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Last updated: July 15, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1892

(July to December)


1892:


1892 July / Stuber case like Bathurst / clothes perforated. [C; 14. See: 1892 Aug 11, (C; 44), and, 1892 Aug 16, (C; 45).]


1892 July 2 / (Disap) / Chicago Citizen, 3-6 / “Mabel Waldron, 13 years old, of Fairbury, Ill., has mysteriously disappeared.” / N.M. [C; 15. (Chicago Citizen, July 2, 1892, p. 3 c. 6.; not @ Newspapers.com.)]


1892 July 2 and 3 / Brilliant projections / Mars / Nature 46/483. [VII; 528. “Observations of the Planet Mars.” Nature, 46 (September 15, 1892): 482-483.]


1892 / summer / Hail with dustof glassy material, hornblende, etc. / Norway / Work / 920, 1892/363. [VII; 529. “Fall of Dust.” Work, 4 (no. 179; August 20, 1892): 363. “In Stockholm recently there was a fall of hail mixed with dust particles which lasted for several hours. The dust, on being collected and examined, was found to consist of glassy material, both isotropic and anisotropic, together with horne-blende, magnetite, mica, metallic iron, and some diatoms.” Stockholm, Sweden, (not Norway). See: 1892 May 3, (VII: 480, 482, and 483), and, 1892, (May 2, 3, 4, (VII; 481).]


1892 / about 1892 / summer / B. rain in Ireland / Sc Gos. '95-294. [VII; 530. Kane, William Francis de Vismes. "Black Rain in Ireland."" Science Gossip, n.s., 2 (no. 23; January 1896): 294.]


1892 / summer / Next year great drought / See green notes from May 9, 1893. [VII; 531. See: (1893 May 9).]


1892 / summer / Insects / This a period of disturbances from Jan. [VII; 532.]

1892 / summer / Insects / See back to April in April. [VII; 533. See: 1892 Ap. 16, (VII; 457).]


1892 / summer / (K1) / Near Kilderry, Donegal, Ireland, abundance of the Ringlet butterfly (Epinephile hyperanthes). Not been seen since 1860, when it was in abundance. It is a weak-winged butterfly, seemingly incapable of long flight and the sudden appearance was considered mystifying. Irish Naturalist 1-125. [VII; 534.1, 534.2. “Insects.” Irish Naturalist, 1 (no. 6; September 1892): 125-126.]


1892 / summer / Cor. Irish Naturalist notes, p. 145, that a butterfly not seen since 1883 was common at Ballyhyland. [VII; 535. “Insects.” Irish Naturalist, 1 (no. 7; October 1892): 145-146.]


1892 / summer / Clouded yellow / Many in Cornwall and Wales—most of them Wales. / Sci Gos, 1892-244 / Cor says of those near Ipswich, not have come from Continent. They appeared after 4 days of continuous rains and north winds, in fresh condition. [VII; 536. Rees, Thomas Alfred Wellesley. "The Clouded Yellow." Science Gossip, 28 (no. 445; November 1892): 243-244.]


1892 / summer / Sci Gos 1893-10 / Cor caught ab 300 clouded yellow, of which only 5 were females. [VII; 537. Davey, Fred H. "The Clouded Yellow in Cornwall." Science Gossip, 29 (no. 337; January 1893): 10-11.]


1892 / summer / Death's Head Moth unusually abundant near Scarborough. / The Naturalist 1892-339. [VII; 538. Clarke, William J. "Acherontia atropos at Scarborough." Naturalist: A Monthly Journal of Natural History for the North of England, 1892 (November): 339.]


1892 / summer / See The Entomologists' Record, P.P. 2040.6. [VII; 539. (Entomologists' Record, ca. 1892.)]


1892 / summer / Of D. pulchella, Richard South says that the specimens were probably blown over from the French coast. Not aware the larva ever found in England. / Entomologist 25/155 / Since 1886, no known capture in England. [VII; 540. South, Richard. "Deiopeia Pulchella in England." Entomologist, 25 (July 1892): 152-155.]


1892 / summer / Reports so many upon C. edusa—think not of them but swarms of entomologists. / Obj / Ap. 19, 1863. [VII; 541. (Refs.???)]


1892 July / Zoologist 3/16/398 lists sixteen specimens shot. Says no escape known. [VII; 542. Ogilvie, Fergus Menteith. “On the Recent Occurrence in the British Islands of the Ruddy Sheldrake.” Zoologist, s. 3 v. 16 (1892): 392-398, at 396-398.]


1892 / summer / Plan—not Belgium / Colias edusa / Ent. Mo. Mag. 28/216 / Said that inquiry had been made at a meeting of the Belgian Entomologist Soc., at Brussels. No member had noticed anything at all unusual this year as to that insect. This the experience in 1877. [VII; 543.1, 543.2. “Colias Edusa.” Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 28 (s. 2 v. 3; August 1892): 216.]


1892 / ab 1st of July / (frgs) / Sun, July 11-6-7 / Said that among other queer happenings in Audrian Co., a rain of frogs. / Missouri / The other occurrence packs such as a mare that had foaled two colts, one a mule and one a horse, and unknown reptile been found like a snake with legs. [VII; 559.1, 559.2. “Nature's Pranks in Old Missouri.” New York Sun, July 11, 1892, p. 6 c. 7.)]


1892 July 2-17 / White spot on Mars / L'Astro 1894/324 / See '94. [VII; 561. Flammarion, Camille. "La Planète Mars." Astronomie, 13 (1894): 321-329, at 323-324. See: 1892 July 2-17, (VII; 1055).]


[1892 July 2-17 /] 1894 July 2-17 / Lick Ob. / projections on Mars every night / Observatory 17/295 / See '92. [VII; 1055. “The Bright Projections on Mars.” Observatory, 17 (1894): 295-296. Campbell, William Wallace. "An Explanation of the Bright Projections Observed on the Terminator of Mars." Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 6 (no. 35; March 31, 1894): 103-112. Campbell thought that snow on mountain tops explained these white spots and projections, (which he had observed). See: 1892 June 10, (VII; 518), and, 1892 July 2 and 3, (VII; 528).]


1892 July 3 / See June 10. / Observatory. [VII; 560. See: 1892 June 10, (VII; 518).]


1892 July 3 / c. burst / At Driffield torrents fell. At 8:15 a roaring sound and a rush of waters—a rumbling as if of an earthquake. A volume of water ab 100 yards wide and 3 feet high carrying hedges and everything else with it. Came down from the hills. At Langtoft, 5 miles n of Driffield, a torrent from the hills burst doors open, filled houses—a woman and child rescued by breaking through a roof. A foot deep in places filled by it. Supposed waterspout had burst. / Symons 27-81. [VII; 562.1, 562.2. "Thunderstorm and Cloud Burst Near Driffield, July 3rd." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 27 (July 1892): 82-85.]


1892 July 3 / See the Langtoft clbrst early in June, 1888 or 1889. / Another waterspout fell on this hill only a few yards from where first fell and cut 3 ditches, 2 of them from 20 to 30 yards long and 7 to 10 feet deep. / Nature 46-246. [VII; 563. Lovel, J. “Waterspouts in East Yorkshire.” Nature, 46 (July 14, 1892): 246. See: 1888 June 9, (VI: 1346, 1347, and 1348).]


1892 July 3 / No record of waterspout on land in England. No mention was sea water. [VII; 564.]


1892 July 3 / Cloudburst at Langtoft, E. Lancashire, and Driffield. Had been one there June, 1857, and June 9, 1888. / Nature 47-118. [VII; 566. “Royal Meteorological Society.” Nature, 47 (December 1, 1892): 118. See: 1857 June, (II; 2059), (1888 June 9).]


1892 July 5 / [LT], 10-b / Waterspout / Langtoft / near Driffield. [VII; 565. “Waterspout in Yorkshire.” London Times, July 5, 1892, p. 10 c. 2.]


1892 (July 6) / Mars / Stationary. [VII; 570. Mars stationary. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1892, 472.]


1892 July 7 / (Cut) / Italy, Austria / Ascend met. / Nature 46/209 / (Cut). [VII; 567. (Nature, 46-209; too early ref.???; not found in v. 46.)]


1892 July 8 / Etna in eruption some time, On 8th, first unusual violence. / D. News, July 22-5-7. [VII; 568. “The Eruption of Etna.” London Daily News, July 22, 1892, p. 5 c. 7.]


1892 July 8 / Meteor / Steiermark / Met Zeit 1892-432. [VII; 571. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 9 (1892): 417-440, at 432-433.]


1892 July 9 / Lightning / At Leeds, Megantic Co, Quebec, two girls, Miss Woodside and Miss Renkin, were found dead in a kneeling position, with scrubbing brushes in their hands. Said been killed by lightning while scrubbing the floor, along in the house. / Montreal Daily Witness, July 11-6-5 / Witness of 11th—no th storms in Quebec mentioned—the weather report dated the 10th tells of storms in N. Scotia, Manitoba, and the Territories, but fine weather elsewhere. [C; 16.1, 16.2, 16.3. “Killed by Lightning.” Montreal Daily Witness, July 11, 1892, p. 6 c. 5.]


1892 July 9, etc. / Midnight, July 9-10, Etna began. / Nature 46-254. / Subsided and on 11th, again violent. / On 14th, violent. /Nature, 46-276 / 16th and 17th / 18th / 19th. [VII; 569. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (July 14, 1892): 253-257, at 254. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (July 21, 1892): 276-279, at 276.]


1892 July 9 / 9 a.m. / Giant Powder Works plant ab 8 miles from San Francisco blown up—Pubs. A.S. Pacific—4/187 / felt 50 miles away. [VII; 572. “Powder Explosion at West Berkeley, July 9, 1892.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 4 (no. 25; September 1892): 187-190. “Powder Explosion.” Industry, 5 (no. 49; August 1892): 639-640. The blast was heard at Sacramento, (60 miles away).]


1892 July 9 / Inf conjunction Venus-sun. [VII; 573. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1892, 472.]


1892 July 9 / Etna / signs the day before / C.R. 115-370. [VII; 574. Wallerant. "Sur l'éruption actuelle de l'Etna." Comptes Rendus, 115 (1892): 370-373.]


1892 July 11, 12, 14, etc. / See Entomologist and Ent. Mo. Mag. / An invasion of P. moneta. [VII; 544. Dallas, R.A. "Plusia Moneta at Tunbridge Wells, 1892." Entomologist, 25 (August 1892): 193. Peers, C.R. "Plusia Moneta in Middlesex." Entomologist, 25 (August 1892): 193. “Plusia moneta at Shorncliffe.” Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 28 (s. 2 v. 3; October 1892): 265. The earliest capture noted in the Entomologist's Monthly Magazine occurred in September.]


1892 July 11, 12, 14, 23 / Cor to Field, July 30, says caught 4 specimens of the moth Plusia moneta, which a few years before had been considered not a British species. [VII; 545. Beeching, Robert Alfred Dallas. "Plusia Moneta." Field, July 30, 1892, p. 204.]


1892 July 11-12 / Balloon / snow / shells and pebbles / See middle of July, 1873. [VII; 575. See: 1873 July 11, (IV; 1259), and, 1873, ab. mid July, (IV; 1263).]


1892 July 11 / Balloon Jupiter left Havre, evening, with 3 persons—fell at Devizes, morning of 12th. / D. News, 19th—3 three aeronauts had been picked up, clinging to the balloon. [VII; 576. “The Rescue of French Aeronauts.” London Daily News, July 19, 1892, p. 6 c. 3.]


1892 July 11 / See Sept 7, 1871. [VII; 577. See: 1871 Sept 7, (IV; 511). Buss, Albert Alfred. "List of 25 exceptional Eruptive Prominences." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 18 (1907-1908): 326.]


1892 July 11 / N.Y. Times, 1-6 / 12-5-1 / 13-1-6 / 14-8-4 / 15-2-3 / 16-2-3 / 17-2-2 / Etna. [VII; 578. “Mount Etna in Eruption.” New York Times, July 11, 1892, p. 1 c. 6.  “Volcanic Eruptions.” New York Times, July 12, 1892, p. 5 c. 1. “Etna's Violent Eruption.” New York Times, July 13, 1892, p. 1 c. 6. “Mount Etna Still Ablaze.” New York Times, July 14, 1892, p. 8 c. 4. “Etna's Streams of Lava.” New York Times, July 15, 1892, p. 2 c. 3. “Two Volcanoes Active.” New York Times, July 16, 1892, p. 2 c. 3. “Etna Hidden in Smoke.” New York Times, July 17, 1892, p. 2 c. 2.]


1892 July 11 / alligator / Daily Picayune / July 15-4-4 / That 11th, Mrs. T.W. Smith, of Birmingham, Ala., went to her garden after a heavy rain and there found, alive, an alligator 14 inches long. There are no alligators indigenous to this part of the country, so it was supposed the reptile had fallen with the rain. [VII: 581.1, 581.2. “Rained an Alligator.” New Orleans Picayune, July 15, 1892, p. 4 c. 4. “Rained an Alligator.” Atlanta Constitution, July 12, 1892, p. 3 c. 2.]


1892 July 11 / [LT], 5-d / 12-5-b / 13-5-a / 14-5-a / 15-3-d / 18-5-b / 19-5-c / 22-5-e / 26-10-5 / 29-3-d / 30-5-d / Etna / See Aug. [VII; 582. “Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, July 11, 1892, p. 5 c. 4. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, July 12, 1892, p. 5 c. 2-3. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, July 13, 1892, p. 5 c. 1-2. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, July 14, 1892, p. 5 c. 1-2. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, July 15, 1892, p. 3 c. 4. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, July 18, 1892, p. 5 c. 2. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, July 19, 1892, p. 5 c. 3. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, July 22, 1892, p. 5 c. 5. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, July 26, 1892, p. 10 c. 5. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, July 29, 1892, p. 3 c. 4. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, July 30, 1892, p. 5 c. 4.]


1892 July 11 and 13 / Most striking prominence on Mars of changing shape in 2 hours / by Hussey and Campbell / Nature 50/500. [VII; 582. Lockyer, William James Stewart. “Bright Projections on Mars' Terminator.” Nature, 50 (September 20, 1894): 499-501.]


1892 July 12 / N.Y. Herald 13-7-2 / Etna increasing. Severe q. in morning, destroying village of Giarre, Sicily. [VII; 579. “Destructive Ætna.” New York Herald, July 13, 1892, p. 7 c. 2. The Etna volcano.]


1892 July 12, etc. / Increase eruption Etna. Loud explosions. / D. News 13-6-7 / Still great on 15th—News, 16th. [VII; 580. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Daily News, July 13, 1892, p. 6 c. 7. “The Eruption of Vesuvius and Etna.” London Daily News, July 16, 1892, p. 6 c. 6.]


1892 July 12 / Shocks in Springfield, Ohio—reported been explosion of a powder mill. This found not to be so, / B Eagle 13-10-1 / 1st, 8 p.m. / 8:30, 11:00 and 11:30, a rumbling sound that lasted about 10 minutes. [VII; 584. “Not Due to a Powder Mill Explosion.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 13, 1892, p. 10 c. 1.]


1892 July 13 / Alta, Iowa, following Northern Lights, “a superb beam of greenish light resembling a long, narrow fish visible from Coma Berenices to Leo Major.” / Pop Astro 10-250. [VII; 585. Hadden, David Edward. “Auroral Phenomena at Alta, Iowa.” Popular Astronomy, 10 (no. 5; May 1902): 249-251, at 250. The beam “remained stationary until it gradually faded out.”]


1892 July 14 / B. Eagle, 1-1 / Man named Angerer, aged 53, in a Vienna hotel, been asleep a week. Impossible to arouse him. [C; 17. “Been Asleep For a Week.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 14, 1892, p.1 c. 1.]


1892 July 14 / Eagle, 10-7 / 17-20-2 / Aug 7-1-2 / Sept 5-1-7 / Etna. [VII; 586. “Great Floods of Lava.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 14, 1892, p. 10 c. 7. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 17, 1892, p. 20 c. 2. “Many Localities.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 7, 1892, p. 1 c. 2. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 5, 1892, p. 1 c. 7.]


1892 July 15 / Photo of a remarkable sun spot, crossing solar meridian, taken in Chicago. Crossed meridian on 13th. This photo on 15th, at 11:13 a.m., showed an intensely bright hook-shaped form crossing the bridge in the spot. / N.Y. Herald 17-17-4 / At 1:34 p.m., it had disappeared. [VII; 587.1, 587.2. “Remarkable Phenomenon.” New York Herald, July 17, 1892, p. 17 c. 4.]


1892 July 15 / “Jumping Planet” / Glb. Dem, Aug 20-13-3, reports letter to the Tropical Sun, from Mr. R.N. Andrews, of Cocoa. Saw luminous body, which he says was Jupiter, about 15 minutes above the horizon (saw it above trees = means 15 degrees) but increasing to size of the moon, then moving rapidly northward to a distance of a quarter of a mile, “measured by local landmarks, then stationary a few seconds; then back to first position. Occupied about 10 minutes. / (See moon, ab Sept 1, 1895.) 19. [VII; 588.1, 588.2. “Now It Is Jupiter.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, August 20, 1892, p. 13 c. 3. The Tropical Sun was a newspaper published in Juno, Florida. See: 1895 Sept 1, (VII; 1352).]


1892 July 15 / Vesuvius active / Nature 46-277. [VII; 589. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (July 21, 1892): 276-279, at 277.]


1892 July 15 / Trib, 2-2 / Explosion / naptha tank / Westport, Conn. [VII; 595. "A Naptha Tank Explodes." New York Tribune, July 15, 1892, p. 2 c. 2.]


