, 1881.)]


1881 / ab. Aug 23 // Great clouds of ants at Emerson, Manitoba / Sun 25-3-3. [V; 608. “Clouds of Winged Ants in Manitoba.” New York Sun, August 25, 1881, p. 3 c. 3.]


1881 Aug. 22 / [London Times], 12-b / Ext. Storm / Tahiti. [V; 609. “An Extraordinary Storm.” London Times, August 22, 1881, p. 12 c. 2. See: 1881 May 11, (V; 494).]


1881 Aug 22 / Watergall / Banburyshire? / Fireball exploded near earth. / Nature 24-476. [V; 610. "Notes." Nature, 24 (September 15, 1881): 475-477, at 476. Watergall, Leamington, Warwickshire, (not Banburyshire). "Watergall." Banbury Guardian, August 25, 1881, p. 8 c. 6. "Banburyshire Natural History Society." Banbury Advertiser, September 8, 1881, p. 5 c. 1. "Mr. E.A. Walford read a note 'On the occurrence of a Fire-ball at Watergall.' He quoted from articles by Professor Tait in 'Nature,' shewing how this form of electric discharge, called ball lightning, might probably be caused by the formation of a kind of natural Leyden jar, the rupture of which was often disatrous in its consequences. He said it was distinguished from ordinary lightning by the slowness of its descent and its spherical form. In answer to Mr Walford's queries, Mr Fessey, jun., had sent an account, as follows:—"Watergall, Leamington, August 30th, 1881. Dear sir,—As regards the fire-ball, I was about 200 yards from it, in a waggon hovel. I saw it directly it left the sky, as I was looking in that direction at the time. When I first saw it, it looked like ball of fire, about as large as a dinner plate. It slowly descended, and I have no doubt I could have run twenty yards from the time I first saw it until it struck the ground; but when about fifteen to eighteen feet from the ground it exploded with loud crash, quite as loud as a cannon, distinctly before the thunder, which was very loud also. The explosion shook the whole buildings. I certainly thought the slates were falling in, but when it exploded, one part struck the hedge, making a hole in the ground about a foot deep, and laying all the roots bare, but not damaging them. For some time, the place looked all on fire, and there was a considerable quantity smoke when it hit the ground, lasting for a second or two. It was seen by myself and four men. They also agree with me that this is as near as possible a correct explanation of it. We dug the hole yesterday, but found nothing. The soil was blackened for several deep. Hoping this will meet with your approval, I am, sir, yours truly, Johnson Fessey.' The President, commenting upon the paper, said he did not see how a spherical mass of electricity could be accounted for under the conditions name, nor that it could 'explode' in the manner described. He doubted Professor Tait's conclusion, and thought that such phenomena were really meteoric. Messers J.H. Beale, J.R. Davis, and A. Boulton spoke upon the subject."]  


1881 Aug 24, etc. / Great forest fires in Algeria / Jour des Debats, Sept 2-3-2. [V; 611. “Les journaux d'Algérie sont remplis de détails....” Journal des Debats, September 2, 1881, p. 3 c. 2.]


1881 Aug 26 / q. / Nottinghamshire, England / BA '11. [V; 612. Milne, 729.]


1881 Aug 26 / q. / Chios / III / BA '11 / 28th—Persia. [V; 613. Milne, 729.]


1881 Aug 26 / At Charleston the severest storm in the South since Sept., 1874 / N.Y. Herald, Aug 29. [V; 614. “Hurricane at Charleston.” New York Herald, August 29, 1881, p. 7 c. 3.]


1881 Aug 26 / [LT], 3-e / At Solingen—house swallowed up in a fiery grave. [V; 615. “A Fiery Grave.” London Times, August 26, 1881, p. 3 c. 5. A house and its residents were reported to have collapsed into a subterranean fire, (probably a burning coal seam).]


1881 Aug 27 / evening / Hurricane / Southern states / Sun 31-3-2. [V; 616. “The Hurricane From the Gulf.” New York Sun, August 31, 1881, p. 3 c. 2.]


1881 Aug 28 / q / England and Persia / BA '11 / Sims / See Feb. 18, 1889. [V; 617. Milne, 729. The earthquake in England was on August 26, (not August 28). See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1881 Aug 28 / ab. noon / Small town of Erzgebirge, Saxony. In the midst of a torrential rain a gigantic tourbillon of dust with sounds like thunder—great destruction. / Jour des Debats, Sept 3-2-5. [V; 618. “Les journaux saxons annoncent que dimanche dernier une trombe de vent....” Journal des Debats, September 3, 1881, p. 2 c. 5.]


1881 Aug 29 / 11 p.m. / Shock / Highland Co., Ohio / NY Times 2-5-1. [V; 619. “General Notes.” New York Times, September 2, 1881, p. 5 c. 1.]


1881 Aug 30 / [LT] 3-b / Sept 2-3-b // Forest fires in Algeria. [V; 620. “North Africa.” London Times, August 30, 1881, p. 3 c. 2. “North Africa.” London Times, September 2, 1881, p. 3 c. 2.]


1881 Aug 30 / Meteor from Cepheus / NY City / Sun, Sept 1-2-4. [V; 621. “A Strange Meteor.” New York Sun, September 1, 1881, p. 2 c. 4.]


1881 Aug 30 / 10 p.m. / Detonating meteor / New Orleans / N.Y. Times, Sept 5-2-3. [V; 622. “A Southern Meteor.” New York Times, September 5, 1881, p. 2 c. 3. (New Orlean Daily Picayune, September 1, 1881.)]


1881 Aug. 30 / [LT], 4-e / q / Nottinghamshire. [V; 623. “Earthquake in Nottinghamshire.” London Times, August 30, 1881, p. 4 c. 5.]


1881 Aug 30 / Pirates / See Toronto Daily Mail, Sept 6-12-3. / Sailing ship Heather arrived at St. John's, Newfoundland. Capt. Decoste reported having on the 26th met a schooner rigged vessel of 120 tons, the "Cortie", ab 50 miles off Cape Breton. There were upon her many marks of violence but of smashings not attrib. to a storm. "The apparent violence of men's hands was everywhere visible. Rails broken. Apertures in the bulwarks. Numerous abrasions on it. D's opinion that ac to evidence work of pirates. / dismasted / no rigging. [B; 378.1, 378.2, 378.3. "An Ocean Mystery." Toronto Mail, September 6, 1881, p. 12 c. 3.]


1881 Aug 30 / The Cortie / Celeste / N.Y. Herald 30-5-2. [B; 379. “An Ocean Mystery.” New York Herald, August 30, 1881, p. 5 c. 2.]


1881 Aug 31-Sept 1 / night / Rains in Ill. and northwest where greatly needed because of the drought / B Eagle, Sept 1-4-1. [V; 624. “Needed Rains.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 1, 1881, p. 4 c. 1.]


1881 Sept / Forest fires / See back in Aug. [V; 625. See: 1881 Aug. 16, (V; 604); 1881 Aug 24, etc., (V; 611); and, 1881 Aug 30, (V; 620).]


1881 Sept / Phe of The Comet period. [V; 626.]


1881 Sept / q's / Philippines / See Jan. [V; 627. See: 1881 Jan / May / July / Aug / Sept, (V; 426). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 18.]


1881 Sept 1, ab / Ghst in Garstang, Lancashire. / Told of in Preston Guardian, Sept 3 // The Spiritualist, Sept 16 / A trickster caught. [B; 380. (Spiritualist Newspaper, (London), September 16, 1881.) (Preston Guardian, September 3, 1881; not at BNA.)]


1881 Sept 1 / B. Eagle, 4-1 / The fire in province of Constantine, Algeria, had devastated 200,000 acres. [V; 628. “Extent of the Recent Forest Fires in Algeria.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 1, 1881, p. 4 c. 1.]


