Last updated: August 16, 2017. - Fortean Notes

Go to content

Main menu:

Last updated: August 16, 2017.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1873


1873:


1873 / A.W. Underwood / Negro boy / Paw Paw / fire breath / See May 1, 1880. [A; 799. See: 1880 May 1, (B; 289), and, 1882 Dec 1, (B; 408).]


1873 / Body of Mrs W.I. Peters / Frankfort, Ind, / See Dec. 22, 1888. [A; 800. See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1873 / Ellen Sudworth / near Leigh, England / Faster / See Ap., 1876. [A; 801. See: 1876 April, (B; 91).]


1873 / H.H. / Gardney, Kansas. / See March 7, 1874. [A; 802. See: 1874 March 7, (A; 909).]


1873 / Bewitched man named Weedstrand, at Meadsville, Pa. / See July 29, 1875. [A; 803. See: 1875 July 29, (B; 61).]


1873 about / Will-o-the-Wisp / Broughton, Ill / Pop Sci News 34-98. [A; 804. Gholson, J.G. "Meteors and Lightning." Popular Science News, 24 (May 1900): 98.]


1873 early / Marks—pictures appearing near Metz—on window glass / See "Faces". / See Religio-Phil Jour., 1873, March 29-4-3. [A; 805. "Pictures on Glass." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 14 (no. 2; March 29, 1873): 4, (c. 3). See: ("Faces").]


1873 / Lonely Houses. / N.Y. Times, July 23-4-5, 1873 / Mrs. Burdett, a widow, at Gilmorton, England, died. In her will, directed that her house, a large country mansion, should remain barred and bolted for 20 years. Said to have had illusions: said that when her son died she believed he had been buried alive; but upon disinterment this found not so. Ac to will, doors and windows were to be bricked up. [A; 806.1, 806.2. "Encouragement for Ghosts." New York Times, July 23, 1873, p. 4 c. 5. Anna Maria Burdett's will was overturned, with the house being declared "undisposed of property", (Brown v. Burdett (1882) 21 Ch D 667). See: http://www.trusts.it/admincp/UploadedPDF/200904081540480.jUK%20Brown%20v%20Burdett18820802.pdf .]


1873 / Ellen Sadler. / Sleeping girl. / near Henley, Eng. / See Feb. 12, 1875. [A; 807. See: 1875 Feb 12, (B; 41).]


1873 / Sounds and ghosts in a house in Deerfield, Portage Co, Ohio / See Dec 13, 1873. [A; 808. See: 1873 Dec 13, (A; 870).]


1873 / H.H. / N. 11th St., Philadelphia / See Ap. 21, 1883. [A; 809. See: 1883 Ap. 21, (B; 495).]


1873 / Louisiana / Substance like fish scales / D-288. [IV; 1151. The note copies information from page 288 of The Book of the Damned. "Alleged shower of fish scales." Annual Record of Science and Industry, 1873, 350-351.]


1873 // Seven comets this year. / N.Y. Times, Nov 21-4-4. [IV; 1124. "Comets of the Year." New York Times, November 21, 1873, p. 4 c. 4. Comets 9P/1873 G1, 10P/1873 N1, 4P/Faye, C/1873 Q1, C/1873 Q2, 5D/Brorsen, and 27P/1873 V1.]


1873-[18]74-[187]5 // Karaman, Asia Minor / Famine / N.Y. Times, July 26-3-4. [IV; 1125. "Famine in Asia." New York Times, July 26, 1875, p. 3 c. 4.]


1873 Jan / Obs. on Jupiter this month / C.R. 76-423. [IV; 1126. Tacchini, Pietro. "Sur quelques phénomènes particulars offerts par la planète Jupiter pendant le mois de janvier 1873." Comptes Rendus, 76 (1873): 423-424.]


1873 Jan 1 / Sleep / Trance / Editorial, N.Y. Times, [Jan 1]-4-4. / In Hoshangabad, married woman named Nunnee. In 12 years had never met her husband without instantly falling asleep. These sleeps sometimes lasting 8 or 10 days. [A; 810. "A Sleeping Beauty." New York Times, January 1, 1873, p. 4 c. 4. (Homeward Mail, 1872??? acto Punch, "Mesmeric Bliss." Punch, 63 (December 21, 1872): 261.) (Indian Medical Gazette, v. 7 (1872),  and, Indian Public Opinion and Panjab Times, acto British newspapers.) "Extraordinary Mesmeric Influence." Newcastle Courant, December 13, 1872, p. 8 c. 1.]


1873 Jan 2. / Several bright meteors at Wexham told of in Daily Telegraph of 3rd. There was a rather bright auroral light, ac. to Rept BA 73-394. [IV; 1127. (London Daily Telegraph, January 3, 1872; not @ BNA.) Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1872-73." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1873, 349-403, at 394. "The sky was clear, and the light of an aurora rather bright in the north."]


1872 Jan 2-3 / night / Tempest / unprecedented violence / England / Ireland / N.Y. Times 4-1-7. [IV; 1128. "A Tempest." New York Times, January 4, 1873, p. 1 c. 7.]


1873 Jan 3. / q. / Vienna / Nature 14-279. [IV; 1129. "Notes." Nature, 14 (July 27, 1876): 278-280, at 279.]


1873 Jan 4 / Ohio / q / Ref, Jan 4, '72. [IV; 1130. Refer to: 1872 Jan 4, (IV; 580). Hayes, Richard. "Catalogue of Earthquakes for the Years 1872-1873." Transactions of the Academy of Sciences of St. Louis, 3 (1868-1877): 243-245, at 245.]


1873 Jan 4 / Moon / like a fog in and around Kepler, by Trouvelot / L'Astro 1/302. [IV; 1131. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Observation Curieuse Faite sur la Lune." Astronomie, 1 (1882): 302 The crater was Kant, (not Kepler). "Le 4 janvier 1873, observant le cratère Kant et son voisinage, il m'a semblé voir là un volie atmosphérique, quelque chose comme des vapeurs lumineuses légèrement empourprées."]


1873 Jan 6 / 6 p.m. / Nevada / met / Sc Am 30-82. [IV; 1132. "A Meteor in Nevada." Scientific American, n.s., 30 (February 7, 1874): 82.]


1873 Jan 6, 7, 8, / 3, 4—1874 / 7, 8—1875 / 8, 9—1876 // Auroral electric storms in Nebraska—high magnetic conditions and storms / NY Times, 1876, Jan. 15-2-3. [IV; 1133. "Annual Electric Storms." New York Times, January 15, 1876, p. 2 c. 3.]


[1873 Jan. 7 /] 1873 July 7 / Eruption / Mauna Loa / N.Y. Times 20-2-2 / on through July and Aug. at least. [IV; 1256. "Mauna Loa." New York Times, October 20, 1873, p. 2 c. 2. The Mauna Loa volcano erupted on January 6 and was in eruption from April 20, 1873, to October of 1874.]


1873 Jan 7 / Aurora / Paris / C.R. 76-118 / ab. midnight / from N.W. to east. [IV; 1134. Chapelas. "Aurora boréale du 7 janvier." Comptes Rendus, 76 (1873): 118-119.]


1873 Jan 7 / Aurora / C.R. 76/118. [IV; 1135. Chapelas. "Aurora boréale du 7 janvier." Comptes Rendus, 76 (1873): 118-119.]


1873 Jan 8-13 / Eruption in Iceland. Smith. Inst. Rept. 1885/511. [IV; 1136. ("Volcanic Eruptions and Earthquakes in Iceland within Historic Times." Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian, 1885, 495-541, at 511.)]


1873 Jan 9 / Eruption of Skaptur Jokul, Iceland—lasted 4 days. Chorley Standard, Ap. 12. [IV; 1137. "Great Eruption of the Skaptar Jokel in Iceland." Scotsman, Apri 9, 1873, p. 6 c. 6. (Chorley Standard, April 12, 1873.; not at BNA.) The Grimsvotn volcano.]


[1873 Jan 9. Wrong date. See: 1872 Nov 13, (I; 1138).]


1873 Jan 9-12 / Details of eruption of Skaptar Jokull, Iceland / Nature 7-470. [IV: 1139. "Notes." Nature, 7 (April 17, 1873): 469-472, at 470. "Great Eruption of the Skaptar Jokul in Iceland." Scotsman, April 9, 1873, p. 6 c. 6. The Grimsvotn volcano.]


1873 Jan 13 / Dispatch from London so dated—violent q., 114 miles north of Bombay, India. N.Y.  Times 14-1-7. [IV; 1140. "Report of  Frightful Earthquake in India." New York Times, January 14, 1873, p. 1 c. 7.]


1873 Jan., middle / Volc eruptions / Chile / Nature 8-404. [IV; 1141. "Notes." Nature, 8 (September 18, 1873): 404-405, at 404. No volcanic eruptions in Chile began in 1873; and, the eruptions of the Nevados de Chillán, Llaima, and Quetrupillan volcanoes, (beginning in June and July, 1872), may not have continued into 1873.]


1873 Jan 11 / Brunswick, Me. / q / Ref, Jan 4, '72. [IV; 1142. Refer to: 1872 Jan 4, (IV; 580). Hayes, Richard. "Catalogue of Earthquakes for the Years 1872-1873." Transactions of the Academy of Sciences of St. Louis, 3 (1868-1877): 243-245, at 245.]


1873 Jan. 11 / met train / Metite fell at Tyngsboro, Mass, near a railroad train with an explosion that caused a panic among the passengers. / Sc Am 28-132. [IV; 1143. "A Brilliant Meteor in Massachusetts." Scientific American, n.s., 28 (March 1, 1873): 132.]


1873 Jan. 4 / (Cut) / Something like a luminous vapor in crater Kant and neighborhood, by Hammar. / (N.M.) / L'Astro 1/302. [IV; 1144. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Observation Curieuse Faite sur la Lune." Astronomie, 1 (1882): 302. "by Hammar"???]


1873 Jan 9-12 / Great eruption Skaptar Yokul, in Iceland / Jour Seis Soc Japan 3/27. See Ap. 9. [IV; 1145. Milne, John. "Seismic, Magnetic, and Electric Phenomena." Seismological Journal of Japan, 3 (1894): 23-33, at 27. "Telegraphic lines were influenced on the 9th. Current on the 10th. Deflection on the 10th, and up to 12:35 a.m. on the 12th." See: 1873 Ap 9, (IV; 1195).]


1873 Jan 14 / 8th death in 2 years of artists in studios in New York Y.M.C.A. Building. / Rel-Ph. J., Feb 2-4-4. [A; 811. "Remarkable Succession of Deaths." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 13 (no. 20; February 2, 1873): 4, (c. 4). "Remarkable Succession of Deaths." New York Evening Post, December 27, 1873, p. 2 c. 3-4.]


1873 Jan 19 / Tempest / France / C.R. 76-241. [IV; 1146. "M. Bérigny adresse, sur la tempête du 19 janvier dernier...." Comptes Rendus, 76 (1873): 241-242.]


1873 Jan. 26 / Chicago Times, copied in Rel.-Phil. J., May 17, 1873—phe in the home of Tobias Goldschmidt, 317 S. Park Avenue, Chicago. Bell ringing, though guarded by members of the family and police—since August. [A; 812. "Come In." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 14 (no. 9; May 17, 1873): 1, (c. 1-5). (Chicago Times, 1873.)]


1873 Jan 26 / Accidents / N.Y. Times, 4-5—from English newspapers—During the Pytchley hunt, Gen Mayow fell dead from his saddle. "Almost directly after" but far away in Gloucester, daughter of the Bishop of Gloucester thrown while hunting, and was thought dead but survived. On same day, in the north, a Miss Cavendish was thrown in the same way and was killed. About last of December, 1872, a clergyman was killed while hunting in Lincolnshire. About same time near Sander's Gorse 2 hunters were thrown and seriously injured. [A; 813.1, 813.2. "A Chapter of Accidents." New York Times, January 26, 1873, p. 4 c. 5. "Colonel Mayow...." Bradford Observer, January 3, 1873, p. 3 c. 7. "Accident to a Bishop's Daughter." Bradford Observer, January 7, 1873, p. 4 c. 2. "Accidents in the Hunting-Field." Reading Mercury, January 13, 1873, p. 8 c. 2.]


1873 Jan 26, 27 / Slight eruptions / Vesuvius / NY Times 28-1-7. [IV; 1147. "Slight Eruptions from Vesuvius." New York Times, January 28, 1873, p. 1 c. 7.]


1873 Jan 27 / Great display / Mauna Loa / A.J. Sci 3-5-476. [IV; 1148. Coan, Titus. "Volcanoes of Hawaii." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 5 (1873): 476-477.]


1873 Jan 30 / N.Y. Times, 4-5 / Star Shower / Ed. [IV; 1149. "The Late Star-Shower." New York Times, January 30, 1873, p. 4 c. 5.]