1892 July 15 / Active spot on sun—then a bridge of dazzling light spanned the space between. / Clerke, Hist Astro, p. 161. [VII; 596. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1st ed., (1885); 4th ed., (1902), 161.]


1892 (July 16) / Alta, Iowa / See obj fell, June 2, 1891. [VII; 590. See: 1891 June 2, (VII; 109).]


1892 July 16 / The aurora at Greenfield, Ulster Co., N.Y. / a streamer / N.Y. Herald, Aug 7-11-4. [VII; 591. “The Aurora of July 16.” New York Herald, August 7, 1892, p. 11 c. 4. The phenomenon was described as “a very long and narrow stripe resembling at first glance the tail of a comet” and “seemed to be comprised of a luminous vapor carried on through a narrow current of air.” A possible STEVE (Strong Thermal Emission Velocity Enhancement) phenomenon.]


1892 July 16 / The aurora / considerable in Science 20-66. [VII; 592. Larkin, Edgar Lucien. “Magnetic Storm, Aurora, and Sun-Spots.” Science, s. 1 v. 20 (July 29, 1892): 65-66.]


1892 July 16 / Alta, Iowa / beam of light from northwest to southeast / Nearly stationary / Pop. Astro 10-250. [VII; 593. Hadden, David Edward. “Auroral Phenomena at Alta, Iowa.” Popular Astronomy, 10 (no. 5; May 1902): 249-251, at 250.]


1892 July 16 / N.Y. Times, 2-3 / Vesuvius. [VII; 594. “Two Volcanoes Active.” New York Times, July 16, 1892, p. 2 c. 3.]


1892 July 16 / [LT], 7-a / 21-5-d / Aug 14-3-e / Etna and Vesuvius. [VII; 597. “Etna and Vesuvius in Eruption.” London Times, July 16, 1892, p. 7 c. 1. “Etna and Vesuvius in Eruption.” London Times, July 21, 1892, p. 5 c. 4. (London Sunday Times, August 14, 1892, p. 3 c. 5; not found here; recheck London Times index.)]


1892 July 16 / Beam / Aurora / Iowa, etc. / Science 19-65, 66, 178 / Indiana / Penn. [VII; 598. Bereman, Thomas Armstrong. “Auroral Display.”  Science, s. 1 v. 20 (July 29, 1892): 65. Larkin, Edgar Lucien. “Magnetic Storm, Aurora, and Sun-Spots.” Science, s. 1 v. 20 (July 29, 1892): 65-66. Stine, Wilber Morris. “The Aurora of July 16.” Science, s. 1 v. 20 (September 23, 1892): 178. And, at Rochester, New York, on June 16 and July 16: Swift, Lewis. “Brilliant Auroræ of 1892.” Science, s. 1 v. 20 (December 9, 1892): 323.]


1892 July 16 / Alta, Iowa / beam in sky / Pop Astro 10/249. [VII; 599. Hadden, David Edward. “Auroral Phenomena at Alta, Iowa.” Popular Astronomy, 10 (no. 5; May 1902): 249-251, at 250. “Julv 16, 1892, a beam of light spread athwart the sky from northwest to southeast which was nearly stationary.”]


1892 July 17 / Eagle, 5-5 / Sunspots. [VII; 600. “The Spots on the Sun.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 17, 1892, p. 5 c. 5.]


1892 July 17-18 / night / Brilliant obj seen and metite thought to have fallen to a point ab 3 miles south of Burlington, N.J. / N.Y. Herald 19-7-6. [VII; 601. “Brilliant Meteor Lost.” New York Herald, July 19, 1892, p. 7 c. 6.]


1892 July 18 / Frgs / Dispatch dated [July 18) / (Chic. Trib 19-1-4) / from Valparaiso, Ind.—That thousands of half-grown frogs had appeared in Pleasant Township, Ind. Had appeared immediately after a cloudburst, so supposed to have fallen from the sky. [VII; 602. “Infested with Thousands of Frogs.” Chicago Tribune, July 19, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. “A Shower of Frogs.” Crawfordsville Daily Journal, (Indiana), July 19, 1892. p. 4 c. 4. “Pleasant township, in the southeastern portion of this county, has been visited by a shower of live frogs. They came down in a thunderstorm a few days ago, and in some places literally cover the ground. They are about one-quarter grown and on the approach of anyone fly like grasshoppers. During the storm, which was late in the afternoon, the air appeared to be thick with wriggling life, and although many were killed when they struck the earth their loss had no appreciable effect on the number. The hot weather of the last two days has killed a vast number of the animals, but multitudes are left.”]


1892 July 18 / Increased violence / Etna / D. News, 19th. [VII; 603. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Daily News, July 19, 1892., p. 6 c. 3.]


1892 / Turtles / See July 17, 1886. [VII; 604. See: 1886 July 17, (VI; 561).]


1892 July 19 / [LT], 10-f / 23-5-d / 28-5-b / Sept 2-8-e / Volc at the Great Sangir / See Nov. 18. [VII; 605. Hickson, Sydney John. “The Reported Volcanic Eruption at Great Sangir.” London Times, July 19, 1892, p. 10 c. 6. “The Disaster at Sangir Island.” London Times, July 23, 1892, p. 5 c. 4. “The Disaster at Sangir Island.” London Times, July 28, 1892, p. 5 c. 2. Ormsby, Nina. “The Eruption at Sangir.” London Times, September 2, 1892, p. 8 c. 5-6. “The Eruption at Sangir.” London Times, September 2, 1892, p. 5 c. 2. See: 1892 Nov. 18, (VII; 736). The Awu volcano.]


1892 July 18 / N.Y. Times, 1-5 / 19-2-2 / Sangir Island destroyed by a volcano / 23-1-2; 28-1-4 / (Aug 22/3/7). [VII; 606. “Volcano's Terrible Work.” New York Times, July 18, 1892, p. 1 c. 5. “The Sangir Eruption.” New York Times, July 19, 1892, p. 2 c. 2. “Two Thousand Victims.” New York Times, July 23, 1892, p. 1 c. 2. “The Sangir Disaster.” New York Times, July 28, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. “The Great Sangir Outburst.” New York Times, August 22, 1892, p. 3 c. 7. The Awu volcano.]


1892 July 18 / Trib, 1-2 / Volcano / Malay Archipelago. [VII; 607. "An Island Destroyed." New York Tribune, July 18, 1892, p. 1 c. 2. The Awu volcano.]


1892 July 19 / (Turtle) / In Daily Picayune, 24-4-5, said that a man had brought to the office of the Chattanooga Times, a little mud turtle that he said he had seen fall in a storm, night of 19th. [VII; 608. “Raining Mud Turtles.” New Orleans Picayune, July 24, 1892, p. 4 c. 5. “Local Snap Shots.” Chattanooga Daily Times, July 21, 1892, p. 5 c. 4.]


1892 July 19 / Cyclone / disastrous / Ravigo, Italy / Otago Witness, Aug. 18. [VII; 609. “The San Francisco Mail.” Otago Witness, August 18, 1892, p. 33 (c. 3).]


1892 July 20 / Guarena, Badajoz, Spain / (F). [VII; 610. Fletcher, 106. This is the Guarena meteorite.]


1892 July 21 / Deluge, Malta. Th storm and 3 inches of rain. 55 years since rain had fallen in Malta in month of July. / Nature 46-473. [VII; 611. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (September 15, 1892): 471-475, at 473. “Notes and News.” Mediterranean Naturalist, 2 (September 1, 1892): 249-250, at 250.]


1892 July 21 / Another increase in violence, Etna. / D. News, July 22 / Shocks felt as far as Syracuse. [VII; 612. “The Eruption of Etna.” London Daily News, July 22, 1892, p. 5 c. 7.]


1892 July 21 / Utica / magnetic effect / Amer Met Mag 1892/357. [VII; 613. Harris, T.W. "Observation on the Aurora of July 16, at Utica, N.Y." American Meteorological Magazine, 9 (1892): 355-358, at 357-358.]


1892 July 22 / Oakland / Another man, Peter Sugard, of 812 20th St, missing. / SF Chronicle 26-3-5. [C; 18. “A Missing Man.” San Francisco Chronicle, July 26, 1892, p. 3 c. 5.]


1892 July 22-23 / fishes / night / Bjelina, Bosnia / living fishes in a violent storm. / Cosmos, N.S., 23/31 / NQ 9/5/516. [VII; 614. “Pluie de poissons.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 23 (August 13, 1892): 31. Wallace, R. Hedger. "Showers of Snakes, Fish, Spiders &c." Notes and Queries, s. 9 v. 5 (June 30, 1900): 516. "Serpent Storms and Spider Showers." Pearson's Weekly, (London), May 19, 1900, p. 756. “This Morning's News.” London Daily News, August 11, 1892, p. 5 c. 3-4. “ A shower of fish is reported by the 'Bosnischen Post.' At four a.m. a violent thunderstorm from the north-west broke over Bjelina, lasting about two hours. With the rain fell a number of small living fish, which after daybreak were caught by childlren and adults in the ponds and gutters of the town. The fish fell also in the neighbourhood, people bringing them in from the fields, meadows, and high road. All the fish were examined and found to resemble whitings.” The location was probably Bijelina, Bosnia and Herzegovina, (rather than Bjelina, Croatia).]


1892 July 23 / Field of / Paper by John T. Carrington upon exceptional appearances in England, even in London, of 2 butterflies, Deiopeia pulchella, and a rare hawkmoth, C. edusa. He thinks they came from Africa. [VII; 546. Carrington, John T. "Abnormal Abundance of Insects." Field, July 23, 1892, pp. 162-163.]


1892 July 23 / Insects / Toronto Globe of, dispatch from Kingston—“On Wolfe Island cattle are suffering from attacks of flies, the like of which has never been seen here. The flies eat the flesh on the forequarters and at the roots of the horns. [VII; 547. (Toronto Globe, July 23, 1892.)]


1892 July 23 / Field of / That British Vice Consul at La Rochelle had reported the appearance of white ants in Europe. Editor of The Field says that the only unusual fact here was the abundance—that several species of white ants were indigenous to Europe. [VII; 548. Carrington, John T. "White Ants in Europe." Field, July 23, 1892, p. 163. "The White Ant in Europe." London Morning Post, July 13, 1892, p. 2 c. 4-5. McLachlan, Robert. "The White Ant in Europe." London Morning Post, July 19, 1892, p. 3 c. 6.]


1892 July 23 / Typhoon / coast Japan / B. Eagle, Sept 17-4-6 / N.M. [VII; 615. “Recent Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 17, 1892, p. 4 c. 6.]


1892 July 25 / Destructive cl. brst near Wheeling, W. Va. / Chicago Citizen, 30th. [VII; 616. (Chicago Citizen, July 30, 1892.)]


[1892 July 25 /] 1892 Aug 6 / Frgs / N. Jersey. [C; 36. “Frogs Fell Like Hail in the Storm.” Port Jervis Union, July 29, 1892, p. 2 c. 5. “The thunderstorm which burst over New York city and its vicinity Monday afternoon rained frogs around Port Morris. This phenomenon, though rare, is by no means unknown. It was shortly after 2 p.m. when the rain came down heavily about 138th street and East river, as soon as the storm was over the streets and surrounding lands were simply alive with small frogs hopping around in the most lively style. The small children of the neighborhood were soon busy catching them.” “Whence Came the Frogs?” Boston Globe, July 29, 1892, p. 10 c. 2. “During a thunder storm in New Jersey the other day it rained frogs to such an extent that, according to the testimony of multitudinous witnesses, the streets of Port Morris were alive with hundreds of these creatures.” Port Morris, is in the Bronx, New York, (not New Jersey); but, many newspapers repeated the “New Jersey” error from the Globe's article.]


[The following two notes were clipped together by Fort. VII: 624-625.]


1892 July 25 / q. phe / by the Trinacaria, of the Anchor Line, at seaa q. followed by a huge fiery serpent that stretched from the horizon to the zenith. / P.L., Aug 4. [VII; 624. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 4, 1892.) “A Serpent in the Sky.” New York Herald, July 30, 1892, p. 8. c. 2. “An Earthquake at Sea.” New York Times, July 30, 1892, p. 1 c. 6. On Monday last the pilotboat [No. 10] was cruising for incoming ships in the vicinity of Georges Shoal. About 7 o'clock in the evening the crew were suddenly startled by a noise which seemed to come from directly underneath. First it had a grating sound, and then it seemed as if the metal sheathing of the hull was exposed to a submarine hailstorm. The sharp, rattling noise continued for about six seconds. The vibrations were steady, and, according to the pilot, were undoubtedly caused by an earthquake.” “For a moment the crew thought the keel had grated on the bottom, but they, were reassured a moment later by the lead, which showed plenty of water underneath the vessel.” “Before the crew had time to cease wondering at the subsequent disturbance their attention was demanded by a brilliant and startling display overhead. The heavens from zenith to horizon were suddenly streaked by a rift of light, serpentine in a shape and clearly defined. The rippling coil of light was dazzlingly brilliant, and it was several minutes before there was any perceptible diminution to its lustre.” “For nearly an hour the heavens were illuminated by the gigantic scroll, which looked like a tracing in phosphorus, and then it gradually faded away, and finally disappeared. Throughout the time, the sea remained perfectly calm.” “On the same date and at the same hour the same phenomenon was observed from the steamship Trinacaria, which was then sixty miles distant from the pilot boat Capt Thompson of that vessel says the light glanced across the sky as swiftly as a streak of lightning. It looked to him like a huge serpent. The earthquake shock was not felt on board the Trinacaria, but heavy tide rips were observed.” See: 1892 July 27, (VII; 620).]


[1892 July 25 /] 1892 July 15 / q phe / South of Cape Sable / 7 p.m. / reported by two steamship Captains / Toronto Weekly Globe, Aug 3-6-5 / A shock that was reported as an earthquake and a fiery cloud in the sky, Description of its serpentine shape and changes is that of a meteor train. [VII; 625.1, 625.2. (Toronto Weekly Globe, August 3, 1892, p. 6 c. 5.) See: 1892 July 27, (VII; 620).]


1892 July 26 / Disap. / Glb-Dem, 5-7 / 16-year-old daughter of Albert G. Beard, disappeared on 20th from her father's farm near Sedalia, Mo. Said had always lived on the farm and had no male acquaintance. [C; 19. “A Mysterious Disappearance.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, July 26, 1892, p. 5 c. 7. “Alta Beard Located.” Sedalia Weekly Bazoo, August 2, 1892, p. 3 c. 6. Alta Beard left her home due to abuse from her step-mother; and, after briefly earning her own living at a restaurant in Kansas City, she returned home to Sedalia.]


[The following two notes were clipped together by Fort. C: 20-21.]


1892 July 26 / Fires / San Francisco Chronicle of, 12-1 / On June 16, Maggie Cummings, aged 15, went to work for Mrs Eichwauld, 15 Hollis Street, San Fran. Then on a row of 6 apartment houses, of which No. 15 was one, trouble broke out. Windows smashed at all hours, night and day, and chucnks of coal coming through. It is said that the ore superstitious of the victims thought there was a demon. But on the night of July 15, Mrs. E. caught Maggie throwing a stone. There had been five mysterious fires. Fire Marshall Towe had been watching the house. In his opinion the phe had been the work of some insane person living in one of the house. He had the girl taken to the Chief of Police, and in his office she confessed and signed the confession that she had thrown all the missiles and had started all the fires. / See 27-12-3—It was learned that upon March 30th, similar fires in the house where Maggie had lived. Her father was a kerosene peddler. He had been blamed, but the firemen and police could not prove arson against him. In court the girl denied having set any of the fires. Her mother and sister said that she was ill and did not know what she was doing when she confessed—she got 3 years in a reformatory. / See Ap 3 and Ap. 6. [C; 20.1 to 20.6. “A Girl Incendiary.” San Francisco Chronicle, July 26, 1892, p. 12 c. 1. “A Mania for Fires.” San Francisco Chronicle, July 27, 1892, p. 12 c. 3. See: (Ap 3 & Ap. 6).]


1892 July 27 / [San Francisco Chronicle of], 12-3 / night / The March 30 fires / Said that small house owned by Cummings on fire. Said doorway that had flamed was soaked in ker oil and underneath the house bagging soaked in kerosene. This out and stable roof nearly burst into flames—flames bursting through roof—said kerosene been used. Occupants of the house went to inform Cummings and found the porch of the house he lived in in flames. Said that the odor of kerosene told how the fire had originated. Nothing said of insurance. Simply that no case could be proved against C. And with all this arson not proved against him. [C; 21.1, 21.2, 21.3. “A Mania for Fires.” San Francisco Chronicle, July 27, 1892, p. 12 c. 3.]


1892 July 26, 27 / See Spook and flames, Sept. 15. [C; 22. See: 1892 Sept 12, (C; 53).]


1892 July 26 / Flies / Glb Dem of, 5-6. / Swarms of “immense” flies in St Louis. “Almost as large as an ordinary butterfly.” Said such numbers of the fly never noticed before in that part of the world, but were well-known in Russia. [VII; 549. “Swarms of Russian Flies.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, July 26, 1892, p. 5 c. 6.]


1892 July 26 / Etna been subsiding but on 26th again violent. / Nature 46-299 / More so on 27th / Nat., p. 332. [VII; 617. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (July 28, 1892): 298-301, at 299. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (August 4, 1892): 331-334, at 331-332.]


1892 July 26 / Village of Pentewan. s. coast of Cornwall, 10:30 p.m., sound like thunder and a shock. At intervals from 3 to 5 minutes, 3 more shocks. / D. News, 29th. [VII; 618. (London Daily News, July 29, 1892; not found here.)]