1881 Sept 1 / [LT], 8-b / 23-11-c / 27-7-f // (?). [V; 629. The common topic of news in these columns concerns ships; two articles concern boiler explosions aboard ships; and, two other articles in these columns are noted for other subjects. “The Loss of the Doterel.” London Times, September 1, 1881, p. 8 c. 1-2. “The Late Commander Scott.” London Times, September 23, 1881, p. 11 c. 3. “The Explosion on Board the City of Rome. London Times, September 27, 1881, p. 7 c. 6.]


1881 Sept. 2 / at Oissel / Sept 9, Cricquebœuf (Seine-Inférieure) // black rain / L'Annee Sci 25-55. [V; 630. “Une pluie noire.." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 25 (1881): 55.]


1881 Sept 2 / Black rain / at Eissel / Sept. 9, at Criquebat / both in Dept of the Seine-Inféure / Les Mondes 56-177. [V; 631. (Les Mondes, 56-177; check references, no such volume for Les Mondes.)]


1881 Sept 2 / Point of N.E. phe is b. rains in France. [V; 632.]


1881 Sept / Australia, Nov 13, 1902 / The fire from Pelée, May 8, 1902 / Phe, 1883. [V; 633. See: (1883), (1902 May 8), and, (1902 Nov 13).]


1881 Sept 3 / [source unidentified], 4-1 / Dispatch from New Brunswick, N.J.—no rain in 65 days. [V; 634. (Unidentified source, September 3, 1881, p. 4 c. 1.)]  


1881 Sept 3 / B. Eagle, 2-7 / Rain had fallen in many parts of the country, but not enough to relieve the drought. Forest fires in N.J. and Pa., were put out, but in northern N.Y. not. [V; 635. (Brooklyn Eagle, September 3, 1881, p. 2 c. 7.)]


1881 Sept. 4 / (Stones) / N.Y. Trib. of / Westville, S.I. [Staten Island, New York] / Home of Detective Charles F. Rilling. His home bombarded night after night by stones coming from a southeasterly direction. Rilling had fired his revolver in the direction, but the stones continued to arrive. There were stories of a ghost and of sounds of music. "Mr. Rilling said yesterday that he did not know much about the woman in white, but the bombarding of his house [with stones,] and that of his neighbor, Arthur W. Brash, was certainly very strange." So it was not only a detective's house. [B; 381.1, 381.2, 381.3. “A Ghost That Throws Stones.” New York Tribune, September 4, 1881, p. 12 c. 2.]


1881 Sept 5 / fires and meteors / See June, 1895. [V; 636. See: 1895 June, (VII; 1305).]


1881 Sept / Forest fires and meteors—see Sept 17 and 7, 1893. [V; 637. See: (1893 Sept 7), and, (1893 Sept 17).]


1881 (Sept) / Fire / See Fires and Spon Comb, May 3, 1884. [V; 638. See: (1884 May 3).]


1881 Sept / See the Montreal Series. / Nov 7, 1819, etc. [V; 639. See: (1819 Nov 7).]


1881 Sept 5 / See phe of fire and gale, etc., of Ap. 2, 1889. [V; 640. See: (1889 Ap. 2).]


1881 Sept / Meteors start forest fire. / Ap. 26, 1910. [V; 641. See: (1910 Ap. 26).]


1881 Sept 5 / Bring in the phe of Nov., 1819. [V; 642. See: (1819 Nov.).]


1881 Sept 5 / See Jan 22, 1903. / Great fires and sandstorm. Looks as if meteoric fires had started the bush fires. / See grass fires, 1881, Sept. [V; 643. See: (1903 Jan 22), and, (1881 Sept).]


1881 Sept / Forest fires / See fiery mist, Sept 9, 1911. [V; 644. See: (1911 Sept 9).]


1881 Sept / See fires in a gale, March, 1913, in England. [V; 645. See: (1913 March).]


1881 Sept 5 / I find nothing in "Ragnarok", published in 1883. / But Donnelly writes upon the forest fires in Minnesota, Michigan, and Illinois at the time of the Chicago fire—whirlwinds of fire from the heavens. His idea is that it was a deluge of inflammable gas from the tail of Biela's Comet. The identification with Biela's is not good—the details of a fiery deluge are striking. [V; 646.1, 646.2. (Donnelly, Ignatius. Ragnarok.)]


1881 Sept 5 / det. / Came so that many could not run. Jumped down wells to escape—Trib 9-1-4 / 7—persons suffocated in a well near Charleston, the Redmond family. [V; 647. “Burning Forests in Michigan.” New York Tribune, September 7, 1881, p. 2 c. 3. “Devastated by Fire.” New York Tribune, September 9, 1881, p. 1 c. 4-5.]


1881 Sept 5 / Nothing findable that there was a tornado in Michigan except this tornado of fire. [V; 648. The Detroit Free Press account describes the Thumb Fire in terms as if it had been a tornado: “Behind that pall of smoke was a greater enemy than an earthquake, and it had a tornado at its back...”; “...the path of the fiery serpent”; and, “The fire seemed to catch them at once, and after a whirl and a roar nothing would be left.” “Characteristic Incidents of the Michigan Fire.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (October 22, 1881): 265.]


1881 Sept / For instance—the burning of the village of Bad Axe, the seat of Huron Co., Mich. There was smoke and intense darkness in the forenoon. It was known that there were fires 3 miles south, and no thought of danger from them. There was a glare, wind and flame. In 30 minutes, 53 of the 55 buildings were in ashes. / Sci Amer 45-244. [V; 649.1, 649.2. “The Michigan Fire.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (October 15, 1881): 244.]


1881 Sept / Michigan fires. / (Sci Amer, 45-265, (as if from external), copying from Detroit Free Press. That there had been the usual fires of the season and people had thought nothing of them. Then either a tornado of fire or fire driven by a tornado. "Almost at the same minute the flames appeared in every spot over a district of country[”] 30 miles broad and 100 in length. First came a sound like thunder. Then "a terrible roaring". [V; 650.1, 650.2. “Characteristic Incidents of the Michigan Fire.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (October 22, 1881): 265.]


1881 Sept 3 / Forest fire / Olean, N.Y. / Sun 4-1-7. [V; 651. “The Forest Still On Fire.” New York Sun, September 4, 1881, p. 1 c. 7.]


1881 Sept / In Sci Amer, 79-55, the Editor writes that Ignatius Donnelly had written that the Mich. fires were of cosmic origin. He says that there are several facts to support this view. He tells of its seeming electric nature: of a man who was found dead, with no marks of fire upon him, but with 3 silver half-dollars in his pockets solidly fused together. [V; 652.1, 652.2. “Possible Passage of the Earth Through a Nebula.” Scientific American, n.s., 79 (July 23, 1898): 55. Donnelly, Ignatius. Ragnarok: The Age of Fire and Gravel. New York: D. Appleton, 1883, 415. Donnelly suggested remnants of Biela's Comet as a source of the fires, on October 8, 1871; and, he repeats an account of fused coins, (not “silver half-dollars”). Sheahan, James Washington, and, Upton, George Putnam. The Great Conflagration. Chicago: Its Past, Present and Future. Chicago: Union Publishing, 1872, 373. “For instance, we have in our possession a copper cent taken from the pocket of a dead man in the Peshtigo Sugar Bush, which will illustrate our point. This cent has been partially fused, but still retains its round form, and the inscription upon it is legible. Others, in the same pocket, were partially melted, and yet the clothing and the body of the man were not even singed. We do not know in what way to account for this, unless, as is asserted by some, the tornado and fire were accompanied by electrical phenomena."]


