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Last updated: January 24, 2017.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1861 to 1862


1861:


[186. Wrong date. See: 1862 July 1, (III; 60).]


1861 // Carbon / Cranbourne, Australia / D-74. [III; 61. The note copies information from page 74 of The Book of the Damned. Flight, Walter. "Meteorites and the Origin of Life," Eclectic Magazine, 89, (n.s., v. 26; December 1877): 711-718, at 716. Fletcher, 74. This is the Cranbourne meteorite, fragments of which had been found since about 1853 and were described by Wilhelm Karl Ritter von Haidinger in 1861.]


1861 / Sleeper Susan C. Godsey, near Hickman, Ky. / See July 14, 1869. [A; 410. See: 1869 July 14, (A; 547).]


1861 Jan 1 / Red continuing Siena / Italy / (16) / (D-41). [III; 53. The note copies information from page 41 of The Book of the Damned. "Coloured rain." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1861, 273.]


1861 Jan 5 / Large detonating meteor / Bermuda / B.A., '61. [III; 54. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 6-7.]


1861 Jan 7 / 7:51 p.m. / Chester / met first seen very near Mars / BA '61-8. [III; 55. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 8-9]


1861 Jan. 21 / Chatham, Eng / Explosion / An Reg, 1861 / 1[note cut off]. [III; 56. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 103 (1861): pt. 2, 1-270, at 12-13, cv. "Terrible Explosion at Chatham."]


1861 Jan 24 / (+) / [LT], 9-c / Colored rain / I suppose this is Siena. [III; 57. "Coloured Rain." London Times, January 24, 1861, p. 9 c. 3. At Siena, Italy. See: 1860 Dec 28, (III; 51).]


1861 Jan 27 / 8 a.m. / Butte Co., Cal / explosive sound / Ref., May 13, 1850. [III; 58. See: 1850 May 13, (II; 1390). Holden, Edward Singleton. List of Recorded Earthquakes in California, Lower California, Oregon and Washington Territory. Sacramento: State Office, J.D. Young, Supt. of State Printing, 1887, 37. "Supposed to be an explosion of gunpowder, or of a meteor, or the rumbling of an avalanche. Heard also in Sierra County."]


[1861 Feb 5. Wrong date. See: 1861 Feb 20, (III; 62).]


1861 Feb 8 / 7:50 p.m. / Norwalk, Ohio / great met / Sci Am, NS, 4/167. [III; 63. Hall, David D. "A Great Meteor." Scientific American, n.s., 4 (March 16, 1861): 167.]


1861 Feb. 14 / Th. stone / 6:30 p.m. / Aerolite / Tocane-Saint-Apre / (Cosmos 18/453) / moment of a light rain / (BA 67-419) / while raining. [III; 64. "Chute d'un aérolithe." Cosmos, 18 (April 26, 1861): 453-454. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 419. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. Meteors, Aerolites, and Falling Stars. London: L. Reeve, 1867, 68-69. "...on the 14th of February, at half past six o'clock in the evening, a boy, named Duchazeau, entered his dwelling in a state of consternation. He said he had just seen a luminous meteor fall to the ground, in the market-place of the little town. He conducted his father, a veterinary surgeon, and his uncle, the Abbé Duchazeau, to the spot. They found the ground had been slightly cut up, and soon picked up a stone presenting all the characters of an aerolite. A fine rain was falling at the time. The stone only weighed about a quarter of an ounce, but was very hard, grey, and covered with the usual black rind."]


1861 Feb 16 / at Malacca / French spelling / Shock / 23rd, another followed by deluge / C.R., 52-882. [III; 65. Castelnau, Francis de Laporte de. "Pluie de poissons; tremblement de terre à Singapore." Comptes Rendus, 52 (1861): 880-882, at 882.]


1861 Feb. 16 / 7:30 p.m. / Sevre q. / Penang, Singapore, etc. / A. J. Sci 2/32/297. [III; 66. "Earthquake on the Island of Penang." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 32 (1861): 297.]


1861 Feb 16 / 20, 21, 22 // Singapore / Quake / Storm—fall of fish / D-231. [III; 59. The note copies information from page 231 of The Book of the Damned. "Pluie de Poissons; Tremblement de Terre à Singapore." La Science Pour Tous, 6 (no. 24; May 16, 1861): 191. Castelnau, Francis de Laporte de. "Pluie de poissons; tremblement de terre à Singapore." Comptes Rendus, 52 (1861): 880-882. (La Science Pour Tous, 6 (1861): 317.)]


1861 Feb 16 / Great q / Sumatra / BA '11. [III; 67. Milne, 715.]


1861 Feb 20 / 0° 30' 51 S / 20° 27' W / Ship felt great concussion. / CR 53-1003 / See May 19, 1806. / Said it was 1 h, 30 m. before the q at Mendoza. but this was March 20. / C.R. 55/675. [III; 68. "Effets d'un tremblement de terre ressentis en mer, le 20 février 1861." Comptes Rendus, 53 (1861): 1003. See: 1806 May 19, (I; 184).]


[1861 Feb 20 /] 1861 Feb 5 / 7:30 p.m. / [0° 31' S.] Latitude about equator20° 27' W. Longitude / vessel shaken by a shock / La Sci Pour Tous 7-22. [III; 62. "Effets d'un tremblement de terre ressentis en mer." La Science Pour Tous, 7 (no. 3; December 19, 1861): 22. "Effets d'un tremblement de terre ressentis en mer, le 20 février 1861." Comptes Rendus, 53 (1861): 1003.]


1861 Feb 23 (?) / Field ofCor writes that 6 o'clock, evening of Ash Wednesday, at Northfield, Kent, came profoundist darkness which lasted an hour--two extraordinary circs. The stillness and the fright of animals. Editor writes that did he not know the cor, he would doubt it. / Another cor, March 2, corroborates. Says his feeling was of having been thrust into a darkest of dungeons. Two others say similar. / Feb 20, 13, 6, Wednesdays in Feb. [III; 69.1, 69.2. (Field, February 23, 1861.)]


1861 March 1 / Field, March 9 / Cor tells of profound darkness at Otteg like see Feb 23. [III; 70. (Field, March 9, 1861.)]


[1861 March 2. Wrong date. See: 1861 March 9, (III; 71).]


[1861 March 4 /] 1861 May 4 / Ballarat, Australia / Meteor-appeared to come from a cloud. Ploughed up the earth a distance of 12 yards. / BA 61. [III; 95. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44 at 8-9. "Fall of a Meteor." Ballarat Star, March 5, 1861, p. 2 c. 7. "Extraordinary Meteor." South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide), March 11, 1861, p. 2. c. 7.]


1861 March 4 / Cone-shaped meteor / Australia / Timbs'  Year Book 1862/268. [III; 72. "Meteor in South Australia." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1862, 268-269.]


[1861 March 4 /] 1866 March 4 / 9:38 a.m. / Crossed S.E. part of Australia. Great met. / BA 66-127. [III; 821. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1865-66." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1866, 16-146, at 127.]


[1861 March 9 /] 1861 March 12 / [LT], 10-e / Aurora / Magnificent. [III; 71. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "Splendid Aurora Borealis." London Times, March 12, 1861, p. 10 c. 5.]


1861 March 9-10 / Aurora / C.R. 52/465. [III; 73. Coulvier-Gravier, Remi Armand. "Aurores boréale de la nuit du 9 au 10 mars 1861." Comptes Rendus, 52 (1861): 465-466.]


1861 March 10 / 8:50 p.m. / Met from Capella to Pleiades / BA 61-8. [III; 74. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 8-9.]


1861 March 20 / ab 9 p.m. / q in Chile / C.R. 52-1148 / other side of Andes from Mendoza. [III; 75. Domeyko, Ignace. "Notice sur le tremblement de terre du 20 mars 1861 au Chili et de l'autre côté des Andes." Comptes Rendus, 52 (1861): 1148-1150.]


1861 March 20 / 8:45 p.m. / q. / Mendoza / L.T. June 17-10-e. [III; 76. "The Earthquake at Mendoza." London Times, June 17, 1861, p. 10 c. 5.]


1861 March 20 / See C.R. for account of qby I. Domeyko. [III; 77. Domeyko, Ignace. "Notice sur le tremblement de terre du 20 mars 1861 au Chili et de l'autre côté des Andes." Comptes Rendus, 52 (1861): 1148-1150.]


1861 March 20-30 / q / Mendoza / Showers of ashes on the Upsallata Pass / Geog. Mag 4-207. [III; 78. "The Great Earthquake on the Coast of Peru." Geographical Magazine, 4 (1877): 206-209, at 207, c.v. "1861. March 20, 8:45 P.M."]


1861 / 20-21 March // q and ball of fire / See 1805. [III; 79. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 368.) At Mendoza, Argentina. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1861 March 20 / Q. was 8:30 p.m. / The Geologist 4-391 / Earth opened. emitting violent streams of water. [III; 80. "The Earthquake at Mendoza." Geologist, 4 (1861): 391-392.]


1861 March 20 / In Times, June 17-10-e, letter from cor describing effects at Valparaiso. / On other side of Andesno volc mentioned. [III; 81. "The Earthquake at Mendoza." London Times, June 17, 1861, p. 10 c. 5.]


1861 March 20 / Melb Argus / nothing / nor Southern Cross (Auckland). [III; 82.]


1861 March 20 / (+) / (q and hot rain) / Western portions of La Platacity of Mendoza destroyedab 10,000 perishedwas preceded by fall of hot rain. / Ashes and rocks fell. "There appears to have been a connection between that earthquake and a volcanic eruption in the Andes." / Ponton, Earthquakes, p. 12. [III; 83.1, 83.2. Ponton, Mungo. Earthquakes and Volcanoes. Revised ed. London: T. Nelson, 1872, 76.]


1861 March 20 / 8:30 p.m. /Mendozano volc mentioned in An. Reg. [III; 84.]


1861 March 20 / Mendoza / Writer in All the Year Round 6-444 says that in the opinion of Prof Forbes, the geologist, who had investigated, there had been no volcanic outburst but considerable emissions of gases from the earth. [III; 85. "The Earthquake of Last Year." All the Year Round, 6 (February 1, 1862): 444-448, at 447.]


1861 March 21 / [LT], 11-c / Sunspot. [III; 86. "Spots in the Sun." London Times, March 21, 1861, p. 11 c. 3.]


1861 March 22 / See L. Times, May 10-6-b. / "In an almost inpenetrable ravine["] on bank of Rhine between Brohl and Niedderbreisig, body of a woman with stones piled on. Much decomposed. Death been caused by a shot through the body / cambric chemise and dimity nightgown of fine material. [A; 411.1, 411.2. "Mysterious Discovery." London Times, May 10, 1861, p. 6 c. 2.]


1861 March 26 / [LT, 6-f / Series of crimes. [A; 412. "Extraordinary Series of Crimes." London Times, March 26, 1861, p. 6 c. 6.]


1861 March 29 / q. /Algeria / BA 11. [III; 87. Milne, 716.]


1861 about April / Rappings in almost every house in the village of Hammondsville, Vt. / Religio Ph J., Ap. 19, 1873, p. 2 / About 3 months. [A; 413. Wilkins, W.H. "Mysterious Phenomena." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 14 (no. 5; April 19, 1873): p. 2 c. 5. Huldah Wilkins died on August 24, 1873.]


1861 Ap. 3 / [LT], 11-f / A yarn. [III; 88. "Very Like Munchäusen." London Times, April 3, 1861, p. 11 c. 6.]


1861 Ap. 12 / Met. train / Athens / L'Astro 2/85. [III; 89. Daubrée, Gabriel Auguste. "Les Pierres Tombées du Ciel." Astronomie, 2 (1883): 41-48, 81-89, at 85, (and, figure 37).]


1861 Ap 18 / [LT] 7-f / May 21-11-c / Sunspots. [III; 90. Norris, J.P. "The Sun's Spots." London Times, April 18, 1861, p. 7 c. 6. Norris noted the passage of an "unusually large spot" across the Sun's disc from March 26 to April 5, visible to the naked eye. "Spots in the Sun." London Times, May 21, 1861, p. 11 c. 3. Another large sunspot was visible, to the naked eye, near the centre of the Sun's disc, on May 18.]


