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Last updated: July 15, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1893a

(January to June)


1893:


1893 / Glb Dem / Jan-Ap. [C; 89.]


1893 / Eagle Index / “Edwards.” [C; 90. (Brooklyn Eagle Index, 1893.)]


1893 / Have Picayune / year. [C; 91.]


1893 / To / Sun stops. [C; 92.]


1893 / St. L. Glb-Dem for the year. [VII; 812.]


1893 / 94-95 / from Bellport, L.I. / Phe? / See Feb 17, 1896. [C; 93. See: 1896 Feb 17, (C; 293).]


1893 / Ciel et Terre, Dec 1, 1901 / That a stone said to have fallen in a great storm in the Congo State but it was composed of shale and was incontestably of terrestrial origin. [VII; 813. "Un Prétendu Aérolithe au Congo." Ciel et Terre, 22 (1901-1902): 479.]


1893 / Ciel et Terre 17-42—that at Bourges, 19 marching soldiers all at once struck by an unknown force—some were killed and others made insensible—at inquest it was testified that had been no storm and that nothing had been heard. [VII; 814. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v. 17 pp. 41-42. See: 1892 May 4, (B; 1302).]


1893 Jan / Lum obj. / living in a vacant house / Burrsville, N.J. / See Lum Obj. [C; 94. See: (Lum Obj.).]


1893 Jan / to spring / Lum obj / Burrsville, N.J. / See Lum Objs. [C; 95. See: "Owl" / (O) / 1893 / Jan, (SF-IV; 21).]


1893 Jan 2 / 7:20 p.m. / q / Glen Garry / Geol Mag 1900-107. [VII; 815. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, n.s., decade 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107 & 109.]


1893 Jan 3 / [LT], 10-d / waterspout at sea. [VII; 816. “A Waterspout at Sea.” London Times, January 3, 1893, p. 10 c. 4.]


1893 Jan 3 (and 4, 5, 6) / 3rd—2:15 a.m., 2:17 / Shocks / Chepstow / Nature 47-247 / Nat—p. 270—on 4th—11 a.m. / 5th—bet 2 and 3 p.m. / 6th—a little earlier. [VII; 817. Lowe, Edward Joseph. “Earthquake Shocks.” Nature, 47 (January 12, 1893): 247. Lowe, Edward Joseph. “Earthquake Shocks.” Nature, 47 (January 12, 1893): 247.]


1893 Jan 4 / (q and polt) / 11 a.m. / Illon Court, Chepstow / A heavy plant-stage in a greenhouse seen to move 4 times. Attrib to an earthquake. / Geol Mag 1900-173. [VII; 818. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, n.s., decade 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 173.]


1893 Jan 5 / early morn / and 6—early morn / Near Llanthony Monastery—rumbling sound heard on the Black Mountain. / Geolo Mag 1900-173. [VII; 819. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, n.s., decade 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 173.]


1893 Jan 6 / Luminous phe / Lyons / C.R. 116-142. [VII; 820. Gonnessiat. "Phénomènes lumineux observés à Lyon (observatoire) dans la soirée du 6 janvier 1893." Comptes Rendus, 116 (1893): 142-143.]


1893 Jan 6 / 6:15-8:43 p.m. / At Lyons. White light, form of an arc, Lyra, tail of Dragon and tail of G. Bear. / L'Astro 12-278. [VII; 821. “Phénomènes lumineux.” Astronomie, 12 (1893): 278.]


1893 Jan 6 / 6 p.m., Lyons / White light in arch on W.N.W. horizon in Lyra, head of the Dragon and tail of Great Bear. All details lost in moonlight at 8:40 p.m. / C.R. 116-142. [VII; 822. Gonnessiat. "Phénomènes lumineux observés à Lyon (observatoire) dans la soirée du 6 janvier 1893." Comptes Rendus, 116 (1893): 142-143.]


1893 Jan 7 / B. Eagle 8-2-2—at Toledo, Ohio, young man, Clay G. Hopper, aged 18, pronounced dead on Dec 30th. Funeral services on Jan 3, but burial deferred because of the life-like look of the body. Body limp, ears and lips pink instead of blue. Not the slightest sign of decomposition. / Eagle-12-12-4 / Said young man showed symptoms of a trance—pulse could be felt and his eyes opened and closed. [C; 96.1, 96.2. “Looks Like Suspended Animation.” Brooklyn Eagle, January 8, 1893, p. 2 c. 2. “Strange Case of Suspended Animation.” Brooklyn Eagle, January 12, 1893. p. 12 c. 4. “The Death of Clay Hopper.” Watertown Republican, (Wisconsin), January 25, 1893, p. 7 c. 3. Decomposition was finally noticed, where electricity had been applied in tests for signs of life, and then spread, (about two weeks after being “pronounced dead” on December 29); and, his death was finally admitted after a long “trance,” (during which there was the detection of a breath by a mirror, a heart fluttering, weak pulse and blood circulation, and occasional movements.]


1893 Jan 11 / 6 p.m. / Jeffersonville, Ind / severe shock / Trib 13-1-5. [VII; 823. "Earthquake Shock In Indiana." New York Tribune, January 13, 1893, p. 1 c. 5.]


1893 Jan. 12 / See back Dec 12. / Mars “Scintillating strongly”—Jupiter not. Attrib perhaps to dif subtended angles—but then for 3 hours, Mars a steady light—but then again. / (1893) / E. Mec., 56/497. [VII; 824. Godden, William. "Seeing: Real and Imaginary...." English Mechanic, 56 (no. 1452; January 20, 1893): 497. See: 1892 Dec 13, (VII; 797).]


1893 Jan 12 / Ansonia, Conn / Astronomer exposed a photographic plate from 7:19 tp 7:52 to star in Andromeda and in developing it found trail of an “immense meteor”. / Trib 15-1-3. [VII; 825. "Photographed a Meteor." New York Tribune, January 15, 1893, p. 1 c. 3.]


1893 Jan 13 / 7:30 / John E Lewis, photographing Holmes Comet, was startled by a bright light. Upon developing the plate, the trail of a large meteor was seen across the center of Andromeda. / Sci Amer 68-58. [VII; 826. “Meteoric Photography.” Scientific American, n.s., 68 (January 28, 1893): 58.]