1881 Sept 5 / But the other explanations / Prof. X and Pine pollen—enough to come from all he forest[s] between Sirius and Capella / pollen with the smoke / And the 7th Day Adventists Imagery for this—That at least they did have a vision—Sun turning greener and greener and suddenly go out. Fire concentrating upon their town—up they all go to heaven—the white forms up from a circle of fire—dets perhaps. Old gray headed ones and young ones hanging on to their whiskers. [V; 653.1, 653.2.]


1881 Sept 5 / plan / Doubt that from fires / Have to admit great and at same time / Still France / Then met set fire grass, ab Sept 22. Then phe of Jan, 1902. [V; 654.]


1881 Sept 5 / Phil of it / Impos of self to find out anything because so many equally good explanations always backed by some data. So to a terrestrialist—these forest fires. One to an externalist the other data (in France, etc.) have weight. [V; 655.]


1881 Sept / Sunspots and forest fires / Sept, 1893. [V; 656. See: (1893 Sept.).]


1881 Sept / Fires elec? / March 1913 / Ap. 2, 1889. [V; 657. See: (1889 Ap. 2), and, (1913 March).]


1881 Sept / Forest fires and spon comb / May 3, 1884 / Sept., 1911. [V; 658. See: (1884 May 3), and, (1911 Sept.).]


1881 Sept / fires // plan / The smoke / not Toronto / either before Mich. or not Mich / phe suggested in Mich / b. rains France / Take dect. way and read La Nat. 17 (1881), p. 200. [V; 659. “Catastrophe due à la chaleur aux États-Unis.” La Nature, 1881 pt. 2 (no. 434; September 24): 271.]


1881 Sept 5 / "Darkness and a copper colored sky preceded the fire." / Trib 10-1-6 / It is said that burning masses fell, but that they were burning masses carried a great distance in the high wind. Running down the roads, men who were "both blind and crazy". [V; 660.1, 660.2. “The Great Forest Fires.” New York Tribune, September 10, 1881, p. 1 c. 6. “One man, who had lost all, was both blind and crazy, and had to be led to the lake.”]


1881 Sept 6 / Det meteor and same light effects / See March 7, 1887. [V; 661. See: (1887 March 7).]


1881 Sept 6 / See July 20. [V; 662. See: 1881 July 20, (V; 573).]


[1881 Sept 6. "Yellow Day." Talman, Charles Fitzhugh. "Dark Days and Forest Fires." Scientific American, n.s., 112 (March 6, 1915): 229.]


1881 Sept 1 / [LT], 9-f / q /Ireland. [V; 663. “An Earthquake in Ireland.” London Times, September 1, 1881, p. 9 c. 6.]


1881 Sept 1 / Sept / See Sept 18. / Sun obscured all day at Port Jervis—though no ordinary clouds visible, no known forest fires and no odor of smoke. "Nothing like the present dark condition is remembered. / Sun 2-3-5. [V; 664. “Daylight Obscured at Port Jervis.” New York Times, September 2, 1881, p. 5 c. 2. “A Strange Midday Darkness.” New York Sun, September 2, 1881, p. 3 c. 5. “The sun has been obscured all day, although no ordinary clouds have been visible.” See: (Sept. 18). There were forest fires in Ontario, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. See: 1881 Sept 3, (V; 635); 1881 Sept 6, (V; 669); and, 1881 Sept 18-20, (V; 713).]


1881 Sept 5 / "Peculiar yellow tinted atmosphere” bet 6 and 8 p.m. / Buffalo / N.Y. Times 8-4-7. [V; 665. “General Notes.” New York Times, September 8, 1881, p. 4 c. 7.]


1881 Sept 6 / "The startling appearance of the sky caused many of the Adventists [in] Woonsocket, R.I., to put on their ascension robes....” / NY Times 8-4-7. [V; 666. “General Notes.” New York Times, September 8, 1881, p. 4 c. 7.]


1881 Sept 6 / (+) / vs. forest fires / At Boston. All effects disp at 5 p.m. and moonlight normal. / Sci Amer 45-225. [V; 667. “Heat, Sun Storms and Yellow Light.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (October 8, 1881): 224-225.]


1881 Sept 6 / At Springfield, Mass, all the effects until between 5 and 6 p.m.—the sun took normal appearance. / Nature 24/540. [V; 668. “Notes.” Nature, 24 (October 6, 1881); 539-541, at 540.]


1881 Sept 6 / B. Eagle, 2-7 / Ontario, where the fires were raging—been no rain in 6 weeks. [V; 669.  (Brooklyn Eagle, September 6, 1881, p. 2 c. 7.)]


1881 Sept 6 / The Yellow day / A writer in Sci Amer 106-504 thinks it was caused by the burning of immense peat bogs in Labrador. [V; 670. “Counting Grains of Dust in the Air.” Scientific American, n.s., 106 (June 1, 1912): 497 & 504-506, at 504.]


1881 Sept 1-2 / Torrential rains for 48 hours in Switzerland. Inundations. / J. des Debats 6-3-4. [V; 671. (Journal des Debats, September 6, 1881, p. 3 c. 4.)]


1881 Sept 2 / Hailstones size of cocoanuts at Monkato, Minn. / Toronto Daily Mail 5-1-6. [V; 672. (Toronto Daily Mail, September 5, 1881, p. 1 c. 6.)]


1881 Sept 5, etc. / Nothing in Melbourne Argus. [V; 673.]


1881 Sept 6 / In Boston, attrib to fires in Canada. [V; 674. See: 1881 Sept 6, (V; 669).]


1881 Sept. 6 / The "horrible hurricane" and the "advancing wall of fire" in Michigan / N.Y. Herald 8-3-5 / Villages burned on the 5th. [V; 675. “Swept by Fire.” New York Herald, September 8, 1881, p. 3 c. 5-6.]


1881 Sept 7 / Very great heat. 100 degrees and over in N.Y. State, Pa, Md. / Herald 8-4-3. [V; 676. “September's Scorcher.” New York Herald, September 8, 1881, p. 4 c. 2-3.]


1881 Sept 7 / Lit. balloons / Harper's Weekly, Oct 1, 1881 / That "a strange phenomenon” had been reported from La Grange, Indiana. About 6:30 in the morning there appeared in the heavens a shower of many-colored globes, which seemed to descend from the sun. They disappeared "on touching the horizon.” [V; 677.1, 677.2. “Following the 'yellow Tuesday' of this region....” Harper's Weekly, 25 (October 1, 1881): 667. “Following the 'yellow Tuesday' of this region a strange phenomenon is reported to have been witnessed in La Grange, Indiana. At about half past six o’clock on Wednesday morning there appeared in the heavens a shower of many-colored globes which seemed to descend from the sun. They disappeared on touching the horizon. The phenomenon, it is averred, was seen by many residents.”]


1881 Sept. 7 / (Lit Ballo) / These things associate with local hazes—or that often come from sun—and seen locally when local hazes dim sun. / See Haze, Iowa, Sept. 9. [V; 678. See: 1881 Sept 9, (V; 700).]


1881 Sept 7 (?) / Little balloons / See Nov. 4, 1867. [V; 678.1. See: 1867 Nov. 11, (III: 1167 to 1170).]


1881 Sept 7 / Fire broke out in woods about noon. Lacona, N.Y. / Ab noon, oil lands near Bradford, Pa., / Herald 8-4-1. [V; 679. “Fire in the Oil District,” and, “Fire at Lacona..” New York Herald, September 8, 1881, p. 4 c. 1. The fire at Lacona began in a railway woodshed.]