1892 July 26 / Fish / “According to the Franklin Times, of North Dakota, a large tract of country in that neighborhood was favored on the morning of July 26 with a heavy shower of fish. The fish were mostly of the pickerel variety, and varied from four to six inches iin length.” / N. Orleans Daily Picayune, Aug 24-4-5. [VII: 619.1, 619.2. “A Rain of Fish.” New Orleans Picayune, August 24, 1892, p. 4 c. 5.]


1892 July 27 / Lat 41°-40 / Long 64°-20 / Reported by Capt Fendt, of the steamship Procida, from Hamburg to Philadelphia. In the height of a terrific thunderstorm a blue streak that illuminated the sea for miles around appeared in sky on northern horizon and remained visible all afternoon. / Globe Dem, Aug 6-10-1. [VII; 620.1, 620.2. “Strange Sight at Sea.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, August 6, 1892, p. 10 c. 1. “A Phenomenon at Sea.” Washington Evening Star, (D.C.), August 5, 1892, p. 6 c. 8.  Capt. Fendt says his ship was in latitude 41.40, longitude 64.20, when the phenomenon first appeared. 'We were in the midst of a frightful thunder storm, with heavy rain and vivid lightning. At 1 p.m. the officer of the deck called my attention to the existence of  the streak. It appeared first like a light blue streak ascending skyward in serpentine curves and illuminating the whole surface of the water visible. It remained in an apparently stationary condition until darkness set in, when it grew paler very gradually and eventually faded from view. For a time before sundown the streak appeared to become heavier and spread out in the form of clouds, presenting a gourgeous sight.'” “Capt. Fendt says that in all his years at sea he never beheld such a sight.” See: 1892 July 25, (VII: 624 & 625).]


1892 July 27 / Etna as violent as the first outbreaks / D. News, 28th. [VII; 621. “The Volcanic Eruptions.” London Daily News, July 28, 1892, p. 5 c. 7.]


1892 July 28, etc. / Intense heat in U.S. [VII; 622. (Refs.???)]


[The following three notes were clipped together by Fort. C: 23-25.]


1892 July 29 / Montreal Gazette, 3-2 / 2 cases of disap in Montreal—a man named Wilson—left this home, evening of 26th, for a few minutes and never returned. Other case said no myst. Woman ran from home saying never return to it, Writer in Gazette thinks myst because says been other cases in Montreal—persons who had disappeared “as if this was not a city of the nineteenth century”. / Issue of Aug 1—case of Charles Thibault, a young man who had walked out of his home, one day, 3 weeks before, and had not been seen again. / Aug 6-3-4—police notified that Francis Lawrence, a young man, had walked out of his home a week before and not seen later. / Aug 17—“Another disappearance”—a Frenchman, aged 30, employed as a cook, reported missing Aug 8. / (To 8th) / Aug 19-3-4, “Another Missing Man—Alexander Lamothe, who left his home Aug 14 and no been seen since. / 23-3-2—two more cases of myst disap reported to the police, making 6 since Aug. 8. One was Joseph Lepage, aged 29, a molder. On evening of July 26, he told his wife he was going to take a walk. Went out and not seen again. The other was a ten-year-old boy, Jeremiah Leahy. He was last noticed holding a horse for a farmer. Thought he might have gone to the country with the farmer. [C; 23.1 to 23.7. “Two More Disappearances.” Montreal Gazette, July 29, 1892, p. 3 c. 3. |“Another Disappearance.” Montreal Gazette, August 1, 1892, p. 3 c. 4. “By the Way.” Montreal Gazette, August 6, 1892, p. 3 c. 4. “Another Disappearance.” Montreal Gazette, August 17, 1892, p. 3 c. 2. “Another Missing Man.” Montreal Gazette, August 19, 1892, p. 3 c. 4. “City and District News.” Montreal Gazette, August 23, 1892, p. 3 c. 1-4.]


1892 Aug 6 / John Austin, aged 35, 598 St Urbain St, last seen. With him went $200.00 belonging to a benefit society, whether that anything to do with or not. / Montreal Daily Witness 15-6-2. [C; 24. “Missing with Money” Montreal Daily Witness, August 15, 1892, p. 6 c. 2.]


1892 [June 25th] / Disaps Montreal / Montreal Daily Witness, July 9 / Young man, Stuart Robinson, aged 23, been missing from his boarding house, 50 Victoria street, since June 25th. [C; 25. “Two More Disappearances.” Montreal Daily Witness, July 9, 1892, p. 8 c. 2.]


1892 July 29 —and 30—Aug. 2 / Etna still violent / N.N., 30th-5-8. [VII; 623. “The Eruption of Etna.” London Daily News, July 30, 1892, p. 5 c. 7.]


1892 July 29 / Strange Snakes / Globe-Dem., Aug 3-6-5 / (See Aug 8.) / At Marshall, Minn., afternoon 29th, during height of a storm, an employee of Sturgeon's Meat Market, saw a large object fall outside a window. He ran out and found a large snake, injured but alive and writhing. He killed it and took it into the shop, where a crowd was soon attracted. It was 5 feet long with a girth of 5 inches. It was covered with black and white spots, and its tail terminated in an attachment like an arrow-head. No such known snake in the United States, but “a traveled gentleman” said it was a “turtle-head”, an adder of the West Indies. Said that at the same time a similar snake fell into Mr. Gibbons' garden. / 4 / 7. [VII; 626.1 to 626.4. “Raining Snakes in Minnesota.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, August 3, 1892, p. 6 c. 5. “Marshall, Minn, July 29.Last Friday afternoon, during a severe thunderstorm, two large snakes of strange appearance and unknown variety made their arrival in this village under remarkable circumstances. During the height of the storm an employee of the meat market owned by Jack Sturgeon saw a large object fall by a rear window, near where he was working. He went out and found a large snake, crushed and mangled, but still writhing. He crushed its head to prevent a possibility of danger, and took the snake into the shop, where it was viewed an hour afterward by hundreds of our inhabitants. The serpent was about 5 feet long and 5 inches in circumference. Its body was covered with black and white spots, and its tail terminated in a heavy substance not unlike an arrow-head. It looked like no American snake, and a traveled gentleman of the village pronounces it to be a 'turtle head,' a variety of adder known only in thc West Indies. There are only two varieties of serpents in this regionthe striped and harmless garter snake and a small species of water snake, both utterly unlike the one which fell in Friday's rain. The snake was seen to fall in the rain, and it had every appearance of dropping a great distance.” “At the same time a snake fell in the garden of Mr. Gibbons and was found dead. In size and appearance it was like the other. The above facts are well vouched for. Various theories are advanced, but it seems impossible to account for the presence of the reptiles in and other way than to acknowledge that they fell from the clouds, possibly being carried there by some whirlwind too high up to be felt on the surface.”]


1892 July 29 / Trib, 1-3 / Explosion / Springfield, N.J. [VII; 629. "Chemical Works Blows Up." New York Tribune, July 29, 1892, p. 1 c. 3.]


1892 July 29 / [LT], 3-d / Aug 19-4-a / 20-7-d / q / Cornwall and Wales. [VII; 631. “Earthquake in Cornwall.” London Times, July 29, 1892, p. 3 c. 4. “Earthquake Shocks.” London Times, August 19, 1892, p. 4 c. 1. “Yesterday the south-west coast of Wales....” London Times, August 19, 1892, p. 7 c. 5. “The Earthquake.” London Times, August 20, 1892, p. 7 c. 4.]


1892 July 30 / Religio-Phil. Jour—girl, Alice Sunderland, on a farm near Greenup, Ky—could talk to animals in a language they understood. Also was clairvoyant. [C; 26. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, July 30, 1892; not online.)]


1892 July 30 / Rel-Phil. Jour, p. 160 / Girl, Alice Sunderland, clairvoyant, near Greenup, Ky. [C; 27. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, July 30, 1892, p. 160; not online.) “Is She a Witch?” Daily Tobacco Leaf-Chronicle, (Clarksville, Tennessee), July 19, 1892, p. 1 c. 6. “She Talks with Animals.” True Northerner, (Paw Paw, Michigan), August 10, 1892, p. 5 c. 3. “Alice Sunderland is an unusually pretty country girl residing with her father on a farm several miles from here. The girl is well educated, and had been a wonder to her friends for several years. She speaks to animals in an unknown tongue and they obey her implicitly, even against the commands and blows of their owners. She also foretells hours ahead, just where and how many animals will be found at certain spots and what they will do. Recently she gave a public test of her power. She said five yoke of oxen would be found on Spalding hill at a certain house. She described minutely what the animals and driver would do on her approach. It came about as she predicted. She then described a pasture some distance away, and said that under a certain tree were seven cows, which would approach when she came in sight and all give down their milk without being touched.. The fluid came out in streams, but no one touched them. At her command they returned to their grazing. Many other wonderful things are told of her.” If cows are not completely milked, remnant milk might be ejected when the teat sphincter is stimulated, and, when their udders are full, spontaneous ejection may be stimulated by a conditioned reflex, (sometimes in the presence of their calf, the walk into a milking parlor, or the voice of the milker). Sunderland might have trained local cattle to obey her vocal commands and possessed a knowledge of their habitual locations and employment, (if she was not a witch).]


1892 July 30 / frgs / Chic. Citizen, 3-5 / “It rained frogs in Pleasant township, near Valparaiso, Ind., the ground being covered with them in some places.” / n.m. [VII; 627. (Chicago Citizen, July 30, 1892, p. 3 c. 5.) See: 1892 July 18, (VII; 602).]


1892 / (or 5) / July 30 / N.Y.T., 1-6 / q at sea. [VII; 628. “An Earthquake at Sea.” New York Times, July 30, 1892, p. 1 c. 6. See: 1892 July 25, (VII: 624 & 625).]


1892 July 30 / Great q., San Cristobal, Mexico. 15,000 homeless. / The Galignani Messenger, Aug 6. [VII; 634. "Great Earthquake in Mexico." Galignani's Messenger, August 6, 1892, p. 1 c. 1.]


1892 / one day in (July) / At Brée, by Dr. Raemaekers, of Antwerp, series of detonations—at regular intervals of ab 12 seconds (dizaine). Repeated about 20 times, / Ciel et Terre 16/613. [VII; 630. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v. 16 pp. 612-613.]


1892 / last of July / Coal / Brooklyn. [VII; 632. (Refs.???)]


1892 July / Succession of falls / See Aug 10, 1894. [VII; 633. See: (1894 Aug 10).]


1892 Aug / Lizzie Borden / acquitted June, 1893. [C; 28. (Refs.???)]


1892 Aug / Revolt in Morocco / Gali. Messenger, Aug 30. [C; 29. "The Morocco Revolt." Galignani's Messenger, August 30, 1892, p. 1 c. 5.]


1892 Aug / Revolt in Afghanistan / The Galignani Messenger, Aug 15 / Anti-clerical riots in Rome / See 15th. [C; 30. "The Afghan Revolt." Galignani's Messenger, August 15, 1892, p. 1 c. 3. "Rome News." Galignani's Messenger, August 15, 1892, p. 3 c. 1-2.]


1892 Aug / Revolts in Venezuela, Bolivia, Honduras. / The Galignani Messenger, Aug 13. [C; 31. "America." Galignani's Messenger, August 13, 1892, p. 1 c. 3.]


1892 Aug. / About Henry G. Trickey, reporter of the Boston Globe, is told in “The Fall River Tragedy” by Edwin H. Porter. (SLN is lib class mark.) Trickey's false story was published in the B. Globe of Oct. 12, 1892. Globe learned it was false and apologized. Trickey was indicted, left Boston, and accidentally killed by a railroad train, in Canada, late in November. / Indicted by State—not on complaint of L. Borden. [C; 32.1, 32.2. Porter, Edwin H. The Fall River Tragedy. Fall River, Masschusetts: George R.H. Buffinton, 1893, 144. Porter was a police reporter for the Fall River Globe, (not the Boston Globe). Trickey, Henry G. “Lizzie Borden's Secrey.” Boston Globe, October 10, 1892, p. 1 c. 5-7, p. 4 c. 4-7, & p. 5 c. 2-8. “Honest Amend.” Boston Globe, October 12, 1892, p. 1 c. 2 & p. 5 c. 3-4. “The Lizzie Borden Case.” Boston Globe, October 12, 1892, p. 1 c. 5-7.  “Tragic Death of Reporter Trickey.” Washington Evening Star, December 5, 1892, p. 7 c. 2. Trickey died in Hamilton, Ontario, on December 3, 1892, slipping and falling under a moving train; and, at the time, he was using the name Henry Melzar.]


1892 Aug / Nova Aurigae / temporary brightening from 13th to 10th mag. / Todd, Stars and Telescopes, p. 267. [VII; 635. Todd, David Peck. Stars and Telescope. Boston: Little, Brown, 1899, 267.]


1892 Aug / from July / Etna / [LT], 3-3-d / 8-6-a / 17-4-a / 19-13-f / 26-3-f / Sept 3-5-f; 6-3-f. [VII; 636. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, August 3, 1892, p. 3 c. 4. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, August 8, 1892, p. 6 c. 1. “The Eruption of Etna.” London Times, August 17, 1892, p. 4 c. 1. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, August 26, 1892, p. 3 c. 6. “The Eruption of Etna.” London Times, September 3, 1892, p. 5 c. 6. (London Times, August 19, 1892, p. 13 c. 6; no page 13; not found here; listed in Palmer's Index to the Times Newspaper.) (London Times, September 6, 1892, p. 3 c. 6; not found here; listed in Palmer's Index to the Times Newspaper.)]


1892 Aug 1 / 5 a.m. / Violent shock / Eastern Switzerland / The Galignani Messenger, 2nd. [VII; 637. "An Earthquake in Switzerland." Galignani's Messenger, August 2, 1892, p. 1 c. 4.]


1892 Aug 2 / Etna again startling / The Galignani Messenger, 3rd. [VII; 638. "Etna." Galignani's Messenger, August 3, 1892, p. 1 c. 6.]


1892 Aug 3-4 / Borden murder / Fall River, Mass. / Lizzie Borden died, July, Aug, or Sept, 1927. [C; 33. The murders occurred in the morning of August 4, 1892; and Lizzie Borden died on June 1, 1927.]


1892 Aug 3 and following / See July 8. / Etna—greater on 6th / night of 7-8, earthquake at Stromboli / Cosmos, N.S., 23/31. [VII; 639. “L'éruption de l'Etna.” ” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 23 (August 13, 1892): 31.]


1892 Aug 3 / Op. Mars / (Al). [VII; 640. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1892, 473.]


1892 Aug 4 / World, 2-1 / Thompson's Lake, near Havana, Ill. / Said that monster like traditional sea serpent had been seen. Said that a farmer had seen wide swaths in his fields and now accounted for them. then said that a “reptile” had escaped from a menagerie 2 years before. [C; 34. “The Sea-Serpent Outclassed.” New York World, August 4, 1892, p. 2 c. 7.]


1892 Aug 4 / Metite on a farm in Williamstown, Mass / Sun, Nov. 22-1-4. [VII; 641. "A Meteor in the Heart of an Elm." New York Sun, November 22, 1892, p. 1 c. 4.]


1892 Aug 4 / ab. 6 p.m. / Burlington and other places in Wisconsin / Rumbling sound and vibrations. / Chic Trib 5-1-4. [VII; 642. “Earthquake Felt in Wisconsin.” Chicago Tribune, August 5, 1892, p. 1 c. 4.]


1892 Aug 5 / Glb. Dem., 6-7 / At Albia, Iowa, a black ghost haunting a house and the streets around—house where some years before a woman had mysteriously disappeared. [C; 35. “Terrorized by a Black Ghost.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, August 5, 1892, p. 6 c. 7.]


1892 Aug 5 / near Dunkirk / Ciel et Terre, 16-608 / Prof. Gérard of Brussels / 4 detonations like cannonading. [VII; 643. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v. 16 p. 608.]


[1892 Aug 6. Wrong date. See: 1892 July 25, (C; 36).]


1892 Aug 6 / N.Y. Herald, 5-4 / Incendiary fires / Flushing, L.I. [C; 37. (New York Herald, August 6, 1892, p. 5 c. 4; not found here.)]


1892 Aug 6 / Birds / Cor writes Field of, that he had shot a ruddy sheldrake, a bird known in Great Britain virtually as only an ornamental fowl. It seemed to him not to have been an escaped bird. Editor writes that a small flock had been reported from Ireland and another from Scotland. / Aug 27—other cors write upon ap[pearance]s of the bird whose breeding grounds are in Western Russia. Ac to most accounts the birds were in full plumage. / Field, Sept. 3, a cor writes that a duck in full plumage in the middle of August is as impossible as a tree in full plumage at Christmas would be. He thinks the specimens reported had escaped from parks. Another cor writes “Escapes”. If escaped, from where? He says that ac to his information upon them must have escaped in flocks. / Sept 10, another cor points out that all that were shot were wild birds in behavior. / Field, Sept 17, cor who had shot one in Ireland agrees with this, saying that he had been unable to get within 200 yards of it. / Field, Oct 1—Someone else who had shot one in Ireland as to rareness. Cor who tells of it says had been shooting there 28 years and had never seen one. [VII; 550.1 to 550.6. Ogilvie, Fergus Menteith. “Ruddy Sheldrake in Suffolk.” Field, August 6, 1892, p. 247. MacPherson, H.A. “Ruddy Sheldrakes in a So-Called Wild State.” Field, August 13, 1892, p. 287. “Ruddy Sheldrakes in the British Isles.” Field, August 27, 1892, p. 329. “Ruddy Sheldrakes in the British Isles.” Field, September 3, 1892, p. 368. Ogilvie, Fergus Menteith. “Ruddy Sheldrakes in the British Isles.” Field, September 10, 1892, p. 433. Vyse, H. Howard. “Ruddy Sheldrakes in the British Isles.” Field, September 17, 1892, p. 470. Thompson, R. Wycliffe. “Ruddy Sheldrake in Ireland.” Field, September 17, 1892, p. 470. Bond, T.A. “Ruddy Sheldrake in Co. Donegal.” Field, October 1, 1892, p. 537. Sawrey-Cookson, L. “Ruddy Sheldrake in Cumberland.” Field, October 22, 1892, p. 613.]