1861 Ap. 21 / whirl f. / Reported from many places near Futtiahbad (sic), India / Cosmos 19-171. / A seemingly flaming whirlwind that swept over towns. However, nothing was burned. [III; 91. "Phénomènes mystérieux." Cosmos, 19 (August 16, 1861): 171. "Singular Natural Phenomenon." Homeward Mail, June 14, 1861, p. 6 c. 1. "According to the statement of Jooim Khan, chokedar of the village of Suleempore, in the Thanah of Futtiahbad, Zillah Agra, that place was, on the 21st April, visited by a whirlwind, containing masses of fire, which fell on the fields and the roofs of the houses. The people, apprehending general conflagration, rushed out with water to extinguish the fire, but upon examining the fragments it was found that they did not burn—everything that they had touched remaining unaffected by the contact. This statement is confirmed by the chokedars of Bujeedpore and Bumrolee Rutna, Pergunah Futtiahbad. The same remarkable phenomenon was witnessed during the storm by Mr. Gardner and twenty of his servants near Jungrera, in the Zillah of Allygurh."]


1861 Ap. 27 / Jamaica and Algeria / qs / BA '11. / Sim q's Feb 18, 1889. [III; 92. Milne, 716.]


1861 Apr 29 / Disc Ap 4, in N.Y. / New comet in Ursa Major / LT, Mar 2-7-f. [III; 93. Parkin, James. "A New Comet." London Times, May 2, 1861, p. 7 c. 6.]


1861 May / Doubtful star / [LT] 13-11-f / 16-6-f / April 3-11-f. [III; 94. Doubtful stories, (not a star). "A Shower of Fish." London Times, May 3, 1861, p. 11 c. 6. "A Doubtful Story." London Times, May 16, 1861, p. 6. c. 6. "Very Like Munchäusen." London Times, April 3, 1861, p. 11 c. 6.]


[1861 May 4. Wrong date. See: 1861 March 4, (III; 95).]


1861 May 7-8 / Volc. / Mt. Jebel Dubbeh / 13.57 N Lat / 41.40' E Long / Trans Bombay Geog Soc, 16-41. [III; 96. "Session 1861-62. First Meeting.—September 19th, 1861." Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 16 (1863): xl-lvii, at xli-xlv. The Dubbi volcano is in Eritrea. Wiart, Pierre, and, Oppenheimer, Clive. "Largest known historical eruption in Africa: Dubbi volcano, Eritrea, 1861." Geology, 28 (April 2000): 291-294. "An anomalously cold Northern Hemisphere summer in 1862, recorded in tree-ring records, could be the result of Dubbi's sulfate aerosol veil."]


1861 May 8 / Volc / Jebel Dubbeh, African shore of Red Sea / villages covered with th red dust / All the Year Round 8-251. [III; 97. "Fallen from the Clouds." All the Year Round, 8 (November 22, 1862): 250-256, at 251. The Dubbi volcano.]


1861 May 7-8 / night / L.T., June 20, 21 / Discharge was like red earth. [III; 98. Bell, Charles. "Eruption of a Volcano on the East Coast of Africa." London Times, June 20, 1861, p. 10 c. 6. Beke, Charles. "Volcanoes of Eastern Africa." London Times, June 21, 1861, p. 6 c. 6.]


1861 May 8 / In Times, Sept. 24, more detail of the volc Djebel Dubbeh, near Eddnothing but ashes ejected. But 175 persons and great herds of cattle destroyed. [III; 99. Beke, Charles. "Volcanic Eruption of Djebel Dubbeh." London Times, September 24, 1861, p. 10 c. 4.]


1861 May 8, etc. / Attributed to an unknown volcano on east coast of Africa. At Eddsounds like cannonading heardearth trembled. White dust and then red dust fell for 2 days. At Perim, the sounds were heard till 11thdry fog on 10th in Red Sea. Dust along whole coast of Yemen. / This not near the volc of 1846 (?) or about which the only known Red Sea volc. Edd is on Abyssinian coast, ab 13.57 N. [III; 100.1, 100.2. "Session 1861-62. First Meeting.—September 19th, 1861." Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 16 (1863): xl-lvii, at xli-xlv.]


1861 May 10 / L.T., 6-b / Rheineck corpse. [A; 414. "Mysterious Discovery." London Times, May 10, 1861, p. 6 c. 2.]


1861 May 10 / Rheineck corpse / See March 22. [A; 415. See: 1861 March 22, (A; 411).]


1861 May 12 / Metites / (F) / Bengal / banks of the Gunduk, 42 miles NE of Goruckpur. A. J. Sci 2/36/67. 2 hours later, a storm and a little rain. [III; 101. Fletcher, 102. Maskelyne, N.S. "On Aerolites, and the fall of Stones at Butsura, India, May, 1861." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 36 (1863): 64-76, at 67-69. These are the Butsura meteorites.]


1861 May 14 / (F) / 10 p.m. / Canellas, Barcelona / fireball and many small stones / BA 67-419. In Catalonia. [III; 102. Fletcher, 102. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 419. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. Meteors, Aerolites, and Falling Stars. London: L. Reeve, 1867, 68. "Most of these aerolites penetrated so deeply into the soil that they could not be discovered. Those that fell upon the rocky surface were picked up; the heaviest of them weighs a little more than two pounds English, and has been forwarded to the museum at Madrid. It was, however, very difficult to procue even this specimen, for the peasants in the neighbourhood, believing that these stones fallen from heaven were destined to bring them good fortune, positively refused to give up one of them." This is the Cañellas meteorite.]


1861 May 18 / Very large spot on sun near center of disk visible at sunset without glass / L.T. 21-11-c. [III; 103. "Spots in the Sun." London Times, May 21, 1861, p. 11 c. 3.]


1861 May 23 / Volc / Iceland / L.T., June 28-6-f. [III; 104. "Iceland." London Times, June 28, 1861, p. 6. c. 6.]


1861 / last of May // See April, 1863. [III; 105. See: 1863 Ap. 14, (A; 431).]


1861 / last May // See April, 1868 (+). [III; 106. See: 1868 April, (III; 1324).]


1861 last of May / (moa) / In Nature 4/186, James Hector writes that near Jackson's Bay, Jan, 1863, he saw numerous well beaten tracks ab 16 inches wide made by some unknown creature. / Dr. James Hector, of the Colonial Museum, Wellington, N.Z. / See 1863. [A; 416.1, 416.2. Hector, James. "On Recent Moa Remains in New Zealand." Nature, 4 (July 6, 1871): 184-186, at 186. See: (1863).]


1861 June / London / Hay / Phipson, Earth's Atmosphere, p. 63 / Brit Assoc 1864/ 37 / See Phipson's story, Sept, 1860. [III; 107. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. Researches On the Past and Present History of the Earth's Atmosphere: Including the Latest Discoveries and Their Practical Applications. London: C. Griffin, 1901, 63. "Here is another curious observation which I find among my notes. Standing one morning during the month of June 1861, on the banks of the River Thames, near London, I was a witness of the following singular spectacle: The day was calm, with only a slight westerly breeze, there was bright sunshine, and the sky was blue. Suddenly there appeared moving specks in the atmosphere to the west of the spot on which I stood, and evidently at an enormous distance. They were like a very distant flight of birds; but they got much larger than any birds, as they approached. At last some of them began to fall into the river near Putney bridge; and two or three of these curious objects fell into my father's garden. On examination, they were found to be recently cut grass, twisted into circular masses, much larger than a man's head. I knew that no grass had been cut for hay within hundreds of miles of my residence, and I at once assimilated this phenomenon to the falling of volcanic ash upon ships far out at sea, and hundreds of miles from any volcanoes, of which instance have occasionally been put on record." Phipson, Thomas Lamb. "On the Black Stones which fell from the Atmosphere at Brimingham in 1858." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1864, Notices and Abstracts, 37.]


1861 June 9 / Hail / Lucerne / Fassig 2/343. [III; 108. Fassig, Oliver Lanard, ed. Bibliography of Meteorology. Part II: Moisture. Washington: Signal Office, 1889, 343. Mousson, Johann Rudolf Albert . "Sur la grêle tombée à Lucerne le 9 juin 1861." Archives des sciences physiques et naturelles, s. 2 v. 13 (1862) 35-46.]


1861 June 12-13 / night / "A notable number of shooting stars and fireballs." / Victoria, Australia. Rept BA '68-407. [III; 109. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 407.]


1861 June 12 and 13 / Large number of brilliant meteors in S. Australia. Also in Victoria. Here a frequency of 5.6 meteors per hour. / NeumayerMeteorological Observations, p. 141. [III; 110. Neumayer, Georg Balthasar von. Results of the meteorological observations taken in the colony of Victoria, during the years 1859-1862, and of the nautical observations collected and discussed at the Flagstaff Observatory, Melbourne, during the years 1858-1862,  Melbourne: John Ferres, 1864, 141.  "No reliable information as to a regular shower of meteors having been observed, nor as to a meteor of fragments thereof having reached the earth’s surface within the Colony of Victoria, has reached me, nor were such observed at the Flagstaff Observatory; but it appears that in South Australia, during the nights of the 12th and 13th of June, 1861, a large number of brilliant meteors made their appearance. The report thereon says:'As seen from Port Elliot, a fireball remained visible in the sky for half an hour, during which time shooting stars emanated from it like sparks.' During the same night frequent meteors were observed at the Flagstaff Observatory, and the hourly number amounted to 5.6 meteors, which is considerably above the average."]


[1861 June 16. Wrong date. See: 1860 June 16, (III; 111).]


1861 June 22 / Great fire in London. [III; 113. The Tooley Street fire was said to be the greatest since the Great Fire of London, in 1666, and took three days to extinguish.]


1861 June 28 / Auroral display in N.S. Wales associated with comet / Syd M. Herald, July 2. [III; 114. Scott, William. "Note Respecting the Comet." Sydney Morning Herald, July 2, 1861, p. 5 c. 6. "The occurrence of the aurora on Friday last is worthy of notice in connexion with the near approach of the comet, but it would be useless to hazard any conjecture as to the reality of any such connexion." The connexion may have been that the Earth was within the comet's tail during its closest approach, on June 30, and that cometary streams may have been mistaken for an auroral display. Unfortunately, Scott did not observe this auroral display. "Philosophical Society." Sydney Morning Herald, July 18, 1861, p. 5 c. 4-6. Scott states: "We must not altogether omit to notice the auroral display on the evening of the 28th, which, as I was then busily computing, I failed to notice." Grego, Peter. Blazing a Ghostly Trail. New York: Springer, 2014, 116. "For 2 days at perigee, Earth actually lay within the comet's tail, and it is reported that streams of cometary material radiating from the nucleus could be discerned."]


1861 June 16 or 28 / 7 p.m. / Stonefall / Grosjna, Caucasus / BA 67-418. [III; 115. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430 at 418. This is the Grosnaja meteorite.]


1861 June 28 /Grosnaja, Caucasus, Russia / (F). [III; 117. Fletcher, 102. This is the Grosnaja meteorite.]


1861 June 28 / [LT], 6-f / Volc / Iceland. May 13, 1861. [III; 112. "Iceland." London Times, June 28, 1861, p. 6. c. 6.]


[1861 June 28 /] 1861 June 30 / Athenaeum / that the comet crossed the ecliptic in longitude 279° /Athenaeum, July 6. [III; 139. "The Comet." Athenæum, 1861 (no. 1758; July 6): 19. "It crossed the plane of the Earth's orbit from the south to the north side in longitude 279° 1' on June 28...."]


1861 June 29 / [William] Scott (Sydney) says comet would be a conspicuous object in northnot say where be seen. [III; 134. "The Great Comet." New York Tribune, July 8, 1861, p. 2 c. 6, & p. 3 c. 1-2. Lt. Gillies, Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Observatory reported that the comet was first noticed on the evening of June 30, at 10:30 P.M., "when it was regarded as an auroral beam."]


1861 June 30 / The unexpected comet / near the pole star / An. Reg. [III; 118. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 103 (1861): pt. 2, 1-270, at 99-100, cv. "The Comet."]