1881 Sept 9 / Dispatch to NY Herald (10th) from Rockbridge, Va / "The strange atmospheric phenomenon that has occurred in New England has reached here, only intensified, and the simple mountaineers and the 'cullid' folks are [terribly exercised and nearly] frightened out of their wits." Said been almost darkness and the sun as soft and silvery as the moon. Also from Lynchburg, Va, wan and ghastly appearance of everything alternating with darkness. [V; 680.1, 680.2. “Dark at Noonday.” New York Herald, September 10, 1881, p. 3 c. 4.]


1881 Sept 9 / Herald of / "Fifty Miles of Fire" / Point is that from this greater fire no phe like the New England phe except locally in Michigan. [V; 681. “Fifty Miles of Fire.” New York Herald, September 9, 1881, p. 6 c. 1-2.]


1881 Sept 5 / Suddeness in Mich (Herald 9-6-1) / Experiences of a resident of Verona Mills. On the morning of the 5th, pleasant weather. "We had no more apprehension of danger of fire in our locality than you apparently have here to-day. But about twelve o'clock a dense smoke began to blow out toward the lake and a terrible wind arose." Some went to investigate. In 20 minutes smoke and darkness. People started to run but were caught by flames before got 15 or 20 rods away. [V; 682.1, 682.2. “Fifty Miles of Fire.” New York Herald, September 9, 1881, p. 6 c. 1-2.]


1881 Sept / Plan / Give the New England phe. / See if came from Canada. Not—big rain / if Michigan / but big fire not till 5th / other phe. [V; 683.]


1881 Sept / T / Toronto Mail, Sept. one for Aug 31, reports great forest or bush fires from 20 different places in Ontario. Reports ½ a dozen barn fires. Also from Parkhill, 3 large barns struck by lightning. "Other fires are reported but it is not said to what extent." From Oskosh—7 incendiary fires started during a gale. / There had been a drought for several months. / Mail, Sept 2, "Scarcely a county in the province free from fires. / Also forest fires in Nova Scotia. Sept 1—Great thunderstorms in Ontario—fires checked—also other places. Mail, 5th—fires checked but still burning. Mail of the 6th—Sept 5—at Toronto and various other places, some of which report no fires of importance near them—from 2 to 3 p.m.—darkness, "ashes falling in abundance", "cinders" falling ike snow, "sky red like blood", "dark as midnight—cinders could be felt falling", "sky fiery red", "ashes and heavy rumblings of thunder at a distance". Time of the phe—lurid glare at Walkerton—2 p.m. At 3, darkness and ashes—no fires near the town. At Lucknow sudden darkness ab 3 p.m. Paisley—3 p.m., darkness. Bluevale—3 p.m., sky clouded. At other places from 2 to 4. Perth—"At most peculiar phenomenon occurred here this afternoon, the like of which had not been seen by the oldest inhabitants. About 1:30 the sky assumed a yellowish tinge which gradually changed to a lurid redness. About 2:30 it was so dark that lams had to be lit. Schools were dismissed and all out of door work had to be suspended. About 4 o'clock a dark cloud appeared in the west, which gradually spread over all the horizon, and in less than an hour all was total darkness. Rain began to fall, and with it something which appeared to be ashes or minute particles of carbon, blackening the rain drops almost as black as ink. Mail, 7th—the bush fires increased, also of 8th, and Michigan outbreak, where had been fires—9th—all fires dwarfed by Michigan. [V; 684.1 to 684.9. (Toronto Mail, August 31???, September 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9, 1881.)]


1881 Sept 5 / Herald, 11-7-3 / Case said be typical. Farmer named Carr—Sudden darkness, harnessing of horses as if by blind men—Family driving away, farmer stopping to turn cattle loose—flying cinders—everything inflammable upon the place bursting into flames. [V; 685. “A Smoking Desert.” New York Herald, September 11, 1881, p. 7 c. 1-4.]


1881 Sept / These fires in Canada small compared with those of the year before. / This = mere doubt. See N.Y. Herald, Sept. 8, 1880, etc., and no phe. [V; 686. (New York Herald, September 8, 1880.)]


1881 Sept 5 / From fires in Ontario forests. Smoke so thick in Toronto that artificial lights all day. / Jou des Debats 7-2-6. [V; 687. “On mande de Toronto le 6 septembre....” Journal des Debats, September 7, 1881, p. 2 c. 6.]


1881 Sept / Michigan fires in the peninsulas bet Saginaw Bay on the northwest and Lake Huron on the east. Swath averaging 20 miles wide and 60 long. Same district as ravaged in 1871. [V; 688. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 9 (no. 9; September 1881): 26-30, at 26.]


1881 Sept 6, etc. / Attrib to forest fires, but in dispatch from Lake Placid, N.Y., "The oldest inhabitants" agreed that such a phe. had never been seen before in the Adirondacks. On 7th so dark schools closed in Schenectady. Work suspended in Troy and may other places. No odor of smoke. Explained from Boston that from forest fires, but at great height. On 7th in Boston, but by 5 p.m. began to let light through and stars visible in zenith by 8 p.m. So yellowish that in Trib, 7th, Prof. Emerson, of Dartmouth, attribs to smoke and pine pollen. Trib, 7th—dispatch from Boston—that the air, looked at through windows or up in sky, was clear, the sun, but the sun was totally obscured. / See M.W.R.—Mich., Tenn., etc. [V; 689.1, 689.2, 689.3. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 9 (no. 9; September 1881): 26-30. “Atmospheric Phenomenon.” New York Tribune, September 7, 1881, p. 8 c. 2. (Nothing of Lake Placid and Schenectady in the Tribune and Monthly Weather Review articles.)]


1881 Sept 6 / Providence, R.I. / Odor of smoke and "a sparse shower of minute cinders” / N.Y. Times 12-4-7. [V; 690. “General Notes.” New York Times, September 12, 1881, p. 4 c. 7. The same phenomena was observed, there, on the preceding Thursday, (September 1). There were forest fires in Ontario, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. See: 1881 Sept 3, (V; 635), and, 1881 Sept 6, (V; 669).]


1881 Sept. 6 / Dark day / Johnstown, N.Y. / Sun 9-1-4. [V; 691. “The Dark Day in Fulton County.” New York Sun, September 9, 1881, p. 1 c. 4. “All things were seen through a red tint.”]


1881 Sept 6 / Trib 7-8-2 / Saratoga / Darkest 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. but dark until noon. [V; 692. “Atmospheric Phenomenon.” New York Tribune, September 7, 1881, p. 8 c. 2.]


1881 Sept 6 / From early morning the effects in Boston. [V; 693. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 9 (no. 9; September 1881): 26-30. At Boston, (page 28): “Stars were visible in the zenith at 8 a.m.” See: 1881 Sept 6, etc., (V; 689). Stars were again visible at the zenith, in Boston, at 8 p.m. “Dark at Noon.” New York Herald, September 8, 1881, p. 4 c. 3. Northampton, Massachusetts, was so dark that mills shut down and lamps were lit to see indoors at noon.]


1881 Sept 6 / The phe and auroral-phe / Sc Am 45/225. [V; 694. “Heat, Sun Storms and Yellow Light.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (October 8, 1881): 224-225.]


1881 Sept 7 / Galveston, Texas / bet 8 and 8:30 / from Scorpio toward Gt. Dipper / "Very remarkable meteor” / NY Times 19-4-7. [V; 695. “Brilliant Meteor Seen in Texas.” New York Times, September 19, 1881, p. 4 c. 7.]


1881 Sept 6 / S / a "Siberian" smoke / Dark / New Eng. / 121 / See M.W.R. and newspapers. [V; 696. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 9 (no. 9; September 1881): 26-30.]