1893 Jan 14 / ab. 8 a.m. / Several shocks at Naina Tal. / Pioneer Mail (Allahabad) Jan 19 / At Lahorem 10:30 a.m., and Dehra Dun., / P. Mail, 26th. [VII; 827. (Pioneer Mail, January 19, 1893.) (Pioneer Mail, January 26, 1893.)]


1893 Jan 16 / Holmes Comet small, bright and circular and a well-marked nucleus, whereas at first it was large and hazy. / N.Y. Trib 18-2-1. [VII; 828. "Another Change in the Holmes Comet." New York Tribune, January 18, 1893, p. 2 c. 1.]


1893 Jan 16 / Small, bright, and star-like, as described by Prof. Barnard—Holmes Comet, having changed suddenly from a faint, hazy patch. / N.Y. Trib 21-3-1. [VII; 829. "Phenomena of the Holmes Comet." New York Tribune, January 21, 1893, p. 3 c. 1.]


1893 Jan 17 / (+) / (It) Sounds / q / Said that at Noto, atmospheric sounds were noted. / See 1816. [VII; 830. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 43. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1893 Jan 20 / Friday evening before—Ghost in St. Michel's Church, Coventry / Med and Dayb., 27th. [C; 97. (Medium and Daybreak, January 27, 1893.)]


1893 Jan 21 / Large meteor at West Falls, N.Y. Thought to have struck the earth nearby. / Pub. Ledger, 27th. [VII; 831. (Philadelphia Public Ledger. January 27, 1893.)]


1893 Jan 30-Feb 4 / Heavy rains at Crohamhurst, Queensland.—Met Mag 62-292 / Jan 30—2.368 / Jan 31—10.775 / Feb 1—20.056 / Feb 2—35.714 / Feb 3—10.76 / Feb 4—1.690 / Other records. A mistake to say this was at Beerwah. / Recorded by meteorologist, Mr. Inigo Jones. [VII; 832.1, 832.2. "Abnormal Rainfalls." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 62 (January 1928): 292. These rainfalls, (measured in inches), were from a valley basin on the windward path of tropical storms.]


1893 Jan 31 / Violent q., Zante, at daybreak. / L.T., Feb. 1. / 2 a.m., Feb 1, another severe—others. Naptha springs believed be the center—cloud of smoke from (8-5-c). Weather unusually cold. / 21-13-c—q's, loud peals of thunder, lightning, torrents of rain and hail. / qs repeated, Feb 3, 7, 11. / L.T., Ap. 18-9-d / See Ap 17. [VII; 833.1, 833.2. “Earthquake in Zante.” London Times, February 1, 1893, p. 5 c. 2. “The Earthquakes in Zante.” London Times, February 8, 1893, p. 5 c. 3. “The Earthquake in Zante.” London Times, February 21, 1892, p. 13 c. 3. “Yesterday morning another earthquake....” London Times, April 18, 1893, p. 9 c. 5-6. See: (April 17).]


1893 Jan 31 / Dust at sea / 15 N / 17 W / Nautical Magazine 67-498. [VII; 834. (Nautical Magazine, 67-498.)]


1893 Jan 31 / At Daybreak, Zante q's begin, to April, etc. / Nature 47/394. [VII; 835. “The Earthquakes in Zante.” Nature, 47 (February 23, 1893): 394-395. See: (Zante, April & May).]


1893 (Feb) / BO / Naronic / Left Liverpool, Feb 11, 1893. / There was rough weather. / Freight steamer. / A British steamship Capt reported having seen 2 lifeboats of the Naronic, March 4, floating upside down. Ab. 75 men aboard. / Life-belts for all. / Amer steamship, President, which sailed for England, in 1841, and never again heard of—City of Boston, sailed from American port, Feb., 1870. / Eerin, of the National line, for Queenstown, Dec. 28, 1889. [C; 98.1, 98.2, 98.3. (Refs.???)]


1893 Feb / Disap of the Naronic / Ac to D. Pic., Aug 13, the report of the London Board of Trade on the loss of the N. had appeared. Considered highly improbable she had struck an iceberg, and nothing to support idea of spon comb of cargo, and almost perfect in construction and equipment. [C; 99. “An Unexplained Mystery.” New Orleans Picayune, August 13, 1893, p. 4 c. 4.]


1893 Feb. 1 / Time of q's in Greece, tide ebbed so low at Venice as to leave some canals without water. / LT 6-5-d. [VII; 836. “Low Tide in Venice.” London Times, February 6, 1893, p. 5 c. 4.]


1893 Feb / q / Turkey / III / BA '11. [VII; 837. A class III earthquake. Milne, 737.]


1893 Feb / Began eruption of Calbuco, in Chile, which had not ceased in Dec. / Pop. Sci Mo 45-138. [VII; 838. “Analysis of Volcanic Ashes.” Popular Science Monthly, 45 (May 1894): 138-139. The Calbuco volcano.]


1893 Feb / “Afterglows in Spain / Nature 47-582 / 48-29. [VII; 845. Backhouse, Thomas William. “The Afterglows and Bishop's Ring.” Nature, 47 (April 20, 1893): 582. Arcimis, Augusto. “Afterglows in Spain.” Nature, 48 (May 11, 1893): 29.]


1893 Feb 1 / [LT], 5-b / q / great/ Zante / LT Index / See April index. [VII; 843. “Earthquake in Zante.” London Times, February 1, 1893, p. 5 c. 2. “The Earthquake in Zante.” London Times, April 12, 1893, p. 4 c. 2. “Another Earthquake in Zante.” London Times, April 18, 1893, p. 5 c. 1. “Yesterday morning another earthquake....” London Times, April 18, 1893, p. 9 c. 5-6. “The Earthquake in Zante.” London Times, April 19, 1893, p. 5 c. 3. “The Earthquakes in Zante.” London Times, April 20, 1893, p. 5 c. 2-3. “The Earthquake in Zante.” London Times, April 22, 1893, p. 7 c. 2. “The Earthquake in Zante.” London Times, April 24, 1893, p. 8 c. 1. See: 1893 Ap. 17, (VII: 895 & 896).]


1893 Feb 1 —10.775 inches / Feb 2—20.056 inches / Feb 3—35.714 inches / Feb 4—10.760 inches / (Nature 48-3) / At Crohamhurst, S.E. Queensland, ac to C.L. Wragge, Govt. Meteorologist of Queensland. [VII; 839. Wragge, Clement Lindley. “A Remarkable Rainfall.” Nature, 48 (May 4, 1893): 3.]