1861 June, last / Comet supposed to have come from sun. / Seen in Cancer. [III; 116. The Great Comet of 1861, (C/1861 J1), was first discovered by John Tebbutt, at Windsor, New South Wales, Australia, on May 13, 1861; but, it would not have become visible in the northern hemisphere until June 29, near to the Sun. When first seen by Webb, on June 30, he thought "it could be only a cirrus cloud brought up by the north-west wind, (and, "only streaks of cloud" by George Williams, in Liverpool). Webb, Thomas William. Tebbutt, John, Jr. "A Comet Visible." Sydney Morning Herald, May 25, 1861, p. 5. c. 5. Tebbutt saw a "nebulous star" and did not notice any tail; and, he did not notice any movement until May 22, when it was half of a degree from its original position on May 13. He thought that, if it was receding from the sun, its orbit might never be determined. "On the Great Comet of 1861." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 22 (July 14, 1862): 305-314, at 311. This comet has also been identified as Comet 1500 H1. Hasegawa, I. & Nakano, S. "Periodic Comets Found in Historical Records." Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan, 47 (1995): 699-710, at 705.]


1861 June, last / Another sudden comet in the north, July 3, 1819 / right after sunset. / same time of year. [III; 119. See: 1819 July 3, (I; 715). The Tralles comet, (C/1819 N1).]


1861 June 30 / In Knowledge, 5-177, Mr. A. Cowper Ranyard writes that Mr. Hind had predicted (Ver.) that such a transit (earth passing through tail of the comet) would take place. [III; 120. Ranyard, Arthur Cowper. "The Extraordinary Sunsets." Knowledge, 5 (March 14 and 21, 1884): 155-156, 177-178, at 177.]


1861 June, last / Comet crossed ecliptic unseen because in eclipse? [III; 121. Comet C/1861 J1, (Tebbutt's), would have been too close to the Sun to be observed, (unless seen during a solar eclipse), when it crossed the ecliptic on June 28. On June 30, Julius Schmidt estimated that its tail(s) extended 100 to 120 degrees and that it was bright enough to cast shadows, (estimated between magnitude 0 and -2). Schmidt, Johann Friedrich Julius. Astronomische Beobachtungen über Cometen. Athens: Karl Wilberg, 1863, 77. "Um 9 Uhr 15 Min. war die Krümmung des Schweifes gleich über dem Nucleus merklich nach links gerichtet, also in der scheinbaren Bahn vorangehend, die hohle Seite rechts nachfolgend, ähnlich wie bei Dönati's Cometen. Bis zum Polarstern hinauf, also durch 45° etwa übertraf der Schweif alle Theile der Milchstrasse, und den hellsten Glanz des Zodiacallichtes, wie ich ihn je in Italien oder Griechenland gesehen habe. Um 11 Uhr war der nördlich über dem Horizonte aufragende untere Theil des Schweifes heller als die grossen Lichtwolken im Schützen, die südlich in grösserer Höhe standen, und vermochte einen deutlichen gutbegränzten Schatten zu werfen." Marcus, Joseph N. "Forward-Scattering Enhancement of Comet Brightnes. I. Background and Model." International Comet Quarterly, 29 (no. 2; April 2007): 39-66, at 62. Marcus suggests the forward-scattering of sunlight thru a comet's dust could increase its visibility by several magnitudes, such that it would become visible in daylight or twilight, (and capable of casting shadows). Lowe, Edward Joseph. "The Comet." London Times, July 2, 1861, p. 5 c. 6. "When first seen, which was at 7h. 49m. GMT, it was not only daylight, but the sun was shining." The Earth passed thru the comet's tail(s), on June 30. Hind, John Russell. "The Comet." London Times, July 6, 1861, p. 12 c. 1. "It appears not only possible, but even probable, that in the course of Sunday last, the earth passed through the tail at a distance of perhaps two-thirds of its length from the nucleus." Lowe, Edward Joseph. "The Comet." London Times, July 9, 1861, p. 9 c. 6. Lowe, unaware that the Earth was with the comet's tail(s), noticed: "A singular yellow phosphorescent glare, very like diffused Aurora Borealis, yet being daylight such Aurora would scarcely be noticeable," and, "the sun, though shining, gave but feeble light." Hind also wrote: "In connexion with this subject I may add that on Sunday evening, while the comet was so conspicuous in the northern heavens, there was a peculiar phosphorescence or illumination of the sky, which I attributed at the time to an auroral glare."]


1861 / Last of June // Comet / See Nature 25/94. [III; 122. "The Great Comet of 1861." Nature, 25 (November 24, 1881): 94.]


1861 June, last / Big new comet near Capella / June 24, 1881. [III; 123. (See: 1881 June 24.) This was Tebbutt's Comet, (C/1861 J1).]


1861 June 30 / Sudden comet in Auriga / See July 3, 1819, and before. [III; 124. See: 1819 July 3, (I: 714, 715). This was Tebbutt's Comet, (C/1861 J1).]


1861 June 30 / identified it as Thatcher's Comet. [III; 125. Thatcher's Comet, (C/1861 G1), was discovered on June 3, 1861, and is responsible for the Lyrid meteor showers. Arter, T. R., and, Williams, I. P. "The mean orbit of the April Lyrids." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 289 (1997): 721-728.]


1861 June 30 / (+) / I don't save much out of this except that Amer. astronomers identified it as Thatcher's Comet. [III; 126. "The Comet." Scientific American, n.s, 4 (June 1, 1861): 343. Thatcher's Comet, (C/1861 G1), was a faint object with a tail seldom seen to extend 2 to 3 degrees. Tebbutt's Comet, (C/1861 J1), with a bright tail extending 90 degrees, (or more). American enthusiasm for their discovery of a comet led to confused observations when another bright comet became visible.]


1861 June 30 / Same comet as seen in South. Orbit almost perpendicular to the plane of the ecliptic. [III; 127. The inclination of Thatcher's Comet is now measured as 79.77°.]


1861 June 30 / 3 columns, NY Herald, July 4, p. 8. [III; 128. "The War Comet of 1861." New York Herald, July 4, 1861, p. 8 c. 4-6.]


1861 June 30 / Comet no such size in Australia. N.Y. had cabled news from London. [III; 129. News about Tebbutt's Comet, from Australia, had not yet reached Britain, as telegraphic communications would not extend to and across Australia, until 1872.]


[1861 June 30] / Sydney Morning Herald, 15-5-6 / John Tebbutt writes that ac to observations made at the Sydney Observatory, May 24, and later obs.orbit almost perpendicular(inclination 86.18.42). Perihelion passage June 13.7253 / Heliocentric motionDirect / That the comet would soon move north and that on the 29th (June) the earth would be at no great distance from the extremity of the tail—and some probability that the comet be visible in daylight then. // 19-2-6 / Comet in eastern sky from 3:30 a.m. to daylight (6:30), travelling N.N.W., tail stretching nearly S.S.W. Cor gives these datawants to know the Govt. Astronomer has given out no informationtells readers these data, himself. 24-8-3 / W. Scott, Govt. Astro, says that in issue of 1st, he had pointed out when and where visible in early part of month. On June 1st, all that he had written, on May 31, was, "The result of 5 observations was: May 30, 6 h. 19 m. 14s.; RA. 3 h. 57 m. 17.5 s; December, 30 degrees, 31 min, 31 sec." December, I suppose, misprint for Declination. / So he had given position, but not a word as to orbit. / He says comet's tail ab 8 degrees in direction opposite that of the sun, moving westward at 2 degrees a day, and on 29th not be far from the plane of the earth''s orbit. Does not appear probable be nearly in line with sun so that the tail would not point to and be very near this earth. However (up to 23rd), he had not yet calculated the orbit. // 26-6-5Someone elseWhat are the colonists paying fortell them what that orbit iswhen be back, etc."Strange circumstance this." Mr. Scott replied. / 27-5-4 / Total ignorance of corsignorance and conceit so often found in companyno amount of criticism move him from his rule to advance astronomic science rather than to gratify public curiosity. / He gives the elements overbut perihelion distance on June 11.68918 (right). Nothing said of when comet come back. / Says comet would cross the plane of the earth's orbit June 29, at 6:35 a.m. Distance of the tail from the earth, supposing it to extend in a straight line from sun, 3,300,000 miles. "The comet will, I fear, be too nearly in the direction of the sun to be visible that day." // Sydney Morning Herald, Sept 30, publishes observations from the Times (London). Issue of Oct. 1 [Pabst: Rest of sentence deleted.] // All I find is Oct 7-8-4, is someone writes that not appear to be known that the sudden comet in Europe near, but ac to Tebbutt's elements of orbit it was. [III; 130.1 to 130.12. Tebbutt, John, Jr. "A Comet Visible." Sydney Morning Herald, May 25, 1861, p. 5. c. 5. Scott, William, "To the Editor of the Herald." Sydney Morning Herald, May 27, 1861, p. 5. c. 5. Gledson, J.J. "The Comet." Sydney Morning Herald, May 29, 1861, p. 3. c. 1. Gledson indicates that the comet is approaching the sun, (and not receding from it). Scott, William. "To the Editor of the Herald." Sydney Morning Herald, May 31, 1861, p. 8 c. 1. Scott gives three positions for the comet on May 24, 27, and 29, 1861. Scott, William. "To the Editor of the Herald." Sydney Morning Herald, June 1, 1861, p. 6 c. 1. Scott notes misprints within his letter published on May 31 and provides another position of the comet on May 30. "The result of five observations obtained last night was: May 30, 6h. 19m. 14s.; RA, 3h. 57m. 17.5s.; December, 30 degs. 31 min. 31 sec." Tebbutt, John, Jr. "The Comet's Orbit." Sydney Morning Herald, June 15, 1861 p. 5 c. 6. "The New Comet." Sydney Morning Herald, June 19, 1861, p. 2.c. 6. Scott, William. "The Comet." Sydney Morning Herald, June 24, 1861, p. 8 c. 3-4. "The Comet's Grievance." Sydney Morning Herald, June 26, 1861, p. 6 c. 5. Scott, William. "The Comet." Sydney Morning Herald, June 27, 1861, p. 5 c. 4. Scott writes: "The results sent by me to Europe are such as you would hardly like to publish, on the ground of their being too voluminous, and at the same time unintelligible to any one who was not an astronomer; being data for the accurate determination of the right ascensions and declinations of the comet on the various days on which it has been observed. There are but two or three persons in the colony to whom they could be of any service, and they can have the whole or any part on application to me for that purpose." Scott also provides, in a postscript, the elements of the comet's orbit, as he calculated them, after writing his letter.  As a comparison, with Tebbutt's elements, (published on June 15), these are: perihelion passage: June 11.68918 (Scott), June 13.7253 (Tebbutt); perihelion distance: 0.82218 (Scott), 0.82033 (Tebbutt); longitude of the ascending node: 278° 57' 52" (Scott),  280° 0' 44" (Tebbutt); inclination or orbit: 85° 38' 11" (Scott), 86° 16' 42" (Tebbutt); distance of perihelion from node: 29° 42' 58" (Scott), 27° 47' 05" (using Tebbutt's data); motion: direct (both). "The Comet." Sydney Morning Herald, September 30, 1861, p. 3 c. 3-4. Napier, F. "Tebbutt's Comet."  Sydney Morning Herald, October 7, 1861, p. 8 c. 4. "...A comparison of the elements of the two orbits will show that they are identical, in fact the correspondence of the elements calculated by Mr. Hind, with those of Mr. Tebbutt, is very remarkable, considering the proximity and consequent disturbing influence of the earth, the difference in the inclination not amounting to more than twenty seconds." Lowe, Edward Joseph. "The Comet." London Times, July 2, 1861, p. 5 c. 6. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "The Comet." London Times, July 9, 1861, p. 9 c. 6. Lowe and other astronomers in England announced their own observations of the comet, unaware that it had been observed more than a month before by Tebbutt and Scott, since news and mail usually took more than two months to travel from Australia to Britain at that time.]


1861 June 30 / T. / Tri, July 3-4-4 / New comet in the evening, midway between North Star and the Dippernucleus 3 or 4 times as large as Venusits tail from 15 to 18 degrees toward the zenithlooked like the reflection of a great fire. At 3 a.m., the comet was ab 12 degrees above the horizon and had moved about 8 degrees eastward. [III; 131.1, 131.2. "Another Comet." New York Tribune, July 3, 1861, p. 4 c. 4.]


