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Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1887


1887:


1887 // Body of Mrs. W.I. Peters, Frankfort, Ind. / See Dec 22, 1888. [B; 776. See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1887 / Tingwick, Mass / Josphine Bedard / Fasting girl / See Ap. 20, 1889. [B; 777. See: 1889 Ap. 20, (B; 1024).]


1887 // Wem—northern Shropshire / Polt, Nov., 1883 / Murders, ab. Jan 1, 1888. [B; 778. See: 1888, (B; 832).]


1887 / Trib Index / Elsie Warren of Jersey City / Aphasia. [B; 779. See: (New York Tribune Index. (Concerning E.W. Warren; New York Tribune, October 14, 1887, p. 8 c. 3; not found here.) (Check New York Times, March 28, 1898???)]


1887 Jan / Little Lever / fall of obj from roof of a mine—thought to be a meteorite in coal. [B; 780. “A Collier Killed by a Meteorolite.” Manchester Courier and Lancaster General Advertiser, January 3, 1887, p. 6 c. 6. “An inquest was held at Little Lever, on Saturday, respecting the death of Thomas Kay, who had been killed in the Stopes Colliery, belonging to Messrs. Fletcher and Sons, on the previous day. Death was caused almost instantaneously by the fall of immense stone from the roof, and it was stated that the stone had apparently been a meteorolite, which had fallen to the earth thousands of years ago, and over which there had been the subsequent formations. Such stones were seldom met with in mining operations in this locality. A verdict of accidental death was returned.” “Fall of Roof in a Mine at Little Lever.” Transactions of the Manchester Geological Society, 19 (pt. 5; 1886-1887): 109-113.   “Science-Gossip.” Science Gossip, 23 (no. 266; February 1887): 40-41. "The Meteorite at Little Lever," and, "The Meteorite at Little Lever." Science Gossip, 23 (no. 267; March 1887): 70. “We have received a sample of the so-called meteorite. It is a fragment of mottled sandstone shale, of the ordinary kind met with in the coal measures. The block must have been detached and fallen down. It is very certain the stone is of terrestrial, not celestial origin.”]


1887 Jan, early / Ghost reported in a spinning mill at Lostock, near Bolton. / London Globe, Jan 12 / Med and D., Jan 21. [B; 781. (Medium and Daybreak, January 21, 1887.) “The Latest Ghost Story.” London Globe, January 12, 1887, p. 6 c. 4. “ The 'ghost' is said to be that of spinner who died twelve months ago.” “A Ghost at Bolton.” Manchester Evening News, January 12, 1887, p. 2 c. 7. “Considerable alarm has been caused at Lostock, Bolton, the reported appearance of a ghost, which is said to haunt a spinning mill there. A fortnight ago an overlooker, on arriving at the mill early, saw what he believed to be the ghost of a deceased spinner named Heaton. He spoke to it, but got no answer. He declares that he has seen it several times since. The watchman says he saw the ghost walking about the mill on Sunday. So alarmed have the workpeople become that they enter the premises collectively.”]


1887 Jan 1 / Bieolokrynitschie, Volhynia, Russia / (F). [VI; 960. Fletcher, 105. This is the Bieolokrynitschie meteorite.]


1887 Jan 2 / 8 p.m. / Det. met over Oroville, near Chico / MWR '87-24. [VI; 961. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 15 (no. 1; January 1887): 24-26, at 24.]


1887 Jan 2 / (q met) / 2 p.m. / At Westminster, Md., “lightning” flash from a cloudless sky and “a loud peal of thunder”. / A loud sound at 5 p.m. “Other explosions” heard Jan 3, 2:30 a.m.—a q. in large part of Maryland. / N.Y. Times, 4-1-4. [VI; 964. “Maryland Shaken Up.” New York Times, January 4, 1887, p. 1 c. 4.]


1887 Jan 3 / 5:15 / Jamaica Plain, Mass / Met as if from Ursa Minor. Visible 30 seconds. In latter part of flight seemed to float downward. / Science 9/13. [VI; 962. Wood, J.W., Jr. “A Brilliant Meteor.” Science, s. 1 v. 9 (January 7, 1887): 13.]


1887 Jan 3 / (q—mets / Repeats) / 2:30 / Western Maryland / q—distinct reports as if of explosion / At Taneytown, at 2 p.m., Jan 2, cloudless sky—a flash supposed be lightning and a sound like thunder—5 p.m., loud noise heard—an explosion at 9 p.m. Unusual noises during the night. / N.Y. Times, Jan 4-1-4. [VI; 963.1, 963.2. “Maryland Shaken Up.” New York Times, January 4, 1887, p. 1 c. 4.]


1887 Jan 3 and 4 / 11:30 p.m. / at Westminster, Maryland, and between 2 and 3 a.m. on 4th / sounds and qs / Charleston, S.C. / ab. 7 a.m. on 4th. / NY Times, 5th-22. [VI; 965. “The Earth Shaking.” New York Times, January 5, 1887, p. 7 c. 2.]


1887 Jan. 3-4 / 11:30 p.m. and between 2 and 3 a.m. / “Strange noises and house-shaking” again in Maryland, / on 4th, 6:40, 6:47, 7:50. In morning at Charleston, S.C.—“a roaring sound”. / NY Times 5-7-2. [VI; 966. “The Earth Shaking.” New York Times, January 5, 1887, p. 7 c. 2.]


1887 Jan 4 / Trib, 1-4 / q. / Maryland. [VI; 967. “Earthquake Shocks in Maryland.” New York Tribune, January 4, 1887, p. 1 c. 4.]


[1887 Jan 5-6 /] 1887 Jan 15 / near Baku, Russia / Eruption—enormous column of fire from a mt. summit. Some time before in this region had been an eruption of naptha. / LT, Feb 7-6-d / Or this the “comet”? [VI; 976. “A Russian Volcano.” London Times, February 7, 1887, p. 6 c. 4. Sjögren, Sten Anders Hjalmar. “Der Ausbruch des Schlammvulcans Lok-Botan am Kaspischen Meere vom 5. Jänner 1887.” Jahrbuch der Kaiserlich Königlichen Geologischen Reichsanstalt, 37 (1887): 233-244. The Swedish geologist Sjögren observed the eruptions about 11:30 P.M., midnight, and 12:15 A.M., (on the night of January 5-6, 1887), at Baku, and conducted an investigation of this eruption of the Lok Batan mud volcano.]


1887 Jan 7 / Dispatch dated // Severe shock in Tunis / LT 8-5-e. [VI; 968. “Earthquake Shock in Tunis.” London Times, January 8, 1877, p. 5 c. 5.]


1887 Jan 11 / Trib, 1-5 / q / Charleston. [VI; 969. “An Earthquake at Charleston.” New York Tribune, January 11, 1887, p. 1 c. 5.]


1887 // Sunspots / MWR 1887/146. [VI; 970. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 15 (no. 5; May 1887): 144-146, at 146.]


1887 // Newspapers / Sensational accounts 1887 mets / May 25, Wellsburg, N.Y. / Evansville, Ind (June 12) / “The Georgia Metal ball.” [VI; 971. Kunz, George Frederick. “Meteor-Fall.” Science, s. 1 v. 10 (December 9, 1887): 288. “The many sensational accounts of meteoric falls at Wellsburg, N.Y., Evansville, Ind., the Georgia metal ball, etc., are all the productions of a so-called reporter's fertile brain.” “A Stellar Visitant.” Chicago Tribune, July 22, 1887, p. 1 c. 4.  “After half an hour’s hard digging I came upon the object of my search at a depth of about five feet. It was still too hot to handle, but I succeeded in getting it to my carriage by lifting it on the shovel. I noticed that it was remarkable heavy, but not until I reached my barn, and removed the adhering soil, did I realize what a prize I had. Instead of a rough mass of meteoric iron, there appeared a smooth, perfect sphere of steel-blue metal, with polished surface, and engraved with pictures and writings. I could scarcely believe my eyes, but there was no mistaking facts, There upon the surface of the strange ball was a deeply-graven circle within which was a four-pointed star, a representation of a bird-reptile resembling in a measure our extinct archaeopteryx, and a great number of smaller figures, resembling those used in modern shorthand.” “A Message From the Skies.” Americus Recorder, July 31, 1887, p. 1 c. 4-5. “It sounds like a cleverly written hoax.” “The Clayton Meteor.” Atlanta Constitution, August 4, 1887, p. 4 c. 1. “Recently there appeared in some of our town exchanges (to put the matter briefly) a telegram from Clayton, in Rabun Bounty, relative to the fall of an aerolite bearing inscriptions. The matter seems to have interested a great many people in this country, for our Clayton correspondent, who is especially charged to look after matters of this kind, writes us that the post office at that place is flooded with letters from all parts of the United States. These letters are directed to Dr. Seyers, who is credited in the telegram with the discovery of the meteor.” “As there is no such person in Clayton as Dr. Seyers, the letters are turned over to Dr. Sims. These inquiries all bear on the discovery of the meteor, and of this meteor Dr. Sims, as well as Clayton, is entirely innocent.” See: 1887 May 25, (VI; 1090); 1887 / Thursday before May 27, (VI; 1091); 1887 June 12, (VI; 1101); and, 1887 Nov 18, (VI; 1181).]


1887 Jan 15 / Mauna Loa / Russia / See Feb 12, 1876. [VI; 972. See: 1876 Feb 12, (IV: 1808 & 1809).]


1887 Jan 15 / See Dec 10, 13, 1886. / Japan / severest q in 7 years / Nature 35-399. [VI; 973. "Notes." Nature, 35 (February 24, 1887): 399-401, at 399. See: 1886 Dec. 10, (VI; 952), and, 1886 Dec 13, (VI; 955).]


1887 Jan 15 / Mauna Loa / to Feb 8 / LT, Feb 22-5-c / Renewed later in Feb. [VI; 974. “The Hawaiian Volcano.” London Times, February 22, 1887, p. 5 c. 3.]


1887 Jan 15 / beam / 9:30 p.m. / Kennebec, Me / ac Phil Pub Ledger of 24th / in S.E. sky / Sky as if illuminated by a burning building. From this a shaft of white light to zenith for ½ hour. [VI; 975. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, , January 24, 1887.)]


[1887 Jan 15. Wrong date. See: 1887 Jan 5-6, (VI; 976).]


1887 Jan 16 / Mauna Loa / great smoke 23 and 24 / A.J. Sci 3/33/311. [VI; 977. “Eruption of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, in January.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 33 (1887): 310-311.]


1887 Jan 17 / See case Rev Thomas Hanna, Ap. 15, 1897. [B; 782. See: 1897 Ap. 15, (C: 341 & 344).]


1887 Jan 17 / Prof Boris Sidis, Multiple Personality, p. 377 / Rev. Ansel Bourne, of Greene, R.I., drew $551 from bank, paid some bills—on March 14th he awoke in a fright, as A.J. Brown, having a small stationary store in Norristown, Pa. [B; 783. Sidis, Boris, and, Goodhart, Simon Philip. Multiple Personality. New York: D. Appleton, 1904, 376-382. James, William. Principles of Psychology. New York, Henry Holt, 1890, v. 1, 390-393.]


1887 Jan 18 / Beam / at Cordoba / Comet like that of Sept, 1880 . Ribbon of light contracting toward sun. No nucleus. / Clerke, His Astro/361. [VI; 978. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 4th ed., 1902, 361-362. Comet C/1887 B1.]


1887 Jan 18 / beam—comet / Comet all tail / Cordoba / Sc Am 57/161. [VI; 979. “The Great Southern Comet (1887a).” Scientific American, n.s., 57 (September 10, 1887): 161. Thome, John Macom. “The Great Southern Comet, (1887a).” Astronomical Journal, 7 (1887): 91-92.  Comet C/1887 B1.]


1887 Jan 18 / (Comet disappears. / or Beam) / Comet discovered at Ob of Cordova and seen in Australia should be visible in north in 2 weeks if southern horizon clear. / NYT 27-2-6 / Times (N.Y.), Feb. 27, that by cable, Jan 31—the Comet had disappeared—at Cape Town narrow band of light had been seen and no nucleus. Mr S E Chandler had calculated the orbit and published the ephemeris. Had predicted move through Cetus and Eridanus[, thence toward] Orion, and at end of Feb be 20° from Rigel, and be within 54,000,000 miles of this earth last of Jan. Said that from Cordoba nucleus had been reported but the description was vague. [VI; 980.1, 980.2, 980.3. “The New Comets.” New York Times, January 27, 1887, p. 2 c. 6. “The Great Southern Comet Disappears.” New York Times, February 27, 1887, p. 4 c. 4. Comet C/1887 B1.]