1873 Jan 31, etc. / 1:10 a.m. / Great shock / Samos / Nature 7-311. Up to Feb 3, 104 shocks. / p. 332. [IV; 1150. "Notes." Nature, 7 (February 20, 1873): 310-312, at 311. "Notes." Nature, 7 (February 27, 1873): 331-332, at 332.]


1873 Feb 1-2 / night / British Isles / one of the most violent storms recorded. / N.Y. Times 3-1-7. [IV; 1152. "Violent Storm in the British Islands—Many Wrecks and Great Loss of Life—Heavy Snow." New York Times, February 3, 1873, p. 1 c. 7.]


1873 Feb. 2 / Several parts of Kattywar showers of hail never before seen by natives / Nature 7-392. [IV; 1153. "Notes." Nature, 7 (March 20, 1873): 391-392, at 392.]


1873 Feb 3 / Meteor and its "thunder". / Lancashire and Yorkshire / Eng Mec 16/530, 587 // in Australia / E.M. 17/171. / B. Assoc 1873/353. [IV; 1154. "Singular Atmospheric Phenomenon." English Mechanic, 16 (no. 412; February 14, 1873): 530. "Beautiful Meteor." English Mechanic, 16 (no. 414; February 28, 1873): 587. Watkinson, John. English Mechanic, 17 (no. 423; May 2, 1873): 171. "In more than one of the February numbers of the English Mechanic you had several notices of a very remarkable meteor which was visible in different parts of England on the night of February 3. I inclose

copy of an Australian paper containing account of a remarkable meteor being visible about the same time. The coincidence is somewhat striking, though I suppose it cannot be the same meteor, as of course it would be broad daylight there when the one was seen in England. It may, however, tend to show that large bolides were passing during the same day. "A Brilliant Meteor." Melbourne Argus, February 5, 1873, p. 6 c. 4. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1872-73." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1873, 349-403, at 353.]


1873 Feb 3 / 9:58 (?) / Bristol / det met / BA 73/364. [IV; 1155. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1872-73." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1873, 349-403, at 364-365.]


1873 Feb 3 / ab 9:40 p.m. / Melbourne / very large meteor.  Zenith / Melb. Age, 5th / E to W. [IV; 1156. "Meteor." The Age, (Melbourne), February 5, 1873, p. 3 c. 8.]


1873 Feb 3 / 10 p.m. / Det met / Northwich (sic) / Nature 7-322. [IV; 1157. "Brilliant Meteor of Feb. 3." Nature, 7 (February 27, 1873): 322. Northwich is a town in Cheshire, England.]


1873 Feb 3 / See Feb 4, 1920. [IV; 1158. See: (1920 Feb 4).]


1873 Feb 3 / Both in Australia and Eng / 10 p.m. / (local time) / BA 73-376, 364 / and Appendix. [IV; 1159. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1872-73." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1873, 349-403, at 364-365, 376-377, (Appendix). (Iron : the journal of science, metals &​ manufactures Mechanics Magazine, May 2, 1873.) St. Clair, George. "Brilliant Meteor." Nature, 7 (February 6, 1873): 262.]


1873 (Feb 5) / aurora local time / Local time / Pekin maximum 9 [p.m.] / ended at 2 / Paris maximum 6 / ended at 12 [minuit] / La Nature 1873/240. [IV; 1160. "L'Aurora Boréale du 5 Février." La Nature, 1873 (no. 15; September 13): 240. Faye. "Sur les aurores boréales, à l'occasion d'un récent Mémoire de M. Donati." Comptes Rendus, 76 (1873): 545-549. "M. le Secrétaire Perpétuel, signale...." Comptes Rendus, 76 (1873): 562-563. While Donati reported an aurora on the night of February 4-5, in the latter article, the times given by the article in La Nature were only an "exemple" of how the local times of observations in distant places would vary, as indicated by Faye's article, if auroras occurred as a terrestrial or cosmic phenomenon.]


1873 Feb 9 / N.Y. Times, 4-6 / At Lansingburg, NY, spirits "yelling at unseemly hours". / N.M. [A; 814. "Ghosts in Rome Centre." New York Times, February 9, 1873, p. 4 c. 6. "Of the Lansingburg spirits nothing has yet been published, except the bare statement that they are addicted to yelling loudly at unseemly hours." "Lansingburgh, N.Y., has been enjoying the sensation of a ghost story." Brockport Republic, (New York), February 20, 1873, p. 1 c. 5. "It is inhabited by a Miss Jones, who is not in the least superstitious. The perturbed spirit of spirits jar the house and indulge in cat-calls, night and day.—Miss Jones, however, does not for a moment think that disembodied spirits have anything to do with the unpleasant demonstrations. The explanation which she makes, is that she bought the house of a man in the village, and the property is valuable, or at least susceptible of being made so. This man, Miss Jones claims, wants to get possession of the house again and, finding that she is not disposed to part with it, has taken this means to get her to sell."]


1873 Feb 9 / Faces / N.Y. Times, 4-6 / Rome Center, Mich, pictures of a Negro appearing on a window. Could not be scrubbed off. Then other portraits. [A; 815. "Ghosts in Rome Centre." New York Times, February 9, 1873, p. 4 c. 6. "Strange Faces at the Window." Cambria Freeman, (Ebensburg, Pennsylvania), February 7, 1873, p. 2 c. 2. "Phil. Mosher, a gentleman employed in the store of George W. Bond, kindly volunteered to show us around the town and impart what information he could.  We first visited the house of Dr. Ross, where the pictures were first noticed, and being introduced to that gentleman, he immediately proceded to 'show up' the faces. Ou the lower sash of a chamber window in the west side of the house can be seen, quite distinctly, the picture of three human faces and the face of a black cat." "At first we could not see anything resembling human features, but the doctor, taking a long pole and pointing out the eyes, nose, mouth, and outlines of the faces, we could then see them very plain. We next visited the house of Mr. Samuel Luce, where faces had been seen by a number of citizens. Here we could plainly see two faces on one pane of glass, apparently those of a lady and gentleman who seemed to be facing each other, and on another window could be seen the face of a young lady, and on still another window we could see a head resembling that of some large auimal, looking as much like a lion as anything. The faces on these windows are considerably smaller than are those on Dr. Ross's windows, but fully as plainly to be seen. From here we went to the house of Jake Bullion, and on one of his chamber windows we could see what appeared to be the face of an old colored man having white hair and whiskers, the features being very distinct. These three houses we have mentioned are the only ones where faces have been seen as yet, although there are some very flattering indications on several other houses."]


1873 Feb 9, 10, 11, 14 / Shocks / Turkey and Asia Minor / Nature 7-351. [IV; 1161. "Notes." Nature, 7 (March 6, 1873): 349-351, at 351.]


[1873 Feb 12. Wrong date. See: 1872 Aug 30, (IV; 1162).]


1873 Feb 12 / Peshawar, India / q / Ref, Jan 4, '72. [IV; 1163. Refer to: 1872 Jan 4, (IV; 580). Hayes, Richard. "Catalogue of Earthquakes for the Years 1872-1873." Transactions of the Academy of Sciences of St. Louis, 3 (1868-1877): 243-245, at 245.]


1873 Feb 14 / Group of 2 or 3 meteors appeared near Venus, at New Haven, Conn., ab 6 p.m. / A.J. Sci 3/5/318. [IV; 1164. "Double Meteor of Feb. 14th, 1873." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 5 (1873): 318-319.]


1873 Feb 14 / Met from near Venus / ab. 6 p.m. / New Haven, Conn. / Rept. B.A. 1874-298. [IV; 1165. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 298-299.]


1873 Feb 15 / NY Times, 4-4 / Astro Romance / Ed. [IV; 1166. "A Bit of Astronomical Romance." New York Times, February 15, 1873, p. 4 c. 4.]


1873 Feb. 15 / BO / Preston Herald of / At Bank House, Eccleston, several times since first of Feb showers of water seemingly from ceiling flooding the floor soaking furniture, rendering the house almost uninhabitable. But the ceiling remained dry. Sometimes several a day. [A; 816. "Strange Spiritual Pheonomenon at Eccleston." Preston Herald, February 15, 1873, p. 5 c. 3.]


1873 Feb. 15 / BO / Showers / Chorley Standard of / That the people of Eccleston were excited by most unusual occurrences. At Bank House, occupied by two elderly women and their niece, about the first of February showers of water started falling, apparently from ceiling. Things were drenched and the phe became alarming. There were several precipitations a day, each lasting about two minutes. Furniture and floors were soaked. The falls seemed to come from the ceilings, but "probably the most singular feature about the affair is that the ceilings were apparently quite dry." Workmen had been unable to find any explanation. Town excited and many persons had seen the showers, but no explanation. After several weeks the phe stopped. but in Standard, March 8, said that upon 6th of March there was another downpour. [A; 817.1 to 817.4. (Chorley Standard, February 15, 1873. Chorley Standard, March 8, 1873; 1873 not at BNA.)]


1873 Feb 16 / N.Y. Times, 3-2 / Letter from Miss Lucy A. Perkins, of the Newburyport schoolhouse, describing the ghost-boy. [A; 818. "The Haunted School-House—Animated Brushes and a Traveling Dust-Pan." New York Times, February 16, 1873, p. 3 c. 2-3.]


1873 Jan 11 / N.Y. Times, 2-6 / In Newburyport, the School Committee forced to close the school, because so many visitors. For more than a year a ghost-boy been seen there. Described not as ghostly but at first taken for "a strange boy". Tow-headed, pale-faced boy seen by the teacher and about 50 pupils. Teacher reached for him—not there. [A; 819.1, 819.2. "A Haunted School-House." New York Times, January 11, 1873, p. 2 c. 6.]


1872 Nov 18 / The Newburyport H. house—3 cols in Rel Ph-J, March 22, 1873. [A; 820. "Ghost Hunting." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 14 (no. 1; March 22, 1873): 8, (c. 1-3).]


1872 Nov / Newburyport. / N.Y. Times, May 7-3-2, said that accord to talk in the town Miss Perkins was going to be removed from her job. Presumably because she was not believed. Said that new phe. Visitors had opened a closet in the schoolhouse, and from it a dust pan had been thrown violently. [A; 821. "The Haunted School-House in Newburyport Again Heard From." New York Times, May 7, 1873, p. 3 c. 2.]


1873 Feb 19 / [LT], 11-e / Jupiter. [IV; 1167. "The Planet Jupiter." London Times, February 19, 1873, p. 11 c. 5.]


1873 Feb. 22 / 7:30 a.m. / Eastport, Me / q / Am. J. Sci 3-5-263. [IV; 1168. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 5 (1873): 260-263, at 263.]


1873 Feb 22 / great / March 5, 19 / Ap 11 // qs / San Salvador / [BA] '11. [IV; 1169. Milne, 724.]


1873 / Feb 22-11-d / stunned by a meteor at sea. [IV; 1170. "Stunned by a Meteor." London Times, February 22, 1873, p. 11 c. 4. See: 1872 Nov 13, (IV; 1138).]


1873 Feb. 23 / Rel-Ph-J, 6-2 / Ghost pictures on windows in Rome Center, Michigan. [A; 822. "Spirit Faces on Windows." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 13 (no. 23;  February 23, 1873): 6, (c. 2).]


1873 Feb 26 / 8:30-10:30 / Sydney / Auroral streamers "towards the south" / Sydney Morning Herald 28-4-6. [IV; 1171. "Aurora Australis." Sydney Morning Herald, February 28, 1873, p. 4 c. 6.]


1873 Feb, last of / Floods in N.S. Wales / See Syd Herald, begin Feb 26. / before 26th. [IV; 1172. "The Late Heavy Rains." Sydney Morning Herald, February 26, 1873, p. 5 c. 2-4. "The Floods." Sydney Morning Herald, February 27, 1873, p. 5 c. 3-4. "Notes of the Week." Sydney Morning Herald, March 1, 1873, p. 8 c. 1.]


1873 Feb. 28 / Submarine explosion in Australia / LT '73, Feb 28-12-3. [IV; 1173. "Submarine Explosion." London Times, February 28, 1873, p. 12 c. 3. "Freemantle, Nov. 6." Inquirer and Commercial News, (Perth, Australia), November 27, 1872, p. 3 c. 2-3. "Mr. J. Willis, fisherman, and an old resident at the Port, reports that about ten days since, while searching for fish at Safety Bay, he felt a slight breeze from E.S.E., and immediately it had died away the sea became agitated, and one of the boys with him called his attention to two large volumes of water which began to rise a short distance off, appearing to be about 100 yards distant. Two other volumes formed in a line with the first, and kept close together. These passed by the head of the boat, which they gradually approached to within 40 yards. Two other volumes passed by the stern of the boat, and during their passage there appeared to be a strong current, or some influence dragging the boats towards the larger or principal bodies of water, which appeared to expand as they ascended. When fairly above the surface of the ocean large holes appeared, which did not close while within view of the boat. They were about ten feet deep, but they were too large to be able to form any idea of their diameter. The shape was that of a crescent and inside appeared to be oil, or some other greasy matter. The great heat from these holes was suffocating, as if sulphur was burning, and Mr. Willis says that several times he thought his clothes were on fire. This happened about l½ miles from land, in water averaging 14 to 16 fathoms. Fortunately the boat was to the leeward of the volumes of water, which took a westerly direction. These bodies of water were not tapered at the bottom like an ordinary waterspout. but of nearly equal size, top and bottom, and were upwards of one hundred feet high. Mr. Willis has been 20 years a fisherman, but never saw anything like it before. On Saturday there was a heavy fall of rain at Safety Bay, and Mr. Willis says it was the heaviest he ever witnessed...."]