1861 June 30 / Reported from the Allegheny Observatory, July 3-5-3. "By the appearance of the tail there is reason to infer that it is approaching the sun at an inconceivable rate. [III; 132. (Not found in the New York Tribune, New York Times, nor in LOC search @ 3-5-3.)]


1861 June 30 / I find nothing upon the Comet in the Cape Argus. [III; 133.]


1861 June 30 / Comet was discovered by Tebbutt, May 13th. [III; 135. Tebbutt, John, Jr. "A Comet Visible." Sydney Morning Herald, May 25, 1861, p. 5. c. 5.]


1861 June 30 / This is how in Eng the comet path supposed to be [illustration]. / A Comet between earth and sun  B Comet cutting ecliptic  C Comet July 10  Ea  Earth June 29  eb  Earth June 30  Ec  Earth July 10. [See Doubt, no. 34, p. 110.] [III; 136.1, 136.2. (Fort's illustrated note in Doubt.)]


1861 June 30 / so saw in Sci Amer 2/5/42 / In N.Y. Trib and Herald, said was Thatcher's Comet, which had passed perihelion on June 11, discovered by him Ap. 4th, on its way to perihelion, and doubtless been brilliant in south. / See see the (+)minus note. [III; 137. "Thatcher's Comet." Scientific American, n.s., 5 (July 20, 1861): 42. "Thatcher's Comet." New York Herald, July 8, 1861, p. 5 c. 2-3. "The Thatcher Comet." New York Herald, July 10, 1861, p. 5 c. 2. "The Great Comet." New York Tribune, July 8, 1861, p. 2 c. 6, & p. 3 c. 1-2.]


1861 June 30 / Sci Amer 2/5/27 / Comet moving N. West. [III; 138. "The Comet as it Appeared to the Eyes of a Common Man." Scientific American, n.s., 5 (July 13, 1861): 27.]


[1861 June 30. Wrong date. See: 1861 June 28, (III; 139).]


1861 June 30 / Comet made no impression upon the photographic plate. / Athenaeum, July 6. [III; 140. "The Comet." Athenæum, 1861 (no. 1758; July 6): 19. "I made an attempt on the 2nd to obtain a photograph of the Comet in the focus of my reflector; but not the slightest impression was produced by an exposure of two minutes, although a fixed star was clearly depictedI made several attempts to photograph the Comet by means of Rosse's No. 3 portrait lens mounted on the top of my telescope, and carried round by clockwork,not the slightest trace of the Comet was depicted in fifteen minutes, although fixed stars were depicted." "The Great Comet." New York Tribune, July 8, 1861, p. 2 c. 6, & p. 3 c. 1-2. "Mr. John A. Whipple....reports that the photographic power of light from the comet is very feeble, hardly making an impression on his most sensitive preparations."]


1861 July 3 / midnight / Met from a few degrees under the head of comet / BA 61-8 / See July 8. [III; 141. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 8-9. See: 1861 July 8, (III; 148).]


1861 July 6 / Solar halo at Yzeure (Allier) / C.R. 52/1275. [III; 142. Laussedat, A. "Sur un halo solaire observé le 8 juin 1861 à Yzeure (Allier)." Comptes Rendus, 52 (1861): 1275-1276.]


1861 July 7 / 10:30 p.m. / From near Beta Ursa Majorisseen near Warrington. Brilliant meteor / "Distant thunder heard. / BA 61/10. [III; 143. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 10-11.]


1861 July 7 / 10:30 p.m. / Thelwall, near Warrington / large meteor / "Distant thunder heard." BA 61. [III; 144. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 10-11.]


1861 July 7 / (Det) / Thelwall, near Warrington / Met seen. "Distant thunder heard. / BA '61 / ab. 16 miles E of Liverpool / (See Nov 19 and Dec 8.) [III; 145. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 10-11. See: 1861 Nov 19, (III; 194), and, 1861 Dec 8, (III; 205).]


1861 July 7 / Waiting to hear / Astronomer in NY interviewed / Trib., 7-5-2 / Had he determined he orbit yet? "No. These determiniations require [great] nicety of calculation, and are often tedious." [III; 146. "Night Notes." New York Tribune, July 7, 1861, p. 5 c. 5-6. "The Great Comet." New York Tribune, July 8, 1861, p. 2 c. 6, & p. 3 c. 1-2. The elements of its orbit, calculated by Truman Henry Safford, were published in the next issue.]


1861 July 8 / (+)-minus / Trib of / Prof Bond says the comet's perihelion was June 11. That comet had been in the south, and had crossed from the southern side of the plane of the earth's orbit ab. the 28th of June. Distance from earth a. 25,000,000 miles on 5th of July. [III; 147.1, 147.2. "The Great Comet." New York Tribune, July 8, 1861, p. 2 c. 6, & p. 3 c. 1-2.]


1861 July 8 / 11, 7, 48 / (Clifton)met that became visible a little above tail of a comet / LT 11-7-e / See July 3. [III; 148. Burder, William C. "A Meteor." London Times, July 11, 1861, p. 7 c. 5. See: 1861 July 3, (III; 141).]


1861 July 11 / 9 p.m. / Shock / Syracuse, N.Y. / A.J. Sci 2/32/297. [III; 149. "Earthquake at Syracuse, New York." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 32 (1861): 297.]


1861 July 11, etc., to 22 / Meteors / L.T. [III; 150. Burder, William C. "A Meteor." London Times, July 11, 1861, p. 7 c. 5. Frost, W.M. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, July 18, 1861, p. 9 c. 6. "The Meteor." London Times, July 19, 1861, p. 5 c. 6. "The Meteor." London Times, July 22, 1861, p. 6 c. 3. "The Meteor." London Times, July 23, 1861, p. 12 c. 6. Addison, J.E. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, July 24, 1861, p. 12 c. 6.]


1861 July 12 / q. / Ottawa, Canada / I / [light] / BA '11. [III; 151. Milne, 716.]


1861 July 12 / (q) / Montreal, Ottawa, Canada / BA '11. Canadian Naturalist 6/329. [III; 152. Milne, 716. "The Earthquake of July 13, 1861." Canadian Naturalist, 6 (1861): 329.]


1861 July 16 / ab. 10:50 p.m. / at Greenwich Park / Met NE from Alpha Lyrae / BA 61/10. [III; 153. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 10-11.]


1861 July 16 / Large meteors / England / from 9:30 p.m. to 11:45 p.m. / BA 62-6. [III; 154. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 2-7.]


1861 July 16 / 11:33 p.m. / from Alpha Lyrae in a S.W. direction / See Aug. 6 / Isle of Wight. BA 61/10. [III; 155. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 10-11]


1861 July 16 / Pages in BA '62-4, etc., upon Met. [III; 156. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 2-7.]


1861 July 16 / Great met / Eng / 11:30 p.m. / Rept BA 1860 (?) / It same from 9:30 to 11:30 p.m. [III; 157. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 10-11. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 2-7.]


1861 July 16 / 11:30 p.m. / Met train / MWR 07/391. [III; 158. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (September 1907): 390-397, at 391, cv. Table 2.]


1861 July 31 / q / India / Benares / II / [Med] / BA '11. [III; 159. Milne, 716.]


1861 July 31 / [LT], 7-f / Devil at Corfu. [A; 417. "The Devil at Corfu." London Times, July 31, 1861, p. 7 c. 6.]


1861 Aug 1 / Metite / Near Chorley Rectory, near Lancaster, ac to Rev A.H. Denham, stone weighing 86 pounds / LT, Aug 3-5-f / says saw it fall. [III; 160. Denham, Augustus H. "Fall of an Aërolite."  London Times, August 3, 1861, p. 5 c. 6. The letter was a hoax.]


1861 Aug 1 / Critic, Aug 10 / That no Chorley within 25 miles of Lancaster. That a dealer in minerals had telegraphed to Chorley, receiving reply, "All boshno such personno aerolite." [III; 161. "Notes of the Week." Critic, 23 (no. 579; August 10, 1861): 145-146, at 145. "This much we do know: that when Mr. Wright, the dealer in minerals, read the letter in the Times, he telegraphed at once to Chorley, offering 100l. for the aërolite, and received the following brief but expressive reply: 'All boshno such person knownno aërolite.'"]


1861 Aug 3 / [LT], 5-f / 5-10-b / 7-10-d / Aerolites. [III; 162. Denham, Augustus H. "Fall of an Aërolite." London Times, August 3, 1861, p. 5 c. 6. Gladstone, J.H. "Aërolites." London Times, August 5, 1861, p. 10 c. 2. "Aërolites." London Times, August 7, 1861, p. 10 c. 4.]


1861 Aug. 6 / Meteor / 9:50 p.m. / from the zenith to the E of Alpha Lyrae. At 11:42, one appeared bet d[elta] Cygni and a[lpha] Lyrae, at Greenwich. / BA 61/10. [III; 163. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1859-60." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1860, 1-27, at 10-11.]


1861 Aug 8 / Cambridge / A flash. No met. / At Aylesbury, it was recorded—"Like a gas flame suddenly lighted and then put out." / Intel Ob 1/220. [III; 164. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. "Observed Heights of Meteors and Shooting Stars." Intellectual Observer, 1 (April 1862) 217-222, at 220.]


1861 Aug 10 / 95 mets / New Haven, Conn // 289 / Burlington, N.J. / BA 1863. Radiant of 80% at N.H. = 47-56, RA and 47-56 N Dec. / At Burl., 88% from 48-6 and 50-57. [III; 165. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 212-213.]


1861 Aug 10 / Perseids more numerous than usual, ac to E.J Lowe, of Nottingham. BA 61-42. [III; 166. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 42.]


1861 Aug. 10 / Great meteor / N.J. and Conn / A.J. Sci 2/32/448 / 11:23 p.m. [III; 167. "Grand Meteor of August 10, 1861." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 32 (1861): 448-451.]


1861 Aug 12 / At E. Fairfield, Ohio, 6.29 inches of rain in 4½ hours / A. J. Sci 2/32/296. [III; 168. "Remarkable Rain-Fall in Ohio." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 32 (1861): 296.]


1861 Aug 13 / [LT], 9-f / 17-6-f / Meteors. [III; 169. Mansel, S.P. "Shooting Stars." London Times, August 13, 1861, p. 9 c. 6. "Shooting Stars." London Times, August 17, 1861, p. 6 c. 6.]


1861 Aug 21 / from moon / Venus / Nature 28/54. [III; 170. Pooley, C. "Remarkable Lunar Phenomenon observed at Weston-super-Mare, August 21, 1861." Nature, 28 (May 17, 1883): 54-55. The article says nothing about Venus. See: 1842 Feb 25, (II; 435).]


1861 Aug. 21 / Philippines / 23Guatemala / 26Benares, India / 27Guatemala / 29Argentina // q's / BA '11. Sim q's, Feb. 18, 1889. [III; 171. Milne, 716.]


1861 Aug 22 / [LT], 10-d / Brilliant meteor / Spain. [III; 172. "Brilliant Meteor in Spain." London Times, August 22, 1861, p. 10 c. 4.]


1861 Aug 31 / 5:22 a.m. / q. / Washington / A. J. Sci 2/32/453. [III; 173. "The Earthquake of 31st August." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 32 (1861): 453-454.]


[1861 Sept 5. Wrong date. See: 1872 Sept 5, (III; 174).]


1861 Sept 7 / Bolides at Gaillon (Eure) / C.R. 53-482. [III; 175. Kuhn. "Observation de deux bolides, à Gaillon (Eure), le 7 septembre 1861." Comptes Rendus, 52 (1861): 482-483.]


1861 Sept 7 / Nervous disorders / 3 sudden deaths / in a town where been meteors / C.R. 53/482. [A; 418. Kuhn. "Observation de deux bolides, à Gaillon (Eure), le 7 septembre 1861." Comptes Rendus, 52 (1861): 482-483. In addition to the three deaths in a small village, (with a population of 3,340 in 1861), Kuhn noted many cases of hemorrhages.]