1887 Jan 19 / I find nothing of a comet in Jour of the Roy Soc N. S Wales, 1887. [VI; 981. Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales.]


1887 Jan.21 / 2 p.m. / De Cewsville, Ontario / metite / Science 15-167 / Note here of another found. [VI; 982. Preston, H.L. “A New Meteorite.” Science, s. 1 v. 15 (March 7, 1890): 167. This is the De Cewsville meteorite.]


1887 Jan 22 / Melbourne, Aust. / Comet nucleus not seen, supposed be below horizon. / Beam extending to 30 degrees above southwest horizon. / LT 24-6-b / 26—said nucleus was seen at Adelaide on 24th. / Times, Feb 1—Melbourne, Jan 31—that the comet had disappeared. [VI; 983. “The New Comet.” London Times, January 24, 1887, p. 6 c. 2. “The New Comet.” London Times, February 1, 1887. Comet C/1887 B1.]


1887 Jan 18 / Comet discovered at Rio Janeiro. / Melbourne Argus, Jan 26 / Resembled the comet of 1880. [VI; 984. “A Comet at Rio Janeiro.” Melbourne Argus, January 26, 1887, p. 5 c. 7. Comet C/1887 B1.]


1887 Jan 19 / beam (comet) / The Argus (Melbourne), Jan 31—first seen evening of 19th. Said that in parts of Australia where free from haze the comet had been seen from end to end but always as an indefinite streak of pale light without any condensation to show the presence of a nucleus or even sufficient to indicate a head. One correspondent who in an elevated position had seen it at its best had asked whether any other instance of a headless comet had ever been known. Mr. Todd of the Adelaide Observatory had stated that he had been unable to see any head or even condensation. It was moving at a rate of 4 degrees a day. Corresponds to motion of earth or shell. 4 degrees in space = 4 minutes in time? [VI; 985. “The Comet.” Melbourne Argus, January 31, 1887, p. 7 c. 3. The movement of the comet across the sky, between January 19 and 27, 1887, averaged about 15.5 minutes (Right Ascension); and, a measure of 4 degrees across the sky would equal 16 minutes of the sky's rotation, (not 4 minutes, each degree being 4 minutes). Comet C/1887 B1.]


1887 Jan 20 / Ch / On a dry frozen hill a triangular piece of turf about 5 inches deep, 3 sides about 3 feet long each, found lifted out and deposited 8 feet away. In a thick hoar frost on the hill, there were no footprints. / Few days before Jan 25, 1887. The observer Thos. G. Benn, of Newton Reigny Observatory, Penrith. / (P) / Symons Met 22/8. [VI; 990.1, 990.2. Benn, Thomas Green. “Remarkable Displacement of Earth.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 22 (February 1887): 8.]


1887 Jan 20-21 / night / The comet discovered at Auckland. Nucleus supposed behind the s. western horizon. / N.Z. Times, 22nd. [VI; 986. “A New Comet.” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), January 22, 1887, p. 2 c. 8. Comet C/1887 B1.]


1887 Jan. 22 / evening / the comet at Melbourne. / “It appeared like a well-defined silvery streak, extending from 12 deg. to about 45 deg. above the south-western horizon.” / R. Singleton, in The Argus (Melb), Jan 25. [VI; 987. Singleton, R. “The New Comet.” Melbourne Argus, January 25, 1887, p. 10 c. 2.]


1887 Jan 22 / (Draco) / Comet by Brooks / in Draco / NYT 25-1-4, etc. // On 25th, 2° above Kappa Draconis / Times, Jan 26-1-6 / Telescopic see 27-26. [VI; 988. “Two New Comets.” New York Times, January 25, 1887, p. 1 c. 4. “Comets Galore.” New York Times, January 26, 1887, p. 1 c. 6. See: (Telescopic???). Comet C/1887 B2.]


1887 / ab Jan 23 // (Cut) / Penrith / Triangular  patch of turf lifted out. / Symons Met Mag 22/8. [VI; 989. Benn, Thomas Green. “Remarkable Displacement of Earth.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 22 (February 1887): 8.]


1887 Jan 24 / fishes / Between Walgett and Goodooga—thousands of them. The keeper of the tank, a government watering place, collected about 100 live ones from pools in the road. [VI; 991. “Shower of Fish in New South Wales, January 24th, 1887." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 13 (1887): 314-315. “Mr. H.C. Russell, F.R.S., Government Astronomer for New South Wales, has forwarded to the Society some correspondence which he has received respecting a shower of fish. The following extracts from the letters by Mr. G.S. Hay, Telegraph Station, Walgett, to Mr. Russell, will be of interest.” "January 28th.—I have the honour to report for your information that the mailman running between Walgett and Goodooga, via the Comborah Springs, north-west from here, brought into town a small fish having the appearance of a small bream, about 3 inches long, which he states he found in the wheel track on a sand ridge about 25 miles this side of the Narran river. The place was alive with them. He says that on Monday night, January 24th, there was a terrific storm of rain and wind, and that these fish fell in the shower. The Narran lake is some 20 or more miles from the spot. I may add that the keeper of the Bunghill Tank, a Government watering place on this route, on hearing of the presence of the fish proceeded with a tub and collected a number of them which he intended placing in the Tank to stock it." "February 10th.—Re shower of fish reported by me for your information, I have seen the keeper of the Bunghill Tank, who states that he collected over 100 fish and placed them in the Tank. They were all alike so far as he observed, and much about the same size. When the rain water had subsided they were lying dead in thousands. There is a warrambool or lagoon two miles south-west of the road, and is known to contain fish; and as the storm travelled from that direction, it is supposed the fish must have been lifted from the warrambool and carried along till the storm burst in crossing the track, which is cleared through some thick timber and on an elevated ridge of sand and gravel. There were great atmospheric disturbances along here at the time, twisting winds and thunderstorms from all directions, but principally from south-west to north-east or north, and during the week over 8 ins. of rain fell.” "An old inhabitant here informs me that many years ago he came across a great number of fish on the road from here to Coonamble. They were supposed to have been blown from the Castlereagh River, which was a few miles distant."]


1887 Jan 24 / fishes / Near the Bunghill Tank, New South Wales / Ac to Mr H.C. Russell, Govt Astronomer, N.S.W., thousands of them found lying dead, in roads, after a shower. / Jour Roy Met Soc N.S. 13/314. [VI; 992. “Shower of Fish in New South Wales, January 24th, 1887." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 13 (1887): 314-315.]


1887 Jan 24 / Cygnus / Comet by Barnard / in Cygnus / NY Times 26-1-6 // near Beta Cygni / Times 27-2-6. [VI; 993. “Comets Galore.” New York Times, January 26, 1887, p. 1 c. 6. “The New Comets.” New York Times, January 27, 1887, p. 2 c. 6. Comet C/1887 B3.]


1887 Jan-July / Charleston / B.S.A. 4/152. [VI; 994. Taber, Stephen. "Seismic Activity in the Atlantic Coastal Plain near Charleston, South Carolina." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 4 (1914): 108-160, at 152.]


1887 Jan 26 / night / Holmestrand, s.e. coast of Norway / Meteor so brilliant it illuminated the town for a few seconds as if by broad daylight. / Nature 35-352. [VI; 995. "Notes." Nature, 35 (February 10, 1887): 349-352, at 352.]


1887 / ab Feb // Disap. a new Japanese man-of-war. [B; 784. (Refs??? Not found via Wikipedia's list of Japanese naval ships.)]


1887 Feb 2 (and 5) / at Finschhafen, Kaiser Wilhelm's Land. Bright red halo as if produced by smoke at great elevation, around the sun. On 5th, from 7 to 11 a.m., ashes from unknown origin fell from sky. / Nature 36-281. / New Guinea. [VI; 996.1, 996.2. “Notes.” Nature, 36 (July 21, 1887): 279-282, at 281. Kaiser Wilhelm's Land is now identified as Papua New Guinea. The Ritter Island volcano.]


1887 Feb. 5 / 4 a.m. / Titusville,Pa / stripes in sky / NY Times, Feb 27-4-4. [VI; 997. “The Great Southern Comet Disappears.” New York Times, February 27, 1887, p. 4 c. 4. “About 4:45 one of our citizzens was very much surprised at seeing in the southern sky what appeared to be four lon stripes of fire hanging vertically from the sky. The ends could be seen resting on a very black base, while the rest of the sky was thickly dotted with brilliant stars. The fourth stripe, nearest the west, was much larger than the other three and contained several smaller stripes and toward the end they all united. The gentleman who saw it said it was the lovliest sight he ever saw in the sky.”]


1887 Feb 6 / Southern Ind—Ill, part of Ky, and east central Mo. / q / Science 9/155, 203. [VI; 998. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 9 (February 18, 1887): 153-156, at 155. “The Indiana Earthquake.” Science, s. 1 v. 9 (March 4, 1886): 203-204.]


1887 Feb 6 / ab 4 a.m. / q / St Louis to Chicago / NY Times, Feb 7-1-3. [VI; 999. “The West Shaken Up.” New York Times, February 7, 1887, p. 1 c. 3.]


1887 Feb. 7 / See March 17, 1888. / Heavy rain and a q. in Madagascar. / Cosmos, N.S., 13-114. [VI; 1000. Camboué, Paul. “À Madagascar.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (May 4, 1889): 113-114. See: 1888 March 17, (VI; 1291).]


1887 Feb 15 / Mudgee / Nothing in Sydney M. Herald. [B; 785.]


1887 Feb 16 / BO / Melbourne Herald, copied in Religio-Phil. Jour., June 11—near Mudgee, N.S. Wales, in vicinity of Cooyal, farmer named Large. Stones dropping inside his house, as if from roof. Never unless man and his wife were in the room. Large stones. Woman affected with a chill, at those times. A child struck by a large stone. Did her no harm. [B; 786.1, 786.2. "Stone-Throwing in Australia." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 42 (no. 16;  June 11, 1887): 6, (c. 4).]


1887 Feb 16 / Stones—not harm / Melbourne Herald of, copied in Medium and Daybreak, May 13 / Near Cooyal, N.S. Wales, home of a farmer and wife named Large—no other inmates of house mentioned. Stones appearing as if dropped in rooms from roofs—stones, some of which weighed 1½ lbs, dropping harmlessly around Mrs L. One of these struck a little child but left no mark. Whether with fear, "deathly chills" affected Mrs L at times of stone-falls. One time she sought refuge outside the house. But here stones dropped around her. [B; 787.1, 787.2, 787.3. (Medium and Daybreak, May 13, 1887.) "Ghostly Missiles." Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal, February 15, 1887, p. 3 c. 4. "The Mysterious Stones." Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal, March 1, 1887, p. 3 c. 1. There were many children in the family. "On the first evening of this strange manifestation, Mr. Large was returning home with a bag of flour on a pack horse, and on approaching the house the animal stood still, apparently afraid to move towards the dwelling. After no little persuasion, with much pulling, the terrified steed was got to the door. With difficulty he was unpacked, and an altogether unusual thing for the beast to do, he bolted as though maddened, careering in every direction except near the house. This set the family wondering. Just then, for the first time, the stones commenced dropping in the house. Mrs. Large at once concluded some of the young people were having a lark with her in revenge for her refusal to permit a dance being held there that night. During that evenng, and every succeeding evening from 5 o'clock until 9 or 10, the stones fell." "The Ghostly Missiles." Richmond River Herald, March 18, 1887, p. 4 c. 3. "The mysterious stonefalling at Large's farm near Cooyal is still going on. Yesterday a report came into town that no less than twenty-four stones dropped on the premises. The parents were  

away from home, and the children made off to the house of a neighbour, named M'Cann, and informed him of the occurrence. He at once proceeded to Large's farm. He reports the above having taken place. Hundreds of people have visited this place, and affirm that the stones have come, but the mystery as

to where they comc from remains unsolved.—Evening News." "Farewell to the Ghost." Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal, May 10, 1887, p. 3 c. 2. Mr. and Mrs. Large left the house.]


1887 Feb. 17 / Disap / Lieut Edward W. Remey, U.S.N. / NY City / NY Trib, 1889, Jan 6-15-3. [B; 788. “The Army of the Missing.” New York Tribune, January 6, 1889, p. 15 c. 3.]


