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Last updated: April 8, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1867


1867:


1867 / Body of Mrs W.J. Peters, Frankfort, Ind. /  See Dec 22, 1888. [A; 498. See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1867 / about 1867 / Mr Alvin Smith and his wife, known as a writer, as Mrs Oakes-Smith, left their house at Patchogue, L.I., which was known as a haunted house, until it burned down, about 1885. See paragraph on B. Eagle, 1895, Feb. 28-7-3. Said that both Smiths were noted for eccentricity. Died several years before 1895. [A; 499. "Patchogue's Cemetery Ghost." Brooklyn Eagle, February 28, 1895, p. 7 c. 3. "The house which stood on the spot which the figure is said to frequent was burned down about ten years ago. It is about five hundred feet to the east of the dead sailors' resting place. It was owned by Mme. Oakes-Smith, a rich and eccentric woman, who won renown as an author and poet. Her husband was Alvin Smith, also noted for his eccentricity. Mr. and Mrs. Smith, who have been dead several years, left the house about 1867 and during the period from the time until it was burned down many curious stories have been related." Elizabeth Oakes Smith was a popular poet, novelist, and women's rights advocate; she died in 1893. Her husband, Seba Smith, was a humorist, writer, and land speculator, who died in 1868. Alvin Smith was their youngest son, and Elizabeth moved into his home in 1870.]


1867 / South Bend, Ind. / Body of Anna Rees / See Aug 11, 1872. [A; 500. See: 1872 Aug 11, (A; 776).]


1867 / Sleeper, Susan C. Godsey, near Hickman, Ky. / See July 14, 1869. [A; 501. See: 1869 July 14, (A; 547).]


1867 / H.H. / Gardner, Kansas / See March 7, 1874. [A; 502. See: 1874 March 7, (A; 909).]


1867 / Opinion of Schmidt that change in the moon that could not be attributed to the sun's illumination. B.A. 67/22. [III; 1000. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 22.]


1867 / about / Carbon / India / N / D-74. [III; 1001. The note copies information from page 74 of The Book of the Damned. Flight, Walter. "Meteorites and the Origin of Life," Eclectic Magazine, 89, (n.s., v. 26; December 1877): 711-718, at 717. Fletcher, 108. This is the Goalpara meteorite.]


1867 / Axe flint / Eng / (43). [III; 1002. Lukis, Frederick Corbin. "The Elf-Shot and the Elfin-Dart of the North." Reliquary, 8 (1867-1868): 207-208, (illustration). "Some years ago, after a fearful storm which was accompanied with lightning, by which the signal staff of the watch-house was split and shivered, a farmer in the same neighbourhood picked up a flint celt measuring six inches. He at once broke off a small splinter of the celt, and by applying the instrument to his nose discovered a peculiar smell, which he wisely conceived to proceed from its fire origin. For some years the poor unfortunate celt became so dis-shaped by these frequent chippings, as to lose its character of the neolithic age, to which it really belonged, and it is now in my possession as a fair example of the drift period."]


1867 Jan, early / insects / Victoria, Australia / First seen near Ararat, column of beetles, 20 yards broad, so thick as to cast a dark shadow, 2 hours in passing. / Jour of the Proc of the Ent Soc of London, 3/5/85 / Noise they made like hurricane playing in rigging of a ship. [III; 1003.1, 1003.2. "April 1, 1867." Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, s. 3 v. 5 (1865-1867): Proceedings, 84-86, at 85, (lxxxv). "According to the Melbourne papers just received, enormous swarms of beetles have been noticed lately in Victoria, Australia...." "An Invasion of Beetles." The Age, (Melbourne), January 10, 1867, p. 7 c. 1. "On Friday evening last a singular phenomenon was observed in that portion of the bush which lies about half a mile on the north side of the new Moyston-road. This phenomenon consisted of a cluster of small beetles, which must have covered a circle of nearly a quarter of a mile in diameter, and which were evidently bent on migrating to some other locality. The beetles were of that description which has been pointed out to us as the devourers of all kinds of eucalypti herbage; they were of a dark brown bronze color that nearly approaches to black, and were distinguishable only from the common description of bronze beetle by the difference of size and color. The cluster or swarm took very short flights, of not more than fifty yards, but they never remained more than ten seconds on the ground before they resumed their travels. The noise which the insects made was very curious, when rising to fly and flying; it seemed as though a hurricane were playing in the rigging of a ship on that portion of the ground over which they passed. Every time the mass of life rose to continue their journey, hundreds were left behind, apparently disabled in the region of the wings, for, althongh they appeared to make many efforts to follow the main body, they evidently were unable to keep a straight course, for they came down again to the ground with a force and eccentric kind of motion that was suggestive of a tailless kite.—Ararat Advertiser, January 8." "Armies of Beetles." The Age (Melbourne), January 17, 1867, p. 6 c. 5. "The unaccountable migrations or flights of beetles which are occurring in this district is worthy the attention of our savans. In a former issue we described a flight of these insects, the number of which was so great as to cover at least an area of a quarter of a mile in extent. Last week another flight was noticed, of much larger dimensions, spectators of which describe the number as wholly beyond calculation. They were first noticed in the vicinity of the municipal dam, flying in a stream that appeared to be about twenty yards broad, and keeping in close and compact order. Notwithstanding that they flew so thickly as to cast a dark shadow on the ground, they occupied an hour in passing. It is, perhaps, worthy of observation, that at a certain point the stream of insect life turned off at right angles, as though abruptly changing their course at the instance of a leader. On this occasion the beetles flew comparatively high, although not a few of them fell to the ground over which they passed. The whole could be discerned like a huge waving ribbon against the sky, until they disappeared on the horizon. We may remark that in many of the gardens, and in various directions in the bush, the eucalypti have been stripped of every particle of foliage.—Ararat Advertiser, January 15."


1867 Jan 1-2 / Sky overcast in England / Evening of 2nd clear in London. No mets seen. / BA '67-409. [III; 1004. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 409.]


1867 Jan 2, 3 / q's / Algeria / L'Anné Sci 12/311 / Atlas mountains appeared to be enveloped in a luminous atmosphere. [III; 1005. "Tremblement de terre en Algérie." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 12 (1867): 307-312, at 311. On the night of January 8-9, seven more shocks accompanied by subterranean noises struck villages located at the foot of the Atlas mountains.]


1867 Jan 2 / q. / Algeria / L.T, 5th, etc. / 6:30 a.m. [III; 1006. "France." London Times, January 5, 1867, p. 7 c. 5. Arnold, R. Arthur. "The Earthquake in Algeria." London Times, January 16, 1867,p. 10 c. 6. "The principal shock was felt at about 7 15 on the morning of the 2d...."]


1867 Jan 2 / Jan 3 / Feb 7 / Feb 8 / q. / Belg / C et T 8/38. [III; 1007. Lancaster, Albert Benoît Marie. "Les Tremblements de terre en Belgique." Ciel et Terre, 8 (March 16, 1887): 25-43, at 38.]


1867 Jan 3 / 8:30 to 8:45 p.m.8 meteors at Bridport. / BA 67-342. [III; 1008. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 342-343.]


1867 Jan 3 / Spa, Belgium / Three concussions. / Loud sounds. / Bull de l'Aeecad. de Belgique 2-23-52. [III; 1009. "Correspondance." Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, s. 2 v. 23 (1867): 50-53, at 52.]


1867 Jan 8 / See Dec. 12, 1889. [III; 1010. See: 1888 Dec 12, (VI; 1932).]


1867 Jan 8 / Klamath / Met and column of smoke / See Feb 16, 1912. [III; 1011. See: 1912 Feb 16, (MB-I; 95).]


1867 Jan. 8 / Klamath / Column of smoke from a meteor / See May 2, 1890. [III; 1012. See: 1890 May 2, (VI; 2004).]


1867 / Klamath / Column of smoke, meteor / See Nov. 15, 1859. [III; 1013. See: 1859 Nov. 15, (III: 2399 to 2401).]


1867 Jan 8 / daylight / Fort Klamath, Oregon / Smithson Miscel. Col. 37/appendix, p 71 / Ac to L. Tennyson, Quartermaster's Clerk, at daylig[ht] the garrison startled from sleep by a q and sound like thunder. For a time nothing morethen came darkness. [III; 1014. Holden, Edward Singleton. "A Catalogue of Earthquakes on the Pacific Coast 1769 to 1897." Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, v. 37 art. 5 (1898): 1-253, at 71-72.]


1867 Jan 8 / Shock / Klamath Lake fell six feet. / Ref, May 13, 1850. [III; 1015. See:  1850 May 13, (II; 1390). Holden, Edward Singleton. List of Recorded Earthquakes in California, Lower California, Oregon and Washington Territory. Sacramento: State Office, J.D. Young, Supt. of State Printing, 1887, 47.]


1867 Jan 10 / Op Mars / (Al). [III; 1016. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1867, 486.]


1867 Jan 13 / N.Y. Times, 6-2 / The met shower in Turkey. [III; 1017. Pratt, A.T. "The Meteoric Shower in Turkey." New York Times, January 13, 1867, p. 6 c. 2. See: 1866 Nov. 12, (III; 958).]


1867 Jan 13-19, and 24 / Linné / Schmidt / B.A. 67/7. [III; 1018. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 7.]


1867 Jan 14 / Linne / Knott / a strong impression of a dark spot, but definition poor / B Assoc '67/11. [III; 1019. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 11.]


1867 Jan. 15 / Substance / der sogenannte "Rothe Schnee." / Schweiz, Met, Beob., Zuer. 4/9-14. Zeit Met 4/66. [III; 1020. Killias, Eduard. "Der sogenannte 'Rothe Schnee' vom 15. Januar 1867." Schweizerische Meteorologische Beobachtungen, 4 (1867): ix-xiv. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 4 (1869): 61-69, at 66-67.]


1867 Jan 15 / Red snow various parts of the Grisons, Switzerland / mineral matter, diatoms, spores, pollen, vegetable fibres. Nature 2-169. [III; 1021. "Notes." Nature, 2 (June 30, 1870): 168-169, at 169.]


1867 / winter / Canton DuVaud, Switzerlandreddish dust / estimated 1500 tons / "minute particles of mica, feldspar, quartz and variously shaped organic matter" / Chem News 22-262 / D-287. [III; 1022. The note copies information from page 287 of The Book of the Damned. "Chemical Notices from Foreign Sources." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 22 (November 25, 1870): 262-264, at 262. Husemann, August. "Meteorischer Staub im Schnee." Neues Jahrbuch für Pharmacie, 34 (September, 1870): 148-152. "Meteoric Dust in Snow." Popular Science Review, 10 (1871): 112.]


1867 Jan 15 / Day and night, fall of snow colored by reddish dust, several places in Switzerland / La Sci Pour Tous 15-126. [III; 1023. "Météorologie.—Pluie de Sable Arrivé en Italie du 13 au 14 Fevrier 1870." La Science Pour Tous, 15 (no. 16; March 19, 1870): 126.]


1867 Jan 15 / Red snow / Grisons / Bull Soc Vaud., Lausanne 10-281. La Sci P. T. / 15/126. [III; 1024. Nicati, Constant. "Notice sur la Neige Rouge tombée dans les Grisons, le 15 janvier 1867, et Analyse de la Poussière de Sirocco recueillie en Algérie, en novembre 1867." Bulletin de la Société vaudoise des sciences naturelles, 10 (1869): 281-292. "Météorologie.—Pluie de Sable Arrivé en Italie du 13 au 14 Fevrier 1870." La Science Pour Tous, 15 (no. 16; March 19, 1870): 126.]