1881 Sept. 8 / Interlaken / By Flammarion / La Nature 1881/2/345 / hazy and a fine rain / gigantic prismatic luminous column, clear cut, shown down from sky / seemed perpendicular but no doubt one end of a great nimbus. [V; 697. Flammarion, Camille. “Curieux Phénomènon Météorologique.” La Nature, 1881 pt. 2 (no. 439; October 29): 345-346, (illustration).]


1881 (Sept) / (E light) / between Interlaken and Berne / Knowledge 2/439 / ("N.R.") / Cor writes that at 10 a.m. one morning in Sept., in midst of dark green trees, a spot of then brilliant silver, with things like stars, that may have been birds playing above them. Thinks was a sun effect. [V; 698.1, 698.2. “A Phenomenon.” Knowledge, o.s., 2 (December 1, 1882): 439. “N.R.” were the initials of the correspondent.]


1881 Sept 6 / Long Branch / Vessels, reversed in clouds—65 counted / N.Y. Times, Sept 7/5/4 / Reported from Manasquan, N.J., in M.W Rev, Sept., 1881. [V; 699. “Curious Atmospheric Effects.” New York Times, September 7, 1881, p. 5 c. 4. “Optical Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 9 (no. 9;  September 1881): 26.]


1881 Sept 9 / Peculiar haze reported from Iowa. / NY Times 14-2-6. [V; 700. “Atmospheric Phenomena in Iowa.” New York Times, September 14, 1881, p. 2 c. 6.]


1881 Sept 6 / "Yellow Day" / New England / Perley, Historic Storms, p. 337. [V; 701. Perley, Sidney. Historic Storms of New England. Salem, Mass.: Salem Press, 1891, 337-338.]


1881 Sept 7 / NYT = Times, 5-4 / 8-3-3 / 9-3-1 / 11-5-4; 13-3-2 / 13-2-4 / 14-2-6 // Phe / N. England. [V; 702. “Curious Atmospheric Effects.” New York Times, September 7, 1881, p. 5 c. 4. “Singular Phenomeon.” New York Times, September 8, 1881, p. 3 c. 3-4. “A Saffron-Colored Sky.” New York Times, September 9, 1881, p. 3 c. 1-2.  Bancroft, J.C. “The Yellow Light.” New York Times, September 11, 1881, p. 5 c. 4.  “Another Atmospheric Display.” New York Times, September 13, 1881, p. 2 c. 4. “Atmospheric Phenomena in Ohio.” New York Times, September 13, 1881, p. 3 c. 2. “Atmospheric Phenomena in Iowa.” New York Times, September 14, 1881, p. 2 c. 6.]


1881 Sept 7 / Said that at Saratoga magnetic effects as well as extraordinary atmospheric effects noted. The magnetic needle stood in any position placed in. / NY Times, 8-4-7. [V; 703. “General Notes.” New York Times, September 8, 1881, p. 4 c. 7.]


1881 Sept 10 / q / Italy / BA '11. [V; 704. Milne, 729.]


1881 Sept 12-13 / A / Am J. Sci 3/22/341. [V; 705. Schaeberle, John Martin. “On the Remarkable Aurora of September 12-13, 1881.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 22 (1881): 341-342.]


1881 Sept 12 / B. Eagle, 14-2-8 / Aurora and magnetic storm. Transmission of messages over wires seriously interfered with. [V; 706. “Current Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 14, 1881, p. 2 c. 8.]


1881 Sept 14 / 3 p.m. / Smoke seen in N.W. Sky obscured at 5:30 p.m. and occasional fall of ashes—attributed to forest fires in Marin Co. / (San Francisco) / M.W.R., Sept, p. 26. [V; 707. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 9 (no. 9; September 1881): 26-30, at 26.]


1881 Sept 14 / N.Y.T., 5-4 / Auroral phe / Telegraphy interrupted. [V; 708. “Auroral Electricity.” New York Times, September 14, 1881, p. 5 c. 4.]


1881 Sept 11 / Trib, 9-3 / Mauna Loa. [V; 709. “Eruption of Mauna Loa.” New York Tribune, September 11, 1881, p. 9 c. 3.]


1881 Sept 12 / A band of yellow light bet 8 and 9 p.m. in north and moving toward horizon, reported from Hanover, N.H., and Utica, N.Y. / Sun 13-1-5. [V; 710. “Curious Celestial Pheonomenon.” New York Sun, September 13, 1881, p. 1 c. 5. “The band differed from an auroral display in that the edges were sharply defined, and that when the band broke up it did so in the form of white, luminous clouds.” “Heat, Sun Storms and Yellow Light.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (October 8, 1881): 224-225.]


1881 Sept 12-13 / Great Aurora / best at 3 a.m. (13th) / Toronto Daily Mail 14-8-1 / (N.M.) [V; 711. (Toronto Daily Mail, September 14, 1881, p. 8 c. 1.)]


1881 Sept. 17 / (Repeat) / Harper's Weekly of / "Cloud of flies were seen the other evening passing over the town of Windsor, Nova Scotia, in a southerly direction. They flew just above the roofs of the houses, and the insects were so numerous [that] they obscured the sky. A few of the insects were captured, and it is said that they looked 'very like large mosquitoes.'” / p. 631. [V; 712.1, 712.2. “Clouds of flies....” Harper's Weekly, 25 (September 17, 1881): 631. See: 1880 Aug 21, (V; 328- & 329), and, 1880 Sept 5, (V: 318 & 319).]


1881 Sept 18-20 / Myriads of white moths at Port Jervis / Sun 21-2-6 / See Sept. 1. [V; 713. “Myriads of Moths in Port Jervis.” New York Sun, September 21, 1881, p. 2 c. 6. See: 1881 Sept 1, (V; 664).]


1881 Sept 19 / New comet near Zeta Virginis / Sc Am 45/225. [V; 714. “More Comets.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (October 8, 1881): 225. Comet C/1881 S1.]


1881 Sept 20 / Encke's Comet seen in hour Garfield dying. / In Auriga. / Of 5 comets of 1881—4 discovered in Auriga. / This date 4 comets visible. / N.Y. Times 22-5-5. [V; 715. “A New Comet Discovered.” New York Times, September 22, 1881, p. 5 c. 5. “The New Comet.” New York Tribune, September 23, 1881, p. 8 c. 2. Comet 2P/Encke.]


1881 Sept 20 / Auriga / See June 24. / New comet near Beta Aurigae / Sc Am 45/225. [V; 716. “More Comets.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (October 8, 1881): 225. See: 1881 June 24, (V; 535). Comet 2P/Encke.]


1881 Sept. 20 / night / Severe shocks at Newman, Ohio / Toronto Mail 22-2-3. [V; 717. (Toronto Mail, September 22, 1881, p. 2 c. 3.)]


1881 Sept 21 / [LT], 8-b / Solar phe of 1880. [V; 718. “Solar Phenomena in 1880.” London Times, September 21, 1881, p. 8 c. 2.]


1881 Sept. 21 / A fireball was seen to fall from the sky, ab 10, this night. It set dry grass afire and then fences and buildings. / Sci Amer 45-241. [V; 719. “Grass Fired by a Meteorite.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (October 15, 1881): 241.]


1881 Sept 21 / 10 p.m. / Springfield, Ill / Fireball fell and set fire to dry grass. / Sc Am 45-241 / ? / See Aug 2. This set fire to brush. / Seems O.K. [V; 720. “Grass Fired by a Meteorite.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (October 15, 1881): 241. See: 1881 Aug 2, (V; 594). The meteor that fell on August 2, 1881, was at Springfield, Ohio, (not Springfield, Illinois). See: 1881 Sept 28, (V; 726).]


1881 Sept 23 / [LT], 11-c / Washed ashore // Sept 27-7-f / a fire. [B; 382. "Washed Ashore." London Times, September 23, 1881, p. 11 c. 3. "The Supposed Incendiarism at Wrotham." London Times, September 27, 1881, p. 7 c. 6.]