1887 Feb 19 / Jupiter / Stationary. [VI; 1001.]


1887 Feb 20-23 / with q of 23 / B.M.—for NY papers with / C.V. Zenger says phe in U.S. period of q in France. [VI; 1002. (New York newspapers, ca. February 1887.) Zenger, Václav Karel Bedřich. “La parallélisme des phénomènes sismiques en février 1887 et des perturbations atmosphèriques électriques, magnétiques et des éruptions volcaniques.” Comptes Rendus, 104 (1887): 959-961. Zenger stated that violent storms occurred in New York and the American West, on February 20, and, that earthquakes occurred at “Washington” with magnetic disturbances, on February 23. Fort was noting this to find articles in New York newspapers. Fines, Jacques. “Sur le tremblement de terre du 23 février, enregistré à l'observatoire de Perpignan.” Comptes Rendus, 104 (1887): 606-608. Magnetic disturbances were noted at Parc Saint-Maur, on February 23.]


1887 Feb 21 / Tr., 1-5 / Mummies in Dakota. [B; 789. “Mummies Found in Dakota.” New York Tribune, February 21, 1887, p. 1 c. 5.]


1887 Feb 21 / Relating with the q of Feb 23, C.V. Zenger, in C.R. 104-959, tells of a great double meteor that was seen at 11 p.m. in some places in Bohemia while in others concussions felt and sound thought subterranean. Where the meteor was seen loud explosions were heard. / He records sinking of land in England. [VI; 1004.1, 1004.2. Zenger, Wenzl Karl Friedrich. “La parallélisme des phénomènes sismiques en février 1887 et des perturbations atmosphèriques électriques, magnétiques et des éruptions volcaniques.” Comptes Rendus, 104 (1887): 959-961, at 959.]


1887 Feb 22, 27 / Increase Mayon Volc / See July 8, 1886. [VI; 1003. See: 1886 July 8, (VI; 530) Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


1887 Feb. 23 / near Nice / Many deep sea fish dead or half dead cast up on beach. / Nature 36-4. [VI; 1005. Giglioli, Henry H. “Earthquake in the Western Riviera.” Nature, 36 (May 5, 1887): 4.]


1887 Feb. 23 / (+) / q and sky / 5:55 a.m. / In Nice, strong q. “It is also reported that the sky was 'on fire.'” / Great in Italy. / Pop Sci News 21-58 / Hundreds of lives lost. / Other shocks for several days. [VI; 1006. “The Earthquake in France.” Popular Science News, 21 (April 1887); 58.]


1887 Feb 23 / BO / At Bajardo, [Italy,] in the Riviera, had not people rushed to a church, would have lived, but did so and church fell and killed 300. / L.T., Oct 18-13-2. [VI; 1007. “The Riviera After the Earthquake.” London Times, October 18, 1887, p. 13 c. 2-3.]


1887 Feb. 23, 24-27 / 2 shocks, France, ab. 6 and ab 8 a.m. / (L.T.) / again morning of 24th / 11 deaths in France / dispatch from Rome, 1500 killed in Genoese Riviera / 4 columns, Times of 28th / Feb 27—5 and 10 a.m., slight at Menton. / During the Carnival at Nice / 1500 dead said greatly exaggerated / (If exaggerating—also minimum is several notices from mayors of French cities and one from a hotel proprietor that damage exaggerated. / March 1—shock Calabria. / Another letter from someone protesting against a story of a destroyed hotel / shocks morning of March 11 / France and Italy not severe. [VI; 1008.1, 1008.2, 1008.3. “The Earthquakes.” London Times, February 28, 1887, p. 5 c. 3-6. “The Earthquakes.” London Times, March 3, 1887, p. 5 c. 3. (London Times, ca. March 11, 1887.)]


1887 Feb. 23 / (q and phe) / In France at 5:42 a.m., which corresponded to 6:22 at Rome. / But first slight concussion at 3:20. / L'Astro, 1887-121—on p. 137—says that there were other phenomena but that it will not do to give importance to coincidences. At Apt (Vaucluse) at 4:30 a.m. had seen the sky on fire—and then a great light like Bengal fire—without doubt coincidences. [VI; 1009.1, 1009.2. Flammarion, Camille. “Les Tremblements de Terre et Leurs Causes.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 121-142, at 124 & 136-137.]


1887 Feb 23 / It / (+) / Liguria and Piedmont / q and many phe / See 1805. [VI; 1010. Refer to: 1805 July 26, (I; 146). (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 387.)]


1887 Feb 23 / q—versus in sky / In Cosmos, 69-422, P. Bertelli is quoted that inflammable gases might have been emitted from the soil, but that also the stories might be attributed to the fright of the people. [VI; 1011. ("Les phénomènes lumineux des tremblements de terre." Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 69 (October 16, 1913): 422.)]


1887 Feb 24 / Great q, Italy / 26—Charleston / Sun 27-1-3. [VI; 1012. (New York Sun, February 27, 1887, p. 1 c. 3.)]


1887 March 1, 9 / Increase Mayon Volc / See July 8, 1886. [VI; 1013. See: 1886 July 8 / and on 10 March, 1887, (VI; 530). Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


[1887 March 2] / Sea Story / 1887, [LT, March 2-9-d. [B; 790. (London Times, March 2, 1887, p. 9 c. 4.)]


1887 March 2 / q. / Italy / Sun 3-1-6-x. [VI; 1014. “Earthquakes in Italy.” New York Sun, March 3, 1887, p. 1 c. 6.]


1887 March 2 / 4:13 p.m. / q. / Southern Coast of Long Island. Concussion felt and sound like a distress signal at sea. / NY Times 3-2-4 / Times, 4th, said had been similar phe at 2:15 p.m. / NY Times, March 3-1-7 / 4-5-4 / See Trib 3-5-3. [VI; 1015. (New York Times, March 3, 1887, p. 2 c. 4.) (New York Times, March 3, 1887, p. 1 c. 7.) (New York Times, March 4, 1887, p. 5 c. 4.) “Long Island Badly Shaken.” New York Tribune, March 3, 1887, p. 5 c. 3.]


1887 March 2 / 4:13 p.m. / Sound southern coast of L.I. “It was thought a heavy piece of artillery had been fired or that an explosion had occurred, but neither supposition could be confirmed. / NY Times 3-1-7 / 4-5-4, said been a shock also at 2:15 p.m. [VI; 1017. (New York Times, March 3, 1887, p. 1 c. 7.) (New York Times, March 4, 1887, p. 5 c. 4.)]


1887 March 3 / Trib, 5-3 / q. / L.I. [VI; 1016. “Long Island Badly Shaken.” New York Tribune, March 3, 1887, p. 5 c. 3.]


1887 March 4 / Med and Dayb of, quoting London Graphic—Prince Bismarck's estate of Friedrichsruhe—in Lavenburg, northern Prussia—in one of the chief forresters' lodges—flaming swords seen and raps heard. [B; 791. (Medium and Daybreak, March 4, 1887.)]


1887 March 4 (/) / Bismarck / put ref for The Graphic, Feb. 26. [B; 792. "Scraps." London Graphic, February 26, 1887, p. 9 c. 3. "Prince Bismarck's estate of Friedrichsruhe, in Lauenburg, Northern Prussia, is troubled by ghosts. Most mysterious noises and visions haunt one of the chief foresters' lodges, flaming swords strangely appear, and spirits rap all over the house, so that the neighbouring peasants are in abject terror, believing the signs to imply impending war and misery. Crowds from the country round hover about the lodge to watch the manifestations, and the whole place is demoralised."]


1887 March 6 / Pollen? / Morning after a severe rainstorm, people of Princeton, Ind, found the ground covered to the depth of an inch with a yellow substance. Chemists could not agree in identifying it, but almost all agreed that it was a vegetable substance. But some sent to Indianapolis for examination and described as pale yellow, insoluble in water and alcohol, but fully soluble in oil of turpentine. It was composed of small round bodies and the chemists opinion that it was of volcanic origin. Said had been found in Warrick, Spencer and Pike Counties. / Sun 9-4-5. [VI; 1018.1, 1018.2, 1018.3. “The Earth's Yellow Covering.” New York Sun, March 9, 1887, p. 4 c. 5.]


1887 March 7 / 11:30 p.m. / Dalcarlia, Sweden / met moving south—size of moon / Nature 35-495. [VI; 1019. “Notes.” Nature, 35 (March 24, 1887): 494-496, at 495.]


1887 March 9 / Gaston, small village near Dover / Loud, rushing noise heard and a wind that picked up fowls, ducks, and pieces of lumber to a great height.A second gust felt. / Similar occurrence at Deal and Walmer about same time of year before. / Symons Met 22/22. [VI; 1020.1, 1020.2. “Whirlwind near Dover.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 22 (March 1887): 22. “Whirlwind near Dover.” St. James's Gazette, March 10, 1887, p. 9.]


1887 March 12 / Rays of light / Falmouth / Nature 35/536. [VI; 1021. Gibney, Robert Dwarris. “A Peculiar Radiation of Light.” Nature, 35 (April 7, 1887): 536. See: 1883 Ap. 6, (V; 1224).]


1887 March 17 / (Det met and light effects) / 4:14 p.m. / Great met across Southern Australia, from E to W. It left a cloud of greyish smoke at Sandhurst, Victoria. Ac to cor to Nature 36-93, “A little after 5 o'clock p.m., the sky was obscured by a kind of mist or vapour at a great height—in colour between steel-grey and lead-grey, and with tints similar to those of the metal bismuth over the whole. All objects looked green or greenish in the strange light.” Loud detonations in many places. Some places taken for earthquake. [VI; 1022.1, 1022.2. “A Remarkable Meteor.” Nature, 36 (May 26, 1887): 93.]


1887 Mar 19 / (D 271) / black object and luminous and ice / at Sea. ** [VI; 1023. The note copies information from pages 271 to 272 of The Book of the Damned. "Atmospheric Electricity." Monthly Weather Review, 15 (no. 3; March 1887): 83-85, at 84.]


1887 March 22 / Gigantic naptha fountain burst up 350 feet at Baku. / Naturalist's World 4-82 / Had been preceding ones. / See ab Jan 15. [VI; 1024. (Naturalists' World and Scientific Record, 4-82.) “Notes.” Nature, 35 (February 10, 1887): 349-352, at 352. See: 1887 Jan 5-6, (VI; 976).]


[1887] March 23 / Disap / F.A. Roy / Sun, March 23-3-5, 1887. [B; 793. “Missing Dentist F.A. Roy.” New York Sun, March 23, 1887, p. 3 c. 5. “Forgot Two Weeks of His Life.” New York Sun, March 28, 1887, p. 1 c. 2. After disappearing in New York City, Frank Austin Roy found himself in the streets of Richmond, Virginia, with no memory of the two weeks and suffering from nervous prostration.]


1887 Ap. 4 / Sun, 2-7 / Recently in severe storm at Hecla, Pa., large flocks of wild geese and ducks were driven down and attracted by light of coke ovens. Floundered about, dazed. [VI; 1025. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, April 4, 1887, p. 2 c. 7.]


1887 Ap. 5 / Waterbury, Conn. / Flock of wild geese saw kite flying very high. Circled about it. Attacked and tore it to pieces. / Sun 9-2-7. [VI; 1026. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, April 9, 1887, p. 2 c. 7.]


1887 Ap. 5 / Hail at Chepstow, England, “fell with but little force”. / Destructive hail / Nature 36-44. [VI; 1027. “Remarkable Hailstones.” Nature, 36 (May 12, 1887): 44-45, (illustrations).]


1887 Ap. 5 / Central N. Hampshire / “reports like dull thunder claps” and vibrations felt / Phil P.L., Ap. 7. [VI; 1028. (Philadelpha Public Ledger, April 7, 1887.)]