1873 March / Spiritual Mag of. / Loud sounds in a house occupied by a newly married couple named Johnson, in village of Wislow, 3 miles from Selby. / Copied from Birmingham Daily Mail. / A neighbor, Mr. G. Wilson, equally disturbed, and unable to sleep. Early in preceding summer, house was occupied by Mr. and Mrs John Harper. Wife died and he committed suicide in the house. House unoccupied for a while. Phe began when the Johnsons moved in. [A; 823.1, 823.2, 823.3. (Spiritual Magazine, March 1873; missing issue at IAPSOP.) (Birmingham Daily Mail, March 1873; not @ BNA.)]


1873 / 1872? // March 29 / Rel.-Ph. J, 4-3 / Crosses, etc., pictures appearing on window glass near Metz. [A; 824. "Pictures on Glass." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 14 (no. 2; March 29, 1873): 4, (c. 3). See: 1872 March 12, (A; 753), and, 1873 early, (A; 805).]


1873 (March 4) / [LT], Ap 12-5-a / etc. / Great q. / San Salvador. [IV; 1174. "Earthquake in Central America." London Times, April 12, 1873, p. 5 c. 1.]


1873 March 4 / Heavy rain / Durban, Natal / Quar Jour. Met Soc 1-266. [IV; 1175. "Proceedings at the Meetings of the Society." Quarterly Journal of the Meteorological Society, 1 (1872-1873): 264-266, at 266. "Rain fell at Durban, the seaport of Natal, on the night of March the 4th, so morning of the 5th amounted to 6.50 inches. This is the heaviest fall on record in the colony, with the exception of that of the flood of April 15th, 1856...."]


1873 March 4/ q / See March 19. [IV; 1176. See: 1873 March 19, (IV; 1184).]  


1873 March 4 / about 4:30 p.m. / San Salvador / N.Y. Times—Ap. 11-5-5 / Three violent shocks. For several days there had been slight shocks. / Shocks continued. Another heavy one March 10th. [IV; 1177. "San Salvador." New York Times, April 11, 1873, p. 5 c. 5.]


1873 March 10 / Another q. / See March 4. [IV; 1178. See: 1873 March 4, (IV: 1176 & 1177).]


1873 March 12 / 9 p.m. / q. / Rome. Italy / N.Y. Times, Ap. 12-1-4. [IV; 1179. "Terrible Earthquake." New York Times, April 12, 1873, p. 1 c. 4-5.]


1873 March 12 / (It) / Flames from ground / reddish light over a mountain and q / See 1805. [IV; 1180. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146). (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448.)]


1873 Mar 12 / —Italy / Mar 18—Philippines / 19—Cent. Amer / 27—China / 31—Phillipines // BA '11 / q's. [IV; 1181. Milne, 724.]


1873 March 12 / It / (Success) / q / Italy / See Mar 14. / C.R. 76/689, 897. [IV; 1182. (Compte Rendus, 76-689, 897.)]


1873 March 14 / Orange-red hailstones in Tuscany, says a writer in NQ 9/5-516. / (ver) / quoting a writer in Pearson's Weekly / D- 46. [IV; 1183. The note copies information from page 39, (not page 46), of The Book of the Damned. Wallace, R. Hedger. "Showers of Snakes, Fish, Spiders &c." Notes and Queries, s. 9 v. 6 (June 30, 1900): 516. ("Serpent Storms and Spider Showers." Pearson's Weekly, recent to June, 1900???; not @ BNA)


1873 March 19 / 2 a.m. / Final destruction of San Salvador by q. / N.Y. Times, Ap. 21-1-3. Volc Ysalco in full blast. [IV; 1184. "The Fallen City." New York Times, April 21, 1873, p. 1 c. 3-4. The Izalco volcano.]


1873 March 24 / (Cut) // Circular black spot on sun reported to Mr. Hind by cable from Shanghai / Astro Reg XI/112 / or Times, March 26, 1873. [IV; 1185. Hind, John Russell. "Spots in the Sun." London Times, October 19, 1872, p. 5 c. 5. "An Intra-Mercurial Planet." London Times, March 26, 1873, p. 5 c. 6. In response to Hind's suggestion tthat "a very close watch be kept on the sun's disc" for an intra-Mercurial planet, "on the 24th of March next," he received a telegram from Mr. Cowie, in Shanghai: "Your predicted circular black spot on sun, seen here distinctly at 9 morning, 24th. On the 23d and 24th, there was no circular black spot of the ordinary kind upon the sun's disc while above the horizon in this country. The only isolated spot resembling such remarked here was a dusky elliptical spot in the north following quadrant, but when viewed with roper magnifying power no one could doubt its solar origin. This elliptical spot was growing fainter towards sunset yesterday and this morning soon after sunrise was perceptible with difficulty; two hours later it had disappeared." "An Intra-Mercurial Planet." Astronomical Register, 11 (April 1873): 112, (this article was copied from the London Times).]


1873 March 24 / N.Y. Times, 2-1 / Nat Bridge, Va.—Burning Stone. [IV; 1186. "Another Curious Story from the Region of the Natural Bridge." New York Times, March 24, 1873, p. 2 c. 1. Vapor, black smoke, a peculiar odor, and "a bright light shooting from the side of the bridge" suggested "extraordinary phenomena," to John Parry McCluer; but, the article states: "Wonderful stories about great changes, impending or actual, at the Natural Bridge, Virginia, come pretty regularly every Spring."]


1873 March 28 / [LT], 12-e / Jupiter's 4th Satellite. [IV; 1187. "Jupiter's Fourth Satellite." London Times, March 28, 1873, p. 12 c. 5.]


1873 March 29 / Rel-Ph. J, 1-4 / Rapping ghost at Warsaw—Ind.? [A; 825. "The Latest Wonder." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 14 (no. 2; March 29, 1873): 1, (c. 1-5). The Warsaw Democrat was an Illinois newspaper, but the article fails to provide any detail about the location of this story.]


[1873 March 29] / Marks / Religio-Philosophical Journal, 1873, March 29-4-3 / At Boulley, 5 leagues from Metz, religious emblems appearing on window glass—picures of many kinds, an eagle, a death's head, a rainbow. At Plattville, near Metz, other pictures. [A; 826. "Pictures on Glass." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 14 (no. 2; March 29, 1873): 4, (c. 3). See: 1872 March 12, (A; 753), and, 1873 early, (A; 805).]


1873 April / Meteors and aurora / Nature, Ap. 24, 1873 / Denning. [IV; 1188. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. "Auroral Display." Nature, 7 (April 24, 1873): 481-482. Denning, William Frederick. "April Meteors." Nature, 7 (April 24, 1873): 482-483.]


1873 Ap. 1 / 6:45 a.m. / Destructive tornado / Franklin Williamson Co., Tenn. / N.Y. Times 2-6-7. [IV; 1189. "Tornadoes in the South." New York Times, April 2, 1873, p. 6 c. 7.]


1873 Ap. 2-3 / W Pic / ac to Birt / Astro Reg 17-220. [IV; 1190. Birt, William Radcliffe. "Lunar Objects Suitable for Observation in September, 1879." Astronomical Register, 17 (September 1879): 220-221.]


1873 Ap. 3 / Explosion or prominence on sun / Flammarion, Pop Astro, p. 273. [IV; 1191. Flammarion, Camille. Popular Astronomy: A General Description of the Heavens. New York: D. Appleton, 1894, 273-274.]


1873 Ap. 5 / 4 a.m. / Great explosion in a colliery, Abertilly, Monmouthshire / Standard, Ap. 7. [IV; 1192. "Fearful Colliery Explosion in Monmouthshire." London Standard, April 7, 1873, p. 2 c. 5.]


1873 Ap 5 / afternoon / Burlington, Iowa—N.Y. Times—7-8-2 / "The most terrible rain, hail, and wind storm ever known" there. [IV; 1193. "Terrific Storm in Iowa." New York Times, April 7, 1873, p. 8 c. 2.]


1873 Ap 7 / N.Y. Times, 4-5 / Savannah, Ga.—In a house—crockery thrown about—appearance of an apparition—pointed to a gash in its throat—beheaded itself. [A; 827. "A New Ghostly Device." New York Times, April 7, 1873, p. 4 c. 5-6.]


1873 Ap. 9 / [source unidentified], 1-7 / Son of Peter Brutcher, aged 5, of Evansville, Ind, had slept almost constantly for 3 months. Attacked by pain in foot—then violent spasms. Had lost power of speech. Ate such food as physicians prescribed. No loss of flesh. [A; 828. "Singular Malady." Bloomington Progress, (Indiana),  April 16, 1873, p. 2 c. 2. "Mr. Peter Brutcher, who does business on Water Street, in this city, has a little boy, five years old, who has slept almost constantly for three months. The child was first attacked by a pain in his foot, and this was soon succeeded by violent spasms, which, were followed by paralysis. When the spasms passed off, the litffe fellow went to sleep and continued to sleep until roused by violent shaking, or until the spasms return. He takes such nourishment as the physicians prescribe for him, and does not seem to have wasted in flesh. He has lost the power of speech, and, in fact, seems to have no control over his muscles except that when roused he opens his eyes. The case has been examined by some of the best physicians in the city, to whom it is a great puzzle.—Ev. Journal." ]


1873 Ap 9 / [LT], 5-e / Vesuvius. [IV; 1194. "Southern Italy." London Times, April 9, 1873, p. 5 c. 5.]


1873 Ap 9 / [LT], 10-c / 10-10-e // Volc / Shaptar Jokull / See Jan 9. [IV; 1195. "An Icelandic Volcano." London Times, April 9, 1873, p. 10 c. 3. "The Volcanic Eruption in Iceland." London Times, April 10, 1873, p. 10 c. 5. See: 1873 Jan 9-12, (IV: 1139). The Grimsvotn volcano.]


1873 April 10 / moon / by Schmidt—about 30 little points on a dark gray which could not have been shadows—the south west of Copernicus / L'Astro 4-309. [IV; 1196. Detaille, C. "Points sombres énigmatiques observés dans les cratères lunaires." Astronomie, 4 (1885): 308-311, at 309, (illustration).]


1873 Ap 11 / N.Y. Times 1-4 / The horse disease in Mexico. Also fowls and cattle dying. [A; 829. "Mexico Tranquil—Horse Disease—Extradition—Sentence of an Assassin." New York Times, April 11, 1873, p. 1 c. 4.]


1873 Ap. 14 / Sound / 9:45 p.m. / South coast Devon / slight q and sound resembling thunder / "perfectly clear sky. / See May 3, '09. [IV; 1197. Refer to: 1809 May 3, (I; 265). Parfitt, Edward. "On Earthquakes in Devonshire." Report and Transactions of the Devonshire Association, 16 (1884): 641-661, at 654-655.]


1873 Ap 12 / [LT], 5-a / etc. // See Index. q. / San Salvador. [IV; 1198. "Earthquake in Central America." London Times, April 12, 1873, p. 5 c. 1. "The West Indies." London Times, April 15, 1873, p. 6 c. 5-6. "The San Salvador Earthquake." London Times, April 21, 1873, p. 7 c. 3. "The San Salvador Earthquake." London Times, April 22, 1873, p. 5 c. 2. "The Earthquake at San Salvador." London Times, April 23, 1873. p. 5 c. 4. "The Earthquake of San Salvador." London Times, April 30, 1873, p. 10 c. 1. Gonzalez, Santiago. "The San Salvador Earthquake." London Times, May 7, 1873, p. 5 c. 4. "The United States." London Times, May 21, 1873, p. 13 c. 1.]


1873 Ap. 15 / [LT], 10-b / Volcanic Affinities. [IV; 1199. Tivoli, Vital de. "Volcanic Affinities." London Times, April 15, 1873, p. 10 c. 2.]


1873 Ap. 16 / 9:55 p.m. / 2:46 a.m.—17th / qs. Scotland and Ireland and sounds of thunder / BA 73/197 / Nature 8/5. [IV; 1200. Bryce, James. "Fourth Report on Earthquakes in Scotland." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1873, 194-197, at 197. Shaw, J. "Earthquake in Dumfries." Nature, 8 (May 1, 1873): 5.]


1873 Ap. 19 / Rel-Ph. J., p. 5 / Account of the Newburyport ghost boy. [A; 830. "Spiritual Manifestations at Newburyport, Massachusetts." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 14 (no. 5; April 19, 1873): 5, (c. 3-4).]