1892 Aug 6 / Frgs / Chicago Citizen (a weekly), 3-5—“During a heavy thunderstorm, thousands of small frogs were rained down upon Port Morris, N.J.” / N.M. [VII; 644. (Chicago Citizen, August 6, 1892, p. 3 c. 5; on microfilm.) See: [1892 July 25, (C; 36).]


1892 Aug 6 / Bright point Mars / Nature 46/483. [VII; 645. “Observations of the Planet Mars.” Nature, 46 (September 15, 1892): 482-483.]


1892 Aug 6 / Chicago Citizen, 3-5 / Meteor said to have fallen upon a barn a few miles north of Decatur, Ill, and destroyed it, / Citizen is a weekly. [VII; 646. (Chicago Citizen, August 6, 1892, p. 3 c. 5; on microfilm.) "Brief Mention." Indianapolis Journal, July 29, 1892, p. 3 c. 4. A barn and hay-stack belonging to Charles Walker, a few miles north of Decatur, were destroyed by fire Tuesday night. Walker and his neighbors say the fire was caused by a meteor which fell into the haystack."]

 

1892 August 6th / morning, ab. 8 a.m. / Zermatt / by M. Folie, of the Academy of Brussels / Saw the pine trees in side of a mountain turn white as snow. Looked through glasses and effect the same. It was a column of light extending from the sky, because birds flying through it looked silvery. It was like a supra-terrestrial light. / La Nat 1893/1/58. [VII; 652.1, 652.2. Tissandier, Gaston. “Phénomène d'Optique Atmosphérique Observé dans les Alpes.” La Nature, 1893 pt. 1 (no. 1021; December 24, 1892): 58-59. François Folie was an astronomer and the director of the Royal Observatory of Belgium from 1883 to 1897; and, he suggested the explanation might be found in light reflected by glaciers.]


1892 Aug 7 / Mars several hours nearest moon / Sc Am 67/116. [VII; 647. "The Moon and Mars." Scientific American, n.s., 67 (August 20, 1892): 116.]


1892 Aug 8 / 4-5 a.m. / Marshall, Minn. / The worst tornado and hailstorm ever known there / Boston Post 9-2-5 / See July 29. [VII; 648. “A Minnesota Tornado.” Boston Post, August 9, 1892, p. 2 c. 5. See: 1892 July 29, (VII; 626).]


1892 Aug 9 / Mussels / Paderborn, Germany / D-90. ** [VII; 649. The note copies information from page 90 of The Book of the Damned. "Notes." Nature, 47 (January 19, 1893): 277-281, at 278. "A yellowish cloud attracted the attention of several people, both from its colour and the rapidity of its motion, when suddenly it burst, a torrential rain fell with a rattling sound, and immediately afterwards the pavement was found to be covered with hundreds of mussels. Further details will be published in the reports of the Berlin Office, but the only possible explanation seems to be that the water of a river in the neighbourhood was drawn up by a passing tornado, and afterwards deposited its living burden at the place in question." Ukmann, R. "Ein seltsamer regenfall." Wetter, 9 (December 1892): 274-277.]


1892 Aug 9-10 / night / Destructive cyclone / western Ontario / Gal. Mess., 11th. [VII; 650. "Destructive Cyclone in Canada." Galignani's Messenger, August 11, 1892, p. 1 c. 3.]


1892 Aug 10 / A cougar that was frightening people between Seattle, Wash, and Lake Washington. / Montreal Daily Witness of Aug 10-8-4, from Seattle papers. [C; 38. “The Cougar on the Track.” Seattle Post-Intelligencer, June 16, 1892, p. 8 c. 4. “The Cougar and the Electric Car.” Montreal Daily Witness, August 10, 1892, p. 8 c. 4.]


1892 Aug 10 / Besides the principal stream, several minor ones. / Nature 47-88. [VII; 651. “Our Astronomical Column.” Nature, 47 (November 24, 1892): 88-89. Perseids.]


1892 Aug 10, 11 / Etna / increasing violence / The Gall. Mess., 12th. [VII; 665. "Mount Etna." Galignani's Messenger, August 12, 1892, p. 1 c. 5.]


1892 Aug 11 / B. Eagle 11-9-6 / Providence, R.I. / John Long, aged 50, in boarding house on Charles Street, walked in sleep, fell from window, was killed. [C; 39. “Somnambulism That Proved Fatal.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 11, 1892, p. 9 c. 6.)]


[The following two notes were clipped together by Fort. C: 44-45.]


1892 Aug 11 / Stuber Disap. / Chic. Citizen 20-3-4 / Miss Lizzie Stuber disap on 11th. Said that a carriage had been seen to pass in that direction, at Farrington, four miles away. A young man, who had been “paying attention” to Miss Stuber, had been suspected, but he had cleared himself. / Near Mt Vernon, Ill. [C; 44.1, 44.2. (Chicago Citizen, August 20, 1892, p. 3 c. 4.)]


1892 Aug 16 / (+) / Disap. / Chicago Tribune, 6-1 / That nothing had been found out in the mystery of the disap of Miss Stuber, in Romain Township, south-eastern part of Marion Co., Ill. Last seen by Mr. Keen, a neighbor. She had driven past his house; and when time enough for her to be ¼ mile away, “pistol shots” and her screams were heard. Her sack with bullet holes in it and her bonnet were found and some of her hair; no trace of blood. The horse with the cart went on [to] the next house, ¼ mile farther. Between these 2 houses the disap. Great excitement, hundreds of persons coming to the place, some from more than 20 miles away. If murder and body removed, the Skillet Fork River was dragged up and down for 11 miles. / [note cut off] Co. [C; 45.1 to 45.4. “They Search in Vain.” Chicago Tribune, August 16, 1892, p. 6 c. 1. “Lizzie Stuber at Home.” Watertown Republican, (Wisconsin), August 24, 1892, p. 2 c. 1. The shots fired were by squirrel hunters; the hair was her false locks; she went away on own accord; and, it was suspected the false murder was a conspiracy to have an enemy arrested.]


1892 Aug 12 / wild man / clothes / Chic. Trib 13-1-4 / Disap in Rock Fall, Conn, of Harvey Miller, “as if the earth had swallowed him”. For 4 years, though one of the wealthiest residents he had lived as a recluse. / Always Is / Said that a gang of 3 or 4 rough looking men had been seen in the neighborhood and these men were suspected of having kidnapped him. / But see (3). / Chic Trib 15/1/4 / Miller found lying in a field ten miles from Rockfall. Wore only a shirt. Weak but conscious. “He cannot tell why he left home and talks disconnectedly.” / He was Capt. Miller. [C; 40.1 to 40.4. “Think He Is Being Held For Ransom.” Chicago Tribune, August 13, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. “Recluse Miller Found in a Field.” Chicago Tribune, August 15, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. “Captain Harvey Miller....” New Haven Morning Journal and Courier, October 25, 1892, p. 4 c. 4. Miller, (who had been the local representative in the state legislature in 1875-1876), died on October 23, 1892, of “softening of the brain” and the exposure he suffered when he wandered off for several days.]


1892 Aug 12 / Albert Buss saw at Manchester and at first mistook flashes from a lighthouse. / E Mec 56/37 (etc.). [VII; 653. Buss, Albert Alfred. "Aurora Borealis." English Mechanic, 56 (no. 1432; September 2, 1892): 37.]


1892 Aug 12 / B Eagle, 4-6 / First rain in 3 years in S.W. Texas. [VII; 654. “Recent Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 12, 1892, p. 4 c. 6.]


1892 Aug 12 / Telegraphic and cable communication interrupted by electric disturbances / B Eagle 13-4-6. [VII; 655. “Recent Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 13, 1892, p. 4 c. 6.]


1892 Aug 12 / Daily Etna more violent / Gal. Mess., 13th. [VII; 656. “Etna.” Galignani's Messenger, August 13, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. The Etna volcano.]


[1892 Aug. 13 /] 1837 Dec 26 / Lights in sky. / Ireland / C.R., Séance, Sep. 18, 1871 / in same planet by Prof B Lick Ob Ast. Nach, no. 4106 / Obj (3)rd / See. [I; 2279. This note involves two subjects, (on each of its two sides), on different dates. Front side. Guillemin, Amédée. "Sur deux observations qui paraissent offrir quelque analogie avec celle du météore signalé recémment par M. Coggia." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 755-756. The fiery meteoric light seen over Kilkenny, for more than an hour, was undoubtedly an extraordinary, red-coloured auroral display on December 5, 1737, (not in 1837), observed from Italy to Scotland. Thomas Stack. "An account of a book intitled, Observationes de Aere & Morbis Epidemicis...." Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 40 (December 1738): 429-40, 437-8. "This same Phænomenon was of great Extent in the Northern Parts of Europe; and at Kilkenny in Ireland, was seen somewhat like a Globe of Fire suspended in the Air for near space of an Hour; which then bursting, spread Flames around on every Side." "A collection of the observations of the remarkable red light seen in the air on Dec. 5, 1737, sent from different places to the Royal Society." Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 41 (January-March 1741): 583-606. On the reverse side. Barnard, Edward Emerson. "An unexplained observation." Astronomische Nachrichten, 172 (1906): 25-26, (with illustration). The star-like object observed by Barnard, at the Lick Observatory, on August 13, 1892, may have been an intra-Mercurial planet, if not a very bright asteroid, (seen in the morning daylight, before sunrise). Delaunay. "Decouverte d'une nouvelle planete." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 716.]


1892 Aug 13 / Prof Barnard saw at 10 to 5 in morning—Standard Pacific—corresponds to 12:50 Greenwich. / That could not have been intra-Mars but could have been in tension to Venus. / Ast. Nach, no. 4106 / Observatory 29/369. [VII; 659. Barnard, Edward Emerson. "An unexplained observation." Astronomische Nachrichten, 172 (1906): 25-26, (with illustration). “On 1892 August 13, at 10 minutes to 5 in the morning Standard Pacific Time, which corresponds to 50 minutes after noon Greenwich Mean Time, he was observing Venus, and in the same field with the planet he saw a star which he estimated to be of the 7th magnitude, but whose place, deduced from that of Venus at the time, does not agree with that of any considerable star in the 'Bonn Durchmusterung.' The observation was made in broad daylight, half an hour before sunrise, and the objects were low down in the sky, and under these circumstances it seems remarkable that a 7th magnitude star should have been.” “An Unexplained Observation.” Observatory, 29 (1906): 369-370.]


1892 Aug 13 / B Eagle, 4-6 / Drought in Zacatecas, Mexico, had caused death of 60,000 cattle. [VII; 657. “Recent Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 13, 1892, p. 4 c. 6.]


1892 Aug 13 / Floods, Mexico, along Vazas River. Many persons said here been drowned. / The Galignani Messenger, 14th. [VII; 658. "Flood in Mexico." Galignani's Messenger, August 14, 1892, p. 1 c. 3.]


1892 Aug 13 / St Elmo's is in L'Astro, July, 1893 / 260, 314. [VII; 660. Folie, François. “Phénomène d'Optique Atmosphérique Observée dans les Alpes.” Astronomie, 12 (1893): 259-262. “Optique atmosphérique.” Astronomie, 12 (1893): 314-315.]


1892 Aug 13 / Rain cloud that cast everything in densest of darkness, as it passed over the Isle of Arran. / Field, Aug 20, p. 313. [VII; 661. “Thundercloud.” Field, August 20, 1892, p. 313.]


1892 Aug 14 / World, 13-3 / Ghost in Albia, Iowa. [C; 41. (New York World, August 15, 1892, p. 4 c. 3; not Evening World, not published on Sunday; not @ Newspapers.com.) “A Colored Individual.” L'Anse Sentinel, (Michigan), September 10, 1892, p. 3 c. 4. See: 1892 Aug 5, (C; 35).]


1892 Aug 15 / B. Eagle, 6-2 / “H. Frank Wheeler, of 401 Washington Avenue, is recovering from a long and peculiar illness, at Danbury, Conn., In Dec, 1891, had had pneumonia, but had recovered. On Dec. 14, was taken with a spasm, and fell upon the floor. Until ab middle of August, 1892, he was in state of mind and body of one starting life all over again. At first uttered meaningless sounds and then learned to talk, like a baby. Had to learn names of common objects all over again. His recovery was in another spasm, Took up life where left it in December, and in August heat, asked how that be, his impressions still of December. He remembered nothing of the experiences of his state between Dec. and Aug. [C; 41.2, 42.2, 42.3. “H.F. Wheeler's Queer Illness.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 15, 1892, p. 6 c. 2.]


1892 Aug. 15 / Look up Wheeler—see if in Brooklyn Directory. [C; 43.]


1892 Aug 15-17 / See flashes in England, 13th. [VII; 662. See: (Aug 13???).]


1892 Aug 15 and 17 / Ac. Capt Findlay, of s.s. Missouri, from London to Phil. / 15th, bet. 9 and 10 p.m. / ab. 46 Lat and 53 Long / Light like a searchlight ap and disap at intervals of ab. 30 seconds. / On 17th, Lat ab 41 and Long ab 69, again, bet 10:50 and 11:15 p.m. / Sun, Sept 21-6-5 / Said that also resembled Northern Lights. / N.Y. Sun, Oct 2-7-4. / Said that upon these nights or from the 13th, searchlight on Mt. Washington. On night of the 17th, words had been flashed and had been read in Portland, Me. Said that position of the Missouri was 500 miles away—(Look up.) Was seen first night in the s.w., second night in n.w. / Both from Phila. Press. [VII; 663.1 to 663.4, (combined with VII; 666). “Lunar Flash Lights From an Iceberg.” New York Sun, September 21, 1892, p. 6 c. 5. “James I. McGoldrick, who is in charge of the branch Hydrographic Office, has referred the report to the Hydrographer at Washington. He is of the opinion that the strange light was produced by the moon behind a cloud shining on an iceberg.” “Was It the Mt. Washington Light?” New York Sun, October 2, 1892, s. B p. 7 c. 4. The distance from Mount Washngton to Portland, Maine, is approximately 105 km., or 65 miles. The distance from Mount Washington to the position of the S.S. Missouri, (south of the Avalon Peninsula, on Newfoundland), on the 15th was approximately, 1,450 km., or 900 miles, and, on the 17th, (the Georges Bank), was approximately 400 km., or 250 miles. Icebergs might have drifted south of Newfoundland, in August, but, probably would not be found in the Georges Bank area.]


1892 / summer / Mt Washington / searchlight / Sci Amer 67-248 / That many towns 100 miles away had seen it and it had been reported from one town 116 miles away. [VII; 664. "The Mount Washington Search Light." Scientific American, n.s., 67 (October 15, 1892): 248.]


1892 Aug 17 / Great explosion of powder / Arendonck (Anvers), Belgium / Ciel et Terre 30/334. [VII; 667. "Tremblement de Terre Produit par une Explosion." Ciel et Terre, 13 (1892-1893): 334-335.]


1892 Aug 17 / “Remarkable tidal wave: in river Dart—supposed related to the q. Again several times on 19th. Hereford Times, 20th. [VII; 668. (Hereford Times, August 20, 1892; issue not @ BNA.) “The Earthquake Shocks.” London Globe, August 20, 1892, p. 2 c. 4. “Though no earthquake shock was felt here, extraordinary tides have occurred in the Dart during the last two days, and these, it is supposed, have been caused the seismic disturbance. At low water Wednesday tidal wave ran up the river, which immediately rose 18 inches. The phenomenon was even more noticeable Thursday afternoon during the regatta, when the tide, after ebbing some considerable time, turned and came again foot higher. This occurred several times, and those most familiar with the river do not recall anything similar.”]


1892 Aug 17, 18, 22 / q's of Pembrokeshire / Geol Mag 1893-292 / Also? Aug 19 and 23. [VII; 669. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1892.” Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 10 (1893): 291-302, at 292-293.]


1892 Aug 18 / Hereford Times, Aug 20 / Noted as singular that the q felt only by persons in upper stories of houses, in Hereford. Q was in S. Wales and W of England. Morning of 18th, shortly after midnight, or ab. 12:25 a.m. [VII; 670. (Hereford Times, August 20, 1892; issue not @ BNA.) (Wellington Journal, August 20, 1892, p. 6, reports violent and strong gusts of wind, on an otherwise calm night.)]


1892 Aug 18 / at Guaymas, Mexico, on Gulf of California, at midnight / Midway between zenith and pole star, meteor disk almost size of moon's. / Science 21-25. [VII; 671. Miller, E. "Notes on Mars and Meteors." Science, s. 1 v. 21 (January 13, 1893): 25.]


1892 Aug 18 / See Aug. 4. / P.L. of [Aug 18] / Snake 6 feet long reported to have fallen in a storm at Marshall, Minn. / See right date, July 29. [VII; 672. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 18, 1892.) See: 1892 July 29, (VII; 626).]


1892 Aug 18 / Succession of shocks / England / Milford Haven, etc. [VII; 673. “Earthquake Shocks in South Wales.” South Wales Daily News, (Cardiff), August 18, 1892, p. 5 c. 5-6.]


1892 Aug 18-19 / night / 3 different explosions and flashes of light of unknown origin in Dearborn St, Chicago. / Chicago Trib 19-3-2. [VII; 674. “Explosions on Dearborn Street.” Chicago Tribune, August 19, 1892, p. 3 c. 2.]