1887 Ap. 7 / Warasdin mirage—told in Quebec Mercury of [Ap. 7] / (See Aug 1, 1888.) / Ac to a Vienna correspondent—that for 3 days at Hungarian village of Vidovec, near Warasdin, or on wild plains around the village, “enormous divisions of infantry, with scarlet caps, led by a chief with a flaming sword, lasting several hours each day, the soldiers disappearing in mid air; all witnessed by awe-struck crowds. [VI; 1029.1, 1029.2. “A Phantom Army.” Quebec Mercury, April 7, 1887, p. 3 c. 2. “A Vienna correspondent telegraphs—In Vidovec, a Hungarian village near Warasdin, the belief of an approaching war has seized hold of the entire population. A splendid Fata Morgana was observed during three consecutive days on the wide plains around the village. Enormous divisions of infantry, with scarlet caps, could be distinctly seen moving in the plains and performing exercises to the words of command of a colossal chief whose sword was seen flashing in the air. The phenomenon lasted several hours and finally the soldiers disappeared in mid-air. The people stood awestruck in great crowds, and observed every movement of the phantom soldiers with breathless attention. Two gendarme, afterwards went in the direction of the scene of action to see if any I traces could be found, but of course in vain. The phenomenon is believed to have been a reflection of some infantry divisions manœuvring at some miles distance.” (New York Times, April 6, 1887.) “A Phantom Army.” London Daily News, March 17, 1887, p. 3 c. 2. Neither the Quebec Mercury nor the London Daily News mention a “flaming” sword. Vidovec, Croatia, is about 885 kilometres distant from Ungheni, Moldova; on April 23, 1877, Russian troops crossed the Eiffel Bridge into Romania, at the start of the Russo-Turkish War. Vidovec is about 575 kiometres distant from Vidin, Bulgaria, where the the largest group of Turkish troops in the Balkins, (often wearing a red fez), was then concentrated outside of fortresses. See: 1888 / ab Aug 1, (VI; 1409).]


[1887 Ap. 7 /] 1888 / ab Aug 1 / summer // Mirage soldiers / L Astro 1888/392 / (See Ap. 7, 1887.) / Ch-212 / Hungary. [VI; 1409. “Mirages?” Astronomie, 7 (1888): 392-393. See: 1887 Ap. 7, (VI; 1029).]


1887 Ap. 7 / Lalitpur, N.W. Provs, India / F. [VI; 1030. Fletcher, 105. This is the Lalitpur meteorite.]


1887 Ap 9 / Stones and tied / Religio-Phil Jour / Home of Harlan P. Wood, Darby Township, Madison Co., Ohio. Showers of stones. Constable Doyahoe investigated. In the cellar he was thrown to the floor and tied hand and foot and clover seed thrown in his face and crammed in his mouth. He had gone to cellar to investigate potatoes which were appearing from a tub there. [B; 794. "Capers of Alleged Spirits." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 42 (no. 7; April 9, 1887): 7, (c. 1).]


1887 Ap. 11 / Trib, 1-6 / q. / Vt. [VI; 1031. “Earthquake in Vermont.” New York Tribune, April 11, 1887, p. 1 c. 6.]


1887 Ap. 11 / Pub. Ledger if / a few days before / Yellowish snow / Augusta, Wis. [VI; 1032. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, April 11, 1887.)]


1887 Ap. 11 / Nothing in Quebec Mercury from March 15. [VI; 1033.]


1887 Ap 11 / Pub Ledger of / See Jan 15. / At Quebec a few days before—a motionless meteor that lighted up the City for 15 minutes. [VI; 1034. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, April 11, 1887.) See: 1887 Jan 15, (VI; 975).]


1887 Ap. 12 / ab 11:30 p.m./ Brilliant meteor at Vaerdalen, Norway / Nature 35-612. [VI; 1035. “Notes.” Nature, 35 (April 28, 1887): 611-614, at 612.]


1887 Ap. 14 / 9:15 p.m. / Throndhjem, N. Norway / Nature 36-63. [VI; 1036. “Notes.” Nature, 36 (May 19, 1887): 62-65, at 63.]


1887 Ap 17 / Sun, 8-6 / Quail shower in Nevada. One day fall, several years before. [VI; 1037. “A Quail Shower in Nevada.” New York Sun, April 17, 1887, p. 8 c. 6. “Sportsmen in this part of Nevada are lamenting the great slaughter of quails made by pot hunters on the Carson and in other places where the birds sought shelter during the late big storm. Such slaughter is to be deplored, but it may be that we shall have a new stock of quail sent us. A few years ago we had in this city a most remarkable shower of quail. It was a reminder of the great shower of quail we read of in the Bible—the shower that fell in the camp of the Israelities when they began howling about the flesh pots they had left behind in Egypt. The irruption of quails occurred about 4 o'clock in the evening in the fall of the year. The flight of birds came from the northward, as was supposed, as they settled in the north end of the city. Where the quail came from no one could imagine, as they were of the large mountain variety and perfect beauties. The fall of birds extended from about Sutton avenue out north to the Union shaft, reaching over three-quarters of a mile of ground. When they fell they seemed to be completely exhausted. People caught them by putting their hats over them, or by simply picking them up. Everybody had quail.” “Besides the birds that were killed, about a hundred were caught alive and kept in cages and pens in various parts of the town. A curious thing was that those that were caught and caged seemed perfectly tame and at home at once. There were at the time many conflicting opinions about this great flight of quails. The most probabile solution of the phenomenon was that the birds had collected at some point in the Sierras for the purpose of migrating to the southward, but had either mistaken their course or had been blown out of  it, and so flew on and on till they were obliged to come to the ground through exhaustion. Night coming on soon after the flight of the birds fell,  hundreds roosted about the town, and next day boys were catching and killing them up to 11 or 12 o'clock. By that time nearly all the bewildered wanderers had scattered away into the hills. There they doubtless remained to breed and stock the country, as it is not known that they ever got together again to try a second flight.”]


1887 Ap. 21 / ab. 3 a.m. / Shock, Guernsey and Jersey. In Jersey some of the inhabs. thought it was gunfire, sounds were so loud. / Nature 35-612. [VI; 1038. “Notes.” Nature, 35 (April 28, 1887): 611-614, at 612.]


1887 Ap. 22 / Trib, 1-2 / q. / Island of Jersey. [VI; 1039. “Earthquake in the Island of Jersey.” New York Tribune, April 22, 1887, p. 1 c. 2.]


1887 Ap. 20 / Jupiter in Opposition / Observatory. [VI; 1040. “Ephemeris for Jupiter.” Observatory, 10 (1887): 16.]


1887 Ap. 24 / Glb. light and substance like coke / Mortrée, France / (D-71) / Flammarion, Th and Lightning, p. 85. * [VI; 1041. The note copies information from pages 71 and  289 of The Book of the Damned. Flammarion, Camille. Thunder and Lightning. London: Chatto & Windus, 1905, 85. "Societies and Academies." Nature, 36 (June 2, 1887): 117-120, at 119. "Note sur un coup de foudre." Comptes Rendus, 104 (May 23, 1877): 1437-1438.]


1887 Ap. 25 (?) / North Pomfret, Vt / Cor saw angle worms on snow—in his opinion had fallen in rain the Saturday before. / See Nov. 30, 1885. / Sc Am 56/341 / See Sept., 1887. [VI; 1042. Bugbee, Dana J. “A Shower of Worms.” Scientific American, n.s., 56 (May 28, 1887): 341. See: 1885 Nov 30, (VI; 305), and, 1887 Sept, (VI; 1141).]


1887 Ap. 26 / Luminous cloud / Eng. [VI; 1043. (Refs.???)]


1887 Ap. 29 / See so stripped by lightning. / Cal / Sc Am 56-360. [VI; 1044. “Wild Geese Killed by Lightning.” Scientific American, n.s., 56 (June 4, 1887): 360. (Chico Chronicle, ca. April 29-June 4, 1887.)]


1887 Ap. 30 / Black / Ireland / (D-30) / (11). [VI; 1045. The note copies information from page 30 of The Book of the Damned. “Shower of Black Rain.” American Meteorological Journal, 4 (September 1887): 193.]


1887 Ap. 30 / Castlecomer, Ire. / b. rain / Sym Met (L) 22/90. [VI; 1046. “Shower of Black Rain.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 22 (July 1887): 90.]


1887 Ap. 30 / (B. Rain) / Sci News of / Black rain recently at Castlecomer in Ireland, and Newport, in Monmouthshire, a few hours later. At Newport “thunder” heard. [VI; 1047. (Sci. News, April 30, 1887; not Scientific News for 1887.)]


1887 Ap 30 / See May 3, etc. / Newport, Monmouthshire / b. rain / Symons Met (L) 22/103. [VI; 1048. “Black Rain.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 22 (August 1887): 103-104.]


1887 May / Stone showers / Georgia / See Oct 1, 1887. [VI; 1049. See: (1887 Oct 1; no note).]


1887 / ab May 1 // Near Dolores, Argentine—(Pub Ledger, May 24) / shower of stones for ab a minute. [VI; 1050. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 24, 1887.) “About People and Things.” Indianapolis Journal, April 21, 1887, p. 4 c. 5. “Near Dolores, Argentine Republic, there was recently a shower of stones. A few moments after the plains were covered with the bodies of geese, storks and other birds and animals killed by the stones. One inhabitant of the place carried forty-eight head of geese home in the space of half an hour. Great loss was sustained. Many animals were killed, and crops and trees destroyed.”]


1887 May 1 / moon / (Cut) / White patch southeast of the Great Pass of the Alps, by W.H. Harris, who writes that it was new to him in a part of the moon familiar to him. / E Mec 45/219 / See July 15, 1888. [VI; 1051. Harris, W.H. “White Patch on the Moon.” English Mechanic, 45 (no. 1154; May 6, 1887): 219-220. See: 1888 July 15, (VI; 1386).]


1887 May 1 / (Cut) / White patch on moon, southeast of the Great Pass of the Alps, by W.H. Harris, who says so noticeable that he not see how he could have over-looked it before. / E Mec. 45/220. [VI; 1052. Harris, W.H. “White Patch on the Moon.” English Mechanic, 45 (no. 1154; May 6, 1887): 219-220.]


1887 May 3 / U.S.A. and Mexico / great q. / [BA '11. [VI; 1053. Milne, 733.]


1887 May 3 and 7 / 3 at Fontainbleau / 7th at Cahors / Said been pine pollen. A yellow powder. / La Nat. 29-62. [VI; 1054. “Pluie de poussière.” La Nature, 1887 pt. 2 (no. 734 ; June 25): 62.]


1887 May / Stone showers / Georgia / See Oct 1, 1887. [VI; 1055. See: (1887 Oct 1; no note).]


1887 May 3 / Metite found at Arispe, Sonora, in 1898. / Proc. Colorado Sci Soc 7-67 / Another now in Silkens. Museum at Moctezuma, Sonora. [VI; 1056. Wuensch, A.F. “The Arizpe Meteorite.” Proceedings of the Colorado Scientific Society, 7 (1901-1904): 67-68. Ward, Henry Augustus. “Description of Four Meteorites.” Proceedings of the Rochester Academy of Science, 4 (1902): 79-88, at 82-86. Farrington, Oliver Cummings. New Meteorites. Field Museum of Natural History. Publication 178. Geological Series, v. 5 no. 1. Chicago: Field Museum Press, 1914, 2-3. Berwerth, Freidrich Martin. Verzeichnis der Meteoriten im K.K. Naturhistorischen Hofmuseum Ende Oktober 1902. Vienna: Alfred Hölder, 1903; 20 & 69. Ward, Henry Augustus. Catalogue of the Ward-Coonley Collection of Meteorites. Chicago: n.p., 1904; 17 & 83. These are the Arispe meteorite, (found in 1896, consisting of three large fragments), and the Moctezuma meteorite, (considered to be a fragment of the Arispe, found in 1899).]


1887 May 3 / At Bavispe continuing phe and Sept 15, 1888, the town finally destroyed. / St. L. Glb-Dem, 1888-Oct- 15-1-5. [VI; 1057. (St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 15, 1887, p. 1 c. 5.)]


1887 May 3 / This time and later many great forest fires in U.S. [VI; 1058. (Refs.???)]


1887 May 3 / Climax unknown volc in Sonora, Mexico.[VI; 1059. (Refs.???)]


1887 May 3 / Meteor / staub / Südtirol / Met Zeit 4/336. [VI; 1060. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 4 (1887): 334-344, at 336.]


1887 May 3 / Point is that fires (forest) at very moment of q. [VI; 1061.]


1887 May 3 / See N.Y. Engineering and Mining Press. / June 1, etc. [VI; 1062. “Earthquake Phenomena in Arizona.” Engineering and Mining Journal, 43 (June 11, 1887): 417-418. “Immediately after the earthquake, volcanoes and lava flows were seen in all our mountain ranges. Eye witnesses averred that immediately after the shock they saw flames and smoke shoot out of more than one peak, and certainly till night nearly every mountain range was on fire. Whether the timber had been burning unobserved, or was ignited (the season being frightfully dry and the woods combustible as tinder) by the friction of falling rocks, there were immediately after the shock large fires in the Whetstones, San Jose, and other ranges, but subsequent search has failed to detect any symptom of volcanic activity. A volcano, however, is said to be belching forth lava in the heart of the Sierra Madre, to the southeast of unfortunate Baciope.”]