1893 Feb 1 / Floods in Queensland. At Yandina, 9.47 inches. At Landsborough, 7.20 inches. / (Brisbane Courier of 2nd) / Courier of 3rd / at Yeppoon—20 inches. All this over a great region—the rise of the rivers of Queensland was beyond precedent. [VII; 840. “Floods in Southern Queensland.” Brisbane Courier, February 2, 1893, p. 6 c. 1-2. “Floods in Southern Queensland.” Brisbane Courier, February 3, 1893, p. 5 c. 5-7.]


1893 Feb. 3 / Another disastrous q., Zante. Followed by terrific th. storm and fall of hail. / Nature 47-348. [VII; 841. “Notes.” Nature, 47 (February 9, 1893): 347-351, at 348.]


1893 Feb 3  Crohamhurst, s.e. Queensland / rain 35.714 inches / See June 14, 1876. / Amer Met Jour 10-194. [VII; 842. "A Remarkable Rainfall." American Meteorological Journal, 10 (1893-1894): 194. See: 1876 June 14, (IV; 1857).]


1893 Feb 11 / Sea / Naronic / Disap never explained. 2 lifeboats found. [C; 100. (Refs.???)]


1893 Feb 12 / —q., New Zealand / 13—q., Baluchistan, at Quetta / BA '11. [VII; 844. A class I earthquake and a class II earthquake. Milne, 737.]


1893 Feb. 13 / Nothing in N.Y. Herald. [VII; 846.]


1893 Feb 13, 14 / March 2, 3, 7 / June 20-29 / July-Dec / q's / Charleston / BSA 4/152. [VII; 847. Taber, Stephen. "Seismic Activity in the Atlantic Coastal Plain near Charleston, South Carolina." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 4 (1914): 108-160, at 153-155.]


1893 Feb. 13 / Pricetown, Ohio / (F). [VII; 848. Fletcher, 106. This is the Pricetown meteorite.]


1893 Feb 14 / Rel-Phil Jour, Feb. 25, p. 637 / Excitement in Newport, R.I. Home of Mr and Mrs M.J. Malloy, 17 Marsh Street. An invalid child—lower limbs paralyzed. A face appeared on the pillow next to one on which the child lay. A male face, in a nunn's head-dress. [C; 101. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, February 25, 1893, p. 637; not online.)]


1893 Feb 15-27 / Large spot e. limb of sun on 15th / Pop Astro 1-382. [VII; 849. “Naked-Eye Sunspots.” Popular Astronomy, 1 (no. 8; April 1894): 382-383.]


1893 Feb 19 / bet 10 and 11 p.m. / N.Y. City / Flash of lightning in sky—an “astonishing glare” followed by a violent wind and sudden drop in temperature. / Trib 21-6-4. [VII; 850. "One of the strangest phenomena...." New York Tribune, February 21, 1893, p. 6 c. 4. "One of the strangest phenomena of an amazing winter was an exceedingly vivid flash of lightning on Sunday night between 10 and 11 o'clock. It illuminated the whole sky, and was a most remarkable electrical effect for midwinter. lt was followed immediately by a violent wind and a rapid fall of the temperature. Fewer changes o weather during this winter of vicissitude have een sharper or more sudden thatn that which accompanied this astonishing glare of February lightning."]


1893 Feb. 22-24 / BO / Nothing in Egyptian Gazette / (p. 48). [VII; 851. (p. 48???) (Fort also found nothing in the Egyptian Gazette with regard to the 1901 dust showers in Lo!, (part 3 chapter 4).)]


1893 Feb 22 / Larvae / Russia / Oct 17, 1827. [VII; 852. See: 1827 Oct 17, (I; 1350).]


1893 Feb 22 / Living caterpillars in snow / Salins. (Jura) / E Mec (Eng Loc) 57/56. [VII; 853. “Scientific News.” English Mechanic, 57 (no. 1459; March 10, 1893): 55-56, at 56. “The story received from Salins, in the Department of the Jura, about the shower of living caterpillars requires corroboration. It is stated that after a snowstorm on Feb. 22 the ground was 'literally covered' with living caterpillars, which are supposed to have been carried by the wind from the Canary Islands, or the Azores, or Cape de Verde.” Salins-les-Bains, France.]


1893 Feb. 22 / La Nat. Sup., March 17 / near village of Pont-d'Hery, (Salins) Switzerland / Innumerable larvae of different species—also some “mouches” fell in snow, “qu'elles noircissaient”. / alive / Writer argues must have come from some southern region where existed leaves on trees for them to live upon. Thinks came from Azores or other African islands. [VIII; 854.1, 854.2. “Neige chargée de chenilles.” La Nature, 1893 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1033, supplement; March 18): 64. “Un de nos lecteurs nous envoie la Note suivante publiée dans le Salinois, journal de l'arrondissement de Poligny (Jura): 'Un phénomène sans précédent, croyons-nous, dans nos régions, vient de se produire sur une partie du territoire du canton de Salins, dont le village de Pont-d'Héry paraît avoir été le centre. Mercredi 22 février, au moment où une bourrasque de neige soufflait avec violence, une quantité innombrable de chenilles vivantes de diverses formes et de familles différentes, auxquelles se trouvaient mêlées quelques mouches, tombèrent en même temps que la neige 'qu'elles noircissaient', nous dit un témoin oculaire. D'où proviennent ces chenilles? Et comment expliquer ce phénomène? Tout d'abord, ces chenilles vivantes proviennent nécessairement, —la direction du vent (sud-ouest) qui les a transportées l'indique, d'ailleurs, —d'une région où il existe actuellement des feuilles aux arbres. C'est donc probablement des Açores, de Madère, des Canaries ou des iles du Cap-Vert, que la bourrasque dont nous venons de parler, trombe ou cyclone là-bas, aura emporté ces chenilles, peut-être encore enveloppées dans leurs bourses, et les a tenues en suspension jusqu'au moment où le refroidissement des vapeurs de l'atmosphère, à l'approche de nos montagnes, en a amené la condensation en neige.” Pont-d'Hery (Jura) is approximately 7 km. south of Salis-les-Bains (Jura), France, (not in Switzerland).]


1893 Feb. 22 / B / No whirlwind of this date, mentioned in An. Soc Met de France, 1893. [VII; 855.]


1893 Feb 23 / 7:30 p.m. / Unga Island, Alaska / triangular light slanting toward / said a little below Jupiter / M.W.R. 1894-128. [VII; 856. “Notes by the Editor.” Monthly Weather Review, 22 (no. 3; March 1894): 126-128, at 128.]