1892 Aug 19 / clbrst / came suddenly / 5 p.m. / Chic. Tribune 20-1-2 / Town of Freedom, on N bank of Ohio, 33 miles from Pittsburg. Rush of water from sky so that in 10 minutes the town was flooded. / The rain was a sheet of water. People living a few miles away knew nothing of the occurence. Houses washed away. [VII; 675.1, 675.2. “Terrible Cloudburst at Freedom.” Chicago Tribune, August 20, 1892, p. 1 c. 2.]


1892 Aug 20 / Field of / Comments by cor upon stories of extraordinary mosquitoes in London—persons who had suffered agonies from their stings. His antagonism seems against the suggestion that unusual mosquitoes had come in esparto grass from Algeria. [VII; 676. Carrington, John T. “Mosquitoes in London.” Field, August 20, 1892, p. 324.]


1892 Aug 20 / Clbrst. / Prince Edward's Island—6 inches of rain in a short time / The Galignani Messenger, Aug. 22. [VII; 677. "A Heavy Cloudburst." Galignani's Messenger, August 22, 1892, p. 1 c. 3.]


1892 Aug 21 / date of dispatch in Otago Witness of 25—q's and floods in Japan wrecked 10,000. 500 perished. [VII; 678. “Cablegrams.” Otago Witness, August 25, 1892, p. 34 (c. 4).]


1892 Aug 21 / Ac to Circular No. 33 of the Wolshingham Observatory, Nov. Aurig rose from 15th to 9th mag. / E Mag 56-37. [VII; 679. Noble, William. "Who Really Discovered Neptune?..." English Mechanic, 56 (no. 1432; September 2, 1892): 35-37, at 37.]


1892 Aug 22 / Body found near Breley / Standard 23/4/1. [C; 46. (London Standard, August 23, 1892, p. 4 c. 1; not found here.)]


1892 Aug 22 / Devon “rats” / near Bakewell / Standard 23/4/1. [C; 47. (London Standard, August 23, 1892, p. 4 c. 1; not found here.)]


1892 Aug 22 / B. Eagle, 4-6 / Colima, Mexico, in eruption. [VII; 680. “Recent Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 22, 1892, p. 4 c. 6. The Colima volcano was in eruption from July, 1891, to June, 1892.]


1892 Aug 23 / Daily Picayune, 4-5—near Columbus, Ind., pigs had been disappearing, Then a farmer named Doolittle, entering his barn, saw an enormous snake. He took out the horses and burned down the barn. Said that in the ashes the ribs of the reptile as big as ribs of a hog. / Doolittle. [C: 48.1, 48.2. “Boa-Constrictor Found In a Barn.” Indianapolis News, August 18, 1892, p. 6 c. 4. “Eckerty, August 18.—Some time ago, when Choulet's show and menagerie passed through this county, a boa-constrictor of medium size escaped from its cage and spread consternation among the natives. As time wore away, the incident was looked upon as a 'fake.' Early yesterday the matter was suddenly sprung afresh, near Doolittle’s mills, south of here, when J.D. Doolittle entered his barn and saw the monster in his hay-loft. Doolittle had lost a calf and several shoats, of which he could find no clew. Their disappearance was explained by the presence of the snake. Seeing the reptile, Mr. Doolittle beat a hasty retreat, and after releasing his horses from the barn, and without attempting to take out his wagon, buggy, and other property, he applied a match and burned the structure and contents to the ground. The mow was full of new hay. After the fire had spent its force, the ribs of the reptile were found in the ashes, and they were nearly as large as the ribs of a two-hundred-pound hog. Mr. Doolittle says that he feels worse from the effect which the snake's vicious eyes had upon him than he does over the loss of his barn and contents. The eyes still haunt him. The contents of the barn were the principal loss, as the structure was an old one and was soon to be replaced. Mr. Doolittle is the proprietor of a large flouring mill here.” “He Got Rid of the Snake.” New Orleans Picayune, August 23, 1892, p. 4 c. 5.]


1892 Aug 24 / P.L. of / “A serpent 10 feet long; with a head like an alligator's, and a flat tail, is reported to be scaring Knightstown, Ind., people. / See Aug 4. [C; 49. “Sea Serpent in a Mill-Race.” Indianapolis Journal, August 20, 1892, p. 2 c. 3. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 24, 1892.) See: 1892 Aug 4, (C; 34).]


1892 Aug 23 / B. Eagle, 4-6 / Time of intense heat in Europe—slight frost at Concord, N.H. [VII; 681. “Recent Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 23, 1892, p. 4 c. 6.]


1892 Aug 25 / [LT], 3-e / Nova Aurigae. [VII; 682. “Nova Aurigæ.” London Times, August 25, 1892, p. 3 c. 5.]


1892 Aug 26 / 3 q's at Vichy / 10:10 a.m.—p. 427 / C.R. 115/373. [VII; 683. "M. le Dr Durand-Fardel adresse une Note...." Comptes Rendus, 115 (1892): 373. "M. G. De Rocquigny-Adanson adresse...." Comptes Rendus, 115 (1892): 427.]


1892 Aug / Tottenham report—see Feb 18, 1901. [VII; 684. See: 1901 Feb 18, (VIII; 715).]


1892 Aug 27 / P.L. of / “A huge serpent has lately been frightening Richmond, Ind., people. / See Aug 4. [C; 50. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 27, 1892.) “Boa-Constrictor Found in a Barn.” Indianapolis News, August 18, 1892, p. 6 c. 4. See: 1892 Aug 4, (C; 34), and 1892 Aug 23, (C; 48).]

1892 Aug 27 / Field of / “A great 'Painted Lady' year.” [VII; 551. “A Clouded-Yellow Year,” Field, August 27, 1892, p. 329.]


1892 Aug 27 / Insects / Field of / A list of captures of the “clouded yellow” butterfly in England. This is C. edusa colias. Some cors writing that they had not seen this butterfly before in many years. / Rev. A.P. Morres, Salisbury, notes as common as in 1877. He had seen none in other years before 1882. And Sept. 3 / Several writers note a great preponderance of males—swarms reported from Scotland. Sept 10 / More cors write upon the great numbers and the astonishing preponderance of males. (Survival better a long journey?) Swarms in Alderney and of painted ladies and the rare hummingbird moth. [VII: 552.1, 552.2, 552.3. Carrington, John T. “A Clouded-Yellow Year.” Field, August 20, 1892, p. 324. “A Clouded-Yellow Year,” Field, August 27, 1892, p. 329. Morres reported seeing Colias edusa in 1847 and in abundance in 1858, but does not mention “1882,” herein. “A Clouded Yellow Year.” Field, September 3, 1892, p. 368. “A Clouded Yellow Year.” Field, September 10, 1892, p. 433.]


1892 Aug 28 / Great volc eruption on one of the Aleutian Islands, Exact location not known but ashes fell on vessels—also thunder and lightning and quakes all day and evening. S.F. Chronicle, Sept 30-1-7. [VII; 685. “An Alaskan Volcano.” San Francisco Chronicle, September 30, 1892, p. 1 c. 7. The Veniaminof volcano.]


1892 Aug 28 / A vessel steamed 4 hours through a dense black cloud of volcanic dust. / Coast of Alaska / Eagle 29-10-6. [VII; 686. “Sailed Through a Cloud of Volcanic Dust.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 29, 1892, p. 10 c. 6.]


1892 Aug 29 / The Galignani Messenger of 29th / 16 suicides in Trieste in 10 days. [C; 51. "An Epidemic of Suicide." Galignani's Messenger, August 29, 1892, p. 1 c. 4.]


1892 Aug 29 / wlf—Chicago / San Fran. Chronicle of, 2-7 / (I saw nothing of this in Chic. Trib.) / South Side of Chicago terrorized by a large grey wolf that had been seen at times for several months there. Policemen had seen it and had shot at it. It had killed cats and drunk from cans on doorsteps. [C; 52.1, 52.2. “In Wild Chicago.” San Francisco Chronicle, August 29, 1892, p. 2 c. 7.]


1892 Aug 29 / Sc Am 68-19 / 4 p.m. / Metite / Bath, S. Dakota / (F). [VII; 687. Fletcher, 106. This the Bath meteorite.]


1892 / last week in August / New volc in Shamugin Isl and ashes falling 250 miles away, sea. / Sun, Oct 12-1-4 / South of Alaskan Peninsula. [VII; 688. "The New Volcano." New York Sun, October 12, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. The Veniaminof volcano.]


1892 Sept / At Addington unusual number of the clouded yellow butterfly (Colias edusa), which had not been seen there since 1877. / Symons Met 27-144. [VII; 553. Mathison, John. "Butterflies." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 27 (October 1892): 144.]


1892 Sept / (Cut) / Butterflies not seen since 1877 / Addington / Symons (L) 27/144. [VII; 554. Mathison, John. "Butterflies." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 27 (October 1892): 144.]


1892 / ab. Sept. 1 / B. Eagle, Sept 3-10-4 / That, at Livingston Manor, Sullivan Co., N.Y., metite had fall—loud report—fragments found. [VII; 689. “A Sullivan County Meteor.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 3, 1892, p. 10 c. 4. “A Visitor From the Heavens.” Sullivan County Record, (Jeffersonville, New York), September 9, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. “In substance this meteor stone was not unlike an ordinary piece of lime stone, and parts of it could easily be crumbled between the thumb and fingers, while other parts of it were a substance that did not slack upon cooling.”]


1892 Sept. 1 / N.Y. Herald / Letter by Pickering, on sights on Mars / also Herald of Oct 7. [VII; 690. Pickering, William Henry. “Melting Snow in Mars.” New York Herald, September 1, 1892, p. 7 c. 2. “Martian Observations.” New York Herald, October 7, 1892, p. 10 c. 1.]


1892 Sept 2 / Etna fresh eruption / L.T. 3-5-f. [VII; 691. “The Eruption of Etna.” London Times, September 3, 1892, p. 5 c. 6.]


1892 Sept 2 / New outbreak of Etna / Nature 46-450. [VII; 692. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (September 8, 1892): 448-452, at 450.]


1892 Sept 3 / [LT], 5-f / Pretended discoveries on Mars. [VII; 693. “The Planet Mars.” London Times, September 3, 1892, p. 5 c. 6.]


1892 Sept. 4 / Mars / Stationary. [VII; 694. Mats stationary. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1892, 473.]


1892 Sept 5 / B. Eagle, 4-6 / Texas fly in N. Jersey and killing cows and horses. [VII; 695. “Recent Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 5, 1892, p. 4 c. 6.]


1892 Sept 6 / B. Eagle, 4-5 / Snow fell in the highlands of Austria. [VII; 696. “Recent Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 6, 1892, p. 4 c. 5.]


1892 Sept 9 / 10:30 p.m. / One of the largest meteors ever seen in Boston / B. Eagle 10-10-4. [VII; 697. “Meteoric Display in Boston.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 10, 1892, p. 10 c. 4.]


1892 Sept. 13 / 4 p.m. / Severe shock at Anna, Ill / Eagle 14-1-7. [VII; 698. “An Earthquake Shock in Illinois.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 14, 1892, p. 1 c. 7.]


1892 Sept 14 / 7:08 p.m. / Meteor, Tewksbury, and train “some minutes. / L.T. 17-7-b. [VII; 699. “A Brilliant Meteor.” London Times, September 17, 1892, p. 7 c. 2.]


1892 Sept 12 / Fire and a phantom / San Francisco Chronicle, 4-5 / That for several years the town of Castroville, Monterey Co., Cal, had been the victim of a succession of disastrous fires that had been undoubtedly of incendiary origin. So many that business was demoralized and a vigilance committee of businessmen had been formed. Many of the fires were in one part of town, and a man there whose store had burned down, for which he had collected insurance, was suspected. He was warned to leave town. He had not yet left but the town was wrought up with another excitement. A woman in black was driving women of the town into hysterics by suddenly appearing at their sides. All the appearances made at dusk. Then men and women saw the figure appearing and disappearing. Was chased once to a fence. Went over and not through the fence, but on the other side it was unfindable. Wherever chased no track was found. / So said be a phantom by some but “the stronger-minded” said was a fire-bug in woman's attire”. [C; 53.1 to 53.5. “Chasing a Phantom.” San Francisco Chronicle, September 12, 1892, p. 4 c. 5.]


1892 Sept. 15. / Similar to the story of Nov. 26, 1893. / Terrifying women, and having a fence handy. [C; 54. See: 1893 Nov. 26, (C; 144).]


1892 Sept 15 / Also ap. disap. woman in black. [C; 55. (Refs.???)]


1893 Sept 15 / See Oct. 3. / See Feb 8. / Aug. 5. [C; 56. See: (Feb 8), (Aug 5), and 1892 Oct 3, (C; 63).]


1892 / ab. Sept 15 / New York City / G. McKenzie confesses killed H. Quill and been haunted by Q's ghost. / This from an English paper. [C; 57. “A Fight on the Lofty Roof.” New York Sun, September 13, 1892, p. 3 c. 6. "Doesn't Fear Quill's Ghost." New York Sun, September 20, 1892, p. 5 c. 1. “After my arrest at the Polo grounds I told Inspector Steers the story of the fight, but I never said I was afraid of Quills ghost. That is a lie and nonsense. I have seen no ghost and expect to see none.”]


1892 Sept 17 / (Disap) / St Louis G-Dem 22-1-4 / “Where is John Harrison? A prominent Texas Farmer Politician has disappeared.” Last seen at Gainesville, Texas, 17th, 10 a.m. “He has disappeared as completely as if the ground had opened and swallowed him.” He had been a candidate for County Treasurer and had been defeated. Supposed the defeat had preyed upon his mind and deranged him. A circular issued and a reward offered. “Hundreds of men are scouring the country.” [C; 58.1, 58.2. “Where Is John Harrison?” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, September 22, 1892, p. 1 c. 6. Harrison apparently was leading a double life, as both John Harrison in Texas and as John Harrison Laflolette in Indiana, with a family in both states. (Fort Worth Gazette, October 24, 1892.) (“Are J.H. and J.H.F. One and the Same?” Greencastle Star Press, (Indiana), October 29, 1892, p. 1 c. 4.)]


1892 Sept 18 / early morning / Jerome, Ind / D. Picayune 24-4-4 / Underground explosion and gas coming up from earth. [VII; 700. “A Frightful Phenomenon.” New Orleans Picayune, September 24, 1892, p. 4 c. 4. “Freaks of Natural Gas.” Greencastle Banner and Times, (Indiana), September 22, 1892, p. 2 c. 4. “Anderson, Ind., Sept. 20.Early Sunday morning the loud report of an explosion startled the people of the little town of Jerome, in Howard county, some twenty miles north of this city. Upon investigation they were horrified to find at the junction of Wildcat and Little creek, about two acres of ground had disappeared, and a small hole which had been ignited for several days past had set fire to the place. Now it is a roaring mass of flame.”]


1892 Sept 19 / Swarm / Ac to Cleveland (Ohio) Daily Press, “swarms upon swarms” of butterflies (Danais archippus) visited Cleveland. “For a while they [completely] filled the air.” / Ent. News 3-234 / Entomological News. [VII; 555. Webster, F.M. “A Flight of Danais archippus Fabr.” Entomological News, 3 (November 1892): 234-235. (Cleveland Daily Press, September 21, 1892' not @ Newspapers.com.)]


1892 Sept. 20 / Spiders / A cor living in Gainesville, Fla., sent Ed of Sci. Amer (67-325) some of the substance that fell there in large quantities during a rain on 20th. Someone else had sent some of it to the Smithsonian Institute. Dr George Marx accounts for it in terms of this one occurrence—not improbable web of a Nephia, a southern spider, or strands of aeronautical spiders drenched and falling in rain, whereas this substance has often fallen not in rain. / 1892 / Sept 20. [VII; 556.1, 556.2. "Spider Web from the Clouds." Scientific American, n.s., 67 (November 19, 1892): 325.]


1892 Sept / Spider Web / from Atlanta Constitution, ab. Oct. 13 / Sun, Oct 23-8-3 / At Gainesville, Fla., from a heavy cloud, accompanied by rain, a “large quantity of white, thread-like stuff”. Said was spider web. [VII; 557. “A Balloon Spider's Web.” Savannah Morning News, September 23, 1892, p. 2 c. 4. "Genuine Spider Web from the Clouds." New York Sun, September 23, 1892, s. B p. 8 c. 3.  “What Is It.” Atlanta Constitution, September 25, 1892, p. 15 c. 5. “The Spider's Web.” Atlanta Constitution, October 13, 1892, p. 2 c. 4. “What Is It?” Atlanta Constitution, October 13, 1892, p. 2 c. 6. “What Is It.” Thomasville Daily Times-Enterprise, (Georgia), October 5, 1892, p. 3 c. 2. “The Times-Enterprise has been sent some samples of the balloon spider web as it is called for, want of a better name, that fell in Alachua and other counties in Florida several days ago. The substance formed in clouds and left to the northward before the rain came up. After the rained it dropped to the ground from bring made heavy by the sprinkling. Around Gainesville the country was covered for miles. From the appearance of the 'what is it,' it looks like fine quality of spider web, but a closer inspection would dispel the idea that it was such. The strands are three times as fine as cotton. Enough felt to start a thread factory.”]


1892 Sept 23 / Newcastle Daily Leader of, copied in Med and Dayb. of 30th / Wailing sounds in a miner's cottage at Birtley. [C; 59. (Newcastle Daily Leader, September 23, 1892; not at BNA.) “Ghost Hunting in Durham.” London Globe, September 21, 1892, p. 4 c. 5. (Medium and Daybreak, September 30, 1892.)]