1887 May 3 ./ N.Y. Times, June 8-3-2—that explorers sent out to investigate had returned reporting an active volcano 14 miles southeast of Bavispe, Sonora—had not been able to approach nearer than 4 miles to it. / in Sierra Madre Mts. [VI; 1063. “The Volcano in Arizona.” New York Times, June 8, 1887, p. 3 c. 2. Bennett, E. Fay. “An Afternoon of Terror: The Sonoran Earthquake of May 3, 1887.” Arizona and the West, 19 (Summer 1977): 107-120. Fires and smoke in mountain areas were reported as volcanoes near Benson and Tucson, Arizona, and, Baispe and Oputo, Mexico). Oputo is now identified at Villa Hidalgo.]  


1887 // See March 12, 1873. / A mountain illuminated. [VI; 1064. See: 1873 March 12, (IV; 1180).]


1887 May 3 / See Engineering and Mining Jour., June, etc, and quote from / or Sun, June 12-2-4. [VI; 1065. “The Earthquake in Arizona.” New York Sun, June 12, 1887, p. 2 c. 4. “Earthquake Phenomena in Arizona.” Engineering and Mining Journal, 43 (June 11, 1887): 417-418. See: 1887 May 3, (VI; 1062).]


1887 May 3 / Unknown volc / See Nov 19, 1822. / Unlikely the 2 volc burst, and subside suddenly. / And a met. was seen. [VI; 1066. See: 1822 Nov 19, (I; 1017).]


1887 May 3 / Mt top lighted in q. / Feb 3, 1809 / unknown volc, March 18, 1817. [VI; 1067. See: 1810 Feb. 3, (I:258 & 287), and, 1817 March 18, (I; 596).]


1887 May 3 / Nature 36-572 / Results of investigations by T. Steery Hunt, F.R.S., and James Douglas—said Hunt, that from the region of Oputo, not less than seven volcanoes had been reported but that the investigators inclined to the belief that these supposed volcanoes as well as that at Bavispe were effects from forest fires. [VI; 1068.1, 1068.2. “The British Association.” Nature, 36 (October 13, 1887): 569-575, at 572. Hunt, Thomas Steery, and, Douglas, James. “The Sonora Earthquake of May 3, 1887.” Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1887, 712-713.]


1887 May 3 / Mr. George E Goodfellow's report in Science 11/162. He says that the mountain fires were the effects of falling boulders and the emission of ignited gases. “The evidences of gaseous irruption were few but striking.” He says that streaks of flame were seen. At the margins of fissures were found and there were “burnt branches” of trees overhanging the edges of such places, as well as the same testimony on some of the hills and mountains near the main fault. / (So no statement that these were forest fires—an inference that may been.) [VI; 1069.1, 1069.2, 1069.3. “The Sonora Earthquake.” Science,  s. 1 v. 11 (April 6, 1888): 162-166, at 165.]


1887 May 3 / 2:12 p.m. / Trib., May 5 / Many dispatches from towns in Arizona. Many towns shaken and skies illuminated at night by volcanic fires. Said that shortly after q, skies illuminated, and vast clouds of smoke seen in neighborhood of the Whetstone Mountains, eight miles from Benson. Said that a volcano had burst into eruption in Mexico. Nothing of a volcanic nature ever known of before in the Whetstone Mountains. / At Tucson smoke in the day and fires in sky at night and thought volc in mountains 22 miles south. / Also volc in San Jose Mts on border of Sonora, Mexico, 75 miles south. // Sun, May 9 / A volcano had ignited the woods near Moctezuma, Mexico—tops of mountains illuminated by volcanic fires. [VI; 1070.1, 1070.2, 1070.3. “The Entire Southwest Shaken.” New York Tribune, May 5, 1887, p. 1 c. 5. “Overwhelmed Villages.” New York Sun, May 9, 1887, p. 1 c. 5. Apart from an undated eruption of the Colima volcano, in Mexico, in 1887, there are no recorded volcanic eruptions from the American Southwest, Mexico, nor Guatemala, in 1887.]


1887 May 3 / (+) / World, July 4-4-6 / Statement from a mine owner that he had arrived in Bavispe upon May 4, and had explored the country to the south and east of B., but had failed to find any trace of the reported volcano. [VI; 1071. (New York World, July 4, 1887, p. 4 c. 4.)]


1887 (May 5) / On [May 5] a thick column of fire and smoke seen 14 miles from Ba—(etc.)—and attributed to a volcano. / C.R., 105-250. [VI; 1072. Partiot, Gaston. “Tremblement de terre survenu au Mexique le 3 mai 1887.” Comptes Rendus, 105 (1887): 250.]


1887 May 5 / q. / Trinidad, B.W.I. / BA 1911-55. [VI; 1073. (BA 1911-55.)]


1887 May / Trib 8—said volc in mts, 35 miles southeast of Magdalene. Said that the reported volc in the Whetstones was a timber fire. / Trib, May 11th—more shocks in Mexico and Arizona. Nothing said of volcano anywhere. Said no doubt as to volc in the Whetstone Mts. / Trib, May 6—not a volc in Whetstones but, “a woodfire started by Mexicans”—another dispatch—no timber on the Whetstone and it was covered with lava. / Trib 12-2-1, May 12, quoting the Phoenix Gazette—according to the report of Dr. D.E. Goodfellow—“There has been no eruption in any part of the region disturbed.” / Trib, May 14—Dispatch from Mexico—that upon several mountains forests had been consumed but that no volcanoes were visible. Said that in Mexico the loss of lives was appalling. / (So say if woods afire this from burning substances from sky.) [VI; 1075.1 to 1075.4. “The Arizona Volcano.” New York Tribune, May 6, 1887, p. 1 c. 5.”A Volcano Reported in Mexico.” New York Tribune, May 8, 1887, p. 1 c. 3. “Earthquakes in Mexico and Arizona.” New York Tribune, May 11, 1887, p. 1 c. 5. “Observations on the Earthquake.” New York Tribune, May 12, 1887, p. 2 c. 1. “Governor Torres on the Earthquake.” New York Tribune, May 14, 1887, p. 1 c. 5.]  


1887 May 3 / N.Y. Times, July 7—that upon May 21, Bavispe had been destroyed—nothing said of a volc. 14 miles from B, but said that one 75 miles away had been reported. [VI; 1076. “The Mexican Earthquake.” New York Times, July 7, 1887, p. 5 c. 2.]


1887 May 3 / Trans Seis Soc Japan, 12/29, says that fires perhaps kindled by huge rocks rolling down mountains gave rise to false stories of volcanoes. / Writers here say that in one region (Oputo) seven volc were reported, but the writers incline to think that all were forest fires. [VI; 1077. Hunt, Thomas Steery, and, Douglas, James. “The Sonora Earthquake of May 3, 1887.” Seismological Journal of Japan, 12 (1887): 29-31, at 31. Oputo is identified in this article as “Opoto.”]  


1887 May 3 / See C.R. notes. / Seems this = Incip Volc. [VI; 1078.]


1887 May 3 / C.R., 105-250 / That southeast of Bavispe a thick column of smoke and flames been seen. Said that crevices opened throwing out tongues of fire which set woods on fire. [VI; 1079. Partiot, Gaston. “Tremblement de terre survenu au Mexique le 3 mai 1887.” Comptes Rendus, 105 (1887): 250.]


1887 May 5 / N.Y.T., 1-6 / 6-1-6 / 9-1-2 / 10-1-6 / 14-5-4 // q / Arizona, Texas, Mexico. [VI; 1080. “Severe Earthquake Shocks.” New York Times, May 5, 1887, p. 1 c. 6. “Ruined by the Earthquake.” New York Times, May 6, 1887, p. 1 c. 6. “The Mexican Earthquake Earthquake.” New York Times, May 9, 1887, p. 1 c. 2. “The Recent Earthquake.” New York Times, May 10, 1887, p. 1 c. 6. “Appalling Loss of Life.” New York Times, May 14, 1887, p. 5 c. 4.]


1887 May / 1st week // Washington / pollen / Science 9/460 / See May 7. / France. / See March 6. / How long pollen last? [VI; 1081. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 9 (May 13, 1887): 459-460, at 460. See: 1887 March 6, (VI; 1018), and, 1887 May 7, (VI: 1082 & 1084).]


1887 May 7 / Substance neither sulphur nor pollen—not burn / France / L Astro 1887/228. [VI; 1082. Laroussilhe, Ferdinand de. “Une pluie de soufre.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 228-229.]


1887 May 7 / At Burrows, Ind., swarm 1½ miles wide of beetles like common may beetles. / Insect Life 1-17. [VI; 1083. Linton, S.H. “An Extraordinary Twilight Flight of Lachnosterna.” Insect Life, 1 (July 1888): 17.]


1887 May 7 / Pollens at Cahors / L'Astro 6-228, 272. /// Plia[note cut off]. [VI; 1084. Laroussilhe, Ferdinand de. “Une pluie de soufre.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 228-229. "Pluie de soufre." Astronomie, 6 (1887): 272-274.]


1887 May 7 / oilish / Italy, etc. [VI; 1085. Laroussilhe, Ferdinand de. “Une pluie de soufre.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 228-229. “Le même jour, ce phénomène a été observé à Catane. Au nord de l'Italie, les eaux du lac de Lugano ont perdu subitement leur bleu limpide habituel et sont devenues jaunâtres: sur leur surface flottait une matière grasse. Cette poussière n'avait avec le soufre qu'une analogie de couleur, elle n'était même pas combustible.”]


[1887 May ] / N / Pollen at Cahors / Doubtful May 7, 1887 / Other case after 1900. [VI; 1086. See: (after 1900, Cahors).]


1887 May / middle and for some time // Volc, one of the Aleutian Islands / Amer. Met. Jour. 4-146. [VI; 1087. “Island Volcano.” American Meteorological Journal, 4 (August 1887): 146. The Akutan volcano.]


1887 / ab. May 15 // Volc / Unalaska / N.Y. World, July 20-1-6. [VI; 1088. (New York World, July 20, 1887, p. 1 c. 6.)]


1887 May 19 / F / South Australian Advertiser of (Med and Bay B of Aug 12) / Home of Mr. Hamdorf. Cottage, near Adelaide—rappings and a little girl medium in frequent trances. / May and June. [B; 795. (Medium and Daybreak, August 12, 1887.) "Our Cradock correspondent, writing on April 27, tells the following strange story...." South Australian Advertiser, (Adelaide), April 29, 1887, p. 4 c. 7. "Writing in May 2 with reference to the ghost...." South Australian Advertiser, (Adelaide), May 4, 1887, p. 4 c. 6-7. "The Boolcunda Creek Ghost." South Australian Advertiser, (Adelaide), May 6, 1887, p. 7 c. 5. "A correspondent of the Port Augusta Despatch...." South Australian Advertiser, (Adelaide),  May 9, 1887, p. 5 c. 2-3. "The Yanyarie Ghost." South Australian Advertiser, (Adelaide), May 19, 1887, p. 6 c. 6. "Another seance with the Yanyarie ghost...." South Australian Advertiser, (Adelaide), May 20, 1887, p. 5 c. 2. "The Yanyarie Ghost." South Australian Advertiser, (Adelaide), May 28, 1887, p. 6. c. 6.]


1887 May 21 / Dispatch from City of Mexico, 19 / As to the recent q—a volcano near Janos and that flames burst from the summit of a mountain setting fire to a forest. / NY Times, May 22-1-6. [VI; 1074. “The Mexican Earthquake.” New York Times, May 22, 1887, p. 1 c. 6.]


1887 May 21 / Protub sun / on 22nd, another / R—Sept 26, '79. [VI; 1089. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 257.]


1887 May 25 / metite / night / Lowmanville, near Wellsburg, N.Y. / (Pub Ledg, May 28) / On farm of James Harney—monstrous metite made a hole 40 feet across and 20 deep. But metite not found Said been seen. [VI; 1090. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 28, 1887.)]


1887 / Thursday before May 27 // 11 p.m. / Lowmanville, N.Y. / Said that meteor had fallen. Not yet found but a pit in ground, 20 ft deep and 40 across. / MWR 87, p. 146. [VI; 1091. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 15 (no. 5; May 1887): 144-146, at 146. Kunz, George Frederick. “Meteor-Fall.” Science, s. 1 v. 10 (December 9, 1887): 288. A newspaper hoax.]