1881 Sept 23 / Lake Geneva region / slight shock followed by a violent th. storm / Nature 24-519 / See Sept 25, Elmira. [V; 721. “Notes.” Nature, 24 (September 29, 1881): 518-520, at 519. See: 1881 Sept 25, (V: 722 & 723).]


1881 Sept 25 / 4 p.m. / Quincy, Ill., wiped out by tornado / Elmira, N.Y., 5 p.m. / Sun 26-3-5. [V; 722. “Quincy's Fatal Tornado,” and “Hurricane in Elmira.” New York Sun, September 26, 1881, p. 3 c. 5.]


1881 Sept. 25 / 4:30 p.m. / Elmira / an earthquake / a great volume of water and a wind that carried roofs of houses—all in 2 minutes / N.Y. Herald 26-5-5. [V; 723. “Earthquake and Hurricane.” New York Herald, September 26, 1881, p. 5 c. 5. “The storm was preceded by an earthquake, and now there is a perfect calm.”]


1881 Sept 26 / Explosion / Carload of powder / Council Bluffs, Iowa / Sun 28-1-6. [V; 724. “A Car Load of Powder Exploded.” New York Sun, September 28, 1881, p. 1 c. 6.]


1881 Sept 27 / (3) / S. Africa / obj like a comet seen near the moon, but moving rapidly / Jour Liverpool Astro. Soc 7/107 / by Col. Markwick, at Coldstream, Transvaal / Transvaal cued to body, but [end of note]. [V; 725. Markwick, Ernest Elliott. “On Comets of the Last Century.” Journal of the Liverpool Astronomical Society, 7 (January 1889): 106-107.]


1881 Sept 28 / N.Y.T., 2-5 / Met. fires grass near Springfield, Ill. [V; 726. “Grass Fired by a Meteor.” New York Times, September 28, 1881, p. 2 c. 5. “At about 9:45 o'clock on Wednesday night last, while Mr. Frank Harbauer was sitting on the porch at the rear of his residence on Adams-street, between Fourth and Fifth, he observed a 'ball of fire' fall to the earth but a few yards from him and strike in the yard back of Shepherd's furniture repairing shop. He described it as resembling in appearance an electric light, and it came with a rushing kind of noise something like a sky rocket. There was no report when it struck, and it left no substance that could be seen. It set the dry grass on fire, however, and this Mr. Harbauer and Mr. Shepherd extinguished with water. A reporter of the [Springfield] Register was shown the burned spot yesterday. It is probable that if Mr. Harbauer had not witnessed the fall of the meteor a conflagration would have followed, as the grass burned up to a wooden sidewalk; fire from this would have communicated with the fence, and from the fence would have spread to wooden buildings near it.” See: 1881 Sept 21, (V; 720).]


1881 Sept. 30 / [L], 12-a / Fleeting Shadow. [B; 383. Williamson, G.E. "Fleeting Shadow." London Times, September 30, 1881, p. 12 c. 1. Williamson explains blood vessels of the retina as the origin of  Purkinje images, observed as shadows; however, these are reflections of the cornea and lens of the eye.]


1881 Sept-Oct / Soldiers / Virginia, etc. / 212+. [V; 727. “Visions in the Clouds.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (November 5, 1881): 291. McGrasty, M.C. "A Phenomenon." Dispatch, (Virginia), October 7, 1881, p. 4 c. 2. “Garfield's Heavenly Escort.” Daily Cairo Bulletin, (Illinois), October 28, 1881, p. 2 c. 2.]


1881 Oct. 1 / 8:42 p.m. / Woodstock meteor / LT 6-10-f. [V; 728. “A Magnificent Meteor.” London Times, October 6, 1881, p. 10 c. 6.]


1881 Oct 6 / litle after midnight / New Hamp. / q / Am J Sci 3-23-261 / also Oct 31. [V; 729. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 11.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 23 (1882): 257-261, at 261.]


1881 Oct 9 / Bloomington, Ind. / Spider webs / Sc Am 45/389. [V; 730. Wylie, T.A. “Rain of Spider Webs.” Scientific American, n.s., 45 (December 17, 1881): 389.]


1881 Oct 10 / Disap / N.Y. / See June 4, '83. [B; 384. See: 1883 June 4, (B; 505).]


1881 Oct 10 / mirage / At Rügenwalde, Pomerania—in afternoon a northern village, with snow-covered roofs, from which hung icicles, visible ab ½ hour. Said that human forms were distinctly visible. / Believed been Nexö, on the Island of Bornholm. / Nature, 25-88. [V; 731. “Notes.” Nature, 25 (November 24, 1881): 87-89, at 88.]


1881 Oct-Nov / q's / Europe / See Nature, "Notes", Oct, Nov, Dec. [V; 732. “Notes.” Nature, 24 (October 27, 1881): 610-612, at 611. “Notes.” Nature, 25 (November 17, 1881): 61-64, at 63. “Notes.” Nature, 25 (November 24, 1881): 87-89, at 87-88. “Notes.” Nature, 25 (December 8, 1881): 135-138, at 137. “Notes.” Nature, 25 (December 15, 1881): 159-161, at 161. “Notes.” Nature, 25 (December 22, 1881): 183-186, at 186. “Notes.” Nature, 25 (December 29, 1881): 206-209, at 208.]


1881 Oct / Swiss Series q's—Oct 14—Monthey (Valais) / 17—Berne / 27—Zurich // qs / L.T., Nov. 10-5-d / See Nov. 5. [V; 733. “Switzerland.” London Times, November 10, 1881, p. 5 c. 4. See: 1881 Nov. 5, (V; 744).]


1881 Oct 13 / Gale and heavy rain / Symons Met Mag 19-141. [V; 734. Stooke, Thomas S. “Heavy Rain During Gale of October 13th, 1881." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 19 (October 1884): 141. ]


1881 Oct 16 / 10 p.m. / Obj thought be missing balloonist reported from Detroit City, Minn. / Sun 21-1-6 / But he landed on 14th. / Sun 22-1-3. [V; 735. “The Missing Balloon.” New York Sun, October 21, 1881, p. 1 c. 6. “Safety of the Aeronauts.” New York Sun, October 22, 1881, p. 1 c. 3.]


1881 Oct 21 / near Dawlish, Devonshire / Cloudburst / B. Rainfall 1881/103. [V; 736. “Heavy Fall in 24 Hours During 1881.” British Rainfall, 188, 98-108, at 103.]


1881 Oct 25 / Japan / Kurile Islands / q. / II / BA '11. [V; 737. Milne, 729.]


1881 Oct, latter part / (D-61) / Spider Webs / Wisconsin / Sc Am 45-389. [V; 738. The note copies information from page 61 of The Book of the Damned. Wylie, T.A. "Rain of Spider Webs." Scientific American, n.s., 45 (December 17, 1874): 389.]


1881 Oct. 29 / J / Very bright / R—Jan 7. [V; 739. Refer to: 1881 Jan 7, (V; 430). Barnard, Edward Emerson. "Observations of Jupiter with a 5-Inch Refractor during the Years 1879 to 1886." Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 1 (no. 5; November 30, 1889): 89-111, at 97.]


1881 Oct. 31 / 1:40 a.m. / Contoocook, N.H. / Slight q / Sun, Nov 1-1-7. [V; 740. “Earthquake in New Hampshire.” New York Sun, November 1, 1881, p. 1 c. 7.]