1892 Sept 23 / [LT], 3-f / Met. [VII; 701. “A Meteor.” London Times, September 23, 1892, p. 3 c. 6.]


1892 Sept 25 / Reincarnation / B. Eagle, 6-4 / Editorial upon statement, made to a St Louis Globe-Democrat reporter, by Isaac G. Foster—that in 1880 had buried a daughter, in Effingham Co., Illinois. She aged 14 or 15. A year later he went to live in Dakota, and 2 years after his arrival, a second daughter was born. She was named Nellie. when old enough to talk she said her name was not Nellie, but was Maria. This was the name of the dead girl. In 1892, the Fosters moved back to their old home in Illinois. Said that Nellie recognized the house, and called by name many of her sister's acquaintances. Asked to go to the school where her sister had attended. Went to her sister's desk, and said: “This is mine.” / Just who so sure just what desk was a little girl's, twelve years before? [C; 60.1 to 60.4. “An Alleged Return to Earth.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 25, 1892, p. 6 c. 4.]


1892 Sept 25 / Great fire at Rockaway / Considerable fire—Sept 25, 1911. [VII; 702. See: (1911 Sept 25; not found here).]


1892 Sept 25 / Meteor / Krems / Met. Zeit 1892-435. [VII; 703. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 9 (1892): 417-440, at 435.]


1892 Sept 26 / Ext wild geese / L. Times, 7-f. / During preceding week extraordinary flights of wild geese across Huntingdonshire. On one day there was a flight almost without interruption for four hours. “The circumstance is altogether remarkable....” [VII; 558. “Unusual Flights of Wild Geese.” London Times, September 26, 1892, p. 7 c. 6.]


1892 Sept. 26 / See July 23, 1883. / [note cut off] is between [note cut off] C. / [note cut off] Australia and r[note cut off]. [VII; 704. See: (1883 July 23).]


1892 Sept 26 / ship—q or elec shock / B Eagle, 1-4 / An account of experience of schooner Dora Steward along coast of B. Columbia. A shock and schooner lifted. But no disturbance on sea surface and weather clear. Strong electric shocks were felt by the man at the wheel. [VII; 705.1, 705.2. “An Earthquake at Sea.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 26, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. “The vessel humped along on her course for fully a minute and when she had covered 600 yards and after being shaken from stem to stern, the eruption ceased and she sailed smoothly on.”]


1892 Sept 26 / Sun, 6-7 / Volcanic ashes in Finland “recently” attrib to volcano in Iceland. / See last Aug. [VII; 706. "Sunbeams." New York Sun, September 26, 1892, p. 6 c. 7. See: 1892 Aug 28, (VII; 685), and, 1892 / last week in August, (VII; 688). The Vestmannaeyjar volcano.]


[1892 Sep 27 /] 1892 Sept. 28 / People at Springfield, Ill, saw a meteor (a good-sized star) moving toward the moon, which it appeared to strike, exploding at the same time. / Daily Picayune, Oct 2-4-4. [VII; 707. “A Meteor Strikes the Moon.” New Orleans Picayune, October 2, 1892, p. 4 c. 4. “A Heavenly Phenomenon.” Decatur Daily Republican, (Illinois), September 29, 1892, p. 3 c. 5. “A wonderful phenomenon was observed in the heavens Tuesday evening about ten minutes before 7 o'clock. Those saw it declare that a bright body resembling in size and brilliancy a good-sized star was seen moving with astonishing rapidity directly toward the moon, it struck with tremendous force, to burst like a bomb, darkening its light for an instant. The scientifically inclined explain it by saying that a large meteor or comet came within the sphere of moon's attraction and fell into it, just thousands of such bodies fall into the earth every day.” The only planet visible, then and there, was Mars, at a considerable distance from the Moon; and, without a significant atmosphere, few meteors would become luminous before colliding into the Moon.]


1892 Sept 30 / 12:30 a.m. / Shock / Huelva, Spain / windows smashed / rumbling / L.T., Oct 1-5-f. [VII; 708. “Earthquake in Spain.” London Times, October 1, 1892, p. 5 c. 6.]


1892 / end of Sept / Rain / St Louis Globe Dem, Nov. 12-16-6 , taken from the Pittsburg Chronicle-Telegraph—That on Water Street, Brownsville, opposite the house in which James G. Blaine was born, a garden. That from cloudless sky rain fell upon a peach tree. “It seemed to fall from some height above the tree and covered an area of about 14 feet square.” “Towards morning it ceased. It appeared always to be heaviest during the hottest part of the day.” Because it was an uncanny phe, the usual ghost-explainers—that someone, no particulars given, had been murdered there “long ago”. [C; 61.1, 61.2, 61.3. “The Weeping Tree of Brownsville.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, November 12, 1892, p. 16 c. 6. Brownsville, Pennsylvania.]


1892 / ab Oct / at Rockville Center (L.I.?) / Martin Diet / Disap. / See Oct. 14, 1893. / A ghost appeared there. [C; 62. See: 1893 Oct 14, (C; 141).]


1892 Oct 3 / Daily Picayune, 4-5 / At Moorestown, N.J. / ghost / A woman in black, appearing and disappearing. [C; 63. “A New Jersey Ghost.” New Orleans Picayune, October 3, 1892, p. 4 c. 5. “A Ghost Annoys Moorestown.” Camden Daily Telegram, (New Jersey), September 26, 1892, p. 1 c. 4.]


1892 Oct. 3 / Sept 7, '71. [VII; 709. See: 1871 Sept 7, (IV; 511). Buss, Albert Alfred. "List of 25 exceptional Eruptive Prominences." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 18 (1907-1908): 326.]


1892 Oct 3 / P.L. of / “A remarkable shower of volcanic ashes recently occurred in several parts of Finland. The ground in some places is stated to have been covered to the depth of nearly an inch.” [VII; 710. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 3, 1892.)]


1892 Oct 5 / In Oklahoma, vast cloud of the Archippus butterfly. Ab 20 miles wide, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. / Oct 6, smaller swarm. / Insect Life 5/197. [VII; 711. Neal, J.C. “Swarming of the Archippus Butterfly.” Insect Life, 5 (January 1893): 197.]


1892 Oct 5 / 8:30 p.m. / “An unusual noise, a rumbling, roaring sound” and vibrations. / Hot Springs, South Dakota / S Fran. Chronicle 7-1-5. [VII; 712. “Shaken by an Earthquake.” San Francisco Chronicle, October 7, 1892, p. 1 c. 5-6.]


1892 Oct 6  / [Trinidad's Great Storm] / Port of Spain Gazette / reprint / Sept 21, 1925. [VII; 713. Newspaper clipping. (Port of Spain Gazette, September 21, 1925.)]


1892 Oct 8 / [LT], 5-e / Mars. [VII; 714. “The Planet Mars.” London Times, October 8, 1892, p. 5 c. 5.]


1892 Oct 11 / NY Times, 4-7 / Juan Contreras, of Guanajuato, creating excitement in Southern Mexico, by predicting earthquakes. [C; 64. “An Earthquake Scheduled for To-night.” New York Times, October 11, 1892, p. 4 c. 7.]


1892 Oct 13 / Violent th. storm ab. 60 miles s.e. of Narrabri, N.S. Wales. / Jour and Proc., Roy Soc. N.S Wales—told by Mr. H.C. Russell, the Govt. Astronomer, with initials of B.A., C.M.G., F.R.S. / Hailstones that 15 or 20 minutes after their fall measured 6½ inches in circumference. 19 sheep killed—many smaller creatures. In a violent sandstorm. [VII; 715.1, 715.2. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. "Hail Storms." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 26 (1892): 314-318, at 316. "Serpent Storms and Spider Showers." Pearson's Weekly, May 19, 1900, p. 756.]


1892 Oct 14 / Polt and stones / Chicago Tribune 23-38-1 / Dispatch from Hamilton, Ohio, that in the home of Jerry Meyers (and his wife), a wealthy farmer of Hazelwood, phe had broken out. Upon this day in the house were his niece, Anne Avery, of Middletown, Ohio, who had been spending some time there, and a young woman, a friend of hers. Ab. 10 a.m., thumping of the doors was heard, and doors flying open. (Ac to one account, was 15th, not 14th.) The girls saw windows opening and shutting. They went from room to room investigating. A tin basin was thrown after them. A chair was found having been taken from one room to another. Mr. Meyers came home, but it seems that he was interested most in dinner. The girls went to the barn to gather eggs. “A large boulder was thrown and struck near the door they were entering.” The next day more large stones were thrown. Then Mr. Meyers went with his gun on guard outside the house. A missile was hurled from inside the house. Alarm had spread and neighbors with guns were gathering outside the house. Also a man with a gun accompanied the girls. A “bowlder the size of two fists” fell near them. Another was thrown. Men with guns came running from all directions, firing their guns—no more phe until the third morning, when another large stone was thrown. Then Miss Avery cut short her visit and returned to her home in Middletown. In a dispatch from Middletown, her story, substantially the same, is published. (Nothing said of phe after her departure.) One detail in her story is that when accompanied by the armed man the stones fell, they seemed to come from different directions. Also—dishes that were moved from the dinner table. Coffee pot taken from the table and put in the oven. A bottle from a wash house thrown as if at her. / Her aunt had left for a visit of several days to the village of Lockland. (Wonder if she had repulsions to her niece. Seems strange or discourteous, she going visiting somewhere else when her niece was visiting her home. The phe began when uncle was taking the aunt to Lockland. [C; 65.1 to 65.11. “Ghost or Goblin?” Chicago Tribune, October 23, 1892, p. 38 c. 1-2. (“A Weird Ghost Story.” Hamilton Daily Republican, Ohio, October 19, 1892.) (“Meyers Wants Damages.” Hamilton Daily Republican, Ohio, October 20, 1892.) (Meyers or Myers, Anna Avey, Minnie Hendrickson, daughter of marshal Richard C. Hendrickson, in Middletown. Carrie Doepke was local teacher.)]


1892 Oct 14 / 7 a.m. / Shocks and damage / Roumania / L.T. 15-5-e. [VII; 716. “Earthquake Shocks in Eastern Europe.” London Times, October 15, 1892, p. 5 c. 5.]


1892 Oct 16 / (Metite) / early morning / That a meteorite had shattered the wing of a windmill at Blackport, Cal. / B Eagle 17-7-6. [VII; 717. “A Meteor Hit the Windmill.” Brooklyn Eagle, October 17, 1892, p. 7 c. 6. “Struck by a Meteor.” Los Angeles Herald, October 17, 1892, p. 5 c. 1. “San Francisco, Oct. 16.—At 4:20 this morning the family of Rev. W.W. Ferris, who occupy the Laidler mansion near Black Point, were awakened by a loud explosion, caused by a meteor striking the windmill. The meteor is described as appearing as large as the full moon, of a pale silvery color on the edges, and dark red in the center. A wing of the windmill was completely shattered. A piece of meteoric iron as large as a goose egg was found in the yard this morning.”]


1892 Oct. 18 / Volc eruption destroyed the town of La Union, Salvador. / The Galignani Messenger, Dec. 3. [VII; 718. "Anent the San Salvador Earthquake." Galignani's Messenger, December 3, 1892, p. 1 c. 3.]


1892 Oct / 4 cases / Rain falling. [VII; 719. See: 1892 Oct. 19, (C; 66); 1892 Oct 22, (C; 67); 1892 Oct, (VII; 722); and, 1892 / late in the fall, (C; 71, 72, & 73).]


1892 Oct. 19 / Rain falling / P.L. of—at Martinsburg, Ohio. In the rear of the house there, a mist was falling upon an area of a dozen square feet. Said that this mist fell whether the weather was rainy or clear, but was most pronounced between the hours of  1 and 2 p.m. [C; 66.1, 66.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 19, 1892.)]


1892 Oct 22 / rain tree / Kansas City Jour. / dispatch from Gutherie, Okla / That in a field near Stillwater, Okla, a large cottonwood tree, branches hanging over a little creek. Said that water falling from tree in a fine mist or drizzle. Not rained in Eppenham in weeks. Day after day. / Sun 30-4-6. [C: 67.1, 67.2. "A Rain Tree." New York Sun, October 30, 1892, s. B p. 4 c. 6. (Kansas City Journal, ca. October 30, 1892; not @ LOC nor Newspapers.com.) “The Rain Tree.” Norman Transcript, (Oklahoma), October 14, 1892, p. 1 c. 5. “Stillwater Republican.” “The attention of the people of this city and vicinity is just now being attracted by what appears to be a phenomenon in the shape of a rain tree, a large cottonwood in Robert Copper's pasture south of town. It was accidentally discovered on last Friday, and since that time the road has been kept hot by people going to see it. The tree grows near the bank of Stillwater Creek and leans out over the baptizing pool. A steady shower of rain has been continually falling from the leaves and branches, and, by standing at proper angle with the sun, a beautiful rainbow may be seen at any time.”]


1892 Oct 20 / clbrst and q. / Chic Trib 24-5-2 / Appalling storm and cloudburst at Sardinia (Island of). In the afternoon, intense oppressive heat, and heavy black clouds tinged with red. Then cyclone, thunder, incessant lightning. “Loud subterranean rumblings.” A deluge fell, all the streams overflowed. 5 villages inundated. Scores of houses carried away. Said that in one town, one hundred bodies were recovered. [VII; 720.1, 720.2. “Hundreds Are Dead.” Chicago Tribune, October 24, 1892, p. 5 c. 2.]


1892 Oct middle / Mauna Loa eruption / Dec. 17. [VII; 721. (Ref.???)]


1892 Oct / BO / Insect Life 5-204, Editor writes that the Stillwater tree had been visited by Dr Neal, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station at Stillwater, and that he had captured some of the insects causing the shower and sent to Editor. They were Proconia undata Fab. / (Fab. not in Italics). [VII; 722.1, 722.2. “Another Weeping Tree.” Insect Life, 5 (January 1893): 204. The insects identified as “Proconia undata,” (Fabricius, 1798), are now identified as the Broad-headed Sharpshooter, (Oncometopia orbona).]


1892 Oct, middle of, ab into Nov / Afterglows / Hawaii / Nature, 47-102 / Hawaii. [VII; 723. Bishop, Sereno Edwards. “The Afterglow.” Nature, 47 (December 1, 1892): 102-103.]


1892 Oct 21 / One of the world's greatest fireworks displays at Chicago Columbian Celebration. [VII; 724. (Ref.???)]


1892 Oct 22 / Austin, Texas / great migration of butterfly Danais archippus / Science 20-291. [VII; 725. Dumble, Edwin Theodore. "Flight of Archippus." Science, s. 1 v. 20 (November 18, 1892): 291.]


1892 Oct. 23 / night / Black Point, Cal / near / (D. Picayune, 26-4-5) / Tremendous crash heard. In the morning found a windmill been struck. Observers of the meteor said seemed size of the moon. [VII; 726. “A Meteor Works Damage.” New Orleans Picayune, October 26, 1892, p. 4 c. 5.]


1892 Oct. 25 / (clbrst) / Cl. burst in Nueces Valley, Texas—cattle, sheep, and horses swept away and drowned by the hundreds. / Glb Dem 27-3-4 / See if one there ab. a week before. [VII; 727. “Death in a Water-Spout.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 27, 1892, p. 3 c. 4.]


1892 Oct 27 / Polt / [source unidentified], 4-5 / In the home of Mr. Granger, near Knox, Ind. Strange sounds. Door violently broken in, Said that a human form entered the house. “Rocks were dropped and dishes smashed.” [C; 68. “Stones.” Wheeling Register, October 24, 1892, p. 5 c. 2. (Ref.???)]


1892 Oct 27 / bet. 5 and 6 p.m. / Great met / Alabama / Nature 47-86. [VII; 728. “Notes.” Nature, 47 (November 24, 1892): 85-88, at 86.]


1892 Oct 28 / First of a series of 13 disastrous fires in Milwaukee, Wis. City excited, and ab Jan 1, a Citizens' Committee was formed to take protective measures. / N. Orleans, Daily Picayune, Jan 2, '93. [C; 69. “The Milwaukee Fires.” New Orleans Picayune, January 2, 1893, p. 4 c. 4.]


1892 Oct 29 / Rel. Phil Jour. of / H. Frank Wheeler, of Brooklyn—26 years old—in Oct., 1891, had an attack of pneumonia. On Dec 14, in Brooklyn, his mind went blank, till July 20th, 1892. Went into amnesia in a violent spasm. Unconscious several days, and then awoke to a new world. Most familiar objects, chairs, tables, etc. were strange to him. In general an infant, but said that he made a toy cart with a skill that he had not in the Wheeler personality. [C; 70.1, 70.2. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, October 29, 1892; not online.) See:  1892 Aug 15, (C; 41).]


1892 / late in the fall / Rain / In Science, 21/94, H.E. Chaplin, of Ohio University, Columbus, Ohio, writes that in the town of Akron, Ohio, there was a continuous rain during a succession of clear beautiful days. The subject attracted the attention of professors of the Ohio University. The water fell from ab sunrise to ab. sunset, reaching maximum ab 2 or 3 in the afternoon. There was a brickyard nearby. Seeming never to have heard of such phe away from brickyards, the professors explained in terms of vapors rising from the brickyard and always precipitating back to point of origin. [C; 71.1, 71.2, 71.3. Chapin, H.E. "Continuous Rain." Science, s. 1 v. 21 (February 17, 1893): 94. "The Athens Miracle." Hocking Sentinel, (Logan, Ohio), October 27, 1892, p. 2 c. 2. "The Athens papers report a strange manifestation out of the usual order of nature. A miracle in this city of saints. In the yard of 'Mrs Haney, who lives on the street which leads to the Lancaster road' rain drops fall every afternoon, the sun shining and not a cloud in the sky. The college professors and the statesmen are puzzled, distracted, and can give no explanation." "Ohio State News." Hillsboro News-Herald, (Ohio), November 3, 1892, p. 3 c. 6. "Prof. Chapin, in connection with other savants of the university at Athens, has as a result of invenstigation [sic] reached the conclusion that the continuous and mysterious rain-fall that has for some weeks past invested a particular locality in Athens with widespread public interest, is caused by a heated current of air from the kilns of the brick plant there, flowing through a channel extending west from the kilns and becoming sufficiently condensed to cause the precipitation at the locality where the phenomenon is witnessed." The location of the rain was in Athens, Ohio, (not Akron).]