1861 Sept 12 / Dunkirk / meteor and sandstorm soon after / London Review 3/2/366. [III; 176. Clarke, Thomas. "Another Meteor." London Review, 3 (no. 64; September 21, 1861): 366.]


1861 Sept 26 / [LT], 8-c / th storm / Birmingham. [III; 177. "Thunderstorm." London Times, September 26, 1861, p. 8 c. 3.]


1861 Sept 30 / Chili / q and flashes and luminous cloud / See 1805. / See months before Mendoza in Chili, too. / (det met). [III; 178. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 368???) See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1861 Sept 30 / No q in Chili in L.T. Index. [III; 179.]


[1861 Oct 1. Wrong date. See: 1862 Oct 7, (III; 180).]


1861 Oct 2 / Ohio / fireball / BA 67-418. [III; 181. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 419.]


1861 Oct 3 / (Aurora) / North Northampton / 7:30 p.m.broad band of light from about N.W. to N.E. At nine, changed to between N. and W. and threw out rays toward zenithtill 10:30. / LT, Oct 7. [III; 182. (London Times, October 7, 1861; not found here.)]


1861 Oct 4 / 7:20 p.m. / Conn / met / brilliantN to E from Cygnus to Cassiopeia / A. J. Sci 2/32/443. [III; 183. "Remarkable Meteor, Oct. 4, 1861." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 32 (1861): 443.]


1861 Oct 4, 9, 10, 11 / Many mets / Eng. / BA 62-18. [III; 184. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 18-21.]


1861 Oct 25 / Conj Saturn and Jupiter / Observatory 24/158. [III; 185. Johnson, Samuel Jenkins. "Planetary Conjunctions." Observatory, 24 (1901): 156-158, at 158.]


1861 Oct 29 / Waterspout fell on Rome and did great damage. / The Geologist 5-110. [III; 186. "Earthquake-Shocks...." Geologist, 5 (1862): 110.]


1861 Nov. 11 / Trans Mercury / Obs. 30/383. [III; 187. Lynn, William Thynne. "Transits of Mercury." Observatory, 30 (1907): 382-383, at 383.]


1861 Nov [11] / Luminous spot on Mercury in transit / M Notices 38-338. [III; 188. Jenkins, Benjamin George. "The Luminous Spot on Mercury in Transit." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 38 (April 12, 1878): 337-340, at 338.]


1861 Nov. 12 / 5:50 p.m. / great met / Manchester, Bristol, etc. / BA 62-24. [III; 189. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 24-25.]


1861 Nov 15 / Ab. 10 p.m., great met in Iowa, somewhat larger than apparent size of full moon. BA 1877-102. [III; 190. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 102-103, 150.]


1861 Nov. 15 / 10:30 p.m. / 7 stones and great explosion / Iowa / BA ' 77-102. 1860? / See. [III; 191. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 102-103, 150. Fort questioned the date of this meteor, which only appears as a "stonefall" in this article and which may be confused with the Homestead meteorite which fell on February 12, 1875. A later article by Irish fails to mention any meteor on this date or matching its description, between 1852 and 1872. Irish, Charles Wood. "Some Remarkable Meteors and Meteoric Falls." Iowa Historical Record, 2 (no. 1; January, 1886): 221-232, at 225. "Passing over two or three of minor importance, I come to one seen by myself, my family, and neighbors. I was with my family visiting at the house of Mr. and Mrs. S.R. Somers, in Tama county in this state. It was on the night of November l0th, 1862, and about ten o'clock. The room which we were in had a window in the south side and one in the west side. Suddenly, while we were in the midst of an animated conversation, several bright and quivering flashes of light came in at the south window, and the figure of the window itself was depicted upon the floor, just as if the sun was shining into it. The apparition of the window on the floor ran rapidly to the wall and disappeared, while at the same time the figure of the north window flashed upon the floor and ran rapidly out into the room. I hastened to the north window and there beheld in the sky, and travelling rapidly towards the northwest, a most beautiful meteor dazzling in its brightness, which, in one dire flash, instantly gave up its beauty and its motion, and disappeared." "In about two minutes after this, there came from the direction of where the meteor was last seen two or three heavy reports, as of a distant cannon, and succeeding this a hollow rumbling, which echoed and re-echoed in, and along the bluffs of Deer creek, and conveyed a most dismal impression to the mind. This meteor fell to the earth near to the northeast corner of Grundy county, in this state, and as far as I know but one small fragment of it was found. This I saw, and it had the usual black crust. The finder refused to part with it on any terms, and so it was lost to science."]


1861 Nov. 19-28 / Potenza, Italy / q. / BA '11. Similar / See Dec 16-17, 1857. [III; 192. Milne, 716. See: 1857 Dec 16-17, (II; 2111).]


1861 Nov. 19 / Met that blazed forth suddenly near the moon and disappeared seen at Woodford / B Assoc 1862-26-28. Noise of it heard by several obse[rvers] (ab 2 minutes after explos[ion]) / seen near moon / Surrey, Kent, Exeter, Essex, etc. / if moon far away, should been great parallaxand was heard. [III; 193. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 26-29, 79.]


1861 Nov 19 / 9:40 p.m. / Kent, etc. / great det met / BA 62/26 / 3 dets. / See '62/79. / See July 7. [III; 194. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 26-29, 79. See: 1861 July 7, (III; 145).]


1861 Nov. 19 / Standard, Nov. 26 / Cor writes he saw the met passing over head, at Margateand saw it explode and a minute later heard a booming sound. / In 28th, cor who heard it in London. [III; 195. "The Meteor." London Evening Standard, November 26, 1861, p. 5 c. 2.]


1861 Nov. 19 / ab. 9:40 / at Portsea / Cor saw it "not far from the moon." / Standard, Nov. 22. /// 262 / 596. [III; 196. "The Meteor." London Evening Standard, November 22, 1861, p. 6 c. 2.]


1861 Nov 19 / 9:35 p.m. / Ipswich / met / "extraordinary detonation" / A S Herschel / Times, 1864, Nov. 26-11-f. See Intel. Obs 9/101. [III; 197. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, November 26, 1864, p. 11 c. 6. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. "Detonating Meteors of February and November." Intellectual Observer, 9 (March 1866): 99-101, at 101. "The 911th of February, and the 1921st of November, are dates deserving future study, with the special view of determining the direction of the detonating meteors. At present the frequent return of detonating meteors on those dates plainly indicate the fact that these bodies, like the acknowledged star-showers of August and November, revolve in fixed orbits round the sun."]


1861 Nov. 19-28 / q. / Italy / Basilicata / BA 11. [III; 198. Milne, 716.]


1861 Dec 2 / Magdeburg / 7Westphalia / fireballs / See March '62. / 11Leipzig / 14E. Germany. [III; 199. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 420. See: 1862 March 5, (III; 239).]


1861 Dec 3 / 7 p.m.det met as if from Polaris / Germany / 67-420. [III; 200. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 420.]


1861 Dec. 3 / 7 p.m. / Loud det met near Halle / A. J. Sci 2/34/431. Seen throughout Germany and as far as Vienna, 300 miles from Halle. [III; 201. "Detonating Meteoric Fireball of Dec. 3d, 1861." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 34 (1862): 431-432.]


1861 Dec 7 / New eruption, Vesuvius / La Sci Pour Tous 7-23. Description / See index Vesuvius. [III; 202. "Nouvelle Éruption du Vésuve." La Science Pour Tous, 7 (no. 3; December 19, 1861): 23. "Nouvelle Éruption du Vésuve." La Science Pour Tous, 7 (no. 4; December 26, 1861): 31. "L'Éruption du Vésuve." La Science Pour Tous, 4 (no. 7; January 16, 1862): 56.]


1861 Dec 8(all Dec / An. Reg) / Vesuvius / C.R. 53/1090 / An Reg. '61-240. [III; 203. Tchihatcheff, Pierre de. "Nouvelle éruption du Vésuve." Comptes Rendus, 53 (1861): 1090-1092. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 103 (1861): pt. 2, 1-270, at 240-246, cv. "Eruption of Vesuvius."]


1861 Dec. 8 / from Hull toward Isle of Man / L.T., 1863, 19-5-f /Meteor. [III; 204. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. "The Meteor." London Times, December 19, 1863, p. 5 c. 6.]


1861 Dec 8 / (+) / (Sound) / (Not Successional) / et. / 8:15 p.m. / Liverpool, Manchester / like a gun at Southport / B.A. 62/35. See BA 1862. [III; 205. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 32-35, 79-80.]


1861 Dec / Exquisite sunsets at Naples. Vesuvius in eruption. / An Reg 1861-244. [III; 206. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 103 (1861): pt. 2, 1-270, at 240-246, cv. "Eruption of Vesuvius."]


1861 Dec 8 / 8:40 / Lancaster / met and sound lke gun / seen Manchester, etc. / BA 62/37 / See 62-79. / and Cartmel, Lancaster / Lancaster no time given. [III; 207. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 36-39. See: 1861 Dec 8, (III; 208).]


1861 Dec 8 / Great met / ab. 8:15 p.m. / 3 pages to it in BA 62. [III; 208. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 32-35, 79-80.]


1861 Dec 8 / More mets at Birkenhead (Seacombe) than at most abundance in preceding Nov or August / BA 62-39. [III; 209. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 38-39.]


1861 Dec. 8 / Many mets at Newcastle / BA 62-38. [III; 210. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 38-39.]


1861 Dec 9 / Vesuvius / started indications on 8th / 2 a,m, / An. Reg. [III; 211. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 103 (1861): pt. 2, 1-270, at 240-246, cv. "Eruption of Vesuvius."]


1861 Dec. 9 / fireballs / 6 a.m., Maine / 17th Buffalo / 25thConn., at sunset / 307 p.m., one from Cygnusin Conn. A. J. Sci 2/33/291. [III; 212. "Large Meteors." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 33 (1862): 291.]


1861 Dec. 11 / (Cut) / Reported from Roy[al] Observatory, Greenwich, another met disappeared near the moon. / B. Assoc '62-40. [III; 213. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 40-41.]


1861 Dec. 12 / bet 4:30 a.m. and daylight / Philadelphia / ab 25 meteors, chiefly in the N. west. A. J. Sci 2/33/149. [III; 214. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Meteoric Observations in December, 1861." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 33 (1862): 148-149.]


1861 Dec 17 / [LT], 8-a / 21-10-b / 25-10-a / 27-8-b / 31-8-b / Vesuvius. [III; 215. "The Eruption of Vesuvius." London Times, December 17, 1861, p. 8 c. 1-2. "The Eruption of Vesuvius." London Times, December 21, 1861, p. 10 c. 2-4. "The Eruption of Vesuvius." London Times, December 25, 1861, p. 10 c. 1. "Naples." London Times, December 27, 1861, p. 8 c. 2-3. "Naples." London Times, December 31, 1861, p. 8 c. 2-3.]


[1861 Dec. 19. Wrong date. See: 1862 Dec 19, (III; 343).]


1862:


1862 / Body of Mrs. W. I. Peters, Frankfort, Ind. / See Dec. 22, 1888. [A; 419. (See: 1888 Dec. 22.)]


1862 / Sleeper Susan C. Godsey near Hickman, Ky. / See July 14, 1869. [A; 420. See: 1869 July 14, (A; 547).]


1862 Jan. 2 / 3:45 a.m. / Hartford, Conn. / a luminous cloud, W to E., followed by another. Meteors from N to S / very numerous / A. J. Sci 2/33/290. [III; 217. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Shooting Stars of January 2, 1862." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 33 (1862): 290-291.]


1862 Jan 2 / morning / New Haven, Conn. / Mets. ab. 4 a.m. / As many as three a minute were seen by one observer. / Proc. Amer. Phil. Soc., 13-501. [III; 218. Kirkwood, Daniel. "On the Meteors of January 2nd." Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 13 (1873): 501-502.]


1862 Jan 3 / 7:17 a.m. / large fireball / N.Y. City / A. J. Sci 2/33/291. [III; 219. "Large Meteors." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 33 (1862): 291.]


1862 Jan 5 / sunset / Meteor / Long Island, N.Y. / A. J. Sci 2/33/291. [III; 220. "Large Meteors." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 33 (1862): 291.]