1881 Nov. 1, ab. / Stones / In the Spiritualist (London) of Dec., copied from the Baltimore American, houses near corner of Frederick and Fayette Streets, Baltimore. Stones coming ab at "stated periods". Began at 10 a.m. Then in afternoon, began soon after 3 o'clock and continued as late as next morning, dropped chiefly at rear of a saloon. A servant girl was struck and injured. Police investigated. No result. [B; 385.1, 385.2. “The Puzzling of Baltimore's Police.” Spiritualist Newspaper, 19 (no. 23; December 2, 1881): 267.]


1881 Nov. 1 / Bright and plowing its way along the equatorial region / R—Jan 7. [V; 741. Refer to: 1881 Jan 7, (V; 430). Barnard, Edward Emerson. "Observations of Jupiter with a 5-Inch Refractor during the Years 1879 to 1886." Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 1 (no. 5; November 30, 1889): 89-111, at 97.]


1881 Nov 3 / 6:15—7 a.m. / Sky a pinkish hue that was imparted to trees, fields, etc., at Rutherford, N.J. At Morrisania, N.Y., everything a pale red as if from reflection of a fire. / Sun, Nov 4 and 5. [V; 742. “Sparks from the Telegraph.” New York Sun, November 4, 1881, p. 1 c. 7. “An Atmospheric Phenomenon.” New York Sun, November 5, 1881, p. 2 c. 5.]


1881 Nov. 5 / qs / 5—Austria—I / 18—Switz / 24—Samoa / 30—Agram // BA '11. [V; 743. Milne, 729-730.]


1881 Nov. 5 / Zurich, etc. / 16—greater part of Switzerland / 17—slight at St Gall / 18—the strongest // q's / Switzerland / LT 22-5-d / See Oct 14. [V; 744. “Switzerland.” London Times, November 22, 1881, p. 5 c. 4-5. See: 1881 Oct, (V; 733).]  


1881 Nov. 7 / Trans. Merc. [V; 745. Transit of Mercury.]


1881 Nov. 8 / Trans Mercury / Obs. 29/417. [V; 746. Denning, William Frederick. "The Planets and Planetary Observation." Observatory, 29 (1906): 280-283, 308-314, 355-359, 375-380, 414-418, 458-462; 30 (1907): 92-96, 128-134, 205-208; at v. 29, 417. “Mr. Tebbutt saw a faint whitish spot at the centre, and Dr. Little, at Shanghai, a darkish halo round Mercury, but no included white spot.”]


1881 Nov. 12 / J / "White and distinct, about the size of a satellite, a clouded train following.” / R—Jan 7. [V; 747. Refer to: 1881 Jan 7, (V; 430). Barnard, Edward Emerson. "Observations of Jupiter with a 5-Inch Refractor during the Years 1879 to 1886." Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 1 (no. 5; November 30, 1889): 89-111, at 97.]


1881 Nov. 14 / Large meteoric stone at Vevey, Switzerland / L.T. 22-5-e. [V; 748. “Switzerland.” London Times, November 22, 1881, p. 5 c. 5.]


1881 Nov. 15 / Trondhjem / 2:03 p.m. / vast vertical red column / Nature 25/450. [V; 749. “Notes.” Nature,  25 (March 9, 1882): 448-450, at 450. See: 1882 Jan. 17, (V; 791).]


1881 Nov / (+) / Bound with Dec / Met stone in Switz / Times, Nov 22-5-e / See all q's in. / Index 81 and 82. [V; 750. “Recent European Earthquakes.” London Times, April 13, 1881, p. 12 c. 6. “Earthquakes in June.” London Times, July 9, 1881, p. 12 c. 2. “Switzerland.” London Times, November 22, 1881, p. 5 c. 4-5. “Earthquakes in 1881.” London Times, June 3, 1882, p. 7 c. 6.]


1881 Nov 14 / The large meteoric stone at Vevey. Switzerland / Nature, 25-88 / On Morning of 16th, 3 shocks in Switzerland. / p. 87—There had been a series of q's and avalanches all year. / See Nature "notes. [V; 751. “Notes.” Nature, 25 (November 24, 1881): 87-89, at 87-88. Brezina, Aristides. Die Meteoritensammlung des K. K. Mineralogischen Hofkabinetes in Wien am 1. Mai 1885. Vienna: Alfred Hölder, 1885, 226. No meteoric stone fell at Vevey, according to Brezina, with this detonating fireball.]


1881 Nov 14 / morning / Great meteorite reported to have fallen in town of Vevey, Switzerland. Not true ac to L'Astro 1/30. [V; 752. “Chute d'un uranolithe apocryphe.” Astronomie, 1 (1882): 30. Brezina, Aristides. Die Meteoritensammlung des K. K. Mineralogischen Hofkabinetes in Wien am 1. Mai 1885. Vienna: Alfred Hölder, 1885, 226. No meteoric stone fell at Vevey, according to Brezina, with this detonating fireball.]


1881 Nov. 15 / (Natal) / an ascending meteor that left a gleaming trail / Astro Reg. 20-17. [V; 753. Markwick, Ernest Elliott. “Meteor.” Astronomical Register, 20 (January 1882): 16-17.]


1881 Nov 16 / 1 a.m. / 5:40 a.m. / Sharp shocks / Messina / L.T. 17-5-c. [V; 754. “Italy.” London Times, November 17, 1881, p. 5 c. 3.]


1881 Nov. 16 / 5:20 a.m. / Smart shocks, Berne and Thun, Switzerland, and again a little later in Canon Tessin / LT 18-5-d. [V; 755. “Switzerland.” London Times, November 18, 1881, p. 5 c. 4.]


1881 Nov. 16 / 7 p.m. / Nashville, Tenn / met train / 15 minutes / MWR 07-391. [V; 756. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (no. 9; September 1907): 390-397, at 391.]


1881 Nov 16 / 7th comet of the year—in Cassiopeia / Sun 18-3-4. [V; 757. “Another Comet Discovered.” New York Sun, November 18, 1881, p. 3 c. 4. Comet  C/1881 W1.]


1881 Nov 18 / q. / Switz and Austria / BA '11. [V; 758. Milne, 730.]


1881 Nov. 18 / 11:08 p.m. / q. / Belg / C. et T 8-39. [V; 759. Lancaster, Albert Benoît Marie. "Les Tremblements de terre en Belgique." Ciel et Terre, 8 (March 16, 1887): 25-43, at 39.]


1881 Nov. 17 / bound with Dec / [LT], 10-c / Met / Blackburn. [V; 760. “A Meteor.” London Times, November 17, 1881, p. 10 c. 3.]


[1881 Nov 18 /] 1882 Nov. 18 / 6:41 p.m. / Germany / meteor to left of Jupiter / Zeit Met 17/24. [V; 1028. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 17 (1882): 10-24, at 24.]


1881 Nov. 19 / (F) / Metite—stone—Gross Liebenthal, Russia / Nature 49-33. [V; 761. Fletcher, 105. Judd, John W. “On a Meteorite which Fell near Jafferabad in India on April 28, 1893.” Nature, 49 (November 9, 1893): 32-33, at 33. This is the Gross-Liebenthal meteorite.]


1881 Nov. 19 / Odessa near / Met wounded a postilion. / L'Astro 1884/232. [V; 762. “Uranolithe tombé à Grossliebenthal, près d'Odessa, le 19 novembre 1881.” Astronomie, 3 (1884): 232-233. At the same time as the fall of the Gross-Liebenthal meteorite, in Ukraine, another meteorite fell at “Sitschawska,” (42 kilometres northeast of Odessa), wounding a postilion; but, this meteorite was broken up by peasants for talismans and never examined by scientists.]