1893 Feb. 24 / See April. / The Galignani Messenger of / Fresh shocks at Zante. [VII; 857. "International Items." Galignani's Messenger, February 24, 1893, p. 1 c. 5. See: (April).]


1893 Feb 24-25 / S / “Caroline” / Lights / 157 / D-284. [C; 102. The note copies information from page 284 of The Book of the Damned. Norcock, Charles James. "An Atmospheric Phenomenon in the North China Sea." Nature, 48 (May 25, 1893): 76-77. The H.M.S. Caroline was a Royal Navy corvette on patrol for the China Station.]


1893 March / Ghost in 27 St. George's Road, Kilburn / Med and Dayb., Ap. 14, p. 227. [C; 103. (Medium and Daybreak, April 14, 1893, p. 227.)]


1893 March / Chalk Farm phe started. / See June. [C; 104. See: 1893 June, (C; 127).]


1893 March / Missing fishing boats. America. / L.T., 1879, March 14-5-e / 27-10-a. [C; 105. “The United States.” London Times, March 14, 1893, p.  5 c. 5. “The United States.” London Times, March 27, 1893, p. 10 c. 1.]


[1893 March 1. Wrong date. See: 1895 March 1, (VII; 858).]


1893 March 2, 3, 7 / q's / Charleston / Bull S. S Amer 4/152. [VII; 859. Taber, Stephen. "Seismic Activity in the Atlantic Coastal Plain near Charleston, South Carolina." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 4 (1914): 108-160, at 153.]


1893 March 4 / Chic. Citizen of / Remarkable revival at Oakland, Ill. Many persons in trances every night. [C; 106. (Chicago Citizen, March 4, 1893.)]


1893 March 6 / Worst hurricane ever known in New Caledonia / NY Herald 21-11-2. [VII; 860. (New York Herald, March 21, 1893, p. 11 c. 2.)]


1893 Mar. 7 / Callaway, Nebraska / pink snow—attributed to soil / Am. Met Jour 10-146 /  (See Feb 13.) / See March 16, 1895, and (another). [VII; 861. "Pink Snow in Nebraska." American Meteorological Journal, 10 (July 1893): 146. See: (Feb 13), 1895 March 16, (VII; 1251); and, 1895 Ap., (VII; 1259).]


1893 March 7 / Jour. B.A.A., quoting L'Astro 3/334 / Reported by M. Raimond Coulon—at Val-de-la-Haye—8:40 p.m. Object Orion, form of an elongated pear—luminous—in a powerful field-glass rapid change of form and brightness—M Coulon's suggestion—may have been a signal suspended from a balloon. / ([note cut off]ars). [VII; 862.1, 862.2. "A Temporary Nebula (?)." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 3 (1892-1893): 335. Coulon, Raimond. “Nébulosité temporaire....” Astronomie, 13 (1893): 196-198.]


1893 March 8 / 12:30 a.m. / Booming sounds / q / NY City and L.I. / NY Times, March 9-8-6 / (Sc Am 68-165). [VII; 863. “Shaken by an Earthquake.” New York Times, March 9, 1893, p. 8 c. 6. "A slight earthquake shock...." Scientific American, n.s., 68 (March 18, 1893): 165.]


1893 March 8 / 12:40 a.m. / N.Y. Herald 8-6-3—Buildings in N.Y. City between 23rd St and 59th Street shaken as if by an explosion or earthquake. / This shock also in Long Island. / (Said in Herald of 9th, that letters been received attributing it to an explosion.) [VII; 864.1, 864.2. (New York Herald, March 8, 1893, p. 6 c. 3.)]


1893 March / Floods / Queensland / See back. [VII; 865. See: 1893 Feb 1, (VII; 840).]


1893 March 8 / 12:30 a.m. / q / N.Y. City, and Long Island was severely shaken. Like a thunderclap or explosion—booming of distant cannon. / Trib 9-2-5. [VII; 866. "Earthquake Was In Town." New York Tribune, March 9, 1893, p. 2 c. 5.]


1893 March 9 / P.L. / Strange wild animal reported in N. Car. [C; 107. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 9, 1893.)]


[1893 March 11 /] 1893 March 28 / Fish / The Galignani Messenger of 28th / Shower of live fishes at Millersburg, Kentucky, “recently”. / See July 8. [VII; 873. "Snake Editor's Column." Galignani's Messenger, March 28, 1893, p. 3 c. 2. "Rivers News," Maysville Evening Bulletin, (Kentucky), March 15, 1893, p. 3 c. 1-2. The shower of fish fell "last Saturday." See: (July 8).]


1893 March 12 / Meteor of unusual brilliance at Los Angeles / P.L., 24th. [VII; 867. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 24, 1893.)]


1893 March 18 / Glb Dem / Ghostly figure in Leipsic, Ohio. [C; 108. “Silas Bean's Astral Body.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, March 18, 1893, p. 13 c. 5.]


1893 March 18 / 6:23 p.m. / Large meteor, Dundee. Train visible ¾ hour. / Nature 47-495. [VII; 868. “Notes.” Nature, 47 (March 23, 1893): 494-498, at 495-496.]


1893 March 19 / Steamship Capt from Cheefoo to Shanghai. In lat 34, at noon saw a large spot on sun. / North China Herald, March 24th. [VII; 869. (North China Herald, March 24, 1893.)]


1893 March 21 / 3:30 a.m. / Great explosion felt far around at Litchfield, Ill. / NY Herald 22-9-5. [VII; 870. (New York Herald, March 22, 1893, p. 9 c. 5.)]


1893 March 23 / Cyclone / Middle West / late afternoon / N.Y. Herald 24-5-1. [VII; 871. (New York Herald, March 24, 1893, p. 5 c. 1.)]


1893 March 24 / dispatch from Panama so dated / NY Trib 25-1-2 / Violent q, Cauca, U.S. Columbia, and volc. eruption. / Tried to comment. Suicide in this house. [VII; 872. "Destructive Earthquake in Columbia." New York Tribune, March 25, 1893, p. 1 c. 2.]


1893 March 25 / N and Q, 8-3-446 / At Yeovil, Frederick Terrell had accused Harriett Carew of being a witch who had cast a spell upon his sister. [C; 109. Coleman, Everard Home. "Witchcraft in the Nineteenth Century." Notes and Queries, s. 8 v. 3 (June 10, 1893): 446. (Ilfracombe Gazette, May 6, 1893; not @ BNA.)]