1862 Jan 6 / [LT], 10-6 / Vesuvius. [III; 221. "The Eruption of Vesuvius." London Times, January 6, 1862, p. 10 c. 2-3.]


1862 Jan. 11 / W. R. Birt / Met appear [be]low the moon. / (London) / B/ Assoc 1862/42 / (Cut). [III; 222. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 42-43.]


1862 Jan 14 / Slains / See Oct 28, 1863. Jan 15, 1866. [III; 223. See: 1863 Oct 28, (III; 490), and, 1866 Jan 15, (III; 803).]


1862 Jan 14 / (Slains) / Slains and whole eastern coast of Aberdeenshire / black, smoky looking cloud that discharged a shower of rain like drops of ink. See May 20, 1862, / Symons Met Mag 53/42 / See Vesuvius, Dec 8. [III; 224. Bonney, T.G. "Black Rain." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 53 (May 1918), 42. See: 1861 Dec 8, (III; 203), and, 1862 May 20, (III; 256).]


1862 Jan 23 / 9 p.m. / Mets as if from Rigel / BA 62-44. [III; 225. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 44-45.]


1862 Jan 29 [?] / Met that came from "beneath the moon" / (London) / (Cut) / B Assoc. 1862-46. [III; 226. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 46-47. Following an entry for January 29 with "?" in the catalog, the date is uncertain.]


1862 Jan to Feb / q's / China / BA '11. [III; 227. Milne, 716.]


1862 Feb. 2 / 8:15 p.m. / 9:15 / 10:23 / 10:54 / 11:11 / 11:30 / BA 62 / great mets / England. [III; 228. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 46-51.]


1862 Feb 2 / 8 p.m. / East Haddam / q / See Nov. 9, 1810. [III; 229. Brigham, William T. "Volcanic Manifestations in New England." Memoirs Read Before the Boston Society of Natural History, 2 (1871/1878): 1-28, at 22. See: 1810 Nov 9, (I; 308).]


1862 Feb. 2 / 8:20 p.m. / Lancashire, Notts, Eastbourne, N. Wales, Derbyshire. Met = Moon / BA 67-420. [III; 230. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 420]


1862 Feb 5-6 / Salsburg / Red snow / Fassig 2/382. [III; 231. Fassig, Oliver Lanard, ed. Bibliography of Meteorology. Part II: Moisture. Washington: Signal Office, 1889, 382. Haidinger, Wilhelm Karl Ritter von. "Der rothe Schnee in Salzburg am 5. und 6. Februar 1862." Sitzungsberichte der Kaiserlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften. Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Classe. Abt. 2, Mathematik, Physik, Chemie, Physiologie, Meteorologie, Physische Geographie und Astronomie, 45 (1862): 796.]


1862 Feb 10 / [LT], 8-d / Ext. discovery from Springhead. [A; 421. "Extraordinary Discovery." London Times, February 10, 1862, p. 8 c. 4. An ancient wooden boat was found while digging a trench between Springhead and Stoneferry, England.]


1862 Feb. 14 / Cor says that heard entire morning, near Madison, Indiana, discharges of artillery or like slight earthquake shocks. Next day came news of bombardment of Fort Donelson, 200 miles away. / Science 8/348. [III; 232. Wiley, Harvey Washington. "Unexplained Noises." Science, s. 1 v. 8 (October 15, 1886): 348. Fort Donelson, in Tennessee, was defended from naval assaults on the Cumberland River, on February 14, with a 128 pounder and two 32 pounder cannon.]


1862 Feb 18 / Algiers / Met / BA 69-283. [III; 233. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 283.]


1862 Feb 19 / London / 11:32 p.m. / 11:50 / 12:10 / Mets from Polaris / BA 62-50 / Next night another display in Weston-super-Mare. 21st, London, from Polaris. [III; 234. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 50-53.]


1862 Feb. 23 / 9:25 p.m. / Liverpool, Somerset, etc. / large fireball / BA 67-420 / 62-52. [III; 235. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 420. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 52-53.]


1862 Feb 23 / Met from near Jupiter / B Assoc 1862-52. /// 61 / 111 / 134 / 16- / 184 / 296 / 5. [III; 236. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 52-53.]


1862 Feb. 25 / Venus Inf Conjunction with Sun / (A1). [III; 237.]


1862 March 4 / Manila / strong q / probable det met / (see 1805) / See Jan 3, 1863. [III; 238. See: 1863 Jan 3, (III; 350). See: (1805; nothing appears to match).]


1862 March 5 / Austria / 12—Saxony / 13—Westphalia / 14—Westphalia / 19—Westphalia // fireballs / BA 67-420 / See Dec, '61. [III; 239. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 420. See: 1861 Dec 2, (III; 199).]


1862 March 20 / Vulcan by Loomis / Manchester / M. Notice 22/232. [III; 240. Hind, John Russell. "Note on a dark, curcular Spot upon the Sun's Disk, with rapid motion, as observed by W. Lummis, Esq., of Manchester, 1862, March 20." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 22 (April 11, 1862): 232.]


1862 March 21 / Brisbane, Queensland / Meteors frequent / BA 65. [III; 241. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1864-65." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1865, 57-142, at 62-63.]


1862 March 25 / Met ½ moon / Tasmania / BA '69-283. [III; 242. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 283.]


1862 March 25 / 10 a.m. / C.R. 55-200 / North of Sumatra, violent concussions to a ship. [III; 243. Dugast, F. "Tremblement de terre ressenti en mer." Comptes Rendus, 55 (1862): 200.]


1862 March 27 / Dustfall / Baun, and near Lyons / Ann. Soc. Agr., Lyon. 6/42 / R-May 16, 1846. [III; 244. "M. Fournet entretient ensuite la Compagnie, d'une pluie de terre...." Annales des Sciences Physiques et Naturelles, d'Agriculture et d'Industrie...., (Lyons). s. 3 v. 2 (1862): xlii. "Séance du 1er avril 1862." Mémoires de l'Académie des Sciences, Belles-lettres et Arts de Lyon. Classe des Sciences, s. 2 v. 12 (1862): 22-23. "M. Fournet entretient la Compagnie d'un phénomène récemment observé aux environs de Lyon. Il s'agit d'une pluie de terre, tombée le 27 mars dernier, à Bonnand, près des aqueducs romains, à la fabrique de toiles imperméables de M. Ducarre, située sur la rive droite de l'Izeron, à 27 mètres au-dessus de la rivière." "Le 27, au matin, on avait couvert de toiles les étendages, lorsque la pluie commença à tomber vers huit heures. Cette pluie fut précédée de larges gouttes chargées d'une terre rouge-brique. Les toiles imperméables ont, pendant le séchage, une propriété adhésive très-marquée. Cette pluie terreuse laissa de fortes empreintes que n'effaça pas la pluie très-abondante de la journée, et qui résistèrent en partie aux lavages à la brosse." "Il a été possible de recueillir de notables quantités de cette poussière, dont M. Fournet fait passer un échantillon sous les yeux de l'Académie." This red rain fell at Lyons, near the Yzeron river, where canvas was being manufactured. Bonnand, (not Baun, nor Baunand), was a textile manufacturer. Refer to: 1846 May 16, (II; 961).]


1862 March 31 / May 16 / 21 / June 29 / July 20 (noted) / Sept 16 / Oct 12 // Mets / Athens / BA 69-283. [III; 245. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 283.]


1862 April 4 / Met / "from Jupiter / B Assoc 1862-52 / (Cut). /// 30 / 91 / 8 . [III; 246. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 52-53.]


1862 Ap. 14 / 7:42 p.m. / London / large fireball / BA 67-420. [III; 247. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 420.]


1862 Ap 17, 19 / Sounds and Concussions / Dijon, etc. / C.R. 54-923. [III; 248. Perrey, Alexis. "Sur un léger tremblement de terre senti à Dijon et dans les départements voisins le 17 avril 1862, vers 8h 10m du matin." Comptes Rendus, 54 (1862): 923-926. ]


1862 May / Hurricane / England / Intel. Obs 1-439. [III; 249. Lowe, E.J. "The Hurricane of May 1862." Intellectual Observer, 1 (July 1862): 439-446.]


1862 May 1 / Carluke / black / Scotland / (Cut) / D-32 / See Aug. 11. [III; 250. The note copies information from page 32 of The Book of the Damned. Rust, James. The Scottish Black Rain Showers and Pumicestone Shoals of the Year 1862 and 1863. Edinburgh: William Blackwood and Sons, 1864.  See: (August 11).]


1862 May 3 / (Fr) / [LT], 12-a / q / France. [III; 251. "France." London Times, May 12, 1862, p. 12 c. 1. See: 1862 Ap 17, 19, (III; 248).]


1862 May 7 / Remarkable hailstones near Leeds / Proc Roc Soc London 12-239. [III; 252. Sutcliffe, Thomas. "Notice of Remarkable hailstones which fell at Headingley, near Leeds, on the 7th of May, 1862." Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 12 (1862-1863): 239-242.]


1862 May 7 / Remarkable hail / Headingley, near Leeds / Phil. Mag, 1863, 26/67. [III; 253. Sutcliffe, Thomas. "Notice of Remarkable hailstones which fell at Headingley, near Leeds, on the 7th of May, 1862." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 26 (1863): 67-70.]


1862 May 16 / Met / Athens / BA 69-283. [III; 254. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 283.]


1862 May 20 / Chile / 26—Austria / 27—Switzerland / 27—Austria / 28—Peru // qs / BA '11. Sim q's Feb 18, 1889. [III; 255. Milne, 716. (See: 1889 Feb 18.)]


1862 May 20 / See Jan 14. / Slains / black / Scotland / D-32 / (12) / See June-July. [III; 256. The note copies information from page 32 of The Book of the Damned. See: 1862 Jan 14, (III; 224).]


1862 May 21 / Met / Athens / BA 69-283. [III; 257. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 283.]


1862 May 22 / [LT], 8-f / Aurora. [III; 258. Burder, William C. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, May 22, 1862, p. 8 c. 6.]


1862 June-July / Hecla / Mr. Sabine Baring-Gould writes in LT, Aug. 14-9-f, that been said were volc eruptions in Iceland, He had been travelling in Iceland and said that if been eruptions must have been slight. [III; 259. Baring Gould, Sabine. "Eruption in Iceland." London Times, August 14, 1862, p. 9 c. 6.]


1862 June 10 / [LT], 14-c / Slf-Mut / other case this year. [A; 422. "Self-Mutilation." London Times, June 10, 1862, p. 14 c. 3.]


1862 June 16 / 7:15 a.m. / Adelaide, S. Australia / Very large meteor. "Like a large body of fire." E. to W. Loud report like that of a very large cannon. BA 1868-346. [III; 260. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 346-347.]


1862 June 18-22 / Several shocks / Candia and Malta / L.T., July 11-12-e. [III; 261. "Earthquake in Malta and Candia." London Times, July 11, 1862, p. 12 c. 5.]


1862 June 21 / 7:40 p.m. / at Bougie / Met and train 10 minutes / C.R. 55-109. [III; 262. "Observation faite à Bougie le 21 juin d'un météore lumineux." Comptes Rendus, 55 (1862): 109.]


1862 June 29 / Met / Athens / BA 69-283. [III; 263. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 283.]


1862 July / Dorah Wentworth / Washington. [A; 423.]


[1862 July 1 /] 186— // Battle of Malvern Hill / heard 123 miles away / Nature 53/296. [III; 60. "Barisal Guns and Similar Sounds." Nature, 53 (January 30, 1896): 296-297, at 296, cv. "W.G. Brown."]


1862 July 9 / ab. 11 a.m. / St. Louis, Mo., an explosive sound was heard. Object crashed through window of Mr. John Riggin, real estate agent, north side of Chestnut street, between 2nd and 3rd streets. Dr B. F. Shumard investigated. Says he was sceptical but became a believer , but the object was found to be of iron but with no nickel in it. / (Am. J. Sci., 2/34/443)/ So when he learned that, he again became doubtful. The obj appeared to be a mixture of iron and other substances, weighed ab ¼ pound, one and a half inches long, ten lines wide, half an inch thick. [III; 264.1, 264.2, 264.3. "Supposed Fall of Meteoric Iron at St. Louis, Mo." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 34 (1862): 443-444.]