1873 Ap. 19 and 20 / 20 meteors at Bristol, by Denning. Of 12 well-observed, 8 were from near Alpha Lyrae. There was another radiant pont in Bootes. / Nature 7-482. [IV; 1201. Denning, William Frederick. "April Meteors." Nature, 7 (April 24, 1873): 482-483.]


1873 / ab. Ap. 20 // q at Dayton, Ohio. / night / preceded by a flash of lightning / N.Y. Times, May 5-2-2. [IV; 1202. "The Earthquake at Dayton, Ohio." New York Times, May 5, 1873, p. 2 c. 2-3. At Oxford, Ohio, a "dazzling flash of lightning" startled the McFarland family, about 10:15 P.M., and a few seconds later heavy rolling thunder shook their house; thus, R.W. McFarland thought that the earthquake was due to the lightning striking the ground, but without the report of thunder beng heard at Dayton, (about twenty-five miles away). "At Dayton Tuesday night...." Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, (West Virginia), April 25, 1873, p. 1 c. 1. "Three distinct vibrations, such as are the unmistakable accompaniments of an earthquake" were felt at 10:13 P.M., on April 22, 1873.]


1873 Ap. 20 / Mauna Loa / See June, 32. [IV; 1203. See: 1832 June 20, (I; 1700). Wood, Harry Oscar. "The Seismic Prelude to the 1914 Eruption of Mauna Loa." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 5 (1915): 39-51, at 47.]


1873 Ap. 21 / Great prominence or explosion on sun / Flammarion, Pop Astro, p. 270. [IV; 1204. Flammarion, Camille. Popular Astronomy: A General Description of the Heavens. New York: D. Appleton, 1894, 269-270, (figure 116).]


1873 Ap. 25 / Malone, N.Y. / 4 shocks, "quite heavy" / N.Y. Times, May 5-1-7. [IV; 1205. "The Late Earthquake in Northern New York." New York Times, May 5, 1873, p. 1 c. 7.]


1873 Ap. 26 / N.Y. Times, 9-3 / Drought and famine in Java. Corpses of the starved-to-death found daily by roadsides. [IV; 1206. "Rice Famine in Java." New York Times, April 26, 1873, p. 9 c. 3.]


1873 Apr. 26 / Op. Mars. [IV; 1207.]


1873 Ap. 29 / Rather severe q at Doncaster. Editor exp. surprise at being so local. / Symons Met 8-79 / also Ap 27, '74 (Roper) p. 39 / Times 30-5-e. [IV; 1208. Howarth, James. "Earthquake at Doncaster." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 8 (June 1873): 79. "Earthquake in England." London Times, April 30, 1873, p. 5 c. 5 (Roper, 39.).]


1873 Ap. 30 / Destructive waterspout / Selma, Alabama / N.Y. Times, May 7-2-7. [IV; 1209. "General Notes." New York Times, May 7, 1873, p. 2 c. 7.]


1873 May / Obj—Exmoor, Devonshire / See Lum Objs. [A; 831. See: (Lum Objs.).]


1873 May 3 / Rel-Ph. J., 1-4, copying from Denver Tribune—a haunted house in Denver—Tenants scared out—name Risley—a daughter in the family, Annette, aged 17. [A; 832. "The Denver Ghost." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 14 (no. 7; May 3, 1873): 1, (c. 4-5).]


1873 May 5 / Inferior conjunction Venus-Sun / (A1). [IV; 1210. (A1).]


1873 May 8-22 / White spot (Mars) by Knobel / M Notices 33/476. [IV; 1211. Knobel, Edward Ball. "Notes on Mars, 1873." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 33 (1873): 476-478, (illustrations).]


1873 May 10 / N.Y. Times, 6-5 / In the home of a German named Augensblicke, in Detroit. Went there. Fire in fireplace blazing. Suddenly went out. Same experience 2 other nights. / Chilly breeze and a spectral form—voice complaining that the bones of the being now a ghost had been dug up and thrown away. / There was a story of some bones thought to be of unidentified animal, dug up in cellar of this house. [A; 832.1, 832.2. "The Last New Ghost." New York Times, May 10, 1873, p. 6 c. 5.]


1873 May 13 / [LT], 9-f / Sunspots. [IV; 1212. "Spots on the Sun." London Times, May 13, 1873, p. 9 c. 6.]


1873 May 14 / BA 76-120 /3:05 a.m. / England / Met appeared little eastward of moon, then a little below and disap west of moon. [IV; 1213. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1875-76." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1876, 119-171, at 120-121.]


1873 May 15 / met train / 8:05 p.m. / Harbor Grace, Newfoundland / met and train ½ hour / A.J. Sci 3/6/154. [IV; 1214. "Meteor seen in Newfoundland." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 6 (1873): 154. "A letter from Henry H. Cleft to Prof. Henry, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, dated Harbor Grace, May 23d, 1873, states that on the 15th of May, at 8h 5m P. M., the writer saw a very large and bright meteor in the W.S.W., at an altitude of about 40°, moving rapidly to the westward, and leaving a long trail of yellow light after it. It burst at about 8½h P.M. in the N.W. by W., 10° above the horizon; and the matter from it formed a coppery-red cloud below it of the shape of a comet's tail, which remained half an hour."]


[1873 May 15 /] 1873 May 23 / 8:05 p.m. / Great meteor / Newfoundland / A.J. Sci 3/6/154. [IV; 1220. "Meteor seen in Newfoundland." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 6 (1873): 154. "May 23" was the date of the letter reporting the meteor.]


1873 May 17 / Trombe / Castex (Ariége) / C.R. 76-1498. [IV; 1215. "M. Jubinal appelle l'attention de l'Académie sur une trombe qui s'est produite dans la commune de Castex (Ariége), le 17 mai dernier." Comptes Rendus, 76 (1873): 1498.]


1873 May 21 / [LT], 13-a / q. / Cairo, Ill. [IV; 1216. "The United States." London Times, May 21, 1873, p. 13 c. 1. "A shock of earthquake was felt at Cairo, Illinois, on the 3d of May, but no damage was done."]


1873 May 22 / Tornado / Iowa and Ill / J. Sci 11-339. [IV; 1217. Mackintosh, James. "The Iowa and Illinois Tornado of May 22, 1873." Quarterly Journal of Science, 11 (July 1874): 339-394, (illustrations).]


[1873 May 22. Wrong date. See: 1857 May 24, (IV; 1218).]


[1873 May 22. Wrong date. See: 1857 May 24, (IV; 1219).]


[1873 May 23. Wrong date. See: 1873 May 15, (IV; 1220).]


1873 May 24 / Rel-Ph-J., 1-5 / Home of John Miller, Kirkpatrick St., Syracuse, N.Y.—unearthly noises, and writing on a wall—"John Miller, you must make a better living for your family." [A; 834. "A Haunted House." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 14 (no. 10; May 24, 1873): 1, (c. 5).]


1873 May 27 / Dust storm, Bombay / th storms at other places and a slight shock of q. / 30 / Bombay Gazette, May 30 / I quote from other paper. [IV; 1221. (Bombay Gazette, May 30, 1873.)]


1873 May 27 / N.Y. Times, 4-5 / Vulcan / Ed. [IV; 1222. "Vulcan." New York Times, May 27, 1873, p. 4 c. 5. The editorial gives a brief review of a few observations and supposed orbits of Vulcan.]


1873 May 28 / N.Y. Times, 4-6 / Polt phe in a Bennington, Vt., house. Said a plot to enable tenants to remove without paying arrears of rent and also said to be someone trying to buy the house cheap. [A; 835. "Minor Topics." New York Times, May 28, 1873, p. 4 c. 6.]


1873 May 30 / [LT], 7-d / Kansas Horror. [A; 836. "A Kansas Horror." London Times, May 30, 1873, p. 7 c. 4. The discovery that the Bender family had fled their home led to the discovery of a trap door, the  bloody pit, and several bodies, indicating a series of murders of missing travellers.]


1873 May 31 / N.Y. Times, 6-7—at the Dr Tichnor Place, Salisbury, Conn., tenants newly moved in—rattling and walking sounds and an apparition in white. [A; 837. "Minor Topics." New York Times, May 31, 1873, p. 6 c. 6-7.]


1873 May 31 / Rel-Ph-J., 4-4, 5 / 2 California Polts. [A; 838. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, May 31, 1873): 4, (c. 4+???); not online.)]


1873 June about / Phe began, Cookstown, Ireland. / See Nov. 16, 1874. [A; 839. See: (1874 Nov 16).]


1873 June or July / frogs / Kansas City, Mo. / D-79. ** [IV; 1223.The note copies information from page 79 of The Book of the Damned. "A shower of frogs...." Scientific American, n.s., 29 (July 12, 1873): 17.  "A shower of frogs, which darkened the air and covered the ground for a long distance, is the reported result of a recent rain storm at Kansas City, Mo." "A Shower of Frogs." Missouri Weekly Patriot, (Springfield), June 26, 1873, p. 4 c. 1. "The Kansas City News says nature furnishes something more for our people to 'wonder at,' or speculate upon, this morning by sending down during the heavy rain, a fine shower of frogs or toads. These toads fell by the hundreds, those who saw the shower declaring 'the air was thick with them,' and the ground in the locality between New Delaware and Central, and Tenth and Fourteenth streets, was fairly strewn with the little hoppers for some time after the rain. From the descriptions given of them we would judge that they varied in size from that of a piece of coal to that of a lump of chalk, although some [of] them as large as the end of a man's thumb."]


1873 June 3 / Eruption / isle of Nisyros (Greece?) / C.R., 77-1475. [IV; 1224. Gorceix. "Sur l'éruption boueuse de Nisyros." Comptes Rendus, 77 (1873): 1474-1477. The Nisyros volcano, on a Greek island in the Aegean Sea, was in eruption from June to September 26, 1873.]


1873 June 7 / Rel-Ph. J., 4-3 / H. House / Galveston, Texas. [A; 840. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, June 7, 1873): 4, (c. 3); issue missing at IAPSOP).]


1873 June 15 / afternoon // June 17 / early morning /// Waves like seismic waves at Sydney, N.S.W. / early morn, 17th—meteors reported / Nature 8-547. [IV; 1225. Russell, Henry Chamberlain. "Remarkable Phenomena." Nature, 8 (October 30, 1873): 547.]


1873 (June 17) / (met from Mars / no parallax) / Great detonating met in Hungary, Aystria, and Bohemia. / From two towns of Rybnik and Ratibon, Upper Silesia. Ac to obs collected by Dr Galle, it "first appeared to emerge and separate itself from the disk of the planet Mars." At Rybnik, Sage was at the time looking at Mars when he saw the meteor "apparently issue from it", the planet itself seeming to break up. / Rept B. Assoc 1874-272 / Seemed take ab 15 seconds from Mars to this earth. [IV; 1226.1, 1226.2, 1226.3. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 272-273.]


1873 June 17 / in Rept. 1877/144 / Seems mistakenly called Saturn for Mars. / In Rept 1874, by various writers ac to their knowledge planet Mars or "the red star in the south", where Mars was at the time. [IV; 1227. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 144-145. "A belief that the planet Jupiter had accidentally been mistaken at Rybnik for Saturn (although not participated in by Professor Galle) led Prof. vo Niessl to extend his inquiries for descriptions of the meteor to the eastward, and especially to Southern Hungary...." Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 273. "The observers at Ratibor, not far from Rybnik, were equally positive of the meteor's first appearance 'as if issuing from the red star in the south;' and their average estimate of the time of flight was reckoned to be 15¾ seconds; one observer, however, especially able to judge correctly of the duration, would not admit that the meteor occupied more than ten seconds in its flight."]


1873 June 17 / Fireball / same radiant as June 3, 1883 / See for ref. [IV; 1228. See: (1883 June 3).(Refs???)]


1873 June 17 / early evening / Vienna / met trail ½ hour / Science 1//422. [IV; 1229. Collier, Peter. "Track of meteor." Science, s. 1 v. 1 (May 18, 1883): 422.]


1873 June 20 / Mayon Volc, Philippines / Ref, Feb 1, 1814. [IV; 1232. Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


1873 June / Jhung / Punjab, India / (F). [IV; 1230. Fletcher, 104. This is the Jhung meteorite.]


1873 June 22 / France / 9 p.m. / by Flammarion / spot like vast train of clouds on Mars / La Nat 1/148. [IV; 1231. Flammarion, Camille. "La Planète Mars." La Nature, 1873 (no. 10, August 9): 145-148, and, (no. 11; August 16): 171-174, at 148.]


1873 June 23 / near Wisbech / Sounds heard from 3:15 to 3:45 p.m. Attrib to gunfire at naval review at Spithead, 150 miles away. / Grantham Journal, 28th-4-6. [IV; 1233. "District Items." Grantham Journal, June 28, 1873, p. 4 c. 6.]