1887 May 27 / Like a forest in sky of Athens, 10 minutes. / L'Astro 12-188. [VI; 1092. Maltézos, C. “Un Paysage dans le Ciel.” Astronomie, 12 (1893): 188-190.]


1887 / last of May // BO / Told in Swansea "Cambrian Daily Leader" of July 7, and preceding numbers (Medium and Daybreak, July 15) / In home of Rev. David Phillips of Swansea (or a suburb of Perth), a woman of his household had been crried over a wall and toward a stream, where she was found in a semi-conscious condition, by a force she thought had seen as apparition of a lodger. [B; 796.1, 796.2. (Medium and Daybreak, July 15, 1887.) (Swansea Cambrian Daily Leader, July 7, 1887, and before.; not at BNA.)]


1887 May, last // Prof. J.M. Klein's obj in Ky. in N.W. sky near horizon. / Phil Pub L., May 27. [VI; 1093. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 27, 1887.)]


1887  May 30 / flashes and obj / ab 9:15 p.m. / E Mec., 45/396 / 2 cors write, or sign the communication, that in English Channel in the evening they had seen flashes of light, or of lightning, near the horizon, at irregular intervals of about 2½ minutes—then saw a luminous body about size and shape of moon. Almost instantly disappeared. 8 min later more flashes, then others. / “Weather fine.” / (Look for Venus.) [VI; 1094.1, 1094.2. Buchanan, William, and, Scudamore, William. “Atmospheric Electricity.” English Mechanic, 45 (no. 1161; June 24, 1887): 396. Venus and Saturn were on the western horizon, and the half moon was to the west-southwest, (opposite from the point in the sky where the luminous globe was observed), at this time.]


1887 May 30 / Tornado cloud / MWR, 1887, p. 141. [VI; 1095. “Winds.” Monthly Weather Review, 15 (no. 5; May 1887): 140-142, at 141. Funnel clouds were observed at Fredonia, New York, and at Loganville, Ohio, on this date.]


1887 May 29-30 / q. / Mexico / coast San Marcos / BA '11. [VI; 1096. Milne, 733.]


1887 May 29 / (Alg.) / Boufarik, Algeria / metite / L'Astro 6-272. [VI; 1097. Duprat, Charles. “Autre chute d'uranolithe.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 272.]


1887 May 31 / 10 a.m. / Jamestown, NY / NY Sun, June 1-1-3. [VI; 1098. “More Earthquakes.” New York Sun, June 1, 1887, p. 1 c. 3.]


1887 / last of May // BO / Mr Phillips and his son, Mr Martin father Phillips, B.A, could offer no explanation of the phe. Doors opened and objects tossed about. Furniture "walked and beds tossed about; still by a "considerate" force. No damage. [B; 798. (Refs??? "The Manifestations of Spiritualism at Swansea." Cambria Daily Leader (Swansea), July 7, 1887, p. 3 c. 5. "Alleged Manifestations of Spiritualism at Swansea." Cambria Daily Leader, July 5, 1887, p. 36 c. 2-3??? "The Spiritualistic Manifestations at Swansea." Cambria Daily Leader, July 6, 1887, p. 3 c. 2.) “Alleged Extraordinary Manifestations at Swansea.” Cardiff Weekly Mail, July 9, 1887, p. 6 c. 9.]


1887 June and befor / H.H. (polt) in Copenhagen / Med and D.B., July 8, p. 423. [B; 799. (Medium and Daybreak, July 8, 1887, p. 423.)]


1887 June 1 / [LT], 6-b / Etna. [VI; 1099. “Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, June 1, 1887, p. 6 c. 2.]


[1887 June 8-9 /]1887 June 10 (?) / Wellington, Somerset / Cor, E Mec 45-372, heard a roar that ended in distinctly separate sounds. [VI; 1100. “Curious Noise—Earthquake?” English Mechanic, 45 (no. 1160; June 17, 1887): 372. The “Wednesday evening last” was June 8, (not June 10); and, the correspondent also says earthquake in Central Asia (Turkestan) “on Thursday morning at 5 o'clock” was “within an hour or so of the time I heard it.”]


1887 June 12 / morning / near St Joseph / dispatch from Evansville, Ind / Sun 13-1-6 / Shock felt—thought been a q, but a great stone had fallen from sky burying itself to a depth of at least 15 or 18 feet. [VI; 1101. (New York Sun, June 13, 1887, p. 1 c. 6.) Kunz, George Frederick. “Meteor-Fall.” Science, s. 1 v. 10 (December 9, 1887): 288. A newspaper hoax.]


1887 June 15 / 8:42 p.m. / Dorchester, Mass / A meteor first seen passing through Leo Minor. / Science, 9/611. [VI; 1102. “Height of a meteor.” Science, s. 1 v. 9 (June 24, 1887): 611-612.]


1887 June 15 / Said that large meteorite fell on farm near Pilot Mound, Iowa. / MWR '87-172 / With a roar almost deafening. [VI; 1103. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 15 (no. 6; June 1887): 171-172, at 172.]


1887 June 16 / (Fr) / [LT], 5-d / q. / France. [VI; 1104. “France.” London Times, June 16, 1887, p. 5 c. 4.]


1887 June 17 / 7:45 p.m. / Paris / bolide / C.R. 105-85, 139. [VI; 1105. Waltner, and, Didier. “Observation du bolide du 17 juin 1887.” Comptes Rendus, 105 (1887): 85. “M. J. Vinot informe l'Académie qu'un certain numbre de ses correspondents....” Comptes Rendus, 105 (1887): 139.]


1887 June 17 / 9:16 p.m. / Magnificent bolide at Lyons—from between Alpha and Beta Andromeda toward Alpha Persei. / L'Astro 6-272. [VI; 1106. “Le bolide du 17 juin.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 270-272.]


1887 June 18 / M.W.R. 87-171 / Palmyra, N.Y. / Mirage—2nd in 2 months / Lake Ontario, 16 miles away, seen reflected in sky—a steamer, large sailing vessels, and waves. [VI; 1107. “Optical Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 15 (no. 6; June 1887): 171. (New York Times, June 19, 1887.) “A beautiful mirage....” Newark Union, (New York), June 25, 1887, p. 3 c. 2. “A beautiful mirage was observed at Palymra Saturday afternoon about one o'clock. Lake Ontario, sixteen miles north of that place, was plainly visible, the trees lining the shore forming a pretty back ground. An easterly bound vessel under full sail was seen going down the lake. The phenomenon lasted about eighteen minutes, and during this time the streets were lined with people carrying opera and field glasses eager to catch a sight of the charming spectacle presented to view. This is the second mirage that has been observed at Palmyra within two months.” “A Mirage of Lake Ontario.” Newark Union, (New York), April 16, 1887,  p. 2 c. 4. “A remarkably distinct mirage of Lake Ontario, fourteen miles distant, was observed by a number of people in Lyons for a few minutes on Monday evening at about sunset.”]


1887 June 19 / Harrisburg, Pa, or Centre Co. / Great invasion of snails—never known there before. / MWR '87-172 / See Oct or Nov., 1885. [VI; 1108. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 15 (no. 6; June 1887): 171-172, at 172. “We were astonished...,” and, “A Plague of Snails.” Millheim Journal, June 16, 1887, p. 3 c. 4. “We were astonished to find the annexed article both in the Harrisburg Patriot and in the Lewisburg Saturday News, when at the same time the reporters of this paper, published right in the midst of the would-be afflicted section of Centre county, seemed entirely ignorant of anything of the kind. Upon inquiry we are informed that there are two or three gardens in Aaronsburg, where the snails did more or less damage, but in no case to the extent represented in the exaggerated tale. Another thing which puzzles the reader is the mention of a place in Penns Valley by the name of Bloomfield. There is no such place to our knowing nor has anybody else ever heard of such a town. The reporter to said papers must have a very vivid imagination and a strong passion for picturing a comparatively insignificant occurrence in the loudest colors possible.” See: 1885 / ab last of Oct, (VI; 194).]


1887 June 19 / Stonefall / near Buenos Ayres / L Astro 6/426. [VI; 1109. Echenique, Mariano. “Chute d'un uranolithe à Ramos-Mejia.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 426.]


1887 June 23 / Jupiter / Stationary. [VI; 1110.]


1887 June 24 / Med and Dayb. of / For some time house to rent because haunted. Bacombe Lodge, South Street, Windover, Bucks. [B; 800. (Medium and Daybreak, June 24, 1887.)]


1887 June 28-29 / Cuenca, Ecuador / great q / Sky leaden hue for several days after the q. Ashes fell from the sky, / World, Aug 3-1-6. [VI; 1111. (New York World, August 3, 1887, p. 1 c. 6.)]


1887 June 30 / 5:10 p.m. / Contocook, N.H., etc. / and Vt / shock / NY Times, July 1-1-2. [VI; 1112. “Earthquake Shocks.” New York Times, July 1, 1887, p. 1 c. 2.]


1887 July 4 / 11:30 p.m. / Summit of Mt Hood, Oregon, lighted up with “100 pounds of [ordinary] red fire”—plainly seen 50 miles away. / Sun, July 6-2-6. [VI; 1113. “Lighting Up Mount Hood.” New York Sun, July 6, 1887, p. 2 c. 6. The celebratory fireworks, seen in Portland, were also seen in eastern Oregon, seventy-five miles away.]


1887 July 5 / F / Cambria Daily Leader—phe had been going on for some time but not till ab May 1st were the Phillips convinced that could not be explained. No damage done but every bed made by the servant girl was tossed about later. Members of family approaching a door would see it open for them. No damage done. [B; 797.1, 797.2. ("Alleged Manifestations of Spiritualism at Swansea." Cambria Daily Leader, July 5, 1887, p. 36 c. 2-3???)]


1887 July 7 / L.T., 10-c / This is a balloon picked up on 4th in Channel. [VI; 1114. “A Balloon at Sea.” London Times, July 7, 1887, p. 10 c. 3.]


1887 July 7 / (Cut) / Juvisy / whirl / L'Astro 1887/392. [VI; 1115. Flammarion, Camille. “Petite trombe ascendante.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 392.]


1887 July 9 / ball lightning / Home of Capt J.T. Patten, 38 Hancock Ave, West, detroit / Rainstorm—a ball of fire larger than a cocoanut burst through wallpaper—into room from chimney. Ball floated around. Someone opened the door and it darted out or went out in draft. / World 11-1-2. [VI; 1116.1, 1116.2. (New York World, July 11, 1887, p. 1 c. 2.)]


1887 July 11 / 5 or 6 a.m. / Dover, etc., New Hampshire / slight shock / World 12-1-2. [VI; 1117. (New York World, July 12, 1887, p. 1 c. 2.)]


1887 July 19 / ab 10 p.m. / St Paul, Minn. / “Countless millions of bugs”—by a bank, sidewalk covered a foot deep—Streets cleaned and at 2 a.m. covered again. / Sun 15-2-3. [VI; 1118. “A Strange Invasion.” New York Sun, July 15, 1887, p. 2 c. 3.]


1887 July 21 / See Jan 7? / [LT], 9-e / Rainham Myst. [B; 801. “The Rainham Mystery.” London Times, July 21, 1887, p. 9 c. 5. See: (Jan 7?).]


1887 July 21 / Wingless ants / Nancy, France / (D-91). [VI; 1119. (D-91.The note copies information from page 79 of The Book of the Damned.) "Notes." Nature, 36 (August 11, 1887): 347-350, at 349. ("Une pluie de fourmis." Nature (Paris), 1887 (August 11): 159.)]


1887 / ab July 23 // K-bug. / Phil Pub Ledger, Aug 2 / "An insect of unknown species bit Mrs McFarland of Lockville, Conn., in the lip, some ten days ago. Last week she complained of being ill, and her lip began to swell in an alarming manner. Her face and head were swollen beyond recognition. Later in the week, she died, the ascribed cause being blood poison." See Aug. [B; 802.1, 802.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 2, 1887.) See: (Aug 19).]


1887 July 24 / Commiskey, Jennings Co., Ind.—people building a church but work stopped. No derrick strong enough to lift one large beam. This night it mysteriously put in place. / N.Y. Times, Aug 1-4-7. [B; 803. “The Mystery of the New Church.” New York Times, August 1, 1887, p. 4 c. 7.]


1887 July 27 / N.Y.T., 2-2 / Weather / “elec. phe. [VI; 1120. “Bolts of Electricity.” New York Times, July 27, 1887, p. 2 c. 2.]