1893 March 28 / N.Y. Trib, 3-6 / House 694 Second Ave—Maggie Zeuner, third woman, who because of troubles. [C; 110. "A House With a Strange History." New York Tribune, March 28, 1893, p. 3 c. 6. See: 1893 March 24, VII; 872), for "Tried to comment. Suicide in this house." (Check note; possibly "commit suicide"???)]


[1893 March 28. Wrong date. See: 1893 March 11, (VII; 873).]


1893 / last of March, at least to May 15 / Polt phe in Newcastle-on-Tyne. Said be 2 others in town. / Med and Dayb., May 26, p. 327. [C; 111. (Medium and Daybreak, May 26, 1893, p. 327.)]


1893 / last of March or April early. / Liv / Large numbers of larvae said to have fallen in a shower, at Cleveland, Ohio. Specimens sent to editor of Insect Life, who, vol. 5, p. 350, writes were specimens of “a Carabid larva, probably belonging to the genus Patrobus—had probably come out of ground after rain. [VII; 874.1, 874.2. “Larvæ supposed to have fallen during a Shower.” Insect Life, 5 (July 1893): 350.]


1893 Ap 1 / ab 8 a.m. / Severe shocks around Etna / L.T., Ap. 3-4-a. [VII; 875. “Earthquake Shock in Sicily.” London Times, April 3, 1893, p. 4 c. 1.]


1893 April 1 / 2 obs. sent to L'Astro (13-34) / 2 / See Sept 25, 1893. / first, at 8:45 p.m. by M. de Moraes Pereira, St. Miquel (note cut off]) / a light projecting from limb of moon. [VII; 876. “La Lune bossue.” Astronomie, 13 (1894): 34. João de Moraes Pereira had his observatory at St. Miquel, in the Azores. See: (1893 Sept 25; not found here).]


1893 Ap 5 / Fires (Invalid) / S. Australian Register (Adelaide), Ap. 8—Home of Mrs. John Foreman, Weller street, Goodwood—servant noticed that a mattress on an invalid's chair near a fireplace was alight. 3 p.m., curtains of the children's bed afire. 5[:45] p.m., curtains in sitting room. On 6th, several other fires. Police unable to find any indications of wilful starting of fires. / In Register, 11th, that at Port Pirie, early morning of 6th, “another to the list of unsolvable mysteries”. The third fire in 3 months of origin that could not be explained. [C; 112.1, 112.2, 112.3. “A Series of Fires at Goodwood.” South Australian Register,  (Adelaide), April 8, 1893, p. 5 c. 2. “The Port Pirie Fire.” South Australian Register,  (Adelaide), April 11, 1893, p. 7 c. 4.]


1893 Ap. 8 / and 3:36 a.m., 10th / Severe qs / Servia / L.T. 11-5-c / Opening fissures from which issued streams of water. Great disaster. [VII; 877. “Earthquake Shocks in Servia.” London Times, April 11, 1893, p. 5 c. 3.]


1893 Ap 8 / afternoon / Ossawatomie, Kansas / That a met had fallen, breaking arm off statue of John Brown. / Sc Am 68-325 / I think this was denied somewhere else. / “We learn upon inquiry that the story was only a hoax.” / Pop Sci News 27-73. [VII; 878. “Fall of Aerolites.” Scientific American, n.s., 68 (May 27, 1893): 325. “An account was recently published....” Popular Science News, 27 (May 1893): 73.]


1893 Ap 10 / B. Eagle 10-10-3 / Series of accidents in Brooklyn, morning (up to noon) of 10th / Unknown / Alex. Burgman / Geo. Sychers / Lawrence Beck / George Barton / Patrick Gibbons / James Meehan / George Bedell / Michael Brown / John Trowbridge / Timothy Hennessy / Philip Oldwell / Almost all by falling from high places, or by falling objects. [C; 113.1, 113.2. “This Was an Unlucky Day.” Brooklyn Eagle, April 10, 1893, p. 10 c. 3.]


1893 Ap. 10 / early morn / Almost all Servia. Severe shocks. Large streams of warm water and yellow mud flowed from fissures. / N.Y. Trib 11-1-3. [VII; 879. "Servia Shaken By an Earthquake." New York Tribune, April 11, 1893, p. 1 c. 3.]


1893 Ap. 11 / Destructive rain and wind storms / Texas / N.Y. Trib 13-5-2. [VII; 880. "Damage in a Texas Town." New York Tribune, April 13, 1893, p. 5 c. 2.]


1893 Ap. 11 / News received in London of Terrible q. at Malattia, Asia Minor. 3,000 houses destroyed. 130 persons killed. / Adelaide Observer, Ap. 15. [VII; 881. “Terrible Earthquake.” Adelaide Observer, April 15, 1893, p. 13 c. 3.]


1893 Ap 11 / Cloudburst / Centralia, Ill. / NY Trib 13-5-2. [VII; 882. "A Cloudburst Over an Illinois Town." New York Tribune, April 13, 1893, p. 5 c. 2.]


1893 Ap 11-12 / night / storm and q shocks in Ohio Valley / Trib 13-5-2. [VII; 883. "Earthquake Felt in the Ohio Valley." New York Tribune, April 13, 1893, p. 5 c. 2.]


1893 Ap 11-12 / night / Shocks, Cincinnati, and a gale / N.Y. Trib 13-5-2. [VII; 884. "Earthquake Felt in the Ohio Valley." New York Tribune, April 13, 1893, p. 5 c. 2.]


1893 Ap. 12 / [LT], 4-b / 19-5-c / 20-5-b / 21-5-b / 22-7-b / 24-8-a / q—Zante / See Feb. / See Ap. 1, 1893. [VII; 885. “The Earthquakes in Zante.” London Times, April 20, 1893, p. 5 c. 2-3. “The Earthquakes in Zante.” London Times, April 21, 1893, p. 5 c. 2-3. “The Earthquake in Zante.” London Times, April 22, 1893, p. 7 c. 2. “The Earthquakes in Zante.” London Times, April 24, 1893, p. 8 c. 1. See: (Feb.), and, (1893 Ap. 1).]


1893 Ap. 12 / Disastrous storm. 16 people killed in Robinsonville, Miss. / NY Trib 14-2-2. [VII; 886. "Disaster in the South." New York Tribune, April 14, 1893, p. 2 c. 2.]