1867 Jan 16 / Knott / Linne by Knott"Very strong impression" of a small central dark spot in Linné. Nevertheless, that may have [been a curious optical illusion]. B Assoc 67/11. [III; 1025. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 11.]


1867 Jan 19 / Khetri, Rajpootana, India / F. [III; 1026. Fletcher, 103. This is the Khetri meteorite.]


1867 Feb 10 / 8:30 p.m. / Met . France / BA 68-348. [III; 1027. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 348-349. "Bolides." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 12 (1867): 37-43, at 38.]


1867 Feb 17 / Darkness / Paris / Cosmos 3/2/May 30/4. [III; 1028. Roche, Édouard Albert. "Sur les obscurcissements du soleil connus sous le nom d'offuscations." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 2 (May 30, 1868): 3-5, at 4.]


1867 Feb 22 / Fr / See Feb 22, '66 / 11 p.m. / det met / BA 68/348. [III; 1029. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 348-349. "Bolides." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 12 (1867): 37-43, at 38-39. See: 1866 Feb 22, (III; 815).]


1867 Feb 22 / q. / Morecambe Bay / q / Nature 3-406. See '64, '65, '66. [III; 1030. "The Earthquake." Nature, 3 (March 23, 1871): 405-406, at 406, cv. "C.D. de Rance." See: 1865 Jan 15, (III; 656).]


1867 March 4 / 7:20 p.m. / Germany / meteor / Zeit Met 2/216. [III; 1031. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 2 (1867): 211-217, at 216-217.]


1867 March 7 / 6:30 p.m. / Violent q. / Smyrna / At the moment of the q fell heavy rain. Cosmos 2/5/317. [III; 1032. Schnaiter, Camille. "Tremblement de terre." Cosmos, s. 2 v. 5 (March 20, 1867): 317.]


1867 Mar 7-16 / q / Asia Minor / 3,000 houses destroyed / [BA] '11. [III; 1033. A class III earthquake. Milne, 719.]


1867 March 9 (?) / Enormous flight of locusts over Malta, ac to Malta Times, from noon all afternoon. Had been a similar visitation in 1814 and in 1850. / The Field, March 30, 1867. [III; 1034. "A Flight of Locusts." Field, March 30, 1867, p. 225. The date of the locusts was March 9, 1867.]


1867 March 12 / Yellow-like pollen / South Union, Ky. / Sc Am 16/233. [III; 1035. Eades, Harvey Lauderdale. "Yellow Rain." Scientific American, n.s., 16 (April 13, 1867): 233.]


1867 March 15 / by Dawes / "An excessively minute black dot in the middle of Linné." / B Assoc 67/17/ '67/17. [III; 1036. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 17.]


1867 March 20 / 6:15 p.m. / Galizien / Dustfall / Zeit Met 2/380. [III; 1037. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 2 (1867): 376-380, at 380.]


1867 March 28 / Huge hail / Symons Met. Mag. 2-53 / Near Bellary, Madras, India, hail as large as cocoanutsseveral human beings and 400 sheep killed. / Village of Bondalavada, blocks of ice cubic yard in size. 3-pounders fell somewhere elsesaid been verified. Here 2,470 sheep killedsome of the records from reports of Government officials. [III; 1038.1, 1038.2. "Severe Hailstorm in India." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 2 (June 1867): 53-54.]


1867 April / Frgs at Saigon, (?), Cochin-China / Cosmos, N.S., 2-47 / Dictionary for this. [III; 1039. Bernard, S. "Les Pluies de Crapauds." Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), v. 2, (1885): 47-48.]


1867 Ap. 9 / Astro Reg 5/114 / T. G. E. Elger writes from Bedford that at 7:30 p.m. he was surprised to see on the dark part of the moon's disk a light like star, 7th mag., probably in AristarchusIt became fainter and almost extinguished at 9 o'clockMr Elger had seen similar lights but never before one so clear as thisquote Webb as from him. [III; 1040.1, 1040.2. Elger, Thomas Gwyn Empy. "Bright Spot on the Moon." Astronomical Register, 5 (May 1867): 114.]


1867 April 10 / At sunrise on Linné, by Respighi, "a brilliant spot or point entirely isolated on an obscure ground" / B Assoc '67/17. [III; 1041. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 17.]


1867 April 14 / Hailstorm at Leamington / Proc. Brit Met Soc 3/405. [III; 1042. Jones, S. Urwick. "On a Hailstorm at Leamington upon Sunday, April 14th, 1867." Proceedings of the Meteorological Society, 3 (April 1867): 405.]


1867 Ap. 20 / wrms / Cor, omits address, says in Land and Water, May 25, that after a heavy rainfall found in his garden, on ground and in trees innumerable hairworms he thought fallen in the rain. [III; 1043. (Land and Water, May 25, 1867.)]


1867 Ap 20 / No reports of mets / BA 67-409. [III; 1044. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 409.]


1867 Ap. 24 / Kansas, etc. / q / (severe) / A. J. Sci 2/44/132 / 45/129. Bet 1 and 3 p.m., 2 q-waves, Kansas, Neb, Mo, Ill, Ind, Ohio. [III; 1045. "Earthquake in Kansas." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 44 (1867): 132. "Earthquake in Kansas." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 45 (1868): 129-131.]


1867 Ap 29 / Missouri / Kansas / q. / BA '11. [III; 1046. A class I earthquake. Milne, 719.]


1867 May early / Shocks / Cormie / Gent's Mag, N.S., 3/797. [III; 1047. "Scientific Notes of the Month." Gentleman's Magazine, n.s. v. 3 (June, 1867): 796-802, at 797.]


1867 May / Strange Insects / Sci. Amer., Ap. 8, 1871 / "Charles W. Libby, of Cambridgeport, Mass., writes to us as follows: 'In May, 1867, while at Panther Springs, Western Texas, I observed a curious phenomenon. Early in the morning, after a heavy thunder shower had passed over, the air appeared to be full of snow flakes, which gave the appearance of a driving snow storm. Upon examination, I

found the white objects, which were descending, were small insects, and the instant they touched the ground, their white wings dropped off, and left them in the form of small worms, resembling maggots. This continued for twenty minutes, when the insects disappeared.'" [III; 1048.1, 1048.2, 1048.3. "A Shower of Insects." Scientific American, n.s., 24 (April 8, 1871): 227.]


1867 May / Insects / P. Springs / See May 19, 1878. / white ants? [III; 1049. See: 1878 May 19, (IV; 2369).]


1867 May 3 / Dry fog and yellow powder called "pine pollen" at Paris / May 4ToulouseNaples / La Sci Pour Tous 14/58. [III; 1050. Bresson, Gédéon. "Les Offuscations du Soleil." La Science Pour Tous, 14 (no. 8; January 23, 1869): 57-58.]


1867 May 6-7 / moon / Linné dark in dark part of moon / ac to Flammarion, pale but very perceptible light in Aristarchus—"doubtless [simply the effect of] reflected 'earth light'" / Sc Am Sup 7/2696. [III; 1051. Flammarion, Camille. "Is the Moon Inhabited?" Scientific American Supplement, 7 (nos. 169 and 170; March 29, and, April 5, 1879): 2696, 2711-2712, at 2696.]


1867 May 7 / Brilliant point in Aristarchus in dark part / by Tempel, at Marseilles / Astro Reg 5/220. [III; 1052. "The Crater Linné." Astronomical Register, 5 (October 1867) 218-220, at 220.]


1867 May 7 / Northern Whig (Belfast), 20th / Ab midnight, Glenelg, Scotland, remarkable meteor, s. to n. [III; 1053. "Remarkable Meteor." Northern Whig, (Belfast), May 20, 1867, p. 4 c. 5. "A correspondent states that towards midnight of Friday last a very beautiful meteor was seen at Glenelg, Scotland. It passed so closely over a small yacht that was becalmed in bay as to afford to the party on board full opportunity of observing it. Its course was from south north, contrary to light airs that had been blowing in the opposite direction, and its motion so slow that the eye could easily follow it. The light it emitted was sparkling, of beautiful bluish tint, and so powerful as to overpower that of the moon, which was in its first quarter, in a cloudless sky. Its apparent height was only a few feet above the mast-head of tbe yacht, over which it passed, and its diameter at that distance seemed to be about nine or ten inches. After proceeding some fifty yards beyond the vessel it was suddenly extinguished, its place being marked for an instant by a faint red spark. There was no explosion, but the air was filled with a very perceptible odour, resembling that produced when two pieces of quartz are struck together."]


1867 May 8 / Shock at Comrie—immediately afterward torrents fall. / Dublin Daily Express, 15th. [III; 1054. (Dublin Daily Express, May 15, 1867; not found here.) "Earthquakes at Strathearn." Dundee Courier, May 13, 1867, p. 3 c. 3. "The district of upper Stratheam and adjacent places have been visited by a succession of pretty smart shocks of earthquake during the last two or three days. At a little past ten o’clock on Wednesday night a pretty severe shock was felt at Comrie. and was followed by another about ten minutes afterwards at Greenloaning Railway Station—a distance of about eleven miles from Comrie. Both shocks were distinctly felt. Between seven and eight o’clock Thursday, and at early hour yesterday morning, shocks passed over the district, and, though there was little shaking of the earth, apparently the noise accompanying the shock, which resembled distant thunder the discharge of cannon, was heard over a large district. Immediately after the shocks of Wednesday rain poured down in perfect torrents, and has continued with very little intermission since. At Comrie, which appears to be the seat of this strange phenomena, earthquakes have not been so frequent as this season since 1839."]


1867 May 9 / Dublin Express, May 14 / an account in the same issue / "They presented a charred appearance, and when broken emitted an aromatic flavor. They are unlike any growing in these latitudes and have defeated efforts of botanists and chemists who might be supposed to throw some light upon the subject of their identity." It is said that the quantity was so great that a hoax was out of the question. A cor in the 14th says he had been told that they fell with such velocity that policemen, though protected by their helmets, had been obliged to seek shelter. / Cor in 15th writes that they were unripe oranges—distributed by the high winds from some distillery or carried by a whirlwind from the south of France. Ex May 15—That a Mr. Leslie, a chemist in Brideshead, Dublin, having an immense number of shrunken oranges, has got rid of them by scutting them in the streets. [III; 1055.1, 1055.2, 1055.3, 1055.4. "Curious Phenomenon." Dublin Daily Express, May 14, 1867, p. 2 c. 6. "The Shower of Berries." Dublin Daily Express, May 14, 1867, p. 3 c. 2. "The Phenomenon Explained." Dublin Daily Express, May 15, 1867, p. 2 c. 5. Tichborne, Charles R.C. "The Shower of Berries." Dublin Daily Express, May 15, 1867, p. 2 c. 8.]


1867 May 9 / Someone sends extracts from Dublin newspapers and a sample to the Editor of Symons Met Mag 2/59. He writes. That the correspondent "is informed that they are simply hazel nuts preserved in a bog for centuries. [III; 1056. "A Shower of Hazel Nuts!" Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 2 (June 1867): 59. Seville oranges are a bitter variety the fruit, which are used to produce marmalade and orange-flavoured liqueurs.; but, the wooden husk of the hazelnut, or filbert, (grown in Ireland and Britain), should easily be distinguished from the peel of a small orange.]