1887 July 29 / 4 inches of rain in 2 hours / West Hartford, Conn / N.Y. Tribune, June 3-6-3, 1889. [VI; 1121. “An Extraordinary Summer Storm.” New York Tribune, June 3, 1889, p. 6 c. 3-4.]


1887 July 30 / Religio-Phil. Jour., 6-1 / Polt, home of Corline Bailey, aged 14, near Gilead, Ill. [B; 804. "A Haunted House." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 42 (no. 23; July 30, 1887): 6, (c. 1).]


1887 July 31 / 6¼ inches rain at Rocky Hill, Conn. In Hartford Times, said that the water came down “almost solid”. / N.Y. Tribune, 1889, June 3-6-3. [VI; 1122. “An Extraordinary Summer Storm.” New York Tribune, June 3, 1889, p. 6 c. 3-4.]


1887 Aug / Woodstock phe—A.C. Holms, in The Facts of Psychic Science and Philosophy, 261, copying from The Two Worlds, 1887, has the date Aug, 1886. / Story told by Mr. J. Walls, editor of a Woodstock newspaper, that while he stood talking with Mrs. Hoyt he saw a window curtain flame when no one near it. He rushed to it and extinguished the fire only to see it burst out in another part of the curtain. / Family was Mr and Mrs Hoyt, 5 children, and 2 nieces. [B; 805.1, 805.2, 805.3. Holms, Archibald Campbell. The Facts of Psychic Science and Philosophy. Jamaica, N.Y.: Occult Press, 1927, 270. (The Two Worlds, v. 1 (1887): 40; not online; Houdini Collect @ LOC???)  ("Fire plays ghostly tricks." New York World, August 8, 1887, p. 1 c. 4.) See: 1887 Aug 20, (B; 806).]


1887 Aug 2 / Big q / Ecuador / [BA] '11. [VI; 1123. Milne, 734.]


1887 Aug 2 / noon / Shelbyville, Ky / explosive sound and geyser spouting on a farm / World 4-2-3. [VI; 1124. (New York World, August 4, 1887, p. 2 c. 3.) “General Mining News.” Engineering and Mining Journal,  50 (September 6, 1890): 277-279, at 277-278. “Recently near Waldron, eight miles southeast of Shelbyville, Ind., an explosion set fully ten acres of the earth in commotion. Geysers were shooting up to the height of six and eight feet, and gas was blazing from ten to 15 feet above the water of the geysers. The river bed Flat Rock was torn up and the water had stopped running below the graveyard and is turning down into the caverns caused by the upheaval.” “The county had not been considered in the gasbelt, although local companies have sunk many wells. At Waldron a sufficient flow of gas was found to supply the citizens with fuel. The fifty or more fountains of fire burst from the earth were interspersed with six or eight geysers.” “Within the bend of the river and for one-eighth of a mile along the stream great rents, one of which is a quarter of a mile long, were seen in the earth and river bed, which is of limestone, and stones the size of a house have been hurled from their places. Gas flows freely from the entire surface of the ten acres.” “The gas is odorless, like the Pennsylvania natural gas. It is now discovered that the soil for many miles around is impregnated with the combustible, and by piercing the soil with a crowbar the gas may be ignited and a blaze produced large enough to cause considerable illumination. In Van Buren township, twenty-four miles north, the gas has broken into the water wells, and the use of water from them has been abandoned. Some of the farmers cased the wells, and are using the gas from them for fuel.”]


1887 (Aug 2) / Turtles? / Phil Pub. Ledger, Aug 6—said that in rainstorm in New Brunswick, NJ, half a dozen turtles had fallen, but it had been discovered that they had been washed from a roof where had been left to sun themselves. [VI; 1125. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 6, 1887.)]


1887 Aug 2 / 12:40 a.m. / Mo., Ind., Tenn. / Rumbling and shocks. In opinion of W.P. Harrison, of Nashville, Tenn, a writer upon seismic subjects, an aerolite had passed. / NY Times Aug 3-1-3/ 4-1-6—that since this phe. land in Trigg Co, Ky, had been sinking. [VI; 1126.1, 1126.2. “It Came Without Warning.” New York Times, August 3, 1887, p. 1 c. 3 “Golden Pond Wiped Out.” New York Times, August 4, 1887, p. 1 c. 6.]


1887 Aug 6-7 / Polts / Woodstock / P.L., Aug. 9 / (See). [B; 807. (Philadelphia Ledger, August 9, 1887.)]


1887 Aug 7 / Flames / New Brunswick / See May 29, 1888. [B; 808. See: 1888 May 29, B: 914 & 915).]


1887 Aug 7 / dispatch // Flames / Woodstock, New Brunswick / That in little 2-story frame house on Victoria Street, occupied by Reginald C Hoyt, a picture frame dealer, his wife, 5 children and 2 nieces, since 11 a.m. on 6th, no less than 40 fires had broken out. "The fires can be traced to no human agency and even the most sceptical are staggered. Now a curtain high up out of reach would burst into flame, a bed quilt in another room, a basket of clothes on a shed, a child's dress hanging on a hook. / World 8-1-4. [B; 809.1, 809.2. (New York World, August 8, 1887, p. 1 c. 4.)]


1887 Aug 7 / Sun, 6-7 from the Galt Gazette / That near Galt, California, an enormous meteorite had fallen into a pond, the fish dying in the boiling water. About 6 feet of it protruding, supposed to be wedge-shaped and about 100 feet wide. / See June 15, 1886. [VI; 1127.1, 1127.2. “A Big California Meteor.” New York Sun, August 7, 1887, p. 6 c. 7. See: 1886 June 15, (VI; 512).]


1887 Aug 10 / Every indication “abnormal star”. / Rochester / Lewis Swift writes that a known star was surrounded by a nebulosity never seen before. Watched for 15 minutes and the nebulosity was constant—not seen next night. Swift's notion of a meteor cloud great enough to last at least 15 min and affecting only one star—not good. [VI; 1128.1, 1128.2. (Refs.???)]


1887 Aug 11 / Sun, 2-3 / That ac to a Georgia newspaper a ball of fire had fallen near Americus, Ga. [VI; 1129. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, August 11, 1887, p. 2 c. 7.]


1887 Aug 13 / Metite / Taborg, Russia / contained an abundance of native iron / Sci News, N.S., 1-41. [VI; 1130. “A Large Meteorite.” Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (January 13, 1888): 41, This is the Taborg meteorite.]


1887 Aug 19 / K-bug / (See July 23.) / Phil P.L. of / "Thomas McCormack, who was formerly town clerk of Union Township, N.J., was working in a quarry last Friday (15th) when he felt a stinging sensation in his left arm and saw a large black spider there. He brushed it away and thought no more of the matter. Son his arm began to swell, and in a few hours, it was twice the normal size. He was taken to a hospital, where he died on Saturday. / (See July 23.) [B; 810.1, 810.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 19, 1887.) See: (July 23).]


1887 Aug 19 / Trombe / Lake Léman / C.R. 105-497. [VI; 1131. Faye, H. “Sur la trombe récente du lac de Genève.” Comptes Rendus, 105 (1887): 497-504.]


1887 Aug 19 / Total solar eclipse / Russia / Clerke. [VI; 1132. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 4th ed., 1902, 185 & 454.]


1887 Aug 19 / Marseilles / Thing that eclipsed moon /L'Astro 1887-427 / Ch-[note cut off]. [VI; 1133. “Échancrure observée sur le disque solaire.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 426-428, (illustration).]


1887 Aug 20 / Religio Phil Jour of, 6-3 / More of the Woodstock, N.B., phe. [B; 806. "Haunted by Fire." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 42 (no. 26; August 20, 1887): 6, (c. 3). "Since 11 o’clock yesterday morning, no less than forty fires have broken out in various parts of the house, and bedding, furniture, window shades, clothing and various household articles partially destroyed. Only untiring vigilance has prevented the house and its contents from burning to the ground, and this would also have caused the destruction of other wooden buildings in the vicinity." "These fires can be traced to no human agency, and even the scientists are staggered. Without premonition and with no lamps lighted or stoves in use, various articles would burst out into flames. Now it would be a curtain, high up out of reach; then a bedquilt in another room would begin to smoke and smoulder, and, as if to still further non plus the theorists, a carpet covered lounge was found to be all afire underneath among the jute stretched above the springs. A basket of clothes in the shed burst into flames, and the basket itself was partially consumed. A child’s dress hanging on a hook, a feather bed, a straw mattress, no two articles in the same room were ignited, and would have been consumed but for water copiously poured on them. News spread quickly that Hoyt’s house was haunted, and great crowds flocked there. It was the talk of the town last night, and to-day a visit was made to the premises by Dr. Smith, a leading physician and druggist, whose only theory was that of electrical or gaseous combustion. But the fact that the fire burst forth in rooms, the windows of which were wide open, seems to refute this supposition." "Mr. James S. Olmstead of Olmstead Bros., a prominent merchant also attempted to investigate the mystery, but gave it up as inexplicable. Mr. James Walls, editor of the Carleton Sentinel, the leading newspaper in town, went to examine into the strange affair, and while standing in the parlor talking with Mrs. Hoyt, was astonished to see a white cotton window curtain burst into flames at a point near the ceiling, and when no one was present. He rushed to the spot, climbed a chair, and with his hands, which were somewhat burned, extinguished the fire, only to see it break out anew at a point far removed from the original blaze. He came away puzzled and completely nonplussed." (Boston Herald, August 7, 1887.)]


1887 Aug 25 / Great strange protuberance from sun / R—Sept 26, '79. [VI; 1134. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 257.]


1887 Aug 27 / Anniversary of first shocks of Charleston in and of this day 1886 ab midnight and at 5 a.m. / Sun 28-11-4. [VI; 1136. “Earthquakes in Charleston.” New York Sun, August 28, 1887, p. 11 c. 4.]


1887 Aug 27 / Religio Phil Jour., 6-3 / At Fish Dam, Florida, a whirlwind that withered acres of cotton plants. [VI; 1137. “J.G. Rice, a farmer near Fish Dam, Fla., reports a queer cloud-burst....” Religio-Philosophical Journal, 43 (no. 1; August 27, 1887): 6 , (c. 3).]


1887 Aug 28 / Nearest to 25th / q in Mexico / B.A. '11. [VI; 1135. Milne, 734.]


1887 Aug 28 / Venus stationary. [VI; 1138. (Confirm.)]


1887 Aug 30 / C.R. 105/987 / ab noon / Met of Oschansk (Perm) Russia / a breccia / (F) / Pop Sci News—25-42. [VI; 1139. Fletcher, 106. “The Meteorite of Oschansk.” Popular Science News, 25 (March 1891): 42. This is the Tabory meteorite.]


1887 Aug 31 / near Canajoharie / near Amsterdam, N.Y. / in a corn field / body of man / had been great struggle / killed by man or mad bull? / World, Sept. 7-3-2. [B; 811. (New York World, September 7, 1887, p. 3 c. 2.)]


1887 Aug 31 / 9:45 p.m. / L'Astro 6-75 / Capt Vogel of the steamer City of Palalka—reported severe concussion to the south of Charleston. [VI; 1140. “Secousse sous-marine.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 75.]


1887 Sept / Earthworm seemed have fallen. / Pop. Sci News 22-12 / Hampton, Iowa / See Ap. 25, 1887. [VI; 1141. “Do Worms Fall During Showers?” Popular Science News, 22 (January 1888): 12. A single earth-worm was found in an empty milk bottle after a rain shower. See: 1887 Ap. 25 (?), (VI; 1042).]


1887 Sept. 2 / morning / Heavy shock / Tucson, Arizona / L.T. 3-5-3. [VI; 1142.”The United States.” London Times, September 3, 1887, p. 5 c. 3-4.]


1887 Sept. 9 / Med and D.B. of / Ghst reported at Gateshead. [B; 812. (Medium and Daybreak, September 9, 1887.) “A Gateshead Ghost.” Shields Daily Gazette, August 25, 1887, p. 3 c. 1.]


1887 Sept 13 / Det met / 8:52 p.m. / Dublin / meteor and 3½ minutes later dull report like that of a distant field-gun / Nature 36-508. [VI; 1143. Moore, John William. “A Meteor's Flash and Explosion.” Nature, 36 (September 29, 1887): 508.]


1887 Sept 15 / date in Phil Pub Ledger of 17th // Meteor of Barrington at 8 p.m. / Halifax at 9 p.m. [VI; 1144. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, September 17, 1887.)]