1892 / late in the fall / In Science, 21-94, H.E. Chaplin, of Ohio University, Columbus, Ohio, writes, “A remarkable phenomenon was observed in the town of Athens, Ohio, late in the fall (1892), which has awakened wide interest, viz., continuous rain during a succession of clear, beautiful days.” Now the places of the fall were brickworks, and Mr Chaplin thinks that vapor from them was precipitated back in rain. [C; 72.1, 72.2. Chapin, H.E. "Continuous Rain." Science, s. 1 v. 21 (February 17, 1893): 94.]


1892 / late in the fall / At Athens, Ohio. / P. Ledger, Feb 24. [C; 73. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 24, 1893.)]


1892 Nov. 1 / [LT], 10-f / Sunspots. [VII; 729. “Sun Spots.” London Times, November 1, 1892, p. 10 c. 6.]


1892 Nov / Holmes Comet and met radiant / See Nov. 14, 1898. / (+). [VII; 730. See: 1898 Nov 14, (VIII; 364).]


1892 Nov 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 23 / Dec 22 / qs / Charleston / BSA 4/152. [VII; 731. Taber, Stephen. "Seismic Activity in the Atlantic Coastal Plain near Charleston, South Carolina." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 4 (1914): 108-160, at 153.]


1892 Nov / Holmes Comet / Comet in Andromeda after mets / See Dec 1, 1885. [VII; 732. See: 1885 Dec 1, (VI; 312).]


1892 Nov. / Changes in Holmes' Comet / B. Eagle, 1893, Jan 20-1-5. [VII; 733. “The Changes in the Holmes Comet.” Brooklyn Eagle, January 20, 1893, p. 1 c. 5. Comet 17P/Holmes. The sudden increase in brightness and size observed in 1893 were repeated in 2007, when Comet 17P/Holmes went from a magnitude 17 object to 2.8 in a period of 42 hours and when its coma grew in apparent size from 3.3 arcminutes to 13 arcminutes in diameter, (half the apparent diameter of the Moon).]


[The following two notes were clipped together by Fort. C: 74-75.]


1892 Nov 5 / Bell in the Convent of Notre Dame, near Baltimore, starts to toll, sometimes violently, by unknown agency. Kept up several weeks. / Globe Dem, Nov 30/1/6. [C; 74. “A Bell Bewitched.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, November 30, 1892, p. 1 c. 6. The door bell continued to ring after its wire to the knob was disconnected.]


1892 Dec 2 / Bell / Glb. Dem, 6-7 / The Mother Superior of the Convent orders the “bewitched bell” taken down and another in its place put up. [C; 75. “A Bewitched Bell.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 2, 1892, p. 6 c. 7.]


1892 Nov 6 / Holmes' Comet at the spot where Biela's would have been if Biela's still existed. / Clerke, His Astro/337. [VII; 734. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1st ed., (1885); 4th ed., (1902), 337. Comet 17P/1892 V1 (Holmes).]


1892 Nov. 10 / Another animal apparition / See Oct 19, 1890. [C; 76. See: 1890 Oct 19, (B; 1108).]


1892 Nov 10 / N.M. / 9 p.m. / Meteor seen at Cana (Dahomey) / C.R. 116-729. [VII; 735. "M. R. Nèple adresse une Note...." Comptes Rendus, 116 (1893): 729.]


1892 Nov. 18 / Suicidal impulse / (Sleepwalker) / B. Eagle, 10-6 / Steve Haven, sleepwalker, wealthy farmer near Fowlerville, Mich, finally killed, by falling from upper-story doorway in his barn. Two years before, found at bottom of a deep well. Two months later, found wading, up to his neck, in Silver Lake, while asleep. Once had set fire to his house and once tried to hang self, while asleep. [C; 77.1, 77.2. “Fatal Accident to a Sleep Walker.” Brooklyn Eagle, November 18, 1892, p. 10 c. 6.]


1892 Nov. 18 / [LT], 13-e / Volc / Sangir / See July 19, etc. [VII; 736. “The Sangir Disaster.” London Times, November 18, 1892, p. 13 c. 5. See: 1892 July 19, (VII; 605). The Awu volcano.]


1892 Nov 12 / Trib, 4-4 / 13-7-3 / 23-2-3 / 27-22-1 / 6 Comets visible. [VII; 737. "The New Comet Seen By Dr. Swift." New York Tribune, November 12, 1892, p. 4 c. 4. "It May Be Biela's Comet." New York Tribune, November 13, 1892, p. 7 c. 3. "A Humbug of a Comet." New York Tribune, November 23, 1892, p. 2 c. 3. "Comets and Meteors." New York Tribune, November 27, 1892, p. 22 c. 1.]


1892 / before Nov 21 / (+) / Sun, [Nov 21]-1-5 / Holmes' Comet at first identified as Biela's. See Sun back to ab. 12th. / 27-8-2 / 27th, Prof Boss, of Dudley Ob, Allegheny, denies statement of Prof Vesy, that Biela's—said Biela's orbit 100,000,000 [miles] away from comet. / 28-1-7, Prof Barnard, of Lick, says is Biela's and is approaching. [VII; 738.1, 738.2. "Not Biela's Comet." New York Sun, November 21, 1892, p. 1 c. 6. "Is The Comet Moving Away?" New York Sun, November 22, 1892, p. 6 c. 5. "It Is Not Biela's Comet." New York Sun, November 25, 1892, p. 1 c. 1. "Not Biela's Comet, Says Prof. Boss." New York Sun, November 27, 1892, p. 8 c. 2. "He Says the Comet is Coming Our Way." New York Sun, November 28, 1892, p. 1 c. 7. Comet 17P/1892 V1 (Holmes).]


[1892 Nov 22. Wrong date. See: 1891 Nov 22, (VII; 739).]


1892 Nov / Holmes Comet / New star Androm. and comet? / Aug 31, Sept 4, 1885. [VII; 740. See: 1885 Aug 31, (VI: 124 & 125), and, 1885 Sept 4, (VI; 129.2).]


[1892 Nov 20 /] 1892 Nov. 22 / 2 or 3 meteors seen close to Holmes Comet, by Russell, in Melbourne. / Jour Roy Soc N S. Wales / 26-333 in Andromeda. [VII; 741. Tebbutt, John. "On the Comet in the Constellation Andromeda." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 26 (1892): 332-334, at 333-334. "A lookout has been kept at my observatory for meteoric or auroral displays, but nothing of any great importance has been seen. Two or three meteors were seen close to the comet on the evening of November 20th, and while observing with the micrometer on the 24th, a small telescopic meteor flitted across the field of view, the momentary trail left by it being as fine as the threads of the micrometer." The observations was made on November 20, 1892, by John Tebbutt, (not Russell), at his observatory at Windsor, New South Wales, (not at Melbourne).]


1892 Nov / Holmes' Comet / See meteors, Nov. 26, 27, 1919, and comet from And? / See Dec 26. [VII; 742. See: (Dec 26), and, (1919 Nov. 26, 27).]


1892 Nov 23 / At Chicago, ac Prof George Haugh, of the Dearborn Observatory, the paths all centered in Andromeda. / Chic Tribune, 24th. [VII; 743. “Dart Across the Sky.” Chicago Tribune, November 24, 1892, p. 1 c. 3.]


1892 Nov. 23 / Androm. / See Dec. 9. [VII; 745. See: 1892 Dec 9, (VII: 791, 792, & 793).]


1892 Nov. 23 / Writer of the “Astronomical Column,” Nature, Nov 16, 1893, saying they were early by perturbations by Jupiter, advises earlier watch in 1893. [VII; 747. “Our Astronomical Column.” Nature, 49 (November 16, 1893): 67. Bielids.]


1892 Nov. 23 / 4 days earlierunusual explanation / See Nature, 47-451. / Bredichin's calculationsperturbed 4 days back by Jupiter. [VII; 748. “Our Astronomical Column.” Nature, 47 (March 9, 1893): 451-452. Bredikhin, Fyodor Aleksandrovich. “Ueber die Bieliden 1892.” Astronomische Nachrichten, 132 (1893): 159-160. Bielids.]


1892 Nov. 23 / There were Androm., Nov 23, 1872, as well as Nov. 27. [VII; 749. See: (1872 Nov 23, Nov 27).]


1892 Nov. 23 / See Dec 9. / At Yale, radiant said near Gamma Andromodae. / Am. J. Sci 3/45/61 / Said that at Washington, D.C., seemed to diverge from a point half way bet. Gamma And. and Gamma Cassiopeae and near Phi Persei. Fell utntil daylight more or less. / Meriden, Conn—radiant between Aries and Andromeda. [VII; 750.1, 750.2. (American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 45 p. 61.) See: 1892 Dec 9, (VII: 791, 792, & 793).]


1892 Nov. 23 / Pima Co., Arizona / Ac to average of several observations from 7 to 10 p.m., 250 good-sized meteors per minute. / Science, Dec 9, p. 333. [VII; 751. Kempton, C.W. "Meteoric Shower." Science, s. 1 v. 20 (December, 9, 1892): 333.]


1892 Nov / Otago Witness (Dunedin, N.Z.) of Nov. 24—dispatch from Melbourne on 22 / That on 21st no collision with Biela's Comet and that Mr. Tebbutt, the astronomer, stated that the earth would cross orbit of the comet on 27th and might then be involved with matter of the comet. [VII: 752.1, 752.2. “Intercolonial.” Otago Witness, November 24, 1892, p. 17 c, 2-3.]


1892 Nov. 23 / Many, various parts of Connecticut. / At Albequerque, N.M., 100 in a few minutes. As many as 3 at a time visible. / A.J. Sci 3-45-63. [VII; 753. Newton, Hubert Anson. “Observations of the Andromed Meteors on November 23d and 27th, 1892.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 45 (1893) 61-63, at 63.]


1892 Nov. 23 / Nothing of meteors in Jour and Proc., Roy Soc. N. S Wales for 1892-93. [VII; 754. Tebbutt, John. "On the Comet in the Constellation Andromeda." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 26 (1892): 332-334, at 333-334. See: 1892 Nov 20, (VII; 741). This is only report of meteors in this journal for this time.]


1892 Nov. / Nothing of meteors in Trans Roy Soc of Victoria, 1892-93. [VII; 755.]


1892 Nov. 23 / If not from Auriga / Great shower of Andromedids at Princeton, N.J., observed from 7 p.m. to 12:30, when sky clouded. 30,000 estimated. / Jour B.A.A., 3-103. [VII; 756. "The Andromedes (Bielids)." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 3 (1892-1893): 103-104.]


1892 Nov. 23 / Extraord long shower of mets from Cassiopeia / Pop Sci News 34/37. [VII; 757. Heffron, D.S. “Meteoric Shower November 23, 1892.” Popular Science News, 34 (February 1900): 37.]


1892 Nov. 23 / Great fall of mets at Jamaica, B.W.I. / E. Mec 56-540. [VII; 758. Monck, William Henry Stanley. "The Andromeda Meteors of 1892." English Mechanic, 56 (no. 1454; February 3, 1893): 540-541. Boraston, John Maclair. "The Andromedes." Astronomy and Astro-Physics, 12 (January 1893.): 3-5. Boraston's observation was made aboard a steamship, at 72° W and 17° N.]


1892 Nov. 23 / At Galesburg, Ill., Prof Larkin, at maximum bet 9 and 10, counted 100 in 11 minutes. He says were the Andromedes or Bielids. [VII; 762. Larkin, Edgar L. “Meteoric Shower.” Science, s. 1 v. 20 (December 16, 1892): 346.]


1892 Nov. 23 / In Astronomical Journal, no. 283, described by Mr. Sawyer as “slow moving”. [VII; 763. Sawyer, Edwin Forrest. “The Meteor-Shower of 1892 November 23.” Astronomical Journal, 12 (1892): 146.]


1892 Nov. 23 / No Androms. noted in England. [VII; 764. (Refs.???)]


1892 Nov. 23 / Prof. Kirkwood tells of the Bielids (?) / spell right? / being predicted and claims these. / Sci Amer 67-384. [VII; 765. Kirkwood, Daniel. "The Meteors of November, 1892." Scientific American, n.s., 67 (December 17, 1892): 384. Bielids.]


1892 Nov. 23 / Shower of Andromede meteors visible in America / Clerke, His. Astro., appendix. [VII; 766. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 4th ed., (1902), 456.]


1892 Nov. 23 / But a shower Nov. 21-28, 1904, not so explained. [VII; 769. (Refs.???)]


1892 Nov 23 / Princeton, N.J. / At 10 p.m., 2 observers back to back counted 104 meteors in 5 minutes from near Upsilon Andromeae. Hour later, 100 in 4½ minutes. / Nature 47-150 / ac to Prof. Young / His estimate us between 24 and 30,000 in five hours. [VII; 770.1, 770.2. Young, Charles Augustus. “Meteors.” Nature, 47 (December 15, 1892): 150.]


1892 Nov 23 / Holmes Comet / See similar display on Androms. / See Dec 1, 1885. [VII; 772. See: 1885 Dec 1, (VI: 310-312).]


1892 Nov / comet / Met-date / comet / Nov 14, 1898. [VII; 759. See: (1898 Nov 14).]


1892 Nov. 24 / Otago Witness (Dunedin, N. Zealand) of 24th / The new comet seen as star of 5th mag in New Zealand near star Mu in Andromeda. [VII; 746. “Local & General.” Otago Witness, November 24, 1892, p. 17 & p. 18 c. 1, at p. 17 c. 1. “The Athenæum.” Wellington Evening Post, November 14, 1892, p. 2 c. 4. The observation was made on the night of November 13, 1892. Comet 17P/1892 V1.]


1892 Nov. 24 / Otago Witness / The mets of Tumut of 24th told of in issue of Dec 1—a weekly paper—no mets in N. Zealand mentioned and no other place in Australia reported. [VII; 760. “Intercolonial.” Otago Witness, December 1, 1892, p. 15 c.1-2. Tumut, New South Wales, Australia.]


1892 Nov 24 / Trib, 1-5 / Met Showers. [VII; 761. "Showers of Meteors." New York Tribune, November 24, 1892, p. 1 c. 5.]


1892 Nov 24-27 / BO / In Sydney Morning Herald, Nov 26, nothing of meteors in Australia, but, dispatch from London tells of mets in Illinois. Also a dispatch from Tumut—that night of 24th many seen between 8 and 10 p.m., almost all from n to w—15 counted in 20 minutes. / (Tumut is in N.S.W. near Gunagai.) [VII; 767.1, 767.2. "The Comet." Sydney Morning Herald, November 26, 1892, p. 8 c. 5. Tumut is about 30 km. to the south-southeast of Gunagai.]


1892 Nov. 25 / [LT], 10-b / 28-6-a / Holmes Comet. [VII; 744. “Another New Comet.” London Times, November 25, 1892, p. 10 c. 2. “Another New Comet.” London Times, November 28, 1892, p. 6 c. 1. Holmes Comet, (Comet 17P/1892 V1), was discovered on the evening of November 6, 1892. These articles concern the discovery of another comet by Brooks and a mistake. “Scientific News.” English Mechanic, 56 (no. 1446 ; December 9, 1892): 359-360. “The report of the discovery of another comet by Mr. Augustus Freeman seems to have been a mistake.” Comet C/1892 W1.]


1892 Nov 26 / Melb. Argus of / Meteors of Indiana told of—nothing else. [VII; 773. "Alleged Collision with a Comet." Melbourne Argus, November 26, 1892, p. 9 c. 7.]


1892 Nov 27 / Afterglows / Dublin / Nature 47-127 / See Dec 15. [VII; 768. Cole, Grenville Arthur James. “The Afterglow.” Nature, 47 (December 8, 1892): 127-128. See: 1892 Dec 15, (VII; 800).]


1892 Nov 27 / Holmes Comet some other obj in Andromeda / See Dec 26, 1920. [VII; 771. See: (1920 Dec 26; not found here).]


1892 Nov. 27 / Large number of mets in Mexico—hopeless to try to count them. / A.J. Sci 3-45-63. [VII; 774. Newton, Hubert Anson. “Observations of the Andromed Meteors on November 23d and 27th, 1892.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 45 (1893) 61-63, at 63.]


1892 Oct 18 / Nov. 27 / Dispatch so dated from San Francisco / Volc eruption destroyed town of La Union, Salvador. / The Galignani Messenger, Nov. 28 / Oct 18 ac to Messenger, Dec. 3. [VII; 775. "Destruction of a Mexican City." Galignani's Messenger, November 28, 1892, p. 1 c. 3. "Anent the San Salvador Earthquake." Galignani's Messenger, December 3, 1892, p. 1 c. 3.]


[1892 Nov. 27. Wrong date. See: 1893 Nov. 27, (VII; 776).]