1867 May 9 / [Typescript]:


In Symons' Met. Mag., 2-9, a correspondent writes that, upon May 9, 1867, a large quantity of "berries" had fallen from the sky. It seems to me that nothing can be said except that they were wooden objects, and that this writer called them "berries" in sheer helplessness and unfamiliarity. His description is of objects like small oranges, half an inch in diameter, but made of a substance like hard, dark-brown wood, slightly aromatic. There is a letter from another correspondent, who says that these objects fell in a rain storm, in great quantities in Dublin, falling on both sides of the river. Someone else sent some of them to the Editor, who writes that they were simply hazelnuts that, for centuries, had been preserved in a bog. One expects him to go and say that a whirlwind had chanced upon and had especially selected a hoard of thousands of hazelnuts out of a bog. However, this time, he says that he cannot explain.


[III; 1057. Typescript. "A Shower of Hazel Nuts!" Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 2 (June 1867): 59.]


[1867 May 9 /] 1867 May 7 / Cor who writes to Symons Met Mag 2/59 says, dated June 1st, "I have been given two of these berries: they are in the form of a very small orange, about half an inch in diameter, black in color, and when cut across, see as if made from some hard, dark, brown wood. They also possess a slight aromatic odor." Various speculations have been given as to their origin, but none of them seem to be worth much. [III; 1058.1, 1058.2. "A Shower of Hazel Nuts!" Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 2 (June 1867): 59.]


1867 May 9 / See Manna berries—June 17, 1890. [III; 1059. See: 1890 June 17, (VI: 2022 & 2024).]


1867 May 9 / Described in Irish Times, May 14, as "a shower of berries of a blackened appearance, varying in size from a pea to a sloe, and having a very aromatic odor, some hard and others soft." [III; 1060. (Irish TImes, May 14, 1867; not found here.) "Extraordinary Phenomenon." Farmer's Gazette and Journal of Practical Horticulture, (Dublin), May 18, 1867, p. 11 c. 3-4.]


1867 May 9 / Someone else sent to the Editor of Symons (2-59) "small balls" which fell upon him. Not told by him where. Editor says, "They are simply hazel nuts, preserved in a bog for centuries. How they came to descend on him we cannot say." [III; 1061. "A Shower of Hazel Nuts!" Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 2 (June 1867): 59. "Inquirer...." Irish Times, (Dublin), May 14, 1867, p. 3 c. 6. "Inquirer who has sent us some 'small balls' which he says 'fell' in large quantities on Thursday night, locality not specified, is informed that they are simply hazel nuts, preserved in a bog for centuries. How they came to descend on him we cannot say."]


1867 May 9 / Nothing in Dublin Evening Freeman. [III; 1062.]


1867 May 10 / Violent th storms this evening Birmingham, Newscastle, Cambridge, etc. [III; 1063. "Thunderstorms." Suffolk Chronicle, May 11, 1867, p. 10 c. 1. "Thunderstorm in Newcastle." Newcastle Journal, May 11, 1867, p. 2 c. 4.]


1867 May 10 / Linné / white cloud / Flammarion / B.A. 67/7. [III; 1064. Flammarion, Camille. "Changement arrivé sur la Lune. Le cratére de Linnêé." Comptes Rendus, 64 (1867): 1020-1022. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 7.]


1867 May 11 / by Schmidt / Linnae like a white cloud. In it a delicate white point, casting a shadow. / B Assoc '67/18. [III; 1065. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 18.]


1867 May 11 / England / Snails after a th. storm / Sci Gos 1867-215. [III; 1066. "An Invading Army of Snails." Science Gossip, 3 (no. 33; September 1, 1867): 215.]


1867 May 11 / Not said where. Cor tells of appearance of army of snails, with and without shells. Many killed by salt, shovelled away. Cor noted that it was after thunderstorms and wondered whether electricity had anything to do with the phe. / Sci Gos 1867/215. [III; 1067.1, 1067.2. "An Invading Army of Snails." Science Gossip, 3 (no. 33; September 1, 1867):  215.]


1867 May 12 / Olivet, Mich / from 1:45 to 3:15 a.m. / 28 meteors from a region between Aquarius and Pegasus. / Am/ J.Sci., 2-44-129 / In Rept. BA '67 and '68, only these noted. [III; 1068. "Observations of Shooting Stars, May 12th, 1867." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 44 (1867): 129-130, at 129. (BA 67. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 348-349.]


1867 May 14 / [LT], 7-c / q. / Comrie. [III; 1069. "Earthquakes at Comrie." London Times, May 14, 1867, p. 7 c. 3.]


1867 May 16 / toward midnight / Shocks / Tabres, France / La S. P. Tous 12-232. [III; 1070. "Tremblement de Terre." La Science Pour Tous, 12 (no. 29; June 20, 1867): 167.]


1867 May 23, 24 / Linné / Schmidt / Rept B. Association '67/7. [III; 1071. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 7.]


1867 May 27 / bet 2:30 and 3:00 a.m. / Enormous meteor over Greece / Chem News 16-228. [III; 1072. "Foreign Science." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 16 (November 1, 1867): 228-229, at 229.]


[1867 May 27 and June 9. Wrong dates. See: 1869 May 27 and June 9, (I; 1074).]


1867 May 30 / Birmingham / Augs / Astro Reg (L) 5/157. [III; 1073. Bird, F. "Meteor-Like Bodies Seen Near the Sun." Astronomical Register, 5 (July 1867): 157-158.]


1867 May 31 / [LT], 5-e / Ghst in Woburn Sq. [A; 503. "A Ghost in a London Square." London Times, May 31, 1867, p. 5 c. 5. The Times article is copied from the Lancet.]


1867 Mayabou[t] / Stationary light / London / Woburn sq / N / D-257. [A; 504. The note copies information from page 257 of The Book of the Damned. "A Ghost in a London Square." Lancet, 1867 v. 1 (June 1): 688.]


1867 June 1-2 / Azores. / First indications were shocks Dec 24, 1855. Then many others. / C.R. 65-663. [III; 1076. Deville, Ch. Sainte-Claire, and, Janssen. "Récit de l'éruption sous-marine qui a eu lieu, le 1er juin 1867, entre les îles de Terceira et de Graciosa, aux Açores." Comptes Rendus, 65 (1867): 662-668. A submarine vent of the Terceira volcano.]


1867 June 1-2 / night / Volc in Azores / had been shocks since May 26 / CR 65-29. [III; 1077. "M. Charles Sainte-Claire Deville communique l'extrait suivant d'une Lettre publiée par le journal A Persuasão, de Saint-Michel (Açores)." Comptes Rendus, 65 (1867): 29. A submarine vent of the Terceira volcano.]


1867 June 1-2 / night / Submarine eruption near Serreta / 38° 52' Lat N or S, not said / and Long 27° 52' W. La Sci Pour Tous 12-261. [III; 1078. "M. Charles Sainte-Claire Deville communique l'extrait suivant d'une Lettre publiée par le journal." La Science Pour Tous, 12 (no. 33; July 18, 1867): 261. "M. Charles Sainte-Claire Deville communique l'extrait suivant d'une Lettre publiée par le journal A Persuasão, de Saint-Michel (Açores)." Comptes Rendus, 65 (1867): 767. North latitude.]


1867 June 5 / Azores / maximum / See June 1/ q's greatest 12th and 13th. [III; 1079. See: 1867 June 1-2, (III: 1076, 1077, 1078).]


1867 June 5 / Maximum volc / Azores / Then decreased to Aug 18. / C.R. 65-667. To Aug. 18. [III; 1080. Deville, Ch. Sainte-Claire, and, Janssen. "Récit de l'éruption sous-marine qui a eu lieu, le 1er juin 1867, entre les îles de Terceira et de Graciosa, aux Açores." Comptes Rendus, 65 (1867): 662-668, at 667-668. A submarine vent of the Terceira volcano.]


[1867 June 8 /] 1878 June 8 / Raps / child dead / Told in South Australian Chronicle, June 17, copied in the Spiritualist, Aug. 9, of phe in home of Philip Howell, of Adelaide, Mr Howell in a letter told his version. / Loud rapping on doors. So loud neighbors attracted 6 to 10:30 p.m. and a crowd around. On 11th a child of his died. Noises kept up at least to 10thall very loud. [B; 192.1, 192.2. "There has recently been a supposed supernatural visitation...." South Australian Advertiser, (Adelaide), June 18, 1867, p. 2 c. 7. Howell, Philip. "The Ghost Story." South Australian Weekly Chronicle, (Adelaide), June 22. 1867, Supplement, p. 1 c. 2-3. Howell's letter is dated "June 17" and published on June 22. Sinclair, Frederick. "Psychological Phenomena in Australia and Elsewhere." Spiritualist Newspaper, (London), 13 (no. 6; August 9, 1878): 67-69, at 69. "I have neglected my usual custom of marking the date of the occurrence on this extract, but the event occurred only a few years back."]


[1867 June 9. Wrong date. See: 1869 June 9, (I; 1075).]


1867 June 9 / Great q / Java / BA '11. [III; 1081. A class III earthquake. Milne, 719.]


1867 June 9 / 10:30 p.m. / Metites /Setif / C.R. 65-240 / 66-514. [III; 1082. Augeraud. "Chute d'aérolithes dans la plaine de Tadjera (Amer Guebala) à 15 kilomètres sud-est de Sétif, le 9 juin 1867, vers 10h 30m du soir." Comptes Rendus, 65 (1867): 240-242. Daubrée, Gabriel-Auguste. "Météorite tombée le 9 juin 1867, en Algéie, à Tadjera, près Sêétif, province de Constantine." Comptes Rendus, 66 (1868): 513-519. This is the Tadjera meteorite.]


1867 June 9 / (See Jan.) / Near Setif, Algeria / flashing light, rumbling sound, fall of 3 stones / Rept. .A. 1867-381 / to 10:30 p.m., local time / (F). This is May 9, ac to Chem. News 16/83. / See Aug 25, 1865. [III; 1083. Fletcher, 103. (BA 67-381.) "Reports of Societies." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 16 (August 16, 1867): 83. See: 1867 Jan 2, 3, (III: 1005 & 1006). Fort may have considered as association between these meteorites and an earthquake and luminous phenomena in Algeria, six months earlier. This is the Tadjera meteorite.]


1867 June 9 / 10:30 p.m. / Details / stones / Setif / La Sci Pour Tous 12-301. [III; 1084. "M. Augeraud Fait la Communication Suivante Relative à une Chute d'Aérolithes...." La Science Pour Tous, 12 (no. 38; August 22, 1867): 301-302. Augeraud. "Chute d'aérolithes dans la plaine de Tadjera (Amer Guebala) à 15 kilomètres sud-est de Sétif, le 9 juin 1867, vers 10h 30m du soir." Comptes Rendus, 65 (1867): 240-242. This is the Tadjera meteorite.]


1867 June 9 / Aerolite / See 1866. [III; 1085. Monck, William Henry Stanley. "AerolitesPerpetual Motion.” English Mechanic, 79 (no. 2045; June 3, 1904): 383-384. See: 1866 June 9, (III; 879).]


1867 June 10 / 3 distinct roundish spots near Sulpicius Gallus by Dawesnot there June 13 / The Student 1/261. [III; 1086. Birt, William Radcliffe. "Has the Surface of the Moon Attained Its Final Condition?" Student and Intellectual Observer, 1 (May 1868): 261-268, at 261.]