1873 June 23 / Spithead vibrations at Tedstone, Delamere / [LT], 25-11-f // other notes on review / 26-14-a / 27-9-f. [IV; 1234. "Spithead Salutes." London Times, June 25, 1873, p. 11 c. 6. Eagles, Charles L. "The Spithead Salutes." London Times, June 26, 1873, p. 14 c. 1. "Spithead Salutes." London Times, June 27, 1873, p. 9 c. 6.]


1873 June 26-27 / "Vulcan" / (3) / N Y State / 6-6-5 NY Times July 6, 1873. [IV; 1235. ("The Planet Vulcan." New York Times, July 6, 1873, p. 6 c. 5.)]


1873 June 26 / Several days before 26th, waterspouts at North Platte, Nebraska / hail—3 to 6 inches circumference / N.Y. Sun, July 2-1-3. [IV; 1236."The Wonders of Nebraska." New York Sun, July 2, 1873, p. 1 c. 3.]


1873 June 26 / Mich, Ohio, Penn / aurora bars of light from south to north / Sc Am 29-49. [IV; 1237. "The Auroral Phenomenon of June 26." Scientific American, n.s., 29 (July 26, 1873): 49.]


1873 June 28 / 3 p.m. / Cloud Co., Kansas / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1238. Finley, 4.]


1873 June 29 / ab 5 a.m. / q's / several parts of Italy / Nature 8-191. [IV; 1239. "Notes." Nature, 8 (July 3, 1873): 191-193, at 191.]


1873 June 29 / Details of the q at Marino (Belluno), Italy / La Sci Pou Tous, 18-227 / The writer wonders whether any relation with storms in Germany, at that time. [IV; 1240. (La Science Pour Tous, 18-227.)]


1873 June 29 / 5 a.m. / q. destructive in the Ampezzo Valley, Italy / N.Y. Times, July 21-2-4. [IV; 1241. "Earthquake in Northern Italy." New York Times, July 21, 1873, p. 2 c. 4.]


1873 June 29 / Cor in Land and Water, July 5, writes that this day, after a heavy thunder shower, he saw a creature like a very attentuated eel on the top of a tall rose tree, ab 3 inches long. [IV; 1242. (Land and Water, July 5, 1873.)]


1873 June 29 / N.Y. Times 30-1-1 / 5 a.m. / Strong shocks / north of Italy / At Feletto, 38 persons killed. [IV; 1243. "Earthquake in Italy." New York Times, June 30, 1873, p. 1 c. 1.]


1873 June 29 / q / Piedmont, etc. / La Nat 1873/98, 116 / and sounds supposed been subterranean / C.R. 77-66. [IV; 1244. "Le Tremblement de Terre de la Saint-Pierre (29 Juin 1873)." La Nature, 1873 (no. 7; July 19): 98-99, and, (no. 8; July 26): 116-118. Fonvielle, W. de. "Quelques détails sur le tremblement de terre du 29 juin." Comptes Rendus, 77 (1873): 66-68.]

 

1873 June 29 / St. John's Day—Festivities of the Voudoo Worshippers in a bayou near New Orleans. [A; 841. (Ref???)]


1873 last of June / Bonham, Texas / Fort Scott, Kansas / objs / See Lo. [A; 842. The note copies information from page 143 of Lo! ("General Notes." New York Times, July 6, 1873, p.1 c.4. "General Notes." New York Times, July 7, 1873, p.1 c.4.) "Singular Phenomenon." Emporia News, (Kansas), June 27, 1873, p. 2 c. 4. (Fort Scott: "Morning Star and Catholic Messenger, August 10, 1873, p. 5 c. 1. Refers to "The Monitor," (Fort Scott???).]


1873 June last—July 17 / Nothing of obj. in San Francisco Ev. Bulletin. [IV; 1246.]


1873 / last June // Obj. / Nothing in Carthage (Ill) Gazette. [IV; 1247.]


1873 / last of June // Obj in sky / Texas / See col under Objs. [IV; 1248. See: (Objs.)]


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

1873 June / q / Italy / See July Index, Times. [IV; 1245. "Earthquakes in Italy." London Times, June 30, 1873, p. 7 c. 2. "The Earthquake in Italy." London Times, July 1, 1873, p. 5 c. 1. "The Earthquake in Italy." London Times, July 4, 1873, p. 5 c. 2. "The Earthquake in Northern Italy." London Times, July 5, 1873, p. 5 c. 2. "The Earthquake in Italy." London Times, July 7, 1873, p. 7 c. 2.]


1873 July / Body of a man, not a tramp, found near Albany, N.Y. / See Times (N.Y.) Index. [A; 845. ("Life of a Tramp." New York Times, June 23, 1872, p. 4 c. 7??? New York Times Index, 1873).]


1873 July 1 / 0.30 a.m. / Alarming shock / Jamaica / Nature 8-294. [IV; 1251. "Notes." Nature, 8 (August 7, 1873): 292-294, at 294.]


[1873 July 3 /] 1873 // summer /// Tadpoles or salamander (?) / Minnesota / M.W.R. 45/223. [IV; 1249. McAtee, Waldo L. "Showers of Organic Matter." Monthly Weather Review, 45 (May 1917): 217-224, at 223. (American Sportsman, October 11, 1873, p. 22.) "A Strange Shower." Alexandria Gazette, (Virginia), July 26, 1873, p. 2 c. 1. "A gentleman from Elk river, in Sherburne couuty, tels of a shower of reptiles which fell upon a meadow on the farm of Edward Upham, near that place, on the morniug of the 3d inst., during a heavy rain aud wind storm. The meadow, he says, was thickly strewn with the bodies of the strange creatures, none of which were discovered alive. They are described as about six inches lone, having gills and fins like fish but having also four legs each, about two inches long and terminated in claws. One person who saw them declared that like creatures exist only in the waters of Mexican lakes, from whence he supposed they might have been caught up in a water-spout and been carried along by the wind until they were dropped on Mr. Upham's farm."]


1873 July 3 / 5 p.m. / Tornado / New Jersey / N.Y. Sun 4-1-6. [IV; 1252. "A Tornado in New Jersey." New York Sun, July 4, 1873, p. 1 c. 6.]


1873 July 3 / N.Y. Sun, 1-4 / Incendiary fires—Hudson, N.Y, for 2 weeks, almost nightly. [A; 843. "Incendiary Fires in Hudson, N.Y." New York Sun, July 3, 1873, p. 1 c. 4.]


1873 July 3, 4, 5 / Storms in Ohio and rains seldom if ever equalled / N.Y. Times 6-1-1. [IV; 1253. "Severe Storms." New York Times, July 6, 1873, p. 1 c. 1.]


1873 July 4 / Storms / tremendous / Eastern and Southern U.S. / NY Times 6-1-1. [IV; 1254. (New York Times, July 6, 1873, p. 1 c. 1.)]


1873 July 6 / Buffalo / 3 alarming shocks in morning / 5, 7, 9:30 o'clock / N.Y. Times 7-1-7. Also Titusville, Pa. / 9-2-6. [IV; 1255. "Earthquake in Buffalo." New York Times, July 7, 1873, p. 1. c. 7. "Sunday's Earthquake." New York Times, July 9, 1873, p. 2 c. 6.]


1873 July 6 / Ref / NY, Penn., Canada / q and sound / Am J. Sci 3-7-384. [IV; 1261. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 4." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 7 (1874): 384-387, at 385.]


1873 July 7 / N.Y. Times, 1-7 / 9-2-6 // q / Buffalo and Titusville. [IV; 1250. "Earthquake in Buffalo." New York Times, July 7, 1873, p. 1. c. 7. "Sunday's Earthquake." New York Times, July 9, 1873, p. 2 c. 6.]


[1873 July 7. Wrong date. See: 1873 Jan. 7, (IV; 1256).]


1873 July 7 / 2:21 a.m. / q. / Vaparaiso / Very few buildings escaped damage. Severe other places in Chile. / Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, 12th. [IV; 1257. (Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, July 12, 1873.)]


1873 July 7 / Hull—England / great met / 1:10 a.m. / train in Ursa Minor / La Nat 1873/142 / (Times 9-12-b). [IV; 1258. "La Météorite d'Hull." La Nature, 1873 (no. 9; August 2): 142. "Meteor." London Times, July 9, 1873, p. 12 c. 2.]


1873 July 8 / Slight q, Halifax / same morning, severe in Chile / R—July 6. [IV; 1262. Refer to: 1873 July 6, (IV; 1261). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 4." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 7 (1874): 384-387, at 385.]


1873 July 10 / Body of well-dressed man found at Hoboken. / Sun 11-1-5 /// [illustration]. [A; 844. "Still Another Mystery." New York Sun, July 11, 1873, p. 1 c. 5.]


[1873 July 11 /] 1873 July 11 or 18 / In the N.Y. Times, of Sunday, July 20-4-7, copied from the Boston Traveller—that "last Friday" (11th or 18th), between 7 and 8 p.m., a shower of pebbles fell on the steamship New York, about 33 miles from Portland, Maine, on the way to Boston. [IV; 1259.  (New York Times, July 20, 1873, p. 4 c. 7.; not here.) (Boston Traveller, July 16, 1873.) "A Shower of Pebbles." Richmond Daily Dispatch, (Virginia), July 22, 1873, p. 3 c. 5. "The steamer New York, Captain Winchester, when eight miles from land, thirty-three miles east of Portland, on her trip from Boston, last Friday night, between 7 and 8 o'clock, was visited by a shower of pebbles that fell like hailstones. The watch on deck, who was trimming his light at the time, supposed that some of the crew were pelting him. The whole of them fell abaft the paddle boxes. In the morning he swept them up, and threw all but one handful overboard, much to the regret of all on board, as some of them were very handsome." "In the opinion of an emiment geologist the stones were taken up by a whirlwind from some fresh-water brook. It will be remembered that the sky presented a very singular appearance that evening. The wind at the time, to use a queer expression, blew from all quarters. The stones saved were all about one size, and present the worn appearance of pebbles on the bottom of a fresh-water brook, and will weigh about half an ouncc each.—Boston Traveller, July 16th."]


1873 July 12 / morning / Shocks / Rome / Nature 8-231. [IV; 1260. "Notes." Nature, 8 (July 17, 1873): 230-232, at 231.]


1873 July 12 / [LT], 11-f / Volc in the Archipelago. [IV; 1268. "Volcanic Eruption in the Archipelago." London Times, July 12, 1873, p. 11 c. 6. The Nisyros volcano. See: 1873 June 3, (IV; 1224).]


1873 July 12-Aug 24 / (It) (?) / Alvito / 106 concussions and phe / See 1805. [IV; 1269. See: (1805).]


1873 July 13 / NY Times, 6-3 / Carpenter's Hotel set on fire 7 times in 2 weeks. / Morrisania /// [illustration]. [A; 846. "Persistent Incendiarism." New York Times, July 13, 1873, p. 6 c. 3.]


1873 (July 14 / July 19 / Aug 8) // La Nat 1873-209 / In Ardèche and as far as Clerment-Ferrand / q. [IV; 1270. Tissandier, Gaston. "Les Tremblements de Terre en France." La Nature, 1873 (no. 14; September 6): 209-210. "Le 14, le 19 juillet et le 8 août, jours des secousses, le télégraphe électrique ne pouvait fonctionner régulièrement."]


1873 / ab. mid July // Field, July 26, p. 105 / evening, Saturday, 8:30. / At Grantham, balloon came down. Great many locusts on it. None been reported in that neighborhood. Some alive and some dead as if from escaping gas. [IV; 1263. (Field, July 26, 1873, p. 105.)]


1873 July, middle / Nothing of a balloon in Grantham Journal. [IV; 1264. (Nil @ BNA.)]


1873 July / No locust in immature state in Britain ever recorded. / Sci Gos, May, 1895, p. 83. [IV; 1265. (Science Gossip, May 1895, p. 83.)]


1873 / middle of July // See balloon / snow / pebbles / shells / July 11, 1892. [IV; 1266. See: (1892 July 11).]


1873 July, middle / cl burst / Cl brst and heavy rains for a week in Shetland Isles / Grantham Journal, July 26. [IV; 1267. (Grantham Journal, July 26, 1873.)]


1873 July 16 / Ext. flash of lightning / Symons 8/106. [IV; 1271. Ley, William Clement. "Extraordinary Flash of Lightning." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 8 (August 1873): 106-107.]


1873 July 16 / morning / Worcester, Mass / q and rumbling / R—July 6. [IV; 1272. Refer to: 1873 July 6, (IV; 1261). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 4." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 7 (1874): 384-387, at 386.]]


1873 July 16 / evening / Explosive sound and shock / Southport, England / Nature 8-253. [IV; 1275. "Notes." Nature, 8 (July 24, 1873): 251-253, at 253.]


1873 July 17 / N.Y. Times, 3-1 / Protracted drought / New England. [IV; 1273. "The Drouth in New England." New York Times, July 17, 1873, p. 3 c. 1-2.]