1893 Ap. 12 / Wind greatest in years at Lyons, N.Y. / NY Trib 13-5-2. [VII; 887. "Windstorm in New York State." New York Tribune, April 13, 1893, p. 5 c. 2.]


1893 Ap. 12 / Tornadoes and hurricanes / Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska / NY Trib 13-5-1. [VII; 888. "Ruin Wrought By Storm." New York Tribune, April 13, 1893, p. 5 c. 1-2.]


[1893 Ap 13. Wrong date. See: 1893 Ap 16, (VII; 889).]


1893 Ap. 13 / Violent windstorm / Tenn / Mo / Ohio / Miss / NY Trib 15-1-5. [VII; 890. "More Damage By Storms." New York Tribune, April 15, 1893, p. 1 c. 5.]


1893 Ap. 14 / Revolution in Servia and violent strikes in Belgium. [VII; 891. (Refs.???)]


1893 Ap. 14 / Disastrous storms, Texas, Wisconsin. / Heavy snow, Ohio, northern N.Y. / N.Y. Trib 16-1-4. [VII; 892. "Tornadoes Work Havoc in the South." New York Tribune, April 16, 1893, p. 1 c. 4-5.]


1893 / ab. Ap. 15 / Lum Obj (cemetery) / B. Eagle 23-11-2 / Told by and Cornelius Fergueson, on a train from Bensonhurst, passing Greenwood Cemetery. Saw a light in a cemetery, higher than the tops of trees, ab. the size of a head. Sparks of fire streamed backward from it, like hair. [C; 114.1, 114.2. “Mr. Parfitt's Ghost Story.” Brooklyn Eagle, April 23, 1893, p. 11 c. 2.]


[1893 Ap. 16 /] 1893 Ap 13 / Photos of eclipse revealed a body said to be a comet moving away from the sun, so close to sun was [note cut off] the corona. / Observatory 17/253, 304? / Astro and Astro-Physics, Ap., 1894. [VII; 889. Schaeberle, John Martin. “A Comet in the Corona of 1893 April 16.” Astronomical Journal, 14 (1894): 46. “A Comet in the Corona of 1893 April 16.” Observatory, 17 (1894): 253. “The Coronal Comet of April 16, 1893.” Observatory, 17 (1894): 304-305. Schaeberle, John Martin. “Preliminary Note on the Corona of April 16, 1893.” Astronomy and Astro-Physics, 12 (October 1893): 730-733, at 732. “I wish to call particular attention to a curious structure near the middle of the 4th quadrant; the head of this comet-like object is about four-fifths of a solar diameter from the Sun's surface; it is visible on all my negatives of the outer corona.” Schaeberle, John Martin. “A Cometary Structure in the Corona of April 16, 1893.” Astronomy and Astro-Physics, 13 (April 1894.): 307. Cliver, Edward W. “Was the Eclipse Comet of 1893 a Disconnected Coronal Mass Ejection?” Solar Physics, 122 (1989): 319-333, (illustrations). Webb, David F., and, Cliver. Edward W. “Evidence for Magnetic Disconnection of Mass Ejections in the Corona.” Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, 100 (1995 April 1): 5853-5870. Schaeberle's object, (which was only observed photographically during the solar eclipse, on April 16), more closely resembles a coronal mass ejection, (rather than a sun-grazing comet).]


1893 Ap. 16 / Total solar eclipse / S. Amer and W. Africa / C. [VII; 893. (Refs.???)]


1893 Ap. 17 / 5:35 a.m. / Shock / Blinman / Australia / S. Australian Register, 21st. [VII; 894. “Shocks of Earthquake at Blinman.” South Australian Register, (Adelaide), April 21, 1893, p. 5 c. 8.]


1893 Ap. 17 / Another violent q / Zante / See Feb 3. / Nature 47-585. [VII; 895. “Notes.” Nature, 47 (April 20, 1893): 584-589, at 585. See: (Feb 3).]


1893 Ap. 17 / 7:30 a.m. / Violent shock / Zante. [VII; 896. (Ref.???)]


1893 Ap 18 / Tornado, Kansas—great damage, Topeka / N.Y. Trib 19-1-3. [VII; 897. "Work of a Storm in Kansas." New York Tribune, April 19, 1893, p. 1 c. 3.]


1893 Ap. 18, etc. / Lyrids / Nature 48/5. [VII; 898. Denning, William Frederick. “The April Meteors.” Nature, 48 (May 4, 1893): 5-6.]


1893 Ap 18-19 / midnight / Zante again shaken. / N.Y. Trib 20-1-3 / Enormous waves in the sea. [VII; 899. "Earthquakes Continue in Zante." New York Tribune, April 20, 1893, p. 1 c. 3.]


1893 Ap. 19 / afternoon / “Frightful tornado / Mississippi / N.Y. Trib 21-1-5 / Arkansas. [VII; 900. "Awful Work of the Storm." New York Tribune, April 21, 1893, p. 1 c. 5.]


1893 Ap. 19 and 20 / Violent storms / N.Y., Pa., Iowa, Minn., Ohio / Trib 21-5-3. [VII; 901. "New York Seldom Sees Such a Day." New York Tribune, April 21, 1893, p. 5 c. 3.]


1893 Ap. 24 / Daily Picayune, 4-5 / Witch suspected at Paterson, N.J. Cow gave bloody milk. Hogs pined away and died. Horses ridden nearly to death every night. Children in 2 families mysterious disorder. [C; 115. “A Nineteenth Century Witch.” New Orleans Picayune, April 24, 1893, p. 4 c. 5.]


1893 Ap. 25 / “A mysterious fire on Mr. Litchfield's farm, near Freeling. / Adelaide Observer 29-16-2. [C; 116. “Country News.” Adelaide Observer, April 29, 1893, p. 16 c. 2-4.]


1893 Ap 26 / (Ch 31) / Luminosity like a veiled moon.—12 minutes / E. Mec 57/287 / (Edwin Holmes). [VII; 902. Holmes, Edwin. “Two Curious Occurrence—Saturn—Errors—51M.” English Mechanic, 57 (no. 1469; May 19, 1893): 287-288. “On April 26 the sky here was covered with mottled clouds, with stars appearuig here and there in the interstices. At 10.35 I looked up from the telescope, and saw a curious luminous cloud about 3° east of Regulus, which star was not visible continuously. The luminosity was about size of [the] full moon, and looked exactly as if [the] moon was veiled by a cloud. It was roughly circular, but outline not sharp, although definite. It lasted prominently 5m., then faded, and immediately brightened again; then once more faded and lighted up bright for 7m., then gradually paled to same appearance as surrounding clouds. No noise. On sky clearing soon after, there was nothing visible.”]