1867 June 11 / (3's) / Revue Cours Scientifique 4/528 said that some persons heard or alleged that heard 3 detonations before disappearance. [III; 1087. "Aérolithe du 11 Juin." Revue des cours Scientifiques de la France et de l'Étranger, 4 (1866-1867): 528.]


1867 June 11 / 8 p.m. / Great sunset meteor, France, Switzerland. Contorting train more than an hour. / BA 67-378. [III; 1088. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 349-350 & 378-381, (illustration).]


1867 June 11 / sunset met / 8 p.m. / Basle, etc. / great met train from a few minutes after sunset till an hour later / BA '67-350. [III; 1089. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 349-350 & 378-381, (illustrations).]


1867 June 11 / BA 69-284 / 11:55 / Meteor / Germany / Zeit Met 2/315, 352. [III; 1090. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 284. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 2 (1867): 314-317, at 315-317. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 2 (1867): 352-357, at 352-353.]


1867 June 11 / Bolide reported from many places in Belgium. M. Quetelet gives it the one origin of to the right and a little below the moon. / Cosmos 2/6/223 / BA '67-378. [III; 1091. "Le bolide du 11 juin." Cosmos, s. 2 v. 6 (August 24, 1867): 223. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 349-350 & 378-381, (illustrations).]


1867 June 11 / Stream of light in Plato, by Birt, who says that it was thrown by sun through a very apparent depression in the west wall. Student 1/264. [III; 1092. Birt, William Radcliffe. "Has the Surface of the Moon Attained Its Final Condition?" Student and Intellectual Observer, 1 (May 1868): 261-268, at 264, (illustration).]


1867 June 11 / Aug / C. L. Prince of Uckfieldobjects crossing field of his telescope, supposed by him to be seeds. / (NM) / Astro Reg 5/179. [III; 1093. Prince, C.L. "Meteor-Like Bodies Near the Sun." Astronomical Register, 5 (August 1867): 179.]


1867 June 11 / (Cut) / Spot on Mercury a little south of center, by C. L. Prince, of Uckfield / (N.M.) / Astro Reg 5/179 / faint lines diverging from it. [III; 1094. Prince, C.L. "Meteor-Like Bodies Near the Sun." Astronomical Register, 5 (August 1867): 179.]


1867 June 13 / 8 p.m. / Paris / met train / MWR 07/391/ June 11? [III; 1095. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (no. 9; September 1907): 390-397, at 391, cv. Table 3.]


1867 June 13 / Cor in Land and Water, Dec 19, 1868, writes that this day a "curious scream" was heard from some place on his lawn, between the caterwauling of a tom cat and the scream of a macaw. / Heard a few times during night, but next day repeated at intervals of only a few seconds and 2 following nights. Cor searched in vain and got men to help him trample the grass. This at Heywood, Clommel. [A; 505.1 505.2. (Land and Water, December 19, 1868.)]


1867 June 13 / Sheep / L.T., 11/b / 20/7/a  / Sheep fatality / Demon possession. [A; 506. "Singular Fatality among Sheep." London Times, June 13, 1867, p. 11 c. 2. "A Strange Story." London Times, June 20, 1867, p. 7 c. 1. ("Extraordinary Case of Demonical Possession in a Free Church." Scotsman, betw. 17-19 of June, 1867; not @ BNA for this date.)]


1867 June 30 / q. / Austria / I / BA '11. [III; 1096. A class I earthquake. Milne, 719.]


1867 summer / Bullets / Mound City, Kansas / In Religio-Phil Jour., Ap. 24, 1880, someone who read of the Lingo casesee March, 1880. / A cor, J. H. Marshall, writes that, having read of Lingo case he recalled experience of his own. At time he was Register of Deeds of Linn Co. Home of himself, wife and niece, a little girl aged 11. Bullets were falling about in the room, forcefully, but not with gun velocity. Large bird-shotbroad daylight, at short intervaks for an hour or more. Must have been a pound or more, but he could find only half a dozen. / No ghostly phe then, but he says that at another time in the year, raps were heard. [A; 507.1, 507.2, 507.3. Marshall, J.H. "Another Haunted House." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 28 (no. 8; April 24, 1880): 8, (c. 3). See: 1880 March, (B; 277), and 1880 March 6, (B; 278).]


[1867 July 2 /] 1866 July 13 / [LT], 14-d / Submarine volc, off Serreta Point. [III; 897. “Submarine Volcano.” London Times, July 13, 1867, p. 14 c. 4. The Terceira volcano.]


[1867 July 2 /] 1867 July 3 / [LT], 14-d / Volcsubmarineoff Serreta Point. [III; 1098. “Submarine Volcano.” London Times, July 13, 1867, p. 14 c. 4. The Terceira volcano.]


1867 July 3 / Polt / Mass / [Typescript]:


(19)


Atlantic Monthly, 22-129:


That, in a town in Massachusetts, in a house wherein was employed an Irish girl, Mary Garrick, a series of disturbances began, upon July 3, 1867, and lasted several months and was investigated by Mr. H.A. Willis, the writer in the Atlantic Monthly. Mr. Willis says that he saw remarkable levitations: a table rose and fel, when no one was near itexcept that the girl was in the room. He gives instances that indicate a power that was external to the girlor that was emanating from her, without her knowledge, though that is not my notion. Mr. Willis says that he saw a soapstone slab that weighed forty-eight pounds rise and fall and break. He writes that the phenomena did occur, but that, in his opinion, to attribute manifestations of an unknown force to "spirits of the departed" is "folly, delusion, and imposture." The attitude that I take in this book is about the same, though as the years go by, and senility begins to creep over me, I shall probably recant. It is not that I deny the possibility of attaining to immortality; or to Absolute Being, by a few persons in every generation, but that many phenomena, called "psychic" seem to have been dumped together on one maudlin doctrine.


Mary Garrick went awaythe phenomena ceased. She returnedthe phenomena renewed.


One's inclination, upon reading that, is to look knowing, but I think, myself, having had some experience, myself, that the knowing look is the preliminary to the crestfallen. Sometimes I suspect that there may be a functioning in all our theorizing: that we're a lot of trained seals, balancing hypotheses upon our noses, before an audience of higher, invisible beings. It is easy enough to balance a theory upon the apex of [Thayer: "That is all.]


[A; 508. Typescript. Willis, Henry Augustus. "A Remarkable Case of 'Physical Phenomena.'" Atlantic Monthly, 22 (August 1868): 129-135. The name of the girl, according to this article, was Mary Carrick, (not Garrick); and, the incidents in the article were supposed to have occurred in Fitchburg, Massachusetts.]


1867 July 3 / q. / India / I / Madras / BA '11. [III; 1097. A class I earthquake. Milne, 719.]


[1867 July 3. Wrong date. See: 1867 July 2, (III; 1098).]


1867 July 9 / Linne / Huggins / white spot / BA '67/7. [III; 1099. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 7.]


1867 July 10 / Great aurora / N. Zealand / Trans N.Z. Inst 1902-406. [III; 1100. Skey, Henry. "Notes on the Aurora in the Southern Hemisphere." Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 35 (1902): 405-408, at 406.]


1867 July 14 / Brazil / Compass needle oscillating upon appearance of meteor / BA 69-224. [III; 1101. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 224-225. "At the appearance of the meteor, the compass-needle oscillated 15° from the north towards the west; six minutes later, a detonation was heard in the south-west." (Anglo-Brazilian Times, August 7, 1868. Microfilm @ Harvard.)]


1867 July 17 / Great Naval review at Spitheadsound of guns heard in Herefordshire near Frome, 110 miles away / Nature 62-378. [III; 1102. Davison, Charles. "The Distance to Which the Firing of Heavy Guns Is Heard." Nature, 62 (August 16, 1900): 377-379, at 378.]


1867 July 18 / 7:30 p.m. / Meteor / Westmoreland Co., Pa / A. J. Scie. 2/44/288. [III; 1103. Kirkwood, Daniel. "On a Meteor of July 18th, 1867." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 44 (1867): 288.]


1867 July 26 /Excessive rainfall / Symons Met Mag 2-1867. [III; 1104. "Excessive Rainfall, July 26th, 1867." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 2 (August 1867): 75-78.]


1867 Aug 6 / 8 p.m. / Mr. Buckingham saw in the place of Linne the rise of an oval spot. / on the dark part of the moon / Same evening, Mr. Bird saw two "notches" in the terminator near Linné / (Cut) / Rept BA 1867/7. [III; 1105. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 7.]


1867 Aug. 6 / Linné as an oval spot that rose gradually out of the dark part of moon, and cast a shadow. By Buckingham / B.A. '67/7. [III; 1106. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 7. Tempel, Wilhelm. "Schreiben des Herrn W. Tempel an den Herausgeber." Astronomische Nachrichten, 69 (1867): 375-376. Tempel also states that the crater appeared to have become a small hill, when he observed it on July 22, 1867.]


1867 Aug 9 / 8:35 p.m. / Lyons, France / met / also 10th and 11thnot Lyons / BA 68-348. [III; 1107. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 348-349. "Bolides." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 12 (1867): 37-43, at 42.]


1867 Aug / Meteors / BA 1867/20. [III; 1108. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 409-411.]


1867 Aug 10 / Mets scarce in England / BA 67-409. [III; 1109. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 409.]


1867 Aug 11 / At Hazelton, near Philadelphia, ab. 2 a.m."a considerable number of conspicuous meteors," by Prof Cresson / Proc. Amer Phil Soc 10-342. [III; 1110. "Stated Meeting, August 16th, 1867." Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 10 (1865-1868): 342.]


1867 Aug 11 / At Poughkeepsie, N.Y., from 1 to 2 a.m., over 70 mets counted. Then too fast to be counted. / BA 67-411. [III; 1111. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 411.]


1867 Aug 11 / 1 a.m. / Amboise, France / met visible 30 seconds / "consisted apparently of [hundreds of] smaller meteors moving together" / B.A. '68-348. [III; 1112. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 348.]


1867 Aug. 13 / [LT], 10-d / 14-5-f / August Meteors. [III; 1113. "The August Meteors." London Times, August 13, 1867, p. 10 c. 4. "The Meteors of August." London Times, August 14, 1867, p. 5 c. 6.]


1867 Aug 13 / [Wonderful Celestial Phenomenon.] / Reprint in Port-of-Spain Gazette, Sept 21, 1925 / (1925). [III; 1114. Newspaper clipping. ("Wonderful Celestial Phenomenon." Port-of-Spain Gazette, September 21, 1925.)]


1867 Aug 15 / NY Times, 8-5 / Meteors. [III; 1115. "The Meteors." New York Times, August 15, 1867, p. 8 c. 5. On the night of August 11, 1867, 198 meteors were observed in New York' City's Central Park.]


1867 Aug 15 / N.Y. Times, 8-5 / Meteors. [III; 1116. "The Meteors." New York Times, August 15, 1867, p. 8 c. 5.]


1867 Aug 19 / Dobbs' Ferry, N.Y. / met / BA 69-284. [III; 1117. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 284.]


1867 Aug 20 / 10 p.m. / Edinburgh / met. / BA 68-348. [III; 1118. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 348-349.]


1867 Aug 21 / (It) / 8:30 p.m. / Piedmont, Turin, Moncalieri / met / BA 68-348. [III; 1119. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 348-349. "Bolides." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 12 (1867): 37-43, at 43.]