1881 Nov 22 / (Ch) / Enormous sun spot—from a vessel—none like it from Greenwich / L'Astro 1882/74 / Ch-27 / (See Sci Amer "astro notes".) See M.W.R. [V; 763. “Énorme Tache sur le Soleil.” Astronomie, 1 (1882): 74. Thomson, William. “Solar Observations.” Nature, 25 (February 2, 1882): 316. The ship Sarah-Bell was near St. Helena, in the South Atlantic, when Chief Officer W.A. Holland, observed the spot, on November 22 and 23, with a sextant. He estimated its size as a sixth of the Sun's diameter; however, unlike other large naked-eye sunspots seen in November, he reported: “The spot appeared to move from the sun's upper limb to the lower limb, and nearly through the sun's centre.”]


1881 Nov. 28 / Ghost believed been seen in Bristol / Medium and Daybreak 13-86. [B; 386. "An Apparition Seen by Two Persons." Medium and Daybreak, 13 (no. 619; February 10, 1882): 86-87. "What Was It?" Western Daily Press, (Bristol), November 30, 1881, p. 7 c. 2.]


1881 Nov. 30 / moon / Elger's observation upon peaks and ridges on floor of Eratosthenes arranged like a Z / Astro Reg 20/14. [V; 764. Elger, Thomas Gwyn Empy. “Eratosthenes.” Astronomical Register, 20 (January 1882): 15-16. Elger observed Mädler's “large central mountain” on November 30; but, “another small mountain,” (with the Z-shaped peaks and ridges), was observed on December 2, 1881.]


1881 Nov. 30 / (Hun) / Agram / one before / q / BA '11. [V; 765. Milne, 730.]


1881 Dec 5 / at Greenwich / Earth's shadow first contact with moon at 3:28 p.m. / When sun set? / See Oct 13, 1856. / Not visible at Greenwich, moon rising there at 3:50 p.m. / L.T., 1881, Oct. 6-6-f. [V; 766. (London Times, October 6, 1881, p. 6 c. 6.; not found here, possibly October 6, 1856, p. 6 c. 6.) See: (1856 Oct 13).]


1881 Dec. 5 / Severe q., North Canterbury, N.Z.., 10:30 a.m. Some springs dried up. A new spring opened, spreading an odor that made it unapproachable. / N. Zealand Jour. of Sci 1-176. [V; 767. “Earthquake Disturbances in North Canterbury.” New Zealand Journal of Science, 1 (June 1882): 176.]


1881 Dec 7 / Wellington, Kan. / for 3 minutes spongy hail from a cloudless sky. / MWR. [V; 768. “Precipitation.” Monthly Weather Review, 9 (no. 12; December 1881): 15-18, at 18.]


1881 Dec 8 / Trib, 5-1 / 15-8-2 / 9-1-6 / 25-6-3 // Severest storm at sea ever known. [V; 769. “Fierce Gales At Sea.” New York Tribune, December 8, 1881, p. 5 c. 1. “Severe Gales on the Atlantic.” New York Tribune, December 15, 1881, p. 8 c. 2. “The November Gales.” New York Tribune, December 9, 1881, p. 4 c. 4. “Ocean Storms.” New York Tribune, December 25, 1881, p. 6 c. 3-4.]


1881 Dec 9 / 4 p.m. / Wolverhampton and Sheffield / "The densest and blackest of fogs within living memory. / Standard, Dec. 10 // also on 10th / Standard, 11th. [V; 770. 'Th e densest and blackest fog....” London Standard, December 10, 1881, p. 3 c. 4. “A dense fog prevailed in some parts of the north and west of England....” London Standard, December 12, 1881, p. 3 c. 4.]


1881 Dec. 10 / Disap Powell in balloon / Ch-7 / Op—Dec 26. * [V; 771. Valentine, E. Seton, and, Tomlinson, F.L. Travels in Space. London: Hurst and Blackett, 1902, 227-228. "The Missing Balloon." London Standard, December 16, 1881, p. 3 c. 1-2. "The Missing Balloon." London Standard, December 19, 1881, p. 5, c. 7. “The Missing Balloon.” London Standard, December 20, 1881, p. 5 c. 7.]


1881 Dec 10 / NY Times, Jan 23, 1883-1-5 / Dispatch from Paris, Jan 22—That the balloon Saladin had been found in the mountains of Sierra del Phedroza, Spain. [V; 772. “Current Foreign Topics.” New York Times, January 23, 1883, p. 1 c. 5.]


1881 December / Dates of Vesuvius / Nature 25/ 294. [V; 773. Johnston-Lavis, Henry James. “The Late Changes in the Vesuvian Cone.” Nature, 25 (January 26, 1882): 294-295.]


1881 Dec 15 / [LT], 6-d / Mut. Sheep. [B; 387. "Mutilation of Sheep." London Times, December 15, 1881, p. 6 c. 4.]


1881 Dec 17 / Leadville Chronicle / Ghost in Leadville, Col / Copied in Religio-P. J, Jan 7, '82. [B; 388. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, January 7, 1882; not found here.) (“Spiritualism at Leadville, Col.” Religio-Philosophical Journal, January 21, 1882, p. 6; spiritualist gives no mention of this ghost.) (Leadville Chronicle, ca. 1881.)]


[1881 Dec. 18] / Myst fires / Trib., 1881, Dec. 18-6-4. [B; 389. “Mysterious Fires.” New York Tribune, December 18, 1881, p. 6 c. 4. See: 1881 Sept 28, (V; 726).]


1881 Dec 18 / A bright red line like of a meteor passing between Jup and satellites / Observatory 5-23. [V; 774. Terby, François. “A Strange Phenomenon.” Observatory, 5 (1882): 23. “It traversed the field of view in a vertical direction, passing between Jupiter and the two satellites, which were at the time west of him, and it remained visible for some three or four seconds after I first remarked it. This red line was exactly similar to the red rays which we see during auroras; however, up to 10h 15m, I was not able to detect any trace of any such phenomenon.”]


1881 Dec 19 and [1882] Jan 15 / Little balloons and Sun / Cor, Sun, Jan 20, '82-2-6, says that upon these dates "There appeared to be balls of fire rolling from the centre of the sun. They turned to a bluish color, casting shadows on the houses as they floated away.” / List—Sept 7, 1881. / Brooklyn. [V; 775.1, 775.2. “What Ailed the Sun?” New York Sun, January 20, 1882, p. 2 c. 6. See: 1881 Sept 7, (V; 702 & 703).]


1881 Dec. 22 / 11:20 p.m. / Tver, Russia / brilliant meteor with a loud detonation / Nature 25-250. [V; 776. “Notes.” Nature, 25 (January 12, 1882): 248-251, at 250. “Byejetsk” is now identified as Bezhetsky, Russia.]


1881 Dec 24 / Spot on moon / E. Mec of that time, p. 424. [V; 777. Williams, Arthur Stanley. “Cleomedes—Alpha Cassiopeiæ—Mare Serenitatis.” English Mechanic, 34 (no. 876; January 6, 1882): 424.]


[1881 Dec 25] / Myst disap / (9) / Sun, 1881, Dec 25-6-7. [B; 390. “A Man Who Has Vanished.” New York Sun, December 25, 1881, p. 6 c. 7.]


1881 Dec 25 / 10:02 p.m. / Laibach / meteor from Rigel to Castor / Zeit Met 17/63. [V; 778. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 17 (1882): 48-63, at 63.]


1881 Dec 26 / Op Mars / (A1). [V; 779. (A1).]


1881 Dec 31 / India / Bengal / q / I / BA '11. [V; 780. Milne, 730.]


1881 Dec 31  8 a.m. / Tidal wave / Ceylon / Straits Times, Sept 7, 1883. [V; 781. “The Volcanic Eruption in Sunda Straits....” Straits Times, (Singapore), September 7, 1883, p. 2 c. 7.]

 
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