1862 July 10 / Severe q / Accra / LT, Aug 12-6-e. [III; 265. "West Coast of Africa." London Times, August 12, 1862, p. 6 c. 5.]


1862 July 10 / Gold Coast / 11—Peru / 13—Philippines / 14—Gold Coast // q's / BA '11. Sim q's, Feb 18, 1889. [III; 266. Milne, 716-717. See: (Feb 18, 1889.)]


1862 July 20 / Met / Athens / BA 69-283. [III; 267. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 283.]


1862 July 22 / [LT], 13-f / Note on the moon. [III; 268. "The Moon." London Times, July 22, 1862, p. 13 c. 6.]


1862 July 24 / Oullins, near Lyons—tiny fossil shells / See Sept 24, 1898. / said common in sand of N. Africa and in whirlwind. [III; 269. See: (1898 Sept. 24.)]


1862 July 27, 28 / Havana / many mets / BA '68-407. [III; 270. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 407.]


1862 July 28-29 / Increase of meteors / Havana and Rio de Janeiro / C.R. 61-732 / He quotes as remarkable that at a meeting of the B. Assoc that this stream had been seen emanating from Formalhaut, the most "meridionale" of all stars in the latitude of Havana. [III; 271. Poey, André. "Sur la non-existaence, sous le ciel central, des retours périodiques des étoiles filantes, et sur leur extinction graduelle du pôle nord à l'équateur." Comptes Rendus, 61 (1865): 730-734, at 732. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1864-65." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1865, 57-142, at 123, cv. "Star-showers of April, July, and August." This new meteor radiant was for the Piscis Austrinids; however, Poey tries to associate this with the Perseids. Meteor showers and their association with comets was only being established in 1862 by Schiaparelli, with the discovery that the orbits of the Perseids and Comet Swift–Tuttle, (109P/Swift–Tuttle, identified by Schiaprella as "Comète III. 1862"), closely matched. Schiaparelli, Giovanni. "Sur la relation qui existe entre les comètes et les étoiles filantes." Astronomische Nachrichten, 68 (1867): 331-332.]


1862 July 29-31 / See July 28-31, 1865. / Mistake in date? [III; 272. See: 1865 July 28-31, (III; 720).]


1862 / last of July / N.Y. City / vast invasion of moths. [III; 273.  The "measure worm" and subsequent "Miller white" moths plagued New York and Philadelphia by their nuisance and appetite for foliage. Graef, H.A, and Wiebe, Edward. The Measure Worm.... Brooklyn: A.H. Rome, 1862. Some residents of Brooklyn proposed their own war to eradicate the enemy that was stripping bare their shade trees. "We have also proposed to enlist the co-operation of our dear little wrens in our work of destruction, and wish that these, our intended allies, may be cultivated and protected in such a degree as they deserve. We have therefore introduced a very simple, but exceedingly useful, cheap and lasting wren-house, one of which, with nest, we exhibited at some of our former meetings. A large number of these houses should be placed in the trees of our city, and a cordial invitation extended to the birds to occupy them, and to feast upon the millions of worms at their immediate disposal." "The Prospective Measure-worm Nuisance." New York Times, May 5, 1865, p. 8 c. 3. These battles continued for several years, in New York City. "The birds feed on the worm, and thus prevent its undue increase. But birds cannot be induced to remain in the populous parts of our cities. Naturalists who have devoted some time to the observation of the measure-worm and its habits, recommend the application of a strong stream of water to the trees for the purpose of destroying the worm. This remedy has been successfully applied, and there appears to be no reason why our steam fire engines should not be brought into play against this rapacious and disgusting creature." "Moth Visitation Means Pest Coming." New York Times, July 18, 1908, p. 4 c. 2. House sparrows have been said to have been first imported to consume these worms and moths, but they had been brought to America several years before and had already been spread to other cities.]


1862 Aug 1 / Morlans, France / roof of house on fire—meteor? / (Cut) / La Sci Pour Tous 7/344. [III; 274. "Incendie Causé par un Aérolithe." La Science Pour Tous, 7 (no. 43; September 25, 1862): 344.]


1862 Aug / Comet 1862 (III) of the August meteors / Clerke, Hist Astro/327. [III; 275. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1st ed., (1885), 368-369; 4th ed., (1902), 327. Comet Swift–Tuttle, (109P/Swift–Tuttle).]


1862 Aug 4 / (Fr) / Began at 11 p.m. / Paris—Aurora from Cor Coroli to Omicron in the Great Bear / L.T., Aug 8-10-b. [III; 276. "France." London Times, August 8, 1862, p. 10 c. 1-2.]


1862 Aug 7. / Mrs Anna Rees dies, at South Bend, Indiana. / See Aug 11, 1872. [A; 424. See: 1872 Aug 11, (A; 776).]


1862 Aug 9 / Aurora and mets / BA 62-65. [III; 277. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 64-65.]


1862 Aug 9 / Weston-super-Mare. / Remarkable aurora began at 11:10 p.m. / BA 62-. [III; 278. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 64-65.]


1862 Aug 9 / (Beam) / Weston-super-Mare / Aurora—principal beam / contact beta and gamma, Little Bear, 11:10 / Gamma Draconis, 11:20 / Alpha Lyrae and Beta, 11:27 / Polaris, 11:30, extending to Alpha Aquilae / Another large streamer began at the Pointers. L.T., Aug 12-9-f. [III; 279. Wood, W.H. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, August 12, 1862, p. 9 c. 6.]


1862 Aug 14 / Don't mix this comet with another fainter one near orbit of Mars. [III; 280. Comet Swift–Tuttle, (109P/Swift–Tuttle), should not be confused with C/1862 N1.]


1862 Aug 14 / Comet with naked eye, by Charles Shea, 10 p.m., immediate[ly] under Pole star, ¼ the distance bet. Pole star and the northern star of the Pointers. / L.T. 16-12-b // 18-6-a—Hind said would be nearest sun on 23rd—said would pass toward Antares and disappear in the Sept. 10th or 12th, and then be ab. 2,000,000 miles from earth's orbit. // 22-8-d—Hind says would cross ecliptic on Sept 11 but be visible until ab. 20th. // also 29-5-b. [III; 281.1, 281.2, 281.3. Shea, Charles. "The Comet." London Times, August 16, 1862, p. 12 c. 2. Hind, John Russell. "The Comet." London Times, August 18, 1862, p. 6 c. 1. Romberg, Hermann. "The Comet." London Times, August 22, 1862, p. 8 c. 4. Crumpten, Thomas. "The Comet." London Times, August 25, 1862, p. 12 c. 3. "The Comet." London Times, August 29, 1862, p. 5 c. 2. Comet Swift–Tuttle, (109P/Swift–Tuttle).]


1862 Aug 22 / q/ / Spain / II [medium] / Seville / BA '11. [III; 282. Milne, 717.]


1862 Aug 22 / Sound / Weston-super-Mare / 11:30 p.m. / met and det / BA 62/68. [III; 283. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 68-69.]


1862 Aug 23 / 4 p.m. / Probable met train in Georgia / B.A., '63-218 / "Great luminosity"—like a sword—handle silver and point red; ten times as broad as long—pointed "for" S.W. to N.E. [III; 284. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 218-219.]


1862 Aug 23 / 4 p.m. / Great met / Georgia / BA 63-218. [III; 285. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 218-219.]


1862 Sept 2 / Lavington and Easterton—Wiltshire / Very great th. storm. Column in LT, Sept 6-10-e. [III; 286. "Tremendous Storm." London Times, September 6, 1862, p. 10 c. 5-6.]


1862 Sept 10 / [LT], 7-c / Terrible hail at Corfu. [III; 287. "Corfu, Sept. 1." London Times, September 10, 1862, p. 7 c. 3.]


1862 Sept. 12 / Rainstorm / Philadelphia / J. Frank Inst 44-59. [III; 288. "The President gave an account of the rain storm...." Journal of the Franklin Institute, s. 3 v. 44 (1862): 281-283.]


1862 Sept 12 / Storm / Philadelphia / J. F. Inst 74/281. [III; 289.  "The President gave an account of the rain storm...." Journal of the Franklin Institute, s. 3 v. 44 (1862): 281-283.]


1862 Sept 16 / Met / Athens / BA 69-283. [III; 290. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 283.]


1862 Sept 19 / 10:15 p.m. / Ext. met / Great Britain / BA 62-72 / See Rept 1863. / pages of description. [III; 291. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 70-75. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 315.]


1862 Sept 19 / Large met over London / LT, Sept 20-12-b / 22-4-f / 23-12-a / looked up. [III; 292. Slater, T. "Extraordinary Meteor." London Times, September 20, 1862, p. 12 c. 2. Burder, George F. "The Meteor." London Times, September 22, 1862, p. 4 c. 6. "The Great Meteor." London Times, September 23, 1862, p. 12 c. 1.]


1862 Sept 19 / ab 10 p.m. / Meteor / Caen / C.R. 55-594. [III; 293. Eudes-Deslongchamps, Eugène. "Observation d'un bolide, faite à Caen le 19 septembre." Comptes Rendus, 55 (1862): 594-595.]


1862 Sept 19 / det like of rocket's / 10:30 p.m. /Norwich, etc. / BA 62/74. [III; 294. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 74-75. (Norwich Mercury, after September 19, 1862. Not @ BNA.)]


1862 Sept 22 / 11:03 p.m. / Met moving near Mars / 11:48, another / from Slater's observatory, London / B. Assoc 1863/222. [III; 295. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 222-223.]


1862 Sept 25 / 6:15 and 6:30 p.m. / Mets / Eng. / BA 62-76. [III; 296. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1861-62." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1862, 1-81, at 76-77.]


1862 Sept 25 / 6:45 a.m. / Meteor / Paris / C.R. 55-556. [III; 297. Liandier. "Bolide observé à Paris le jeudi 25 septembre 1862 à 6h 45m du matin." Comptes Rendus, 55 (1862): 556.]


1862 Sept 25 / 6:30 p.m. / 7:40 / 8:30 / Mets around London / BA 63-224. [III; 298. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 222-225.]


1862 / 1st week Oct // St Estève, near Perpignan, France / After storm and lightning, windows and doors covered with substance like melted tin. / LT 1862 / Oct 10/8/b / See Oct., 1864. / July 23 (?), 1884. [III; 299. "France." London Times, October 10, 1862, p. 8 c. 1-2. See: (1864 Oct.; nothing here appears to match this.) See: (1884 July 23).]


1862 Oct, 2 weeks in / Sheep worrying by unknown dog / L.T., Oct. 29/8/c. [A; 425. "Worrying Sheep." London Times, October 29, 1862, p. c. 3.]


1862 Oct 5 / Op Mars / (A 1). [III; 300.]


1862 Oct 4 and 9 / 5th mag star / M. Notices 38/330 / In 1877, J. Tebbutt, looking over notes of old observations, found that he had noted 2 unknown stars in Ara (sic), upon these nights, one of them a 5th mag. [III; 301. Tebbutt, John. "On a New Variable in the Constellation Ara." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 38 (March 8, 1878): 330-331. In 1878, when Tebbutt looked for one of the two stars, (one being σ Aræ, and the other, the 5th magnitude unknown, which wasn't in his collection of star catalogs), he could only find a faint star in its position, among stars of the 10th and 11th magnitude; thus, he announced it to be a new variable star. Tappert, Claus, et al. "Life after eruption—I. Spectroscopic observations of 10 nova candidates." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 423 (July 1, 2012): 2476-2485, at 2481. Tappert, Claus, et al. "Life after eruption—II. The eclipsing old nova V728 Scorpii." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 431 (May 1, 2013): 92-101. This variable has been identified as Nova V728 Scorpii, (an eclipsing binary). "V728 Sco could soon play the role of a corner stone in our understanding of post-novae and cataclysmic variables in general."]


1862 Oct 7 / (F) / 12:30 p.m. / Meno, Furstenberg (Mecklenberg) / (stone) / BA 63-224 / 6. [III; 302. Fletcher, 102. This is the Menow meteorite. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 224-225.]