1867 Aug. 22 / Meteor / Germany / Zeit Met 2/428. [III; 1120. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 2 (1867): 422-429, at 428-429.]


1867 Aug 27 / Star shower at Birmingham / bet 9:30 and 11 p.m. / meteors in groups. BA '69/220. [III; 1121. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 218-221.]


1867 Aug 29 / Total solar eclipse / Clerke. [III; 1122. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1st ed., (1885), 218-219; 4th ed., (1902), 170-171. A new element was discovered during this eclipse, when Charles Augustus Young and William Harkness discovered a "single green ray" in the coronal spectrum. Norman Lockyer, (who had discovered the unknown solar element helium, by its yellow line), identified this as "coronium." "The originating substance, designated 'coronium,' of which nothing is known to terrestrial chemistry, continues luminous at least 300,000 miles above the sun's surface, and is hence presumably much lighter even than hydrogen." Mendeleev, Dmitri. Translated by George Kamensky. An Attempt Towards a Chemical Conception of the Ether. London: Longmans, Green, 1904, 28-30. Mendeleev thought that coronium was too light, as an elemental gas, to remain in the Earth's atmosphere and "could certainly only exist in the atmosphere of a body having as great a mass as the sun." The mystery of coronium's existence wasn't resolved, until 1939, when its spectra was correctly identified with iron, by Bengt Edlén. Swings, Pol. "Edlén's Identification of the Coronal Lines with Forbidden Lines of Fe X, XI, XIII, XIV, XV; Ni XII, XIII, XV, XVI; Ca XII, XIII, XV; A X, XIV." Astrophysical Journal, 98 (1943): 116-128, Table 8, at 128.]


1867 Aug 29-Sept 5 / Eruption / Iceland / Smith. Inst. Rept.1885/511. [III; 1123. "Volcanic Eruptions and Earthquakes in Iceland within Historic Times." Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian, 1885, 495-541, at 511. The Grímsvötn volcano.]


1867 / ab. Aug 27 / Distance phe / Hecla / The Field, Oct 5, '67 / Aug 29L.T., Nov. 8. At Reykjavik / Strong disagreeable odorsheets of flame ascending like lightningsounds like gunfire / "lightning and rolling peals of thund[er] / fall of grayish ashes, of black pumice and yellow sulphur. [III; 1124.1, 1124.2. "Eruption of Mount Hecla." Field, October 5, 1867, p. 288. "Eruption of Mount Hecla." London Morning Post, September 26, 1867, p. 2 c. 6. "Volcanic Eruption in Iceland." London Times, November 8, 1867, p. 7 c. 6. The Grimsvotn volcano.]


1867 Aug 29 / Eruption / Iceland / La Sci Pour Tous  13-23 / 13-63. [III; 1125. "Éruption Volcanique en Islande." La Science Pour Tous, 13 (no. 3; December 19, 1867): 23. "Éruption Volcanique en Islande." La Science Pour Tous, 13 (no. 8; January 23, 1868): 63.]


1867 Sept 3 / Meteorite had fallen in a field during a th. storm near Woodstock, ac to Birm Journal , June 6, 1868, quoting Rev. John Hoskyns-Abrahall, of Woodstock, in Daily News. D. News, June 5 / (Oxfordshire). [III; 1126. "Meteorites and Thunderstorms." Birmingham Journal, June 6, 1868, p. 6 c. 5. Hoskyns-Abrahall, John. "Meteorites and Thunderstorms." London Daily News, June 5, 1868, p. 6 c. 4. "It is well to mention (though this may be a case of simultaneity merely), that after the thunderstorm of the morning of the 3rd of last September it was found that a large meteorite had fallen in a field here, burying itself in the ground, and tearing up the surrounding soil."]


1867 Sept 6 / [LT], 7-f / Volc in the Arctic. [III; 1127. "Volcanic Eruption in Arctic Regions." London Times, September 6, 1867, p. 7 c. 6. The Grimsvotn volcano.]


1867 Sept 7-9 / Great sunspots / C.R. 65/501. [III; 1128. Chacornac. "Note relative à l'apparition d'une grande tache solaire, et à quelques observations faites sur l'Úclipse de Lune du 13 septembre." Comptes Rendus, 65 (1867): 501-502.]


1867 Sept 9 / q. / Greece / I / BA 11 / Patras, Candia. [III; 1129. A class I earthquake. Milne, 720.]


1867 Sept 11 / 9 p.m. / Meteor at Arcachon / N.M. / C.R., 65-602. [III; 1130. "M. Daubrée donne communication d'une Lettre...." Comptes Rendus, 66 (1867): 602.]


1867 Sept 13 / Sunspots reappeared. / E Mec 6/15. [III; 1131. Tuck, J. "Solar Spots." English Mechanic, 6 (no. 131; September 27, 1867): 13, (illustration). Smurthwaite, William. "Sun Spots." English Mechanic, 6 (no. 131; September 27, 1867): 15, (illustration).]


1867 Sept 13 / (Cut) / Eclipse of the moon"As the earth's shadow progressed, Aristarchus continued to be well seen till nearly the greatest phase, just before which I saw it as an 8th magnitude star, but after that I did not see it at all." / Herbert Ingall / Astro Reg 5/241. [III; 1132. Ignall, Herbert. "Lunar Eclipse." Astronomical Register, 5 (November 1867): 240-241.]


1867 Sept 13 / Although the moon entered the penumbra of the earth's shadow at 9h. 43m., no change in its appearance was perceptible until 10h. 30m. / by John Browning / Astro Reg 5/216. [III; 1133. Browning, John. "To the Editor of the Astronomical Register." Astronomical Register, 5 (October 1867): 216.]


1867 Sept 13 / Eclipse of moon / In Intellectual Observer, 12-223, John Browning, F.R.A.S., writes, "According to calculation, the eclipse must have commenced at 9:43, for at that time the Moon entered the penumbra of the earth's shadow; yet, three quarters of an hour after this, no diminution of luminosity in the Moon could be detected." [III; 1134.1, 1134.2. Browning, John. "The Lunar Eclipse of September 13." Intellectual Observer, 12 (October 1867): 223-226.]


1867 Sept 14 / Tremendous invasion by moths in N.S. Wales / Entomologist 4-48 / an account of a church filled with them so, Oct 6th, that services had to be abandoned / See Zoologist, March 1868. [III; 1135. "Plague of Moths." Entomologist, 4 (March 1868): 48. "Entomological Society." Zoologist, s. 2 v. 6 (March 1868): 1136-1144, at 1138-1139.]


1867 Sept 13 / (moths) / Enormous flights of moths in Australia, N.S. Wales / On 26th, a flight thick, and broad and a mile long, coming in from the sea, also another such flight at Newcastle, N.S.W. this day. Said that a vessel 20 miles out was covered with them. At St. Leonards, N.S.W., millions, ac to estimate, in a church. 80,000 on the windows. / H. C. Russell, quoting W. B. Clarke / Climate of N. S. Wales, p. 28. [III; 1136.1, 1136.2. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. Climate of New South Wales: Descriptive, Historical, and Tabular. Sydney: Charles Potter, 1877, 28. Clarke, William Branwhite. "Moths." Sydney Morning Herald, October 11, 1867, p. 5 c. 5.]


1867 Sept. 17 / moths / Sydney, etc., N.S.W. invaded by moths, alarming people, the hosts of them scattering dust or "moth-feathers". All examined were males. On Oct 7th, a ship 300 miles from coast of N.S.W., great numbers in sea, and on 8th, sea covered with them. / Proc Ent Soc., London, 1868-2. [III; 1137. "February 3, 1868." Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, 17 (1868): Proceedings, 1-9, at 2-3, (ii-iii). "The Moths." Sydney Morning Herald, October 16, 1867, p. 4 c. 4. "Captain Twiss, of the Express, brigantine, which vessel arrived at Newcastle on the 9th instant,

reports that, on the 7th instant, being three hundred miles from the New South Wales coast, he observed a great number of moths on the sea. On the 8th instant, the weather being moderately calm, the sea was literally covered with moths. Captain Twiss was of opinion they had been blown from the shore; but, from observation on land, they appeared to come from the sea in the teeth of a westerly gale.Newcastle Chronicle."]


1867 Sept 15 / (Cut) / Clapham, London / "Directed, in its apparent path, exactly from the moon." / B Assoc 1868-350. [III; 1138. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 350-351, (illustration).]


1867 Sept. 15 / 11:04 p.m. / London / met / BA 68-350. [III; 1139. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 350-351, (illustration).]


1867 Sept 17 / Village of Bédarieux, France / Detonationthought was exploding meteor. La Sci Pour Tous 12-394. [III; 1140. Berthe, J. "Bulletin." La Science Pour Tous, 12 (no. 50; November 14, 1867): 393-394.]


[1867 Sept 19. Wrong date. See: 1868 Sept 19, (III; 1141).]


1867 Sept 25 / N.Y. Herald 26-6-5 / 4 p.m. and continued ½ hour, at Philadelphia, hailstones, some the size of hens' eggs. At Reading, Pa., some 8 inches in circumference and weighed 3 ounces. [III; 1142. "Terrific Hail Storm in Philadelphia," and, "The Storm in Reading." New York Herald, September 26, 1867, p. 6 c. 5.]


1867 Sept 25 / Deluge and avalanche of hail / Philadelphia / La Sci Pour Tous 13-39. Sudden and as suddenly sun out again. [III; 1143. "Phénomène Météorologique." La Science Pour Tous, 13 (no. 5; January 2, 1868): 63.]


1867 Sept 28 / Sydney Morning Herald of / "A small but destructive beetle has made its appearance in the Kalouda vineyard, on the Hunter. It resembles the Elephant Beetle, but is of considerably less size." [III; 1144. "Notes of the Week." Sydney Morning Herald, September 28, 1867, p. 5 c. 1.]


1867 Oct 2 / Germany / Det met / Zeit Met 2/511. [III; 1145. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 2 (1867): 507-511, at 511.]


1867 Oct 4 / night of / Birds drop dead. / Aldeburgh, Suffolk, Eng. ** [III; 1146. Moor, E.C. "Swallows and Martins picked up dead at Aldeburgh." Zoologist, s. 2 v. 2 (1867): 990. Moor attributed the death of these birds to frost.]


1867 Oct. 5 / Linne as a faint nebulosity / by Slack / BA '67/7. [III; 1147. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 7.]


[1867 Oct 7. Wrong date. See: 1867 Oct 14, (III; 1148).]


1867 Oct. 10 / Linné as a clear white spot / by Slack / BA '67/8. [III; 1149. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 7-8.]


1867 Oct 12 / Nothing in Sydney Morning Herald. [III; 1151. See: 1867 Sept 13, (III; 1136).]


[1867 Oct 14 /] 1867 Oct 7 / afternoon / Detonating meteor / Margate / Symons 2-130. [III; 1148. "Three Strange Stories." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 2 (December 1867): 130. "Fall of an Aerolite." Dover Express, October 18, 1867, p. 3 c. 3. "Those persons who happened to be upon the parades were startled by perceiving an aerolite descend into the sea at some distance."]


1867 Oct 17 / Linné as a white spot, by Bird / BA '67/8. [III; 1150. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 8.]