1873 July 17 / Southport / 10:15 p.m. / Shock followed by three lighter ones / Grantham Journal, 19th / supposed to be a q. [IV; 1274. (Grantham Journal, July 19, 1873.)]


1873 July 19 / Footprints / N.Y. Times, 5-3 / Stones and other objects thrown by a ghost in Essex Co., Va. Also were seen "foot tracks which are of peculiar appearance and of a width entirely disproportionate to the length". / See Aug 29. [A; 847. "General Notes." New York Times, July 19, 1873, p 5 c. 3. "Remarkable Ghost Story." Alexandria Gazette, (Virginia), July 14, 1873, p. 2 c. 5. See: 1873 Aug 29, (A; 852).]


1873 July 26 / N.Y. Times, 8-2 / Another mysterious fire in Morrisania, Westchester Co. [A; 848. "Fire at Morrisania, Westchester County." New York Times, July 26, 1873, p. 8 c. 2.]


1873 Aug / [pres] de Solutré / whirl ext. / La Nat 1888/2/67 / (Ch-20). [IV; 1276. Tissandier, Gaston. "Étude sur les Trombes." La Nature, 1888 pt. 2 (no. 787; June 30): 65-67, at 66-67. A hat was knocked off and loose papers took flight into a whirlwind; but, this whirlwind, (near Solutré-Pouilly), did not disturb the dust nor was it felt from a distance of twenty metres.]


1873 Aug 2 / N.Y. Times, 8-6, copying from the Central City (Colorado) Register, story of a volcanic eruption a few miles from C. City. [IV; 1277. "A Colorado Volcano." New York Times, August 2, 1873, p. 8 c. 6. A prospector told of finding a smoking volcanic crater with "bits of lava"; but, the most recent eruption in Colorado would have been about 2,000 years earlier, and 130 kilometers to the westward of Central City, at the Dotsero volcano.]


1873 Aug 3 / 10:40 p.m. / Vaparaiso / brilliant meteor. / Valparaiso and West Coast Mail of 9th. [IV; 1278. (Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, August 9, 1873.)]


1873 Aug 4 to 8 / Great swarms of luminous objects passing over disk of the moon, by M. Lamey, at Dijon—visible only in telescope / globular / uniform in size / C.R. 79/790. [IV; 1279. "M. le Secrétaire Perpétuel, signale...." Comptes Rendus, 79 (1874): 790. Lamey, Charles. "Du passage des astèroïdes météoriques sur le disque de la Lune." Les Mondes, 32 (1873): 496-507, (illustrations). While Lamey had seen objects pass across the Moon's disc that he thought were birds, on numerous other occasions, he observed what he thought were large meteors or asteroids.]


[1873 Aug. 8. Wrong date. See: 1872 Aug 31, (IV; 1280).]


1873 Aug 8 / Australian beetle captured in London. / Ent. Mo. Mag 10-83. [IV; 1288. (Entomologists Monthly Magazine, 10-83.)]


1873 Aug 10 / N.Y. Times, 6-2 / Mrs. I.A. Powell / divine healer / Olney, Richmond Co., Ill. [A; 849. "Another Spiritualistic Story." New York Times, August 10, 1873, p. 6 c. 2.]


1873 Aug 11 / Stones not in a house / N.Y. Sun, 3-4. copying from the Reading (Pa) Eagle—Mrs Daniel White, her daughter Susan White, and Mary Hartz went to a strip of woodland on farm of Mr White, ab 3/4 miles from Kohl's Mill, in Cumru township, to pick huckleberries. Stones and sticks started flying about. In other visits to this place, other such phe. There were several investigations, but nothing else was learned. Seems that phe confned to one place. Age of the daughter not stated. / Miss Hartz said saw something like an elf. [A; 850.1, 850.2. "A Mystery of the Wood." New York Sun, August 11, 1873, p. 3 c. 4. "The Spirits in the Woods." New York Sun, August 22, 1873, p. 3 c. 3-4. In the later article, a friend of Mary Hartz states, "She says that the objects she saw had human faces, white flowing gowns and wore long hair. They were comparatively small, and very indistinct; so much so that she could not make out who they resembled. Certain was she, however, that they were spirits of human people"; and, Mary Hartz said, "Why , there were so many of them that I really imagined the very air was full of them." Susan White was born in 1848. (Reading Eagle, ca. August 11, 1873; microfilm & newspaper.com.)]


1873 Aug 11 / 2 a.m. / Prolonged "subterranean" rumbling at Valparaiso but no movement of ground. / Val and W. Coast Mail, 16th. [IV; 1281. (Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, August 16, 1873.)]


1873 Aug 12 / [LT], 4-f / Strange Story. [A; 851. Walton, H. Izaak. "A Strange Story." London Times, August 12, 1873, p. 4 c. 6. The failure of a submarine telegraph between Karachi and Gwadar, on July 4, was traced to a whale having entangled the cable with its tail.]


1873 Aug 12 / See 24. / Metite / near Marysville, Cal. / Nature 9-172. [IV; 1290. "Notes." Nature, 9 (January 1, 1874): 170-172, at 172. See: 1873 Aug 24, (IV; 1293).]


1873 Aug 13 / Colorado Springs, Colorado / 9:14 p.m. / and 14th, 3 a.m.-4 a.m. / When sky clear, 58 meteors counted. / N.Y. Times 26-1-2. [IV; 1282. "Meteors." New York Times, August 26, 1873, p. 1 c. 2. The watch for the meteor shower from, 9 P.M. to 11 P.M. on August 13, was limited by a clouded sky from 9 P.M. to 9:40 P.M., (no mention was made about "9:14").]


1873 Aug. 13 / Ab 1:35 a.m., either Venus or Jupiter, ab 10 degrees above horizon. Cor to Land and Water, July 19, saw its light shut off and then ap and disap at intervals. For 10 seconds. Clear and starlight. [IV; 1291. (Land and Water, July 19, 1873.) Jupiter would have disappeared below the horizon about a half hour after sunset, but Venus would have been about ten degrees above the eastern horizon at this time.]


1873 Aug 15 / Splendid meteor / and another, 17th / Valparaiso / Val and W. Coast Mail, 23rd. [IV; 1283. (Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, August 23, 1873.)]


1873 Aug. 15 / Flessingue, Holland / mirage of a town in air / La Nat 1873/206. [IV; 1284. Flessingue, (in Holland), is better known as Vlissingen, (in the Netherlands). "Un Mirage Extraordinaire." La Nature, 1873 (no. 13; August 30): 206. The mirage of the city, reflected in the sky, was accompanied by a hot temperature, flashes of lightning, and distant thunder. "La chaleur, au dire de nombreux témoins, était insupportable; les éclairs brillaient çà et là dans le ciel, et les roulements d'un tonerre lointain se faisaient entendre."]


1873 Aug 17 / 9 a.m. /Sharon, Pa / q / R—July 6. [IV; 1285. Refer to: 1873 July 6, (IV; 1261). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 4." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 7 (1874): 384-387, at 386.]


1873 Aug 21-26 / Small qs / Guatemala / BA '11. [IV; 1292. Milne, 724.]


1873 Aug 24. / See 12th. / Marysville, Cal. / metite weighing 12 lbs / BA 75/236. [IV; 1293. "Notes." Nature, 9 (January 1, 1874): 170-172, at 172. Flight, Walter. "A Chapter in the History of Meteorites." Geological Magazine, n.s., 2 (1875): 16-30, 70-80, 115-123, 152-163, 214-226, 257-267, 311-320, 362-372, 401-412, 497-504, 548-560, 589-608, at 260. "1873, August 24th.—Marysville, California." "All the facts that I have yet been able to gather respecting this fall are that an aerolite, weighing 12lbs., crashed through the tree-tops with a bright flash, and was buried to the unusual depth of eight feet in the ground. When dug out it was so hot that it could not be handled." Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1874-75." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1875, 199-359, at 236. "Curious Meteoric Stone." Marysville Daily Appeal, August 27, 1873, p. 3 c. 2. "J.H. Anderson, whose ranch is about 10 miles from town, brought to this office a very curious specimen of rock which was dug up near his place and is supposed to have fallen from a meteor. It appears that on Sunday night his oldest boy was riding near the edge of the farm about 8 o'clock in the evening, when a flash of light passed over his head, and there was a rattling sound in the trees nearby and a heavy thud in the ground. Next morning they proceeded to the spot and found a place in the ground where the upheaval of fresh dirt showed that some heavy body had fallen. The leaves and branches of a tree near by were singed and splintered, clearly showing the path of some heated object. On digging about eight feet they came upon a stone about twelve pounds in weight, which still retained an intense heat, and the ground was hot around it. Water was poured upon it, and it apparently cooled off and was put in a cart to take to the house when the latent heat was apparently liberated and it set fire to the cart. Placed in a tank of water, it caused it to boil, and did not lose its heat until late in the afternoon. The stone is apparently composed of a mass of heavy metal, which has at one time existed in a fused state. The stone can now be seen in the Appeal office, and will be sent to the Sacramento Academy of Sciences to-morrow." "Full History of the Meteoric Stone." Marysville Daily Appeal, October 5, 1873, p. 3 c. 1. "Several weeks ago, under the pressure of a dearth of items, we wrote an account of the full of an aerolite, or meteoric stone, near Marysville. We did it in a moment of haste, and repented of it the moment we saw it in type. It was a regular out-and-out, flat-footed, abominable lie, without a particle of foundation, and we confess the fact and will endeavor—when we've nothing else to do—to feel sorry for it. We had no idea that a little lie like that would kick up such a thundering commotion all over the country. Nearly every editorial muggins in the State—and there are lots of 'um—copied the item, and attempted a scientific explanation of it, and asked for more light on the subject." "...This is written to inform everybody that we've got no meteoric stones in this office." See: 1873 Aug 12, (IV; 1290).]


1873 Aug 26 / N.Y.T., 1-2 / Met shower / Col. / July 6-6-5. [IV; 1294. "The Planet Vulcan." New York Times, July 6, 1873, p. 6 c. 5. "Meteors." New York Times, August 26, 1873, p. 1 c. 2.]


1873 Aug 27 / Eisenberg, Germany / block of meteoric metal washed from soil by the storm / BA 75-236. [IV; 1286. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1874-75." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1875, 199-359, at 236.]


1873 Aug 27 / Mauna Loa since July 7. This night especially magnificent. Glare seen a hundred miles. / N.Y. Times 20-2-2. [IV; 1295. "Mauna Loa." New York Times, October 20, 1873, p. 2 c. 2.]


1873 Aug 27 / 5:25 p.m. / Brilliant meteor / E to W. / Valparaiso / Val and W. Coast Mail, 30th. [IV; 1296. (Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, August 30, 1873.)]


1873 Aug 29 / Footprints / See a preceding note of Virginia. / N.Y. Times, [Aug 29]-4-5—that in Pennsylvania—not said where—a ghost was appearing. Noiselessly mad footprints in front of and behind persons. Large prints. A Committee was appointed and saw the prints forming around them. / See July 19. [A; 852.1, 852.2. "Summer-Night Ghosts." New York Times, August 29, 1873, p. 4 c. 5-6. See: 1873 July 19, (A; 847).]


1873 Aug 29 / N.Y. Times, 4-6 / In Detroit—ghostly passenger on last trip of a street-car each night. Not seem ghostly. When asked for fare, vanished. [A; 853. "Summer-Night Ghosts." New York Times, August 29, 1873, p. 4 c. 5-6.]


1873 Aug 29 / Nottingham (Highfield-house Observatory) / by E.J. Lowe / ab 6:50 a.m. / q / L.T.—Aug 30-6-f. [IV; 1289. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "An Earthquake." London Times, August 30, 1873, p. 6 c. 6.]


1873 Aug—ab last / Brussels / ab 8 p.m. / From a cloud on horizon into clear sky came a star-like obj. It rose slowly and continued mounting higher and higher till lost to view, after about 10 minutes. / La Nat. 1873/239. [IV; 1287. "La Metèore de Bruxelles." La Nature, 1873 (no. 15; September 13): 239. The object was in view for about two ("deux") minutes, (not ten). "Bolides." Annuaire de l'Observatoire royal de Bruxelles, 41 (1874): 297-298. The date is given here as "le 27 Octobre 1873," (tho it was reported in La Nature, a weekly publication, more than a month earlier).]


1873 Aug-Sept / The annual migrations of butterflies across Panama / E to W. / See preceding years. / Nature 8-536. [IV; 1298. "Notes." Nature, 8 (October 23, 1873): 534-536, at 536.]


1873 Sept / Slow falling hail / near Clermont-Ferrand / "temps tres-calme"—hailstones an inch and a half to 2 inches in diameter. Notwithstanding their size they fell so "mollement" as to do no damage. They seemed in some way under electric influence. Those that struck roofs and rebounded fell faster than those with unbroken fall from the sky. / La Nat 7-298. [IV; 1301.1, 1301.2. Tissandier, Gaston. "Grêlons Extraordinaire." La Nature, 1876 pt. 2 (no. 175; October 7): 296-298, (illustrations).]