[1862 Oct 7 /] 1861 Oct 1 / (noon) / Meno, Mecklenburg / metite almost identical with one in Vernon Co, Wis. March 25, 1865 / BA 77-148. [III; 180. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 148-150. Kirkwood, Daniel. "The Claywater and Meno Meteorites." Nature, 14 (October 12, 1876): 526-527. The Menow and Vernon County meteorites.]


1862 Oct. 12 / Met. / Athens / BA 69-283. [III; 303. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 283.]


1862 Oct 13 / (Mars) / ab 10 p.m. / Spot like long train of clouds on Mars, by Lockyer and Dawes, in England / La Nature 1/148. [III; 304. Flammarion, Camille. "La Planète Mars." La Nature, 1873 (no. 10, August 9): 145-148, and, (no. 11; August 16): 171-174, at 148.]


1862 Oct 14-15 / Meteors / France / C.R. 55/673. [III; 305. Coulvier-Gravier, Remi Armand. "Phénomènes observés avant et pendant la tourmente atmosphérique du milieu d'octobre." Comptes Rendus, 55 (1862): 673-674.]


1862 Oct 15 / 9:01 p.m.—Berlin / 9:14 p.m.—Berlin / 9:24—Prague / 9:30—Bohemia—as if from Polaris, this one / all-large fireballs / BA 67-421. [III; 306. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 421.]


1862 Oct. 15 / Small q / Moluccas / BA '11. [III; 307. Milne, 717.]


1862 Oct 16 / q. / Asia Minor / II / [Medium] / BA 11. [III; 308. Milne, 717.]


1862 Oct. 18 / 8:13 p.m. / by Secchi, Naples / Spot looked like a tourbillon on Mars. / La Nat. 1/148. [III; 309. Flammarion, Camille. "La Planète Mars." La Nature, 1873 (no. 10, August 9): 145-148, and, (no. 11; August 16): 171-174, at 148.]


1862 Oct 21 / 6:10 p.m. / at Somain / An object or met that left a train, seemed to explode and disappear, leaving a cloud of smoke, but then rose and was visible about ten minutes. / Jour des Debats, Oct 28-1-5. [III; 310. "Un phénomène météorologique...." Journal des Debats, October 28, 1862, p. 1 c. 5. The fireball's train, (not the fireball, itself), was visible for more than ten minutes.]


1862 Oct 26 / That at Eaux Chaudes, the sky for a moment had seemed afire. / Jour des Debats, Oct 31-2-4. [III; 311. "On  écrit des Eaux-Chaudes, le 26 octobre, au Mémorial des Pyrénées." Journal des Débats, October 31, 1862, p. 2 c. 4.]


1862 Oct 26 / Pau and sky / (Fr) / Pau—sky / q / Condom / Pau / Mont-de-Marson / Lourdes / Tarbes / For a moment, sky seemed on fire. / See 1805. / See Sept 24, '64. [III; 312. "On  écrit des Eaux-Chaudes, le 26 octobre, au Mémorial des Pyrénées." Journal des Débats, October 31, 1862, p. 2 c. 4. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 369.) See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146), and, 1864 Sept 24, (III: 608 to 611).]


1862 Nov. / one morning // Morpeth, N.S.W. / Cor. to Sydney Morning Herald, Nov. 20, 1866, says he saw a dark object size of a cask moving in the sky, with great rapidity. [III; 313. Middleton, O.E. "To the Editor of the Herald." Sydney Morning Herald, November 20, 1866, p. 5 c. 5. "The subject of meteoric visitations past, present, and future, being at present invested with more than the usual amount of interest, induces me to mention, thus publicly, the circumstance of my attention having been arrested early one morning in November, 1862, by a very peculiar rushing noise, which increased rapidly in volume without my discovering the cause until looking immediately over head I saw distinctly a large meteor travelling with amazing rapidity in a south-easterly direction. Its apparent size was that of a large cask, of a dark colour, the surface irregular, and from the variations discovered in the angularities I was led to conjecture it was revolving on its axis. I may add that the morning was very calm, and the atmosphere beautifully clear. The sun was just about to rise."]


1862 Nov 1 / Metite / Stonefall / Seville, Spain / BA 67-420. [III; 314. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 420. This is the Sevilla meteorite.]


1862 Nov 2 / 10 p.m. / Large fireball / Glascow / BA 67-421. [III; 315. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 421.]


1862 Nov. 3 / Asia Minor / great q. / [BA] '11. [III; 316. Milne, 717.]


1862 Nov 9 / (See Aug 1, 1865,) / Sounds heard by Rev. T. Webb, at Hardwick, at['d] by him to gunfire, Milford Haven. / E Mec 100/279. H = 15 miles w of Hereford = 80 miles from M. Haven. [III; 317. Mee, Arthur. "Objects in Front of Sun—Distant Gunfire—Delavan's Comet—Non-Achromatic Refractor." English Mechanic, 100 (no. 2587; October 23, 1914): 279. See: 1865 Aug 1, (III; 724).]


1862 Nov 10 / Mars / 7 to 7:30 p.m. / 2 mets reported from Manchester by R. P. Greg. "Directed apparently from Mars." / BA 63-228. [III; 318. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 228-229.]


1862 Nov 11 / Mars / 8:45 to 9 p.m. / "Two or three shooting stars" reported by W H Wood, of Weston-super-Mare, "from Mars". / BA 63-228. [III; 319. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 228-229.]


1862 Nov. 12 / 10 a.m. / in bright sunlight / by Mr. Stothard / extraordinary brightness of Aristarchus—as a bright speck on the moon's disk / M. Notices 23-75. [III; 320. "In a letter...." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 23 (December 12, 1862): 75. "In a letter, dated Dublin, Nov. 12, 1862, Mr. Stothard notices an extraordinary brightness of Aristarchus, seen by him as a bright speck on the Moon's disk, that morning about 10h 30m A.M. Mean Dublin Time, in bright sunlight."]


1862 Nov. 16 / 16, 22, 23 // by W. H. Wood / Met appeared near Mars. On (22), one traversed sky, disappearing near Mars. On 23rd, 2 traversed sky and disappeared near Mars. / B Assoc 1863-230. [III; 321. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 230-231.]


1862 Nov. 22 / —Austria / 26—Algeria / 29—Chio, etc. / 29—Caucasia // BA '11. [III; 322. Milne, 717.]


1862 Nov. 26 / 7:45 p.m. / Met apparent size of moon / Melbourne / BA 63-230. Southerly direction. [III; 323. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 230-231.]


1862 Nov 26 / det met / Selkirk (Roxburghshire) great met / "light like the moon" / About a minute later, a prolonged report was heard. / BA '63-230. [III; 324. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 230-231.]


1862 Nov 26 / Leeds and Selkirk / 6:45 p.m. / det met / BA 67-422. [III; 325. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430 at 422.]


1862 Nov 26 / q / Algeria / BA '11. [III; 326. Milne, 717.]


1862 (Nov. 26) / at Peebles, 6:48 p.m. / at Selkirk  (Roxburghshire), ab 7 p.m. / Met seen and rumbling sounds / BA 63/230 / Nov. 26. [III; 327. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 230-231.]


1862 Nov. 27 / 5:52 p.m. / near Broadstairs / Met from close to Mars 6° under Moon to Altair / BA 69-218. [III; 328. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 218-219.]


1862 Nov. 27 / probably 6:47 p.m. / Det met / Colchester, Essex / BA 79-92. [III; 329. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report of Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1878-79." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1879, 76-131, at 92-93.]


1862 Nov. 27 / Windsor / 6:30 p.m. / seems been another meteor / BA 63-240. [III; 330. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 240-241.]


1862 Nov. 27 / 5:50 p.m. / Great detonating meteor / South England / BA 63-234 / also France / Must have been several. The obs. are from 4:55 p.m. at Strasbourg to 6:03 in Worchestershire. Pages of details / Most obs E. to W. or N.E. to S.W., but at Havre = N. to S. [III; 331. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 230-239, 324-325. As Strasbourg may have been ahead an hour from the British and French locations, the times of the meteor's observations only range from 5:45 to 6:03 P.M. Differences in local solar time, keeping standard time, and deviations of various clocks are more plausible than a multitude of brilliant detonating meteors, of which no witness reported more than one of them. Ten of these accounts were used to calculate a single path 220 miles in length traversed in four or five seconds.]


1862 Nov. 27 / (Sound) / Colchester / 5:47 p.m. / Met burst with dull report. / BA '79/93 / 63-232. [III; 332. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report of Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1878-79." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1879, 76-131, at 92-93. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 230-239, 324-325.]


1862 Nov. 27 / 5:47 p.m. / Met wide as moon, twice as long / London / Kent / Nottingham / and Ireland / L.T., Nov 28, 29, (Dec. 3). [III; 333. "A Meteor." London Times, November 28, 1862, p. 10 c. 6. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "Magnificent Meteor." London Times, November 29, 1862. p. 12 c. 1. "France." London Times, December 3, 1862. p. 7 c. 1-2. "The Meteor." London Times, December 3, 1862, p. 12 c. 6.]


1862 Nov. 27 / Great meteor / England and Ireland / France? / L.T., Nov 28, 29 / Dec. 3-12-f / 5:30 p.m. [III; 334. "A Meteor." London Times, November 28, 1862, p. 10 c. 6. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "Magnificent Meteor." London Times, November 29, 1862. p. 12 c. 1. "France." London Times, December 3, 1862. p. 7 c. 1-2. "The Meteor." London Times, December 3, 1862, p. 12 c. 6.]


1862 Dec. 4 / Marseilles / Aurora / C.R. 55/930 / St. Petersburg—930. [III; 335. "M. Morren annonce qu'une magnifique aurore boréale a étée observée à Marseille...." Comptes Rendus, 55 (1862): 930.]


1862 Dec 11/ 8:42 p.m. / Fireball / 3 large ones on 12th / Westphalia / BA 67-422. [III; 336. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 422.]


1862 Dec 12 / B. rain / Argentine, ac to the Mercurio of Valparaiso, ab 7 a.m. became intensely dark—cleared up—that night it had rained black water. "The people of the district were very much alarmed, and the female portion began to pray fervently." / Eclectic Magazine 59/392 / Intel. Obs 3-145. [III; 337.1, 337.2. (Eclectic Magazine 59/392.) "Black Rain in South America." Intellectual Observer, 3 (March 1863): 145.]


1862 Dec 12 / a.m. / In 1¼ hours at Haverford, Pa., 28 mets from Gemini. A. J. Sci. 2/35/302. [III; 338. "Shooting Stars of Dec. 10th-13th, 1862." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 35 (1863): 302.]


1862 Dec 14 / 5:50 to 7 p.m. / Aurora / England / L.T. 16-12-e / related to A. Lyrae / In Marseilles, France, 6:24 to 7:25 / LT-20-6-a / reappeared. 9:20-9:39. [III; 339. "Brilliant Display of Aurora Borealis." London Times, December 16, 1862, p. 12 c. 5. "France." London Times, December 20, 1862, p. 6 c. 1.]


1862 Dec 14 / Aurora / 5:30-9:45 p.m. / Stream passed near A. Hercules at Clifton and at Weston-super-Mare. / LT, Oct 16-12-c / at Paris—Dec. 20-6-a. [III; 340. "Brilliant Display of Aurora Borealis." London Times, December 16, 1862, p. 12 c. 5. "France." London Times, December 20, 1862, p. 6 c. 1.]


1862 Dec 15 / 6:50 p.m. / Met twice size of Venus / Dordogne, France / "during a brilliant aurora". BA 63-240. [III; 341. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 240-241.]


[1862 Dec 15 /] 1863 Dec 15 / (Fr) / Dordogne / met twice size of Venus / BA 67-423. [III; 520. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 423.]


1862 Dec 19 / —W Indies / 19—Cent Amer / 19—Caucasia (also in Nov) / 21—Persia // q. / BA '11. Sim q's Feb 18, 1889. [III; 342. Milne, 717. See: (1889 Feb 18.)]


1862 Dec 19 / qs / Caucasia / Cent. Amer / Persia / qs / BA '11. [III; 343. Milne, 717. The quake in Persia was on December 21.]


1862 Dec. 30 / Thurxton / 7:15 a.m. / great meteor / ½ minute. / Field, Jan. 17. [III; 344. (Field, January 17, 1862.)]

 
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