[1867 Oct 18 /] 1868 Oct 18 / Began phe in house in Kensington / Ev. Standard, Jan 23 / On a Friday and every Friday since, and sometimes on Saturdays. Old lady, aged 84, her daughter and one servant. Loud knocks on street door and no one visible. At irregular intervals. Police on guard and raps while they were watching. / Never after 11 p.m. [A; 535.1, 535.2. "A Haunted House." London Standard, January 23, 1868, p. 3 c. 4. "A Haunted House." London Evening Standard, January 23, 1868, p. 6 c. 2. "Just as all were talking at once, rap-rap-rap! In an instant all four gentlemen were in the front garden; the policeman was quietly standing opposite the door; the lady of the house opposite watching the door from her portico, and another gentleman from the leads. All declared that not a living creature had been near the house for at least a quarter of an hour. The whole thing seems inexplicable, and has created quite a sensation in the heighbourhood."]


1867 Oct 18 / Hawkhurst, Kent / 9 mets in one hour from Ursa Minor / BA 68-350. [III; 1152. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 350-351.]


1867 Oct 18 / (Cut) / Thames Ditton, Surrey / An appearance like a shower of fire and sulphur found upon puddles of water or water butts. Symons Met 2/130. [III; 1153. "Three Strange Stories." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 2 (December 1867): 130. "Atmospheric Phenonenon." Liverpool Mercury,  October 22, 1867, p. 7 c. 7. ""On Friday night last, about ten o'clock, the inhabitants of Thames Ditton, Surrey, were greatly astonished at witnessing what appeared a shower of fire. This strange a phenomenon lasted about a quarter of an hour, and while the shower continued had the appearance of long threads of fire. The next morning it was evident that sulphur must have been the immedite cause of this extraordinary shower, since the puddles and water-butts in the upper part of the village were covered with a thick deposit of sulphur.. Some of the water has been preserved in bottles; it is yellow in colour and emits a strong a. smell of suphur."]


1867 Oct 18 / Pollen (not) / At Thames Ditton, Surrey, told in the Guardian of Kingstown, St Vincent, B.W.I. / a shower of fire for ¼ hour. Next morning, puddles and water butts covered with a thick deposit of sulphur. [III; 1154. (Guardian, Kingston, St. Vincent, BWI, 1867.)]


1867 / Monday, before Oct 18 / afternoon / Village of Thames Ditton, Surreya sound like a signal gunan aerolite was seen to fall into the sea. / Symons, 2-130. [III; 1155. "Three Strange Stories." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 2 (December 1867): 130. The "sound like a signal gun" belongs to the account of a detonating meteor at Margate. See: 1867 Oct 7, (III; 1148).]


1867 Oct 18-20 / Details of 43 meteors at Hawkhurst, Kent. / BA '68-354. [III; 1156. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 350-355.]


1867 Oct 18-20 / Orionids observed by Prof. A. S. Herschel / (N.M.) / Nature 64-651. [III; 1157. Denning, William Frederick. "The October Orionids." Nature, 64 (October 31, 1901): 651-652.]


1867 Oct 18 / 10:55 to 11:53 / 7 mets / Kent / BA 68-350 / Many on 19th and 20th / Streakers. [III; 1158. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 350-355.]


1867 Oct 18-20 / Sky so generally overcast in England, no obs. could be collected. / BA 67-382. [III; 1159. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 382.]


1867 Oct. 18 / Linné as a convex white spot, by Buckingham / B.A. '67/8. [III; 1160. Birt, William Radcliff. "Report of the Lunar Committee for Mapping the Surface of the Moon." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 1-24, at 8.]


1867 Oct 19 / (Jupiter) / by J. E. Clarke, of Pontefract, Yorkshire / (Cut) / between 10:04 and 10:33 p.m. / 5 mets appeared near Jupiter. Rept B As. '69-222 / also on 20th. [III; 1161. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 222-223. Two meteors were observed by Clarke near Jupiter on October 19, at 10:20 and 10:33 P.M.; and, two other meteors were observed on October 20, at 10:04 NS 10:14 p.m., (not five meteors).]


1867 Oct 21 / evening / Germany / met and phe? / Zeit Met 2/546. [III; 1162. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 2 (1867): 534-548, at 546.]


1867 Oct 29 / Great hurricane / Nov. 18, great q / West Indies / Bull Seis Soc Amer 10-9 / details. [III; 1163. Reid, Harry Fielding, and, Stephen Taber. "The Virgin Islands Earthquakes of 1867-1868." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 10 (March 1920): 9-30.]


1867 Oct 29 / Hurricane and 2 severe shocks of q. at St. Thomas. Guardian and Govt. Gazette, Nov 16 (of Kingstown, St. Vincent). [III; 1164. (Guardian and Government Gazette, St. Vincent, November 16, 1867.)]


1867 Nov 1 / night / Cyclone / Bengal / L.T., Dec 4-12-2 / 600 native boats destroyed. 30,000 native huts destroyed. 1000 killed in Calcutta. [III; 1165. "India." London Times, December 4, 1867, p. 12 c. 2.]


1867 Nov. 1 / Of the Jour Asiatic Soc. of Bengalfirst findable allusion, by Bábu Gourdass Bysack, to the Barisal GunsThinks are sounds [of] surf, but notes that never been heard at Balasore, [note cut off, "only seven"] miles from the Bay of Bengalbut were confined [to re]gion around Barisal. [III; 1166.1, 1166.2. Bysack, Gourdass. "On the Antiquities of Bágerhát." Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 36 (1867): 126-135, at 133-135.]


1867 Nov. 4 / [LT], 7-d / Wtchcraft in Warwickshire. [A; 509. "Witchcraft in Warwickshire." London Times, November 4, 1867, p. c. 4. A supposed witch was assaulted with a knife to break a spell upon a family.]


[1867 Nov 4. Wrong date. See: 1867 Nov. 11, (III: 1170).]


1867 Nov. 8 / [LT, 7-f / Volc / Iceland. [III; 1171. "Volcanic Eruption in Iceland." London Times, November 8, 1867 p. 7 c. 6. The Grimsvotn volcano.]


1867 Nov. 11 / (Little Balloons) / bet 3 and 4 p.m. / In Symons Met Mag., 2-130 / taken from the Chatham News, Capt. James F Beveridge of Chatham writes that upon the afternoon of the 4th of Nov., he saw an "extraordinary sight in the heavens. He saw an acquaintance of his looking toward the sky, uttering exclamations. "On turning in the direction toward which he was looking, the west, I, also, was astonishednumberless black discs, in groups, and scattered, were passing rapidly through the air. He said his attention was directed to them by his little girl, who called to him, in the mill, saying, 'Look, father, here are a lot of balloons coming!' They continued for more than twenty minutes, the time I stayed. In passing in front of the sun, they looked like large cannon shot. Several groups passed over my head, disappearing suddenly, and leaving puffs of greyish brown vapor very much like smoke." The Editor writes, "We are told that several persons saw this extraordinary phenomenon and concur in Captain Beveridge's letter." (+) / Not Nov. 4 but 11. [III; 1167.1 to 1167.5. "Three Strange Stories." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 2 (December 1867): 130.]


1867 Nov. (11) / Nothing in Times, Field, Standard, Daily News / Nov. 11. [III; 1168. Allnatt, Richard Hopkins. “November, 1867.” London Evening Mail, December 4, 1867, p. 3 c. 3. “A curious modification described by Mr. James E. Beveridge as having been witnessed by him at Chatham on the afternoon of the 11th. Above the horizon was a succession of dark masses of cirro-stratus rolled bv the action of opposing wind currents into groups of insulated spheroids. Their origin appears to have to that which produces the beautiful undulations of cirro-cumulus so often seen at approaching sunset.”]


1867 Nov. 11 / Date of little balloons, ac to Beveridge's letter in the Chatham News, Nov 16th. [III; 1169. "Three Strange Stories." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 2 (December 1867): 130.]


[1867 Nov. 11 /] 1867 Nov. 4 / Chatham / (Augs) / (Cut) / Augs (+) / Symons Met Mag., 2-130Capt James Beveridge writes that between 3 and 4 in afternoon he saw something that "astonished himnumberless black discs, in groups and scattered, passing overheadfor more than 20 minutes. In passing front of the sun, looked like large cannon shot. Some disappeared suddenly, leaving puffs of greyish brown vapor. Ed writes that he been told others had seen this "extraordinary phe". [III; 1170.1, 1170.2. "Three Strange Stories." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 2 (December 1867): 130.]


1867 Nov. 11-12 / BO / night / 11:21 and 12:20 / Dense dark clouds and lightning and earthquake. / Jamaicaclouds preceded by several hoursL.T., Dec 19-5-5, severe shocks. [III; 1172. "The Earthquakes at St. Thomas." London Times, December 19, 1867, p. 5 c. 4-5.]


1867 Nov. 11 / Nothing in Maidstone and Kentish Journal. [III; 1173.]


1867 Nov. 12 / Vesuvius / Gentleman's Mag, N.S., 5 / signs from last Oct. [III; 1174. "Scientific Notes of the Month." Gentleman's Magazine, n.s. v. 5 (January, 1868): 90-97, at 92.]


[1867 November ] / [The November Star Showers.] / Port of Spain Gazette, September 21, 1925. [III; 1175. Newspaper clipping. (Port of Spain Gazette, September 21, 1925.)]


1867 Nov. 12 / Olmsted and 6 mo period of Leonids / A. J. Sci 29-378. [III; 1176. Olmsted, Denison. "On the cause of the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 29 (1835-1836):  376-383, at 378. "As the periodic time cannot be less than half a year, neither can it be greater; for then a conjunction could not take place at the same part of the earth's orbit in two successive years. Hence, I inferred that the periodic time is six months nearly."]


1867 Nov 12 / Geminids active on Leonid date / Nov 13, 1907 / See 1866. [III; 1177. See: (1866), and, 1907 Nov. 13-14, (IX; 906).]


1867 Nov. 12 / Mets, Nov 27, 1885, active, but so were the Perseids. [III; 1178. See: (1885 Nov 27.)]


1867 Nov. / Androms. predicted for 1905 / See Nov. 27, 1885. [III; 1179. See: (1885 Nov 27.)]


1867 Nov 12 / Leonids great / Nov. 15, morning, 1901. Nature 66-662 / See date. [III; 1180. "The Leonid Shower." Nature, 66 (October 30, 1902): 662. There is no reference in this article to the 1867 date.]


1867 Nov / Leonids in America / "Although failing to match the general expectation, nevertheless was a most striking spectacle." Todd, Astronomy, p. 288. [III; 1181. Todd, David Peck. Astronomy: The Science of the Heavenly Bodies. New York: P.F. Collier, 1922, 288.]


1867 Nov.  Leonids / In the monthly edition of the Natal Mercury of Durban, no mention of meteors. [III; 1182.]


1867 Nov. / Nothing of Leonids in Trans Roy Soc of Victoria. [III; 1183.]


1867 Nov / No mention meteors in Nourse's "Hall's Second Arctic Expeditions". See Appendix I, "Hall's Astronomical Observations". [III; 1184. Hall, Charles Francis. Nourse, J.E., ed. Narrative of the Second Arctic Expedition.... Washington: U.S. Naval Observatory, 1879, 380 & 451-475. Hall does not mention meteors, and he only mentions stars and planets as alternative methods for  determining the time, when chronometers and solar observations are difficult.]


1867 Nov 13 / Mets through clouds / See Nov 13-14, 1871. [III; 1185. See: 1871 Nov 13-14, (IV; 549).]


1867 Nov 13 / bet 10:45 p.m. and daybreak on 14th / 9 meteors observed / Cape of Good Hope / BA 68-356. [III; 1186. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 356-357. Maclear, George William Herschel. "Meteoric Shower, November 1867, observed at the Cape of Good Hope." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 28 (January 10, 1868): 52-53.]