1873 Sept 1 / 4:10 p.m. / Drama, Turkey / q. / Nature 9-18. [IV; 1299. "Notes." Nature, 9 (November 6, 1873): 16-18, at 18.]


1873 Sept 1 or 2 / Serial bolide absent. [IV; 1300. See: 1871 Sept. 1, (IV; 499).]


1873 Sept 4 and 5 / At Marlsford, near Wallingford, Thames, black rain / Nature 9/43 / D-32. [IV; 1297. The note copies information from pages 31 and 32 of The Book of the Damned. Highton, E. "Black Rain and Dew Ponds." Nature, 9 (November 20, 1873): 43.]


1873 Sept 6 / 9 p.m. / Shocks / Armenia / Nature 9-18. [IV; 1302. "Notes." Nature, 9 (November 6, 1873): 16-18, at 18.]


1873 Sept 9 / [LT], 12-b / Comets / 13-7-f. [IV; 1303. Hind, John Russell. "Present Comets." London Times, September 9, 1873, p. 12 c. 2-3. "M. Paul Henry's Comet." London Times, September 13, 1873, p. 7 c. 6. Comets C/1873 Q1, C/1873 Q2, and 4P/Faye.]


1873 Sept 10 / [LT], 5-f / Mock sun at Templemore. [IV; 1304. "Parhelion." London Times, September 10, 1873, p. 5 c. 6.]


1873 Sept 14 / 7:20 p.m. / Galizien / met / Zeit Met 8/336. [IV; 1305. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 8 (1873): 331-336, at 336.]


1873 Sept 16 / [LT], 3-b / Wild beasts at Whitby. [A; 854. "Wild Beasts." London Times, September 16, 1873, p. 3 c. 2. At Mander's Menagerie, (a travelling animal show), a tiger had temporaily seized a boy thru the bars of its cage and created a panic.]


1873 Sept 20 / 10:57 p.m. / Paris / meteor / La Sci Pour Tous 18-317. [IV; 1306. (La Science Pour Tous, 18-317.)]


1873 Sept 22 / N.Y. Times, 5-6 / Strange and fatal disease at Kelton, Oregon. Persons attacked died in a few hours. Kind of fever. [A; 855. "By Mail and Telegraph." New York Times, September 22, 1873, p. 5 c. 6.]


1873 Sept 22 / N.Y. Times, 5-2 / At Branford, Conn., 2 daughters aged 5 and 7, of Oliver Bishop, badly bitten by rats. Not discovered till morning. Said they had lain with their heads covered. [A; 856. "Girls Attacked by Rats." New York Times, September 22, 1873, p. 5 c. 2.]


1873 Sept 23 / Met ap ab 15° above horizon—moved slowly upward and swung to 60 deg and meridian to ab 15° above opposite horizon. / Astro Reg. 12/69. [IV; 1307. Yeates, G. "Fine Meteor." Astronomical Register, 12 (March 1874): 69-70.]


1873 Sept. 23 / 4:30 a.m. / 13 miles S of Mooltan, India / Loud det met and train one hour. / BA 74-300. [IV; 1308. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 300-301.]


1873 Sept. 23 / Khairpur, 35 miles east of Bhawalpar, India / (F) / See La Nat 7/350. [IV; 1309. Fletcher, 104. Tissandier, Gaston. "Météorites dans l'Inde." La Nature, 1876 pt. 2 (no. 178; October 28): 350-351. Medlicott, Henry Benedict. "Record of the Khairpur Meteorite of 23rd Sept. 1873." Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 43 pt. 2 (1874): 33-38. This is the Khairpur meteorite.]


1873 Sept. 26 / Santa Barbara, Rio Grand de Sul, Brazil / (F). [IV; 1310. Fletcher, 104. This is the Santa Barabara meteorite.]


1873 Sept 26 / Again (see June 3) eruption / island if Nisyros / C.R. 77-1475. [IV; 1311. Gorceix. "Sur l'éruption boueuse de Nisyros." Comptes Rendus, 77 (1873): 1474-1477. See: 1873 June 3, (IV; 1224). The Nisyros volcano.]


1873 Sept 26 / 1 a.m. / Shock. No damage. / Kingston, Jamaica / N.Y. Times 27-5-3. [IV; 1312. "Earthquake in Jamaica." New York Times, September 27, 1873, p. 5 c. 3.]


1873 Sept 27 / Financial panic / U.S. [A; 857. "Panics Compared." New York Herald, September 27, 1873, p. 8 c. 5-6. The panic may have begun in Europe; but, the bankruptcy of Jay Cooke & Co., (which had trouble selling its railroad bonds), triggered an economic depression in the United States that lasted several years.]


1873 Sept 28 and Oct 22 / q / Liége, Belg / C. et T 8/38. [IV; 1313. Lancaster, Albert Benoît Marie. "Les Tremblements de terre en Belgique." Ciel et Terre, 8 (March 16, 1887): 25-43, at 38-39.]


1873 // about /// great q-region / Aleppo, Syria / (F). [IV; 1314. Fletcher, 104. This is the Aleppo meteorite.]


1873 Sept 30 / morning / Shock / Montreal / N.Y. Times, Oct 7-2-2. [IV; 1315. "Earthquake in Canada." New York Times, October 7, 1873, p. 2 c. 2. The earthquake occurred at Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec, about 60 kilometres east of Montreal.]


1873 Oct / Famine in Bengal, India / See through 1874. [IV; 1316. "Fear of Famine in India." New York Herald, October 31, 1873, p. 6 c. 5. The failure of crops in Bengal, due to a drought, led to a widespread famine.]


1873 Oct. 3 / 7:45 a.m. / Burkeville, Va / q  / R—July 6. [IV; 1317. Refer to: 1873 July 6, (IV; 1261). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 4." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 7 (1874): 384-387, at 386.]


1873 Oct 4 / Religio-Phil Jour, 2-4, copied from Durand, (Wisconsin) Times / Home of Mr Lynch, 14 miles from Menomonie, Wis. Had moved from Indiana, a few years before, and was living with his second wife. Went to town to buy his wife a dress; laid it away—found it in the barn cut into shreds, rolled up with scissors. 4 children. Objects all over house missing. Mrs L bought a new dress. Found it in barn cut down in a good fit for one of the little daughters. Ac to witnesses such sights as an egg rising from a table, moving at high speed, suddenly disap. Teacups leaped across table. Some neighbors thought it was the spirit of the first wife. According to another account, for two years there had been phe. Wife died 3 years before—said that soft objects like soap that been carried around, bore marks of 3 fingers. Boy aged 6 blamed—he could sometimes tell where missing objects were. But phe when he was tied on a chair. Not said as I supposed would that first wife had 3 fingers on one hand. About 5 columns in R-P. J., Nov. 1 / no phe at night / Boy Georgie said to be clairvoyant and could find articles people hid. / Knives, spoons hurled across rooms. Room with people in it—a pitcher full of coffee disappeared. Pitcher found in a bed—coffee somewhere else. Clock stopped and hands bent. Phe going on and visitors flocking. Wagonloads of them coming—house thronged. Writer says Lynch had been accused of trickery to make money, but that he had lost money—six sets of spoons taken from him, and various damages. Another account from a Wisconsin newspaper—Chairs jumping to ceilings. Bullets of wood, zexs, handspikes, etc., hurtling around—And yet nothing said of anybody hurt. Here too that nothing ever done to disturb slumbers at night—all in broad daylight. / And yet nothing said of anybody hurt. Here too that nothing ever done to disturb slumbers at night—all in broad daylight. / Lynches 2 years before had moved from Marshall Co., Indiana. Eldest son 20 years old. He away harvesting. Children at home were David, aged 17 / Mary, aged 10 / George, aged 7 / Rena, aged 2 or 3. Where they had made a home was forest land, Mr L built a log house, which they occupied. They reached here May, 1871. Phe began Dec., 1871. Log house finished in Aug., 1871. Story of more than garment cut. Boy Georgie lamed and tied in chair several times till seen that phe went on with him tied. One day child Rena close to mother, who saw her hair sheared off close to the scalp and disappear. Not a vestige findable. At first the movements were covert. Not till Aug 30, 1873, were objects seen to move. Also outside of house pieces of board and scraps of iron, etc., thrown about. People were arriving so that they were lounging about outside. Loud thumps and a teacup jump from a table. Trick like soft soap into pans of milk, "four or five impressions in the soap, each with three impressions, this in the barrel where trickery soap came from. Another account, from the Milwaukee News, ab Oct 10. Story is of thousands of people who had visited the house, unable to solve the mystery—here that Lynches had come from Fulton Co., Indiana. Large quantities of water thrown on Mrs Lynch and the children. A reporter of the Milwaukee News quoted that one could never see anything start, but the instant eyes turned from it, up it goes. Another peculiarity—things not bounce. Where strike they stay. Said things not move on Sunday. But told that Mrs Lynch's bible had been thrown into a kettle of water. / Religio-Ph., Nov 15—told of an old Christian who went to the house, to try prayer—His bible was snatched away and was found in another room, torn to pieces. [A; 858.1 to 858.16. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, October 4, 1873) 2, (c. 4); issue missing at IAPSOP.) Best, L.C. "The Haunted House in Wisconsin." Religio-Philsophical Journal, 15 (no. 9; November 15, 1873): 2, (c. 4-5).]


1873 Oct 4 / Things here seemed to be attributed to one corner of a room, or gathered there. / See Feb 26, 1883. [A; 859. See: (1883 Feb 26).]  


1873 Oct 4 / N.Y. Times, 8-4 / Ghost, house in Tompkinsville, in Monroe avenue, Staten Island. Had driven out the tenant. See 6-4-4. Was amusing itself knocking on the windows, attracting attention of passersby. [A; 860. "Staten Island." New York Times, October 4, 1873, p. 8 c. 4. "The Poor Staten Islander." New York Times, October 6, 1873, p. 4 c. 4.]


1873 Oct 5 / 2:30 a.m. / Lake Village, N.H. / R—July 6. [IV; 1318. Refer to: 1873 July 6, (IV; 1261). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 4." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 7 (1874): 384-387, at 386.]


1873 Oct 6 / Hurricane / Florida / N.Y. Times 11-1-6. [IV; 1319. "The Cyclone in Florida—Inundation at Punta Rossa." New York Times, October 11, 1873, p. 1 c. 6.]


1873 Oct 7 / q / Germany and Sumatra / B.A. '11 / Sims. / See Feb. 18, 1889. [IV; 1320. Milne, 724. See: (1889 Feb 18).]


1873 Oct. 23 / At Woolwich, toward 1 p.m., an intense obscuration. It was not caused by clouds. / Ciel et Terre 5-173. [IV; 1321. "Quelques exemples de pluies de poussiìères et d'obscurissements du Soleil." Ciel et Terre, 5 (1884-1885): 173-174. "Alarming Darkness." London Morning Post, October 24, 1873, p. 5 c. 4. "Early yesterday afternoon Woolwich experienced a sudden and almost unexampled visitation of darkness. The morning had been wet and gloomy throughout, but at 1 p.m. the sky was overcast with a dark pall which seemed to obscure every vestige of light from above. The darkness was not that of a London fog, for vistas of lighted windows could be seen for a long distance. It more resembled the darkness of midnight, but there was a reddish tint in the sky like that occasioned by a great fire. The atmosphere was very heavy and oppressive, the rain had ceased, and the wind, which had been blowing from the south-east, entirely abated. The effect was dismal in the extreme, and even terrible. Nervous people experienced the most dread forebodings; the more reasonable ones attributed the darkness to an eclipse of the sun, but found no confirmation in the alamanac. Fowls went to roost, pigeons and other birds stopped in their flight to seek the nearest shelter, and every living thing seemed impressed by the gloom. The period of intense darkness lasted about five minutes, when light gradually broke in from the west, and an hour afterwards there was brilliant sunshine."]


1873 Oct. 27 / Op. Gerda / La Nat 1873/174. [IV; 1322. "Observation de l'opposition de la planète Gerda." La Nature, 1873 (no. 11; August 16): 174. Stockwell, John Nelson. "On the correction of the Elements of Gerda." Astronomische Nachrichten, 91 (1877): 65-70. "Was not the planet which was observed for Gerda in 1873, and very near its computed place in the heavens, really a different planet which chanced to be mistaken for Gerda, but had in fact never before been observed?" Stockwell, John Nelson. "Ephemeride des Planeten Gerda (122) für die Opposition 1873." Astronomische Nachrichten, 82 (1873): 81-84. Discrepancies in the orbit of the asteroid (minor planet) Gerda during its opposition in 1873 led Stockwell to recalculate its orbital elements. His conclusion was that the object which had been observed in 1873 was not Gerda, instead being an unknown object with a similar orbit, separated by a distance of about 3,600,000 miles.]