1893 Ap 26 / morning / Lancaster, Pa / sharp report and rumbling sound and shock / Trib 27-3-2. [VII; 903. "An Earthquake Shock in Lancaster." New York Tribune, April 27, 1893, p. 3 c. 2.]


1893 Ap. 26 / morning / Lancaster, Pa., explosive sound and houses shaken. / N.Y. Trib 27-3-2. [VII; 904. "An Earthquake Shock in Lancaster." New York Tribune, April 27, 1893, p. 3 c. 2.]


1893 Ap. 28 / See met and fishes of Peru, ab Feb, 1873. / See BD, last chapter. / 1871. [VII; 905. The note copies information from page 290 of The Book of the Damned. See: 1871 Feb 12, (IV: 296, 298, and 300).]


1893 Ap. 28 / Pioneer Mail / nothing. [VII; 906.]


1893 Ap 28 / Nature 49-33 / Said that near Jafferabad, Kathiawar, seeds fell from a clear sky. Said seeds were of the Nagali Jaowar, known to the inhabitants. At same time, a mile or so away, a stone fell from the sky. A fragment of the stone was sent to D. Fletcher, of the British Museum, and he pronounced it meteoric. [VII; 907.1, 907.2. Fletcher, 106. Judd, John Wesley. “On a Meteorite which Fell Near Jafferabad in India on April 28, 1893.” Nature, 49 (November 9, 1893): 32-33. “ It is curious that a fall of Nagali Jaowar (a kind of seed used as food by the poorer people of the country) is said to have occurred at the same time as the fall of the stone. As suggested by Dr. Evans, the seed may have been carried a short distance by the wind, which is very strong on the coast of Kathiawar at the time of year when the fall occurred. The spot where the fall took place is a flat region of recent limestone. Dr. Evans adds that the official report is interesting, as it is the account of a man who never heard of a meteorite, and to whom the fall of grain is as probable as that of stones.” The Bherai meteorite.]


1893 Ap. 28 / Nothing in Times of India. [VII; 908.]


1893 Ap. 30 / Sand / afternoon / Bärwalde, Pomerania / Sandstorm for 5 minutes, after which rain fell and cleared the atmosphere—thought to have come from a mt. ½ mile away. / Nature 48-323. [VII; 909. “Notes.” Nature, 48 (August 3, 1893): 321-326, at 322-323.]


1893 May / (See June.) / See 1880, Aug-Sept. / Swarms of flies / Gosport, Eng. / Nature 48/176. [VII; 910. “Singular Swarm of Flies.” Nature, 48 (June 22, 1893): 176. See: (June), and, (1880 Aug-Sept.).]]


1893 May 5-6 / (Ch) / Regular sounds / Isle of Man / atrib to battles / Nature 60/139. [VII; 911. “Spurious Earthquakes.” Nature, 60 (June 8, 1899): 139-141.]


1893 May 5 / obj / P.L. of / Early one morning recently, at Snakomish, Washington, a luminous object among the peaks of the Cascade Mountains. [VII; 912. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 5, 1893.) “Scraps.” Indianapolis News, May 8, 1893, p. 4 c. 3. “Early one morning recently, at Snakomish, Wash., a large and luminous object was observed among the jagged peaks of the Cascade range of mountains which diffused a strange light for some distance.”]


1893 May 9 / Drought / Was 53 days without rain in some parts of S. England. / Nature 48-36. [VII; 913. “Notes.” Nature, 48 (May 11, 1893): 36-39, at 36.]


1893 May 9 / Yarmouth, N.S. / Auroral arch / Science 21-303. [VII; 914. Porter, Alice. "A Beautiful Spectacle." Science, s. 1 v. 21 (June 2, 1893): 303.]


1893 May 10 / In Times of India of 20th, a correspondent quoted that during the rainy weather, for a mile and a half over the Cashmere Road bet Chikoli and Uri, “stones of all sizes” fell. Not said if meant hailstones. [VII; 915.1. (Times of India, May 20, 1893.)]


1893 May 14 / See June 1, and 23. / See other accidents, Ap. 10. [C; 122. See: (June 1), and (June 23).]


[The following fives notes were clipped together by Fort. C: 117-121.]


1893 May 14 / child / B. Eagle 15-10-6 / In Brooklyn, child, aged 2½, son of Charles DeBruyn, fell 50 feet from a roof and only slightly bruised. [C; 117. “A Child's Miraculous Escape.” Brooklyn Eagle, May 15, 1893, p. 10 c. 6. The child fell from a roof, thru a skylight, and onto a chair, which broke with his fall.]


1893 June 1 / child fall / B. Eagle, 1-7 / Ab a week before, a Newfoundland dog had fallen into a well, in Brownsville, Brooklyn, and been killed. Well 50 feet deep. On May 31, a child, Max Levy, fell into the well and landed on the dog's body and was only slightly bruised. [C; 118.1, 118.2. “Tumbled Down Into a Well.” Brooklyn Eagle, June 1, 1893, p. 1 c. 7.]