1867 Nov 13 / See shower, Aug 27. [III; 1187. See: 1867 Aug 27, (III; 1121).]


1867 Nov 12 / (B) / After this date. In Rept BA, 1868-344, says, "Large meteors, star-showers, and aërolites have [contnued] during the past year to attract the attention of observers, especially on the 1st, 28th, [and] 31st of January, and on the 29th of February last," (1868). [III; 1188. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 344.]


1867 Nov. 13 / What clouds have to do with visibility of meteors if many close to earth? / See Nov. 27, 1885, a salmon note. / See other notes, 1885 and 1872. [III; 1189. See: (1885 Nov 27; 1872; 1885.)]


1867 Nov / Leonids somewhat abundant / 1903. [III; 1190. See: 1903 Nov 15, (VIII; 2025), and, 1903 Nov 16, (VIIII; 2026).]


1867 Nov. 12 / Predictions wrong. / See Nov 15, 17, 1905. [III; 1191. See: 1905 Nov 15, (IX; 113), and, 1905 Nov 17-23, (IX; 118).]


1867 Nov. 13 / If Leonids in 1898 active, so were Geminids. [III; 1192. See: 1898 Dec 9, (VIII; 385), and, 1898 Dec 9-12, (VIII; 386).]


1867 Nov / Leonids / Nov. 12-13, 1874. [III; 1193. See: 1874 Nov 12-13, (IV; 1547).]


1867 Nov / Vesuvius and metssame in 1868. [III; 1194. See: (1868.)]


1867 Nov. / Leonids numerous / Nov 17, 1893. [III; 1195. See: 1893 Nov 17, (VII; 916).]


1867 Nov 13 / A protected prediction / Nov 13-16, 1908. [III; 1196. See: 1908 Nov 13-16, (IX; 1125).]


1867 Nov. 13 / If Leonids (some) Nov 13, 1898, also Geminids active. [III; 1197. See: 1898 Dec 9, (VIII; 385), and, 1898 Dec 9-12, (VIII; 386).]


1867 Nov. 12 / Eruption of Vesuvius / La Sci Pour Tous 13-13. [III; 1198. "M. Charles Sainte-Claire Deville Communique une Nouvelle Éruption du Vésuve." La Science Pour Tous, 13 (no. 2; December 12, 1867): 13. Palmieri, Luigi. "Sur une nouvelle éruption du Vésuve." Comptes Rendus, 65 (1867): 897-898.]


1867 Nov 12 / (Dec 12) / See that Geminids active after Leonids. / 1833. [III; 1199. See: 1833 Dec 11, (I; 1854).]


1867 Nov 12 / See prediction of Quadrantids. / Nature 65-199. [III; 1200. Henry, John R. "The Quadrantid Meteors." Nature, 65 (January 2, 1902): 198-199.]


1867 Nov. 12 / Sometimes, when no meteors, there are magnetic disturbances. / See 1905. [III; 1201. See: 1905 Nov, (IX; 99) and, 1905 Nov 12, 15. (IX: 108).]


1867 Nov 13 / Leonids / See Nov 15, 1886. [III; 1202. See: 1886 Nov 15, VI; 940).]


1867 Nov 12 or 13, to Jan 15, 1868 / First greatest series of eruptions of Vesuvius. Y.B. 1869-230. [III; 1203. "Vesuvius." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1869, 230-234, at 230.]


1867 Nov 12 / Leonids great / 1874. [III; 1204. See: (1874.)]


1867 Nov 14 / See 1866. / great mets. [III; 1205. See: (1866.)]


1867 Nov 13 / See prediction, Nov 13, 1869. [III; 1206. See: 1869 Nov 13 or 14, (IV; 20), and, 1869 Nov 12-13 / 13-14, (IV; 21).]


1867 Nov 12 / 33¼ year period / See mets great as 1833, on Nov 12-13, 1832. / See Nov 12, 1831. [III; 1207. See: 1831 Nov. 12-13, (I; 1732). The 1832 reference was the wrong date.]


1867 Nov. 12 / See prediction, Nov 13, 1869. [III; 1208. See: 1869 Nov 12-13 / 13-14, (IV; 21).]


1867 Nov. 12 / See mets of 1872, active before Nov. 27. [III; 1209. See: (1872.)]


1867 Nov. 13 / If period of Leonids so determined, how about others? / See Lyrids, Ap. 20. [III; 1210. See: 1867 Ap 20, (III; 1044).]


1867 Nov 13 / New crater in Vesuvius / C.R. 65-871. [III; 1211. Pisani, P. "Lettre à M. le Président, au sujet d'une éruption qui a eu lieu au Vésuve, le 13 novebre 1867." Comptes Rendus, 65 (1867): 871.]


1867 Nov. 13 / Vesuvius begins. / Revue C. Sci. 5/120. [III; 1212. Palmieri, Luigi. "Éruption du Vésuve commencée le 13 novembre 1867." Revue des cours Scientifiques de la France et de l'Étranger, 5 (1867-1868): 120.]


1867 Nov. 13-14 / night / from 9:30 p.m., 13th / In Trinidad, light like a candelabrum in S. sky. C.R. 66-313 / But see Aug 13. [III; 1213. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. "Note sur quelques phénoménes lumineux qui accompagnent les casaims d'étoiles filantes." Comptes Rendus, 66 (1867): 312-314, at 313.]


1867 Nov 12 or 19th / See 23rd. [III; 1214. See: 1867 Nov. 23, (III; 1243).]


1867 Nov 13-14 / E. J. Lowe obs. as stated N. Lands / Verified in M. Notices 28/32. [III; 1215. The note copies information from page 21 of New Lands. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "14th November, Meteor Epoch 1867." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 28 (December 13, 1867): 32. Lowe observed "no meteors" on November 13, when the skies were clear from 7:40 to 9:10 P.M.; and, only one meteor was observed, at 1:27 A.M., between 1:10 and 3:10 A.M., on November 14.]


1867 Nov 14 / Early in the morning. / Calmar, Sweden / thousands of meteors / BA 68-393 / This continuation of the near Bremen account. [III; 1216. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 393.]


1867 Nov 14 / (A) / 8 a.m. / near Bremen, Germany, in a thick fog / Meteors looked "like small swarms of gnats." Seemed to start from a point in the south. Observer unnamed said been "a friend of Dr. Behrmann". Said he saw some crossing the rising sun. BA '68-392. [III; 1217.1, 1217.2. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 392-393.]


1867 Nov. 14 ./ New volc in Nicaragua, ab 8 leagues from city of Leon / L.T., 1868, Jan-14-10-d. On afternoon of 27th, a vaster eruption. [III; 1218. Dickinson, A.B. "A New Volcano in Nicaragua." London Times, January 14, 1868, p. 10 c. 4. The Cerro Negro volcano.]


1867 Nov 14 / Nicaragua / All around the jungle of skeleton trees stripped of foliage by cinders. [III; 1219. Dickinson, A.B. "A New Volcano in Nicaragua." London Times, January 14, 1868, p. 10 c. 4.  The Cerro Negro volcano.]


1867 Nov. 14-etc. / New volc near Leon, Nicaragua / A. J. Sci 2/45/131 / espec. 27th. [III; 1220. Dickerson, Andrew Bray. "On the Volcanic eruption near the city of Leon." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 45 (1868): 131-133. The Cerro Negro volcano.]


1867 Nov. 13-14 / Great star shower / U.S. [III; 1221.]


1867 Nov. 14 / Iowa City, Iowa / met trains / 2:51 a.m. / 2:56 / 3:03 / 3:08 / each several minutes / MWR 07-391. [III; 1222. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (no. 9; September 1907): 390-397, at 391, cv. Table 4.]


1867 Nov 14 / morning / Star showers / U.S. and West Indies / BA 68-356. [III; 1223. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 356-357.]


1867 Nov 14 / mete[ors] / Editor of the Guardian and Govt. Gazette (Kingstown, St Vincent) in issue of the 16th, says saw from 4:30 until daylight at 5:30. shower of mets "which flew about in every direction and in every magnitude. [III; 1224. (Guardian and Govt. Gazette, November 16, 1867.)]


1867 Nov. 14 / (morning) / Meteors / none reported from Paris Observatory / Symons 2-130. [III; 1225. "The Meteor Shower of November 14th, 1867." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 2 (December 1867): 129-130.]


1867 Nov 14 / N.Y. Times, 1-4 / 15-5-4 / Meteors. [III; 1226. "Meteors." New York Times, November 14, 1867 p. 1. c. 4-5. Meteors were observed in Washington, D.C. "The Meteors." New York Times, November 15, 1867, p. 5 c. 4-5.]


1867 Nov 15 / Algeria / Meteoric dust in Oran, Algeria / Vierlelrahrssch / Naturs. Ges. Zu. 13/313 / Bull Soc Vaud Lausane 1868-69. [III; 1227. Cramer, Carl Eduard. "Auszüge aus den Sitzungs-Protokollen." Vierteljahrsschrift Der Naturforschenden Gesellschaft in Zürich, 13 (1868): 308-316, at 313. Nicati, Constant. "Notice sur un échantillon de poussière de Scirocco, recueillie en Algérie en novembre 1867." Bulletin de la Société Vaudoise des Sciences Naturelles, 10 (1868): 69-73.]


1867 Nov. / No mention of Leonids in Cape Argus. [III; 1228.]


1867 Nov 13, etc. / No meteors mentioned in the Sydney Morning Herald. [III; 1229.]


1867 Nov. 12-13 / Told in Melbourne Argus of 13th that great meteor shower expected between 12th and 14th. No more mention. [III; 1230. (Melbourne Argus, November 13, 1867; not found.)]


1867 Nov. 15 / From 4 to 8 a.m., great display mets, Shanghai / Rept BA 69-301. Also an account of enormous numbers seen ab 50 miles N.N.W. of Pekin. [III; 1231. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 301-302.]


1867 Nov 15 / night / The great eruption of Vesuvius. Y.B. '69-233. [III; 1232. "Vesuvius." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1869, 230-234, at 233.]


1867 Nov. 16 / Spon comb / Dowlais Merthr, 5 a.m. / Workman passing a house, smelled smokebroke in. Mary Howells, aged 70roasted to death in her bedsupposed candle had ignited the bed. Some time before, her son had been suffocated at the Dowlais Works. / Morning Post20-7-5. [A; 510.1, 510.2. "A Woman Roasted Alive in Bed." London Morning Post, November 20, 1867, p. 7 c. 5.]