1892 Nov. 27 / Androm phe / If mets from, comets from. / To 1852 / Biela's Comet—1872 / Great met shower / 1885 star—comet—mets / 1892—comet. In 1852 two objects seen, discovered several weeks apart—said be the two parts of Biela's that divided in 1846. Prof Santini, supposing was Biela's, predicted when reach nearest point to sun—did 3 or 4 days sooner. / (M. Notices 13-128.) / (+) / The two parts close together; one very small. / (In Gemini) / (315 / 632 / 313) / 339. [VII; 777.1, 777.2, 777.3. "Report of the Council to the Thirty-third Annual General Meeting." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 13 (February 11, 1852): 87-136, at 127-128. Comets C/1852 K1 and 20D/1852 O1.]


1892 Nov. 28 / Dispatch so dated from London. / Syd. Morn Herald, 29th / Town of La Union, in San Salvador, destroyed by a q. / See Oct 18. [VII; 778. "Earthquake in Central America." Sydney Morning Herald, November 29, 1892, p. 5 c. 6. See: 1892 Oct 18, (VII; 775).]


1892 Nov 28 / N.Y. Times, 1-1 / Predicted meteors fall. / Holmes Comet in their place. [VII; 779. “No Show in the Heavens.” New York Times, November 28, 1892, p. 1 c. 1.]


1892 Nov. 29 / 8 p.m. / Det met / Dublin, Texas / Science 20-346. [VII; 780. Maxwell, C.F. "Brilliant Meteor." Science, s. 1 v. 20 (December 16, 1892): 346.]


1892 Nov 29 / ab 9 a.m. / Eagle 30-1-2 / That a stone weighing probably 10 tons had fallen a mile N.E. of Denver, Col. [VII; 781. “Perhaps It Dropped From the Comet.” Brooklyn Eagle, November 30, 1892, p. 1 c. 2.]


1892 Nov. 29 / a mile northwest of Newcastle, Col / That a metite weighing 10 tons had fallen. Said that so far as was known no witnesses to the fall but the stone, of a porous substance, had been found in a heated condition sunk in the earth. / Chic Trib., Dec. 1-2-4. [VII; 782. “Fall of a Great Meteric Stone.” Chicago Tribune, December 1, 1892, p. 2 c. 4.]


1892 Nov. 29 / 8 p.m. / Dublin, Texas / large, detonating meteor / Science 20-346. [VII; 783. Maxwell, C.F. "Brilliant Meteor." Science, s. 1 v. 20 (December 16, 1892): 346.]


1892 Nov. 30 / NY Times, Dec 2-2-1 / Battery Park—Park Policeman Kennedy said saw flitting light in Park and that from it evolved a dancing female form. [C; 78. “A Ghost at the Battery.” New York Times, December 2, 1892, p. 2. c. 1.]


1892 Nov 30 / Mut Animals / [source unidentified], 4-3 / A “human fiend” in Columbus, Ohio, mutilating cows and horses, some of them in prominent parts of the city—killed—eviscerated. [C; 79. (Unidentified newspaper, November 30, 1892, p. 4 c. 3.) “The Cow Killer's Work.” Hamilton Evening Journal, (Ohio), November 30, 1892, p. 4 c. 3. “The Cow Killer's Work.” Maysville Evening Bulletin (Kentucky), November 30, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. “Cow Killer Caught.” Sandusky Register, December 3, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. Judd Holland.]


1892 Nov. 30 / Great eruption of steam and mud, and deluge of water poured down side of Volc Temari, N. Zealand. / Melb Argus, Dec 6. [VII; 784. "Volcanic Eruption in New Zealand." Melbourne Argus, December 6, 1892, p. 5 c. 5. The Tongariro volcano.]


1892 December 2 / Charges of witchcraft in Delaware / D Pic, Dec 27-4-5. [C; 80. “Witchcraft in Delaware.” New Orleans Picayune, December 27, 1892, p. 4 c. 5.]


1892 (Dec 2 / [NY] Times, 2-1) / D. Picayune, Dec 7-4-4 / Ghost said going about slapping faces of people at the Battery, N.Y. City. Said been seen by its phosphorescent light. [C; 81. “A Ghost at the Battery.” New York Times, December 2, 1892, p. 2. c. 1. “A Ghost at the Battery.” New Orleans Picayune, December 7, 1892, p. 4 c. 4.]


1892 Dec 2 / NY Times, 2-1 / Ghst / Battery Park. [C; 82. “A Ghost at the Battery.” New York Times, December 2, 1892, p. 2. c. 1.]


1892 Dec 2. / morning / That shock at Chattanooga, Tenn., a great mystery because it was entirely local. / B Eagle 4-17-2. [VII; 785. “Chattanooga's Earthquake Shock.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 4, 1892, p. 17 c. 2.]


1892 Dec 2 / Shock like polt / 2 a.m. / Chattanooga, Tenn, shock. Doors fly open. Piles of lumber were upset. / Chic Trib, Dec 3-6-5. [VII; 786. “Earthquake Shock in Tennessee.” Chicago Tribune, December 3, 1892, p. 6 c. 5.]


1892 Dec 2 / aurora / Science of, volume 20—p. 318 / 346 / Aurora that seemed a reflection of lights in a city. [VII; 787. Hatch, P.L. "Pseudoaurora Borealis; or, What Was It?" Science, s. 1 v. 20 (December 2, 1892): 318. Hatch, (not Natch). Hazen, Henry Allen. "Pseudoaurora." Science, s. 1 v. 20 (December 16, 1892): 346.]


1892 Dec 2 / augs / by Muller, of Nimeguen / Little dark specks moving across disk of moon / Jour. B.A.A.—8-127. [VII; 788. Hopman, Frits. "On Dark Meteors." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 8 (1897-1898): 127-131. Celliée Muller, André Marine du. "Mededeeling Omtrent Verschijnselen, Waargenomen Bij De Maan." De Natuur, 13 (January 15, 1893): 21. Celliée Muller, André Marine du. "De Kosmische Meteoren." De Natuur, 13 (October 15, 1893): 301-304. Similar objects were also observed on March 29, 1892, with G.J. van Dijk.]


[The following two notes were clipped together by Fort. C: 84-85.]


1892 Dec. 5 / B. Eagle, 4-6 / Henry G. Trickey, the Boston newspaperman, who was indicted for writing a scandalous article about Lizzie Borden, was killed, while boarding a train at Hamilton, Ontario. [C; 84. “Recent Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 5, 1892, p. 4 c. 6.]


1892 Dec. 5 / Lizzie Borden in Jail, at this time. [C; 85. (Refs.???)]


1892 Dec 5 / Honeymead Station, N.Y. / 10:45 to 11:30 p.m. / stationary rays north-west from Virgo / Science 20-375 / 21-37. [VII; 789. Hyatt, James. "Auroral Displays." Science, s. 1 v. 20 (December 30, 1892): 374-375. Hatch, P.L. "Pseudoaurora Not Shadows." Science, s. 1 v. 21 (January 20, 1893): 37.]


1892 Dec 6 / Sc Am 68-58 / Gray Hill, Texas / Large hail—one chunk of 4 pounds heard of—some with “particles of dirt” at the center. [VII; 790. “Dangerous Hailstones.” Scientific American, n.s., 68 (January 28, 1893): 58.]


[1892 Dec 6 /] 1893 Dec 6 / Ice / Texas / D-176. ** [VII; 921. The note copies information from page 176 of The Book of the Damned. “Dangerous Hailstones.” Scientific American, n.s., 68 (January 28, 1893): 58.]


1892 Dec 9 / A shower of 7 meteors from one degree from Nova Aurigae. Ac to Corder, noted by David Packer. / E Mec. 74/133. [VII; 791. Packer, David Elijah. “New Stars and Star-Showers.” English Mechanic, 74 (no. 1904;  September 20, 1901): 133.]


1892 Dec 9 / 9 p.m. / Wilmington, N.C., and far around / from Andromeda / great met / Jour. B.A.A., 3-241. [VII; 792. "A Brilliant Meteor." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 3 (1892-1893): 241.]


1892 Dec 9 / ab. 9 p.m. / Met at Wilmington. “Shot out from the Constellation Andromeda.” / Sci Amer 68-226 / Ab size of an orange and increased to size of moon. An account of it as seen at Jacksonville, N.C., ab. 50 miles N.E. of W, was “the same description of the meteor in every particular." [VII; 793.1, 793.2. "A Remarkable Meteor." Scientific American, n.s., 68 (April 15, 1893): 226.]


1892 Dec 11, etc. / Polt / Glb Dem 17-13-5 / At Kecksburg, Mt. Pleasant Township, Pa. In a farm house, hammerings on a bed. Bed clothes torn off. Investigators slept in the bed. Violently hurled out of it. No other phe. [C; 83. “A Bed-Room Spook with Surplus Muscle.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 17, 1892, p. 13 c. 5.]


1892 Dec 11 and 12 / It Sounds / Isola di Ponza / Rombi / See 1816. [VII; 794. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 42. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1892 Dec 11 / New Haven, Conn (See p. 61.) / From near Iota Geminorum, 39 Geminids counted bet 10:40 p.m. and 12. / A.J. Sci 3/45/77. [VII; 795. Newton, Hubert Anson. “Observations of the Andromed Meteors on November 23d and 27th, 1892.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 45 (1893) 61-63. “Geminid Meteors of Dec. 11, 1892.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 45 (1893): 77.]


1892 Dec 12 / Geminids moderately abundant in England / Nature 47-226 / Monthly Notices, Jan., 1893. [VII; 796. Denning, William Frederick. “December Meteors (Geminids).” Nature, 47 (January 5, 1893): 226. Denning, William Frederick. "The Geminid Meteor Shower, 1892 December 12." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 53 (January 13, 1893): 130-136.]


[1892 Dec 13] / 1892 Dec 12 / Bolide seen, Syra and Paris, 4 hours apart. Seem same, evidently not. / L'Astro 12-116. [VII; 799. Pszenny. “Magnifique bolide.” Astronomie, 12 (1893): 115-116. Syra, (or Syros), is a Greek island, among the Cyclades, in the Aegean Sea, (not in Syria). Pszenny was the Turkish consul general, there, in 1892, and reported the time of the bolide as 7:39 P.M., followed by heavy detonations, on December 13, 1892, (not December 12).]


1892 Dec 13 / (light on planets) / Syra / Syria? / Great bolide and Mars and Jupiter shining with an intermittent light. Said to have been curious and astonishing—like that of revolving lighthouse lights. / L'Astro 12-438 / See Jan 12. [VII; 797. Mavrogordato, F.-A. “Phénomène Météorolgique à Syra.” Astronomie, 12 (1893): 437-438. See: 1893 Jan. 12, (VII; 824).]


1892 Dec 13 / metite / 6:52 a.m. / Wm. Burrows, of Small Lane, Ormskirk, says that he saw a meteorite fall and that it was in his possession. Sent a drawing of it to W.F. Denning, who notes it in Nature 47/226. [VII; 798. Denning, William Frederick. “December Meteors (Geminids).” Nature, 47 (January 5, 1893): 226. “Seeing the meteor was coming to the earth I crossed the road to where it appeared to be falling, and it fell about two yards from me. When it struck the earth it made a noise like the report of a gun; it also went black instantly. While descending it had a tail of fire about a foot long. It is 1⅜ inch in diameter one way, and 1¼ inch another, and one inch thick."]


1892 Dec 15 / London / 17—Dublin / Brilliant afterglows / Nature, 47-183 / See Nov 27. [VII; 800. “Notes.” Nature, 47 (December 22, 1892): 182-186, at 183. See: 1892 Nov 27, (VII; 768).]


1892 Dec 16 / met / Albany, Oregon / Ab. 5 a.m., a rock ab 14 inches in circumference fell—like a volcanic product. / B Eagle 17-7-7 / Albany? See Gaz. / Some other phe at town like Albina. [VII; 801. “An Aerolite Falls in Albany.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 17, 1892, p. 7 c. 7. Four years later, another alleged meteorite fell at Albina, (now within Portland, Oregon, which is about 100 kilometres north of Albany, Oregon). “A Redhot Meteor.” Evening Capital Journal, (Salem, Oregon), December 17, 1892, p. 2 c. 2. “About 5 o'clock yesterday morning, as Fred Reis was coming from the depot on Lyon street, he saw a bright meteor approaching from the southeast. Its descent was very rapid, and with a rushing sound it fell obliquely in the street followed by a wake of bright sparks. Reis hastened to where it fell and dug it out. It was a queer looking stone, about fourteen inches in circumference. It was still very hot and he carried it home on a board. The stone retained its heat to a wonderful degree, and charred the board upon which it was placed. The stone in appearance resembles a piece of reddish brown clay that had been burned, rather than stone. It is not very hard, and looks like volcaulo production. It was broken in two, and one piece was sent to Portland to be analized. The stone is no[t] heavy, and evidently has been subjected to great heat.”]


1892 Dec. 16 / 5 a.m. / Albany, Oregon / Stone fell. / Pubs. Astro Soc Pacific, 5/47 / Ab. 14 inches in diameter. “It was very hot and charred the board upon which it was placed. The stone had the appearance of a volcanic production.” [VII; 802. "Found the Meteor Hot." New York Sun, December 18, 1892, p. 8 c. 7. “Meteor-Fall in Oregon, December 16, 1892.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 5 (no. 28; January 1893): 47. “This stone is now in the possession of Messrs. Warn of Rochester, New York.” The stone does not appear in Farrington's catalog of meteorites, acquired from the Ward-Coonley collection. Farrington, Oliver Cummings. "Catalogue of the Meteorites of North America, to January 1, 1909." Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, 13 (1915): 1-513.]


1892 (Dec 16) / ab last of Nov / Meteorite said to have fallen near Cloverdale, Oregon. / Pub. Ledger, Dec. 23. [VII; 803. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 23, 1892.) “Close to a Meteor.” States Rights Democrat, (Albany, Oregon), December 2, 1892, p. 2 c. 2. “The meteor seen during the day of Nov 14, near Cloverdale, fell on the ranch of F K Sprowles. just over the county line in Lake county, Cal. Sprowles was out hunting quail, and the meteor fell within twenty feet of him. He was knocked down by the shock, and it was about five minutes before he could gather his senses and stand upon his feet. The meteor made a deep hole in the ground where it struck, and many pieces of meteoric metal were laying around for a space of 200 feet, some of which he carried to San Francisco to have essayed. Mr Sprowls believes that he has a fortune in that hole in the ground.—Lakeview Examiner.” Cloverdale, Oregon, is about 85 kilometres northwest of Albany, Oregon; however, Cloverdale, California, is next to Lake County, California, and would appear to be a California story reported by an Oregon newspaper.]


1892 Dec 17 / 7:30 p.m. / Lead missiles / ab. 5—one, ½ inch diameter / through window / 42 E. 9th St, NY City / Sun 19-5-4. [C; 86. "Lead Missiles Broke The Windows." New York Sun, December 19, 1892, p. 5 c. 4. The pieces of lead were not bullets, and police suspected that a boy using a "spring bean shooter" was the cause but failed to find anyone responsible for this mischief.]


1892 Dec 17 / Mauna Loa in violent eruption / Melb Argus, 19th. [VII; 804. "Eruption of Mauna Loa." Melbourne Argus, December 19, 1892, p. 5 c. 5. The Mauna Loa volcano.]


1892 Dec. 19 / [LT], 5-e / Volc / Hawaii. [VII; 805. “Volcanic Eruption in Hawaii.” London Times, December 19, 1892, p. 5 c. 5. The Mauna Loa volcano.]


1892 Dec. 20 / early morning / Two smart shocks at Quetta, Baluchistan. Severest in the Khojak. / Pioneer Mail (Allahabad), Dec. 29. [VII; 806. (Pioneer Mail, December 29, 1892.)]


1892 Dec 20 / q / Baluchistan / Nature 48/348. [VII; 807. “The Earthquake in Baluchistan.” Nature, 48 (August 10, 1893): 348-349.]


1892 Dec. 22 / q. / Charleston / Bull. Seis Soc Amer. 4/152. [VII; 808. Taber, Stephen. "Seismic Activity in the Atlantic Coastal Plain near Charleston, South Carolina." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 4 (1914): 108-160, at 153.]


1892 Dec 23 / Whiting, Ind / A sword of fire hanging over the town. Said was a reflection from a burning gas well. “One hundred to one hundred and fifty miles” away was reflected in the sky. / Eagle 24-1-4. [VII; 809. “Strange Mirage in Indiana.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 24, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. “One of the most remarkable mirages recorded in this section was seen in the southern sky Friday night. A sword of fire seemed to hang almost over the town. The night was cloudy and the snow flying and the apparition caused the utmost alarm among the superstitiously inclined. At times it reached from the horizon almost to the zenith and at others receded until it seemed to be a comet about 30 degrees above the horizon. The fire companies of two neighboring towns supposed the light to be a conflagration. The light from a burning gas well, one hundred to one hundred an[d] fifty miles distant, reflected from a stratum of air on an intensely cold night, caused the wonderful effect."]


1892 Dec 27 / B. Eagle 27-5-7 / Rose Tucker, of Cincinnati, Ohio—man snipped off her hair, and ran away with it. [C; 87. “Robbed of  Her Hair.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 27, 1892, p. 5 c. 7.]


1892 Dec 30 / Trib, 1-3 / Explosion / bomb / Paris. [C; 88. "Bomb Explosion in Paris." New York Tribune, December 30, 1892, p. 1 c. 3.]


1892 / last week in Dec / Padernal Peak, in New Mexico, dormant from 1820, in eruption. / Also Colima, on Pacific coast of Mexico. / NY Times, Jan 20-1-6. [VII; 810. “Volcanoes in Eruption.” New York Times, January 26, 1893, p. 1 c. 6.]


1892 / last week of Dec and into Jan / Padernal Peak, New Mexico, violent / Sci Amer 68-67. [VII; 811. "Activity of Three North American Volcanoes." Scientific American, n.s., 68 (February 4, 1893): 67.]

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