1893 June 20 / Hair / B. Eagle 21-1-3 / Girl, age 13, walking along Division Ave, Brooklyn (named Gertie McBride). Man snipped off her braid and ran. He did not seem to be able to run very fast. She after him, screaming. He threw the braid back to her, and she stopped to pick it up, and he got away. / 22-10-6—Police of the Sixteenth Precinct were of the opinion that Gertie had cut off her own hair—had been trying to get her mother's consent to have her hair cut. / 26-1-4—Police not satisfied with their explanation—Caroline Clundt, 390 Linden Street, had reported that upon the 24th, while she was on her way home from school, a pock-marked man had caught ahold of her hair, cutting it. She screamed and broke away and the man ran, disappearing in the direction of Gates Ave. Said that the person who cut Gertie's hair was pock-marked. / 27-1-6—Capt Kitzer, of the 20th Precinct, inclined to discredit Carrie Lund's statements. / July 6-10-4—a man answering the description of the one who in New York had cut off the long blond tresses of Miss Agnes O'Neill, of 129 W. 48th Street, had been arrested. / Eagle, July 31-10-7—Joseph Herzog, aged 29, arrested for grossly assaulting a girl, was identified as the man who had been snipping hair in Brooklyn and New York. / (See July 4.) / This “Jack” was identified by being picked out of a line, by the second little Brooklyn girl. / Put in foregoing that described as red-mustached and pock-marked. / In story of identification, said Herzog was red-mustached. Not said he was pock-marked. [C; 119.1 to 119.7. “Snipped Off a Girl's Braid.” Brooklyn Eagle, June 21, 1893, p. 1 c. 3. “Who Cut Off Gertie's Hair?” Brooklyn Eagle,  June 22, 1893, p. 10 c. 6. “An Eye Opener For the Public.” Brooklyn Eagle, June 26, 1893, p. 1 c. 4. “Is There a 'Jack the Snipper?'” Brooklyn Eagle, June 27, 1893, p. 1 c. 6. “Caught a Hair Cutter.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 6, 1893, p. 10 c. 4. “The Snipper, Sure Enough.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 31, 1893, p. 10 c. 7. See: 1893 July 4, July 30, (C; 121).]


1893 June 23 / B Eagle 24-1-1 / 3 children, dif. parts of Brooklyn—Maggie Fallon, William Napier, Ellen Reigol—fell from windows and were severely injured. [C; 120. “Three Children Fell From Windows.” Brooklyn Eagle, June 24, 1893, p. 1 c. 1.]


1893 July 4, July 30 / (Hair) / Gospel meetings, 8th Ave, cor w. 30th St, N.Y. / a Hair Clipper / N.Y. Trib 31-1-3. [C; 121. "Another Girl's Hair Cut Off." New York Tribune, July 31, 1893, p. 1 c. 3.]


1893 May 17 / P.L. of / Monster—40 feet long—in Cedar Bass Lake, near Knox, Indiana. [C; 123. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 17, 1893.) “Ananias in Indiana.” Indianapolis Journal, May 14, 1893, p. 2 c. 1.]


1893 May 18 / Daily Pic., 4-4 / Monster caught in Cedar Bass Lake, near Knox, Ind. 40 feet long and 3 feet in diameter. But it got away. Five persons reported having seen it. One of them was Scoville, the lawyer who defended Guiteau. [C; 124. “Another Fish Story.” New Orleans Picayune, May 18, 1893, p. 4 c. 4. “It was 42 feet long and 3 feet in diameter.”]


1893 May 28 / (Wtch) / D. Pic., 4-5—a woman in Salem, Ohio, accused her brother-in-law of witchcraft: that he had procured the death of his wife and her mother and had injured the cattle of his enemies. But was a voodoo doctor who told her he was the criminal. / See Feb. 6, 1894. [C; 125.1, 125.2. “Salem Witchcraft.” New Orleans Picayune, May 28, 1893, p. 4 c. 5. See: 1894 Feb 6, (C; 158).]


1893 June / Polt / near London / Proc. 12/81 / (good). [C; 126. Podmore, Frank. "Poltergeists." Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, 12 (1897): 45-115, at 81-90.]


1893 June / Med and Dayb., June 30 / Polts—house in Leyburn Road, Kantish Town. Large stones thrown. Children's faces painfully slapped. Stones thrown past the children. One was hurt by a stone, but mostly not hurting. / Med of July 7 = Leyburn Road, Chalk Farm—tenant Mr. Parker—wife died 2 years before, leaving large family. / Med of July 14 = 4 Leyburne Road. House described—all windows on lower floor broken. Here, seems was a Mrs. Parker—described as Mrs. P. Marks on walls from stone throwing. Said children slapped so severely, marks of a hand were visible. Had been going on 4 months. Stones were kept as specimens. Nothing peculiar about them. This last ac to investigation by Mr Arthur Beasley. / In Med and D of July 21, said Mr. B concluded it was all a got-up affair to attract attention. [C; 127.1 to 127.5. (Medium and Daybreak, 1893: June 30, July 7, July 14, and July 21.)]


1893 June 15, ab. / (Notes and Queries 8-4-55.) / At Sunderland, a woman named Ellen Robinson assaulted the Rev. Wm. B. Tremenheere, asserting he had bewitched her. [C; 128. Collinson, Joseph. "Witchcraft in the Nineteenth Century." Notes and Queries, s. 8 v. 4 (July 15, 1893): 55. “Attacking a Vicar.” Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette, June 16, 1893, p. 3 c. 2.. Ellen Robson, (not Robinson).]


1893 June 21 / Gorilla / Daily Picayune of (23rd) / That negro ran into the town of Olathe night of 21st (near Kansas City), saying that he had been chased by a monster. Next morning, a dairy-farmer, Robert Wilson, came into town for help, saying that upon his farm 2 miles away, something had killed 2 cows and a calf, and same morning a man employed upon another farm told of a gorilla-like animal fully 7 feet tall. 2 parties went out, and found tracks and saw the remains of the cows, but no more. Thought something from a circus that had escaped. [C: 129.1, 129.2, 129.3. “A Loose Gorilla in Kansas.” New Orleans Picayune, June 23, 1893, p. 4 c. 4. “Terrorized by a Strange Monster.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 19, 1893, p. 4 c. 5.]


1893 June 23 / Cosmos, N.S., 26/64 / Seven workmen on a farm at Clermont-Ferrand. Very warm in field—they went under a walnut tree to recover. Suddenly a brilliant light—the seven men thrown down—one carried several metres—three thrown were seriously burned and were half asphyxiated. [C; 130.1, 130.2. “Les singularités de la foudre.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 26 (August 19, 1893): 63-64.]


1893 June 29 / (K-bug) / See Sept. / Daily Pic of, that ac to the Washington News, there had in one week been treated more than a dozen cases, at the Emergency Hospital, of series bites by “flies”. Said that the physicians did not know what to make of it. Parts bitten swelled greatly and caused intense pain. / Issue of 17th told that W.K. Clynes, of Jersey City, that his hand began to swell. He remembered that the day before, a small black spider had fallen upon his hand, He had thought nothing of it at the time. [C: 131.1, 131.2, 131.3. (New Orleans Daily Picayune, June 29, 1893; not @ Newspapers.com.) “It Was Not a Tarantula.” New Orleans Picayune, June 17, 1893, p. 4 c. 5. See: 1893 Sept., (C; 137).]

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