1867 Nov. 16 / Spon Comb / [London] Times of "The Downpatrick Recorder reports a case of [alleged] spontaneous combustion in the human body as having occurred in that town. A woman named Mary M'Mullen and her son, living in a house in Baron-lane, were missed, and the door of their house was forced open. Hugh M'Mullen, the son, was found lying with his head next the fireplace, [and his feet towards the door,] quite insensible. In an inner room were found lying under the window [simply] a few fragments of what had been his mother. A bed and bedstead in the room had been burnt, and she had died by fire. Some furniture in the apartment was still smouldering. The only portions of her body found were the breast, hands, both feet, and the lower parts of the leg bones. The upper portions of the leg, the thighs, and all the parts of the body not specified as having been found, were completely calcined. Hugh M'Mullen died in the Infirmary the same night. At the inquest, Mr. Newport White, M.D., said he was strongly inclined to the opinion that the woman's death was caused by spontaneous combustion. In the case of Hugh M'Mullen the jury returned a verdict [of]  'Death from effusion on the brain by blood poisoning from smoke;' and in the case of Mary M'Mullen 'Burnt to death.' " [A; 511.1 to 511.6. "Spontaneous Combustion." London Times, November 16, 1867, p. 9 c. 1. "Shocking Catastrophe. Supposed Case of Spontaneous Combustion." Downpatrick Recorder, November 9, 1867, p. 2 c. 7. Martin, John. "Spontaneous Combustion." Downpatrick Recorder, November 16, 1867, p. 2 c. 1. "To the Editor of the Downpatrick Recorder." Downpatrick Recorder, November 30, 1867, p. 2 c. 1.]


1867 Nov. 18 / [LT], 9-d / Ext. freak, [A; 512. "Extraordinary Freak." London Times, November 18, 1867, p. c. 4.]


1867 Nov. 18 / The dry fog at St. Thomas came with the q and lasted several days. / Nouvelles Météorologiques 1/170. [III; 1233. (Nouvelles Météorologiques, 1-170.)]


1867 Nov 18 / Ship Capt reported having seen on or about the 19th, large flames of fire on Guadeloupe./ Colonial Standard, Kingston, Jamaica, Dec. 2. [III: 1234. (Colonial Standard, Kingston, Jamaica, December 2, 1867.)]


1867 Nov 18-19 / [Terrific Earthquake At St. Thomas.] / Reprint / Port of Spain Gazette, Sept 21, 1925. [III; 1235. Newspaper clipping. (Port of Spain Gazettte, September 21, 1925.)]


1867 Nov 18 / Dry fog and quake / Island St Thomas / La Sci Pour Tous 14/58 / See Oct 29. [III; 1236. Bresson, Gédéon. "Les Offuscations du Soleil." La Science Pour Tous, 14 (no. 8; January 23, 1869): 57-58. See: 1867 Oct 29, (III; 1163.)]


1867 Nov. 18 / q, etc. / St Thomas, Danish W.I. / 2:45 p.m. / Rumbling sound and violent q. and the sun obscured as in an eclipsecontinuing raining all day and all next day more or less. [III; 1237. Reid, Harry Fielding, and, Stephen Taber. "The Virgin Islands Earthquakes of 1867-1868." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 10 (March 1920): 9-30. "The underground sound, while the first shock was going on, for about one minute and a half, was most dreadful. It terrified every living soul. The sun seemed at once to become dim; it was as if eclipsed, and this dimness lasted that first day until sunset, and continued the whole of the next day, but in a less degree, and it only wore away entirely in the course of two days more. It was as if the sun, though apparently as bright as usual, had lost some of its warming and illuminating power," (at page 10). The sky was described as clear at the time of the earthquake. Van Housel, Louis. "An Earthquake Experience." Scribner's Monthly, 15 (March 1878): 662-672, at 666, (illustrations). On the day before the earthquake, "The sky, we remembered by the light of after events, wore a coppery hue"; and, at the time of the earthquake: "I looked toward Frederickstadt and saw a dusty hazy atmosphere over the town." Louis van Housel was a naval officer aboard the USS Monongahela, when it was carried and stranded inland by the tsunami. (Watlington, Roy A., and Lincoln, Shirley H. Disaster and Disruption in 1867: Hurricane, Earthquake and Tsunami in the Danish West Indies.... St. Thomas, Virgin Islands: Eastern Caribbean Center, University of the Virgin Islands, 1997.) "America." London Times, December 3, 1867, p. 7 c. 4. "Money-Market & City Intelligence." London Times, December 9, 1867, p. 7 c. 1-2. "The Earthquake at St. Thomas." London Times, December 17, 1867, p. 7 c. 2. "The Earthquakes at St. Thomas." London Times, December 18, 1867, p. 6 c. 4. "The Earthquake at St. Thomas." London Times, December 19, 1867, p. 5 c. 4-5.

"The Earthquake in the West Indies." London Times, December 20, 1867, p. 4 c. 6.]


1867 Nov 18 / Ab. 3 p.m., the q at St Thomas and rise of the sea. / Said was a volc eruption on Saba Island, near St. Thomas. / Guardian, Kingstown, St Vincent, Dec. 14. [III; 1238. (St. Vincent Guardian and Government Gazette, Kingstown, St. Vincent, December 14, 1867; @ BL.)]


1867 Nov. 18 / bet 4 and 5 p.m. / The Grenadine group, W. Indies. / Sea calm. Sudddenly it rose and rushed upon the landwave fully 10 feet high. / The Guardian (Kingstown, St. Vincent), Nov. 23. [III; 1239. (St. Vincent Guardian and Government Gazette, Kingstown, St. Vincent, November 23, 1867; @ BL.)]


1867 Nov. 18, etc. / q. / St Thomas / 3 p.m. / details / A. J. Sci 2/45/134 / less severe from 21st. [III; 1240. "Earthquake at St. Thomas." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 45 (1868): 133-135.]


1867 Nov 18 / BO / Q. where been hurricane, unroofed house, and streets still filled with trees. In the harbor, wrecks of 80 ships, some in a heap, their yard arms locked, funnels out of water. Then the wrecks in the harbor thrown on the ruins on land. [III; 1241.1, 1241.2. (Ref???) Watlington, Roy A. "The Terrible Earthquake and Tsunami of Nov. 18, 1867." St. Croix Source, November 19, 2013. A tsunami, resulting from an undersea earthquake estimated above 7 on the Richter scale, struck St. Thomas.]


1867 Nov 18 / L.T., Jan. 1-10-c / 3 p.m. / Shock and water wall 30 feet high cast a steamship ashore at St Croix, West Indies, carried over a street of warehouses in the town. [III; 1242. "The Earthquake in the West Indies." London Times, January 1, 1868 p. 10 c. 3.]


[1867 Nov 18 /] 1867 Nov. 25 / Destructive q / Tortola, W. Indies / BA 1911-55. [III; 1244. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 55. The "Nov. 25" date is for a despatch reporting this earthquake.]


[1867 Nov 18 /] 1867 Dec. 23 / q. / Tortola, W. Indies / BA 1911-55 / also sea waves. [III; 1253. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 55. The "Dec. 23" date is for a despatch reporting this earthquake.]


1867 Nov. 23 / Morning Post of, quoting the Leeds Mercury, that at Douglas, Isle of Man, upon night of Tuesday19th or 12ththe heavens had "opened" with an illumination like the full moon. In this space appeared a figure like a man waving his arms. Then the "opening" closed. [III; 1243.1, 1243.2. "Strange Appearance in the Heavens." London Morning Post, November 23, 1867, p. 2 c. 6. "Strange Appearance in the Heavens." Leeds Mercury, November 22, 1867, p. 3 c. 6. "A remarkable appearance was witnessed on Tuesday night, shortly after ten o'clock, at Douglas, Isle of Man. A portion of the sky opened and emitted a light that illuminated the heavens as bright as the full moon. In the open space appeared a gigantic figure, like that of a man, which waved its arms slowly for a short times. Then the open space closed up, and the heavens were afterwards much darker than they were before this extraordinary phenomenon. The weather became very stormy a few hours subsequently."]


[1867 Nov. 25. Wrong date. See: 1867 Nov 18, (III; 1244).]


1867 Nov 30-Dec 1 / Great gale / England. [III; 1245. "The Gale." London Times, December 3, 1867, p. 10 c. 5-6. "The Gales." London Times, December 4, 1867, p. 5 c. 5-6.]


1867 Dec / All month Vesuvius great / See L.T. Index and 1868, Jan. [III; 1246. "The Eruption of Vesuvius." London Times, December 14, 1867, p. 8 c. 3. "Southern Italy." London Times, December 21, 1867, p. 6 c. 3-4. "The Eruption of Mount Vesuvius." London Times, January 2, 1868, p. 8 c. 3-4. "The Eruption of Mount Vesuvius." London Times, January 6, 1868, p. 7 c. 1-2. “The Eruption of Mount Vesuvius.” London Times, January 11, 1868, p. 9 c. 5. “Italy.” London Times, January 11, 1868, p. 10 c. 2-5. "The Eruption of Mount Vesuvius." London Times, January 13, 1868, p. 10 c. 2. “The Eruption of Vesuvius.” London Times, January 22, 1868, p. 8 c. 1-2. "Mount Vesuvius." London Times, January 30, 1868, p. 9 c. 3.]


1867 Dec 2 / Volc. / Nicaragua / C.R. 66-481. See Feb. 23, 1868. [III; 1247. De la Sagra, Ramon. "Lettre à M. le Secrétaire perpétuel, sur une éruption volcanique qui s'est produite dans l'État de Nicaragua, le 2 décembre 1867, et qui a duré seize jours." Comptes Rendus, 66 (1867): 481-482. See: 1868 Feb 23, (III; 1284). The Cerro Negro volcano erupted for sixteen days, (according to Ramon de la Sagra, it commenced on December 2, but the Global Volcanism Program says that it erupted from November 14 to 30, 1867.]


1867 Dec 2-3 / LT Index / Gales. [III; 1258. "The Gale." London Times, December 3, 1867, p. 10 c. 5-6. "The Gales." London Times, December 4, 1867, p. 5 c. 5-6.]


1867 Dec 4 / [LT], 12-3 / Queer death / woman covered with little wounds. [A; 513. "Mysterious Case." London Times, December 4, 1867, p. 12 c. 3.]


1867 Dec. 11 / Hankow, China / explosion of 100 tons of gunpowder / whole streets in ruins. / Standard, Jan 27, 1868. [III; 1249. "The Explosion at Hankow." London Evening Standard, January 27, 1868, p. 5 c. 5.]


1867 Dec 13 / BO / Vesuvius covered with snowlava flows striping it / L.T. 21-6-3. [III; 1250. "Southern Italy." London Times, December 21, 1867, p. 6 c. 3-4.]


1867 Dec 18 / NY State / Montreal and Vt. / q / 3 a.m. / Am. J. Sci 2/45-135 / 19-1-3, N.Y. Times. [III; 1251. "A Domestic EarthquakeShocks Felt in Vermont, Canada and New-York." New York Times, December 19, 1867, p. 1 c. 3. "Earthquake in Western New York, Vermont and Lower Canada." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 45 (1868): 135.]


1867 Dec 18 / Great q / Formosa / [BA] '11. [III; 1252. A class III earthquake. Milne, 720.]


1867 Dec 20 /  A disap in New York. / Harpers 38/505. [A; 514. "Missing." Harper's New Monthly Magazine, 38 (1868/69): 504-511, at 505. "Edwin R. Colton" was reported to have been seen in London, in April, 1869, and to have explained to an old acquaintance his travels, under an assumed name, as a sailor. "Running Away." New York Tribune, May 13, 1869, p. 4 c. 5-6.]


[1867 Dec. 23. Wrong date. See: 1867 Nov 18, (III; 1253).]


1867 Dec 26 / Morning / sun spots / [illustration] / E Mec 6/363. [III; 1254. Newton, F.E. "Spots on the Sun." English Mechanic, 6 (no. 146; January 10, 1868): 263, (illustration).]


1867 Dec 31 / q. / Iceland / II / BA '11. [III; 1255. A class II earthquake. Milne, 720.]

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