1873 Oct 27 / Tennessee sleeper, Susan Godsey, died. / See Oct 15, 1870. [A; 861. See: 1870 Oct 15, (A; 633).]


1873 Oct. 27 / Susan Caroline Godsey died in her home, Tennessee. Still the story told of her timed awakening. / N.Y. Times, Nov 10-5-5 / Said been taken to St Louis, where the physicians were unanimous in saying that she was an imposter. / See June, 1870. [A; 862. "Death of the Sleeping Woman." New York Times, November 10, 1873, p. 5 c. 5-6. See: 1870 June 25, (A: 620 & 621).]


1873 Nov 1. / Rel-Phil J, p 1, col 5 / More of the Lynch family polt. [A; 863. "Spiritualism and Its Phenomena." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. 7; November 1, 1873): 1, (c. 1-5), & 5, (c. 1-3). See: 1873 Oct 4, (A: 858).]


1873 Nov. 3 / (Det) / 5:30 p.m. / Glascow, etc. / met and det like cannon / BA 73/369 / 362. [IV; 1323. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1872-73." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1873, 349-403, at 362-363, 369, and 380.]


1873 Nov. 3 / 2:30 p.m. / Birmingham / Explosion of a fireworks factory. Only several pounds of powder. Cause unknown. 3 workmen severely burned. / Bristol Daily Post, 4th. [IV; 1324. (Bristol Daily Post, November 4, 1873; not at BNA.) "Explosion at a Fireworks Factory." Bradford Observer, November 4, 1873, p. 3 c. 4.]


1873 Nov. 3 / Det / 9:15 p.m. / Bristol / det met / BA 73-364. [IV; 1325. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1872-73." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1873, 349-403, at 364-365.]


1873 Nov. 4 / bet 11:30 and midnight / Burlington, Vt. / q / R—July 6. [IV; 1326. Refer to: 1873 July 6, (IV; 1261). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 4." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 7 (1874): 384-387, at 387.]


[1873 Nov 6. Wrong date. See: 1873 Nov 26, (IV; 1327).]


1873 Nov. 7 / 6:30 p.m. / Severe shock, Unionville, Nevada. Other shocks followed. / N.Y. Times 8-3-5. [IV; 1328. "Earthquake in Nevada." New York Times, November 8, 1873, p. 3 c. 5.]


1873 Nov 8 / N.Y. Times, 3-5 / q—Nevada / (Dec 19-1-6 / Utah). [IV; 1329. "Earthquake in Nevada." New York Times, November 8, 1873, p. 3 c. 5. "Earthquake in Utah—Polygamists Denied Citizenship." New York Times, December 19, 1873, p. 1 c. 6.]


1873 Nov 8 / [LT], 12-d / 12-5-f / Spectral Banquet. [A; 864. "The Cologne Gazette prints the following curious story...." Pall Mall Gazette, November 7, 1873, p. 5 c. 1. "A Spectral Banquet." London Times, Novmber 8, 1873, p. 12 c. 4. Mudford, William Heseltine. "A Spectral Banquet." London Times, November 12, 1873, p. 5 c. 6. William Heseltine Mudford, (editor of the London Standard), wonders if the story of an annual dinner party celebrated over a period of decades, until only one of its members survives to dine alone, (which was a short story written by his father), was a "curious coincidence." Mudford, William. "First and Last." Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, 25 (February, 1829): 223-227.]


1873 Nov. 13 / 9:18 p.m. / York / met streak / 12:30, Bristol, streak ¾ hour // BA 73-370. [IV; 1330. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1872-73." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1873, 349-403, at 370-371.]


1873 Nov. 22 / Shock at Klamath, etc. / Holden's Catalog. [IV; 1331. Holden, Edward Singleton. List of Recorded Earthquakes in California, Lower California, Oregon and Washington Territory. Sacramento: State Office, J.D. Young, Supt. of State Printing, 1887, 63.]


1873 Nov. 22 / 9 p.m. / Severe shocks / California and Oregon / NY Times 24-1-6. Dec 8-2-5 / details. [IV; 1332. "Earthquake in California and Oregon." New York Times, November 24, 1873, p. 1 c. 6. (New York Times, December 8, 1873, p. 2 c. 5.)]


[1873 Nov 26 /] 1873 Nov 6 / (Fr) / Bas. Pyrn. / Bagneres / Pau / Bayonne / series of q's preceded by auroral light / See 1805. / This is 26th. [IV; 1327. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146). (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448.)]


1873 Nov 26-29 / q-phe / Many shocks, beginning 4:33 a.m. At the moment of the first shock, there was a reddish light in the atmosphere. / Les Mondes 32/649 / Pyrenées Centrales. [IV; 1333. "Tremblement de terre des Pyrénées centrales." Les Mondes, 32 (1873): 645-649, at 649.]  


1873 Nov. 26 / 11 p.m. / Prevesa, Turkey / violent shock / Nature 9-152. [IV; 1334. "Notes." Nature, 9 (December 25, 1873): 151-152, at 152. Preveza, in "European Turkey," is now in Greece.]


1873 Nov. 27 / q. / Barcelona / N.M. / C.R. 77-1486 / Elec. phe? [IV; 1335. "M. J. Leconte adresses une Note relative au tremblement de terre...." Comptes Rendus, 77 (1873): 1486.]


1873 Dec / Drought / Cuba / N.Y. Times 26-5-2. [IV; 1336."Extracts from Havana Papers.," New York Times, December 26, 1873, p. 5 c. 2.]


1873 Dec / Alleged phe in Peoria began. / See Feb 28, 1874. [A; 865. See: 1874 Feb. 28, (A; 906).]


1873 Dec 1 / 10:25 a.m. / Violent shock, Sofia, Turkey / Nature 9-249. [IV; 1337. "Notes." Nature, 9 (January 26, 1874): 248-250, at 249. Sofia, in "European Turkey," is now in Bulgaria.]


1873 Dec 6 / Ab. 1 a.m., column of light that looked auroral shot out of a mine near Viriginia City, Nevada. / N.Y. Times 20-9-5 / fluttered like aurora. [IV; 1338. "Another Nevada Phenomenon." New York Times, December 20, 1873, p. 9 c. 5.]


1873 Dec 8 / Story in Bristol Daily Post, Dec 10, is substantially the same. / Cumpston's story—"They went to bed about twelve o'clock, and about one were annoyed by a disagreeable odor. He could not explain it. They were both frightened. The bed was a peculiar one. It opened and did all sorts of strange things, and the floor opened, and they heard voices, and then they jumped out the window. "Mrs Cumpston was asked to give her version of the affair. She said they were both very much frightened about one o'clock in the morning by what they heard, but the landlady came and reassured them for a time and they went back to bed. About three or four o'clock they heard worse noises but had no idea what they were. The floor seemed to be giving away and the bed also seemed to open. They heard voices and they said was repeated after them. Her husband wished her to get out of the way. The floor certainly seemed to open, and her husband fell down some distance, and she tried to get him up. She asked him to discharge his pistol to frighten anybody who might be near, and he fired his revolver into the ceiling. They got out of the window, but she did not know how, being so frightened, and when they got to the ground she asked him to fire another shot, which he did. She certainly heard the repetition of their voices. Someone spoke every time they did." The landlady's testimony was that ab. one o'clock she had been awakened by a great noise in the Cumpston's room. She had gone there and found the Cumpstons in a very excited state but had quieted them. No details of "great noise". And then the excitement about 4 o'clock. "From inquiries we have made of the police, who examined the room at the Victoria hotel occupied by the parties, there seems to be nothing to warrant such conduct on their part. There is little doubt that the whole was an hallucination." [A; 866.1 to 866.9. "Extraordinary Occurrence at a Bristol Hotel." Bristol Daily Post, December 10, 1873, p. 3 c. 2.]


1873 Dec 8 / Leeds Weekly News, Dec 18, 1873—simply the story told of "Mr and Mrs Cumpston, of Virginia-road, Leeds. [A; 867. (Leeds Weekly News, December 18, 1873; not at BNA.)]


1873 Dec 8 / Hallucination / See March 6, 1888. [A; 868. See (1888 March 6).]


1873 Dec 9 // Leeds Weekly News 13-3-5 / "An extraordinary scene occurred at Tynmouth on Tuesday night (9th), by two children bringing a report into the village that they had seen a man take a child into his arms and stab it to death. Nearly the whole village turned out to verify the story. Superintendent Stewart and the police were sent for from North Shields. A most diligent search was made by the detectives until a late hour, but nothing could be made of the account, though the children adhere to it. There is no blood nor anything of the kind near the spot where they state the alleged murder was committed. [A; 869.1, 869.2, 869.3. (Leeds Weekly News, December 13, 1873, p. 3 c. 5; not at BNA.)]


1873 Dec 10-11 / In Germany, Geminids rather above the average / Nature 9-143. [IV; 1339. Clark, J. Edmund. "Meteor Shower." Nature, 9 (December 25, 1873): 143.]


1873 Dec 11 / Heavy falls of rain in Bengal gave promise of relief of threatened famine. / N.Y. Times 13-1-7. [IV; 1340. "India." New York Times, December 13, 1873, p. 1 c. 7.]


1873 Dec 13 / Rel-P. J., 8-1 / Sounds and ghosts for more than 4 years in a house in Township of Deerfield, Portage Co., Ohio, [A; 870. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. 13; December 13, 1873): 8, (c. 1); issue missing @ IASIOP.)]


1873 Dec. 18 / Heavy shock at sunrise in Bear Lake Valley, Utah / N.Y. Times 19-1-6. [IV; 1341. "Earthquake in Utah—Polygamists Denied Citizenship." New York Times, December 19, 1873, p. 1 c. 6.]


1873 Dec 20-27 / Spot of unusual magnitude on sun reported by Prof. Langley / Trib, Jan 1-8-2, 1874. [IV; 1342. "Sun Spots." New York Tribune, January 1, 1874, p. 8 c. 2.]


1873 Dec 21 / night 21 / Man and his sister in New York killed—"hemorrhage from incised wounds in the neck" verdict at Inquest. / Herald, Jan 16-8-2 / 15-5-5 / See Jan 5, 1874. [A; 871. (New York Herald, January 16, 1874, p. 8 c. 2; not online.) "The Ryan Mystery." New York Herald, January 15, 1874, p. 5 c. 5. See: 1874 Jan 5, (A; 872).]


1873 Dec 23 / NY Times, 4-3 / Haunted house in Chili, near Rochester, N.Y., occupied by Mrs. Gascoigne. [A; 875. "A Nut for Spiritualists." New York Times, December 23, 1873, p. 4 c. 3-4.]


1873 Dec. 23 / Chile / See Dec 16, 1876. [A; 876. See: (1876 Dec 16).]


1873 Dec 24 / ab. 8 p.m. / Washington, D.C. / various points in Va / meteoric explosion and shocks like q's / NY Times, Jan 5-2-6. [IV; 1343. "A Remarkable Meteor." New York Times, January 5, 1874, p. 2 c. 6.]


1873 Dec 24 / 7:40 p.m. / Penn, Maryland, D.C. / Det. met. / Sc Am 30-82 / Va and N. Car. / M.W.R. '07-447 / BA 79-79. [IV; 1344. "Recent Meteors." Scientific American, n.s., 30 (February 7, 1874): 82. Peck, Henry A. "The Christmas Meteor of 1873 at Washington, D.C." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (October 1907): 447-448. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report of Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1878-79." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1879, 76-131, at 79-81.]


1873 Dec 24 / 7:39 p.m. / Meteor exploded over Washington, shaking doors, windows, and the earth. / BA '79/79 / Seems ended Fairfax Co., Va. [IV; 1345. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report of Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1878-79." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1879, 76-131, at 79-81.]


1873 Dec 24 / about 7:40 p.m. / Remarkable meteor at Washington. / N.Y. Times, 1874, Jan 5-2-6 / Loud explosion and intense light from south of east about NW by W. Plaster thrown down by detonation in one old building. / Times given as ab. 7 p.m. at Alexandira, Va. Also ab. 7 at Fairfax Courthouse, Va. and other places. These places the detonation had effects like shock of earthquake. Reports from Pa. placed shocks and sights of great meteor about 8 p.m. [IV; 1346.1, 1346.2, 1346.3. "A Remarkable Meteor." New York Times, January 5, 1874, p. 2 c. 6.]


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

1873 Dec 27 / R-P. J, 2-4 / Lights appearing in home of Mr Courtney, of Oshkosh. 2 weeks before, his wife had died. [A; 877. "The Spook of Oshkosh." Religio-Philosophical Journal, (no. 15; December 27, 1873): 2, (c. 4-5). "Spooks in Oshkosh." Chicago Tribune, November 25, 1873, p. 5 c. 4.]. [A; 877. "The Spook of Oshkosh." Religio-Philosophical Journal, (no. 15; December 27, 1873): 2, (c. 4-5).  "Spooks in Oshkosh." Chicago Tribune, November 25, 1873, p. 5 c. 4.]

 
Copyright 2015. All rights reserved.
Back to content | Back to main menu