1887 Sept 15 / M.W.R. '87-257 / New Eng and New Brunswick / great meteor / Pop Sci News 21-163. [VI; 1145. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 15 (no. 9; September 1887): 257-258, at 257. “On the evening of Sept. 15....” Popular Science News, 21 (November 1887): 163.]


1887 Sept 15 / 8 p.m. / At Barrington, Nova Scotia, a luminous body looking as large as an elephant exploded with a “[The] noise, which was terrifying, lasted fully a minute and a half”—was seen at Halifax and other places sounding like distant thunder. / Times 17-5-6. [VI; 1146. “Fall of a Meteor.” New York Times, September 17, 1887, p. 5 c. 6.]


1887 Sept. 16 / Cloud like lion and harp / North Berwick, Eng / Folklore Jour 6/109. // E 12 [stamped]. [VI; 1147. (Folklore Journal, 6-109.)]


1887 Sept 17 / metite—railroad / Religio-Phil-Jour, 6-5, in a column of miscellaneous news—aerolite near the line of the Mexican National Railway, between Morella and Patzcuaro—burrowed a furrow in earth 100 yards long and buried self 9 feet deep. [VI; 1148. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 43 (no. 4; September 17, 1887): 6, (c. 5).]


1887 Sept 17 / ab. 9 p.m. / Great meteor / Portland, Me. / World 19-1-3 // also N.Y. City / 20-5-5. [VI; 1149. (New York World, September 19, 1887, p. 1 c. 3.) (New York World, September 20, 1887, p. 5 c. 5.)]


1887 Sept 21 / 4 h / Inf. conjunction Venus-Sun. [VI; 1150. (Confirm.)]


1887 Sept 23 / Med and D.B. of / Polt / Liverpool hotel. [B; 813. (Medium and Daybreak, September 23, 1887.)]


1887 Sept 23 / 7 a.m. /9:10 a.m. // Sept 24-26 / big q / West Indies / [BA] '11. [VI; 1151. Milne, 734.]


1887 Sept. 23 / Shocks felt by a vessel off s. coast of Cuba. / L.T. 30-7-5. [VI; 1152. “Earthquake Shocks in the West Indies.” London Times, September 30, 1887, p. 7 c. 5.]


1887 Sept 23 / Destructive q / Hayti / BA 1911-54. [VI; 1153. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 54.]


1887 Sept / For 2 or 3 weeks, shocks almost every day, Bahamas. / BA 1911-54 / Epecially Sept 23, 24, 25, 26. [VI; 1154. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 54.]


1887 Sept 24 / Trib, 1-2 / Cuba / q. [VI; 1155. “Cuba Shaken by an Earthquake.” New York Tribune, September 24, 1887, p. 1 c. 2.]


1887 Sept 25 / Observatory de Saint-Maur and Bordeaux / great magnetic perturbation / La Nat 1887/2/303. [VI; 1156. Moureaux, Th. “Perturbation magnétique.” La Nature, 1887 pt. 2 (no. 749;    October 8): 303.]


1887 Sept. 30 / BO / 10 a.m. / Strong shock / Smyrna / L.T., Oct 1-5-f / Another on Oct. 1, at 10:40 p.m. (3-6-a). [VI; 1157. “Earthquake at Smyrna.” London Times, October 1, 1887, p. 5 c. 6. “Turkey.” London Times, October 3, 1887, p. 6 c. 1.]


1887 Oct 2 / Sun, 5-2 / Ac to Monticello Watchman—two men fishing on Wolf Pond saw and had an enconter with a gigantic snake-fish—mottled green head—body black with rings of a dark yellow. [B; 814. “Thirty Feet of Snake.” New York Sun, October 2, 1887, p. 5 c. 2.]


1887 Oct 4 / 1 a.m. / Severe shock / Greece / L.T. 5-5-5. [VI; 1158. “Greece.” London Times, October 5, 1887, p. 5 c. 5.]


1887 Oct 5 / 3:15 a.m. / Another slight shock, Greece. / 7-3-4 / Continue at least till 8th—inhabitants driven from houses—10-6-b. [VI; 1159. “Greece.” London Times, October 7, 1887, p. 3 c. 4. “Greece.” London Times, October 10, 1887, p. 6 c. 2.]


1887 Oct 6 / BO / Dispatch from New York / destructive q's in Cuba / L.T. 8-5-e. [VI; 1160. “Earthquakes in Cuba.” London Times, October 8, 1887, p. 5 c. 5.]


1887 Oct 7 / Sun, 4-7 / New Haven invaded “the other night”. Birds of diff species, attracted by lights, entered dwellings and were caught. [VI; 1161. (New York Sun, October 7, 1887, p. 4 c. 7.)]


1887 Oct 10 / Venus / Stationary. [VI; 1162. (Confirm.)]


1887 Oct 11 / Slight shocks / Mexico / L.T. 15-5-e. [VI; 1163. “Earthquake Shock in Mexico.” London Times, October 15, 1887, p. 5 c. 5.]


1887 Oct 11-24 / 90 Orionids counted by Denning. / Nature 37-69 / 4 of these days either no obs or obstructed obs by clouds. [VI; 1164. Denning, William Frederick. “The October Meteor-Shower of 1887.” Nature, 37 (November 17, 1887): 69.]


1887 Oct 11-24 / 45 meteors from Aries, by Denning. / Nature 76-574 / Denning writes that he made it one of his principal objectives to find if the radiant moved—but “It appeared to maintain an absolutely persistent position 1° north of the star ξ (Xi) Orionis.” [VI; 1165.1, 1165.2. Denning, William Frederick. “The October Meteor-Shower of 1887.” Nature, 37 (November 17, 1887): 69. Denning, William Frederick. “October Meteors.” Nature, 76 (October 3, 1907): 574.]


1887 Oct 12 / 6:20 a.m. / Slight shock / Wales / L.T. 13-8-a. [VI; 1166. “Shock of Earthquake.” London Times, October 13, 1887, p. 8 c. 1.]


1887 Oct 13 / P. Ledger of / Ghost in Belvidere, N.J. [B; 815. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 13, 1887.)]


1887 Oct 13, etc. / Orionids great / See Oct. 19. [VI; 1167. See: 1887 Oct. 19, (VI; 1168).]


1887 Oct. 19 / See Oct 13. / Several dazzling meteoric showers at Kingston, N.Y. / Pub L., Oct 24. [VI; 1168. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 24, 1887.)]


1887 Oct 20 / 3:45 a.m. / Chinon (Indre-et-Loire) / Met left a luminous train that formed into a reddish cloud. / C.R. 105-963. [VI; 1169. Paulin. “Météore observé le 20 octobre à Chinon (Indre-et-Loire).” Comptes Rendus, 105 (1887): 963.]


1887 Oct 21 / P.L. of / Wild man appeared in vllage of Mountain View, N.J. [B; 816. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 21, 1887.)]


1887 (Oct 21) / On [Oct 21] at Port Sandwich, in the Mallicolo Islands, flames and a column of water shot up at a place in harbor where vessels were unusually moored. / Scientific News, [N.S.], 1/127. / Scientific News, N.S., 1/127. [VI; 1170. “Submarine Earthquake.” Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (February 10, 1888): 127. Port Sandwich, Mallocolo Islands in now identified as Port Sandwich, Malekula Island, Vanuatu.]


1887 Oct 23 / 4:15 p.m. / Great met in sunshine / Met. Zeit 4/413 // Austria / Kärnten—463 / 5-112. [VI; 1171. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 4 (1887): 411-424, at 413-415. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 4 (1887): 460-466, at 463-465. (Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 5-112.)]


[1887 Oct 25 /] 1888 Oct, early / “Animal” from sky in China / See 1887. / See “worm. / Sc. Am. 58/289 / Cor with Horse 1888 (?) and Cambrian Observer Animal / See Ap 12, 1889. [VI; 1457. "A Remarkable Meteor." Scientific American, n.s., 58 (May 12, 1888): 289. Delauney, J. “Uranolithe Colossal Tombé en Cochinchine.” Astronomie, 7 (1888): 93-96, (illustration). Delauney stated that only the imprint of a large meteor was found, where he thought it had struck the ground and ricocheted, (the local natives saying that the “animal” had returned to the sky). “M. J. Delauney, dans une Lettere adressée de Saigon, informe M. Daubrée, qu'une meteorite....” Comptes Rendus, 105 (1887): 1145. The phenomenon occurred at Thạnh Đức, Tây Ninh, Vietnam. See: 1888 May 27, (VI; 1336); 1888 Aug 16, (VI; 1439); and, 1889 Ap. 12, (VI; 1631).]


1887 Oct or autumn / Most disastrous floods recorded in modern history in China, submerging in one district 1,500 villages. Estimated between 1 and 2 million drowned in province of Honan. / Sci News, N.S., 1-74. [VI; 1172. “The Inundation in China.” Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (January 27, 1888): 74.]


1887 Nov and Dec / Polt / Bramford, near Ipswich / Proc 10-73. [B; 817. Podmore, Frank. "Poltergeists." Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, 12 (1897): 45-115, at 73-77.]


1887 Nov-Dec / Bramford, near Ipswich / polt / told in E. Ang. D. Times / Very loud sounds / heavy objects moved / Proc S.P.R. 12-73 / Girl and boy in house. Only in presence of the girl, aged 11. Said that the children were detected in tricks. Ac to another investigator, phe that they could not have accomplished. [B; 818.1, 818.2. "A Bramford Ghost Story." East Anglian Daily Times, November 11, 1887, p. 5 c. 1. "A Bramford Ghost Story." East Anglian Daily Times, November 15, 1887, p. 5 c. 1. "The Bramford Ghost at Stowmarket." East Anglian Daily Times, December 3, 1887, p. 8 c. 2.  "The Bramford Ghost Story." East Anglian Daily Times, December 8, 1887, p. 4 c. 6 & p. 5 c. 1. "The Bramford Ghost." East Anglian Daily Times, December 14, 1887, p. 8 c. 3. Podmore, Frank. "Poltergeists." Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, 12 (1897): 45-115, at 73-77.]


1887 Nov. / Polt / Stones / See Jan 27, 1888. [B; 819. See: 1888 Jan 27, (B; 857).]


1887 Nov / Bramford polt. / In Med and Dayb., Feb 21, 1890, a letter to East Anglian Times, from Mr. Jeffrey, Mrs. Parker's brother-in-law, to whom the girl was sent. The child arrived in his home, at Stowmarket, evening of Nov. 26th. Raps on front door 2 nights later. Objects began moving about terrifyingly, some of them heavier than a child could lift, such as a clothes chest weigh 7 stones. [B; 820.1, 820.2. (Medium and Daybreak, February 21, 1890.) “A Bramford Ghost Story.” East Anglian Times, November 11, 1887, p. 5 c. 1. “The Bramford Ghost.” East Anglian Times, November 15, 1887, p. 5 c. 1. “The Bramford Ghost at Stowmarket.” East Anglian Times, December 5, 1887, p. 4 c. 5.  “The Bramford Ghost Story.” East Anglian Times, December 8, 1887, p. 4 c. 6 & p. 5 c. 1. “Hearing of his sster-in-law’s troubles, he invited the little girl Ellen to stay at his house, thinking that change would do the child good. She came on Monday week, [November 28,] and what happened during her visit is best told in the words, nearly as they can remembered, of Mr. Jeffrey himself—“ “The girl came to my house (he said) on the Monday. My wife and two boys, and wife's mother live with me. and the little Parker slept with the last-named, who is of course her grandmother. During Monday and Tuesday nothing unusual happened. On Wednesday evening, however, my wife went to chapel, and when I was at the back of the house, the girl came to me and said that some boys wre knocking at the door. I had left her seated at a table in the inner room writing a letter. I went back with her, feeling certain that nobody had been to the door, and then I heard peculiar knocking—on the table, in the walls (as it were) and all around. The inner door, which nobody could have reached from the outside, was apparently struck with great violence—just one blow only. At that moment the girl was seated at some distance from the door, with her back to it. When my wife came home that night, she heard the knocks—in fact, we all heard them, the sounds going on around the girl as she went upstairs to bed. On that day, however, the knocking was all we heard. But when Thursday night came things began to look serious. The girl went to bed in good time with her grandmother, and directly she got upstairs different articles on the room began to move about. I heard the noise, and went upstairs. As 1 entered the room, the washstand, which stood near the door, fell over against me, and would have pitched on to the floor had I not pushed it back. A chest containing linen—the whole being so heavy that the girl could not have moved it by herself—had been shifted about the floor, the hot water bottle was taken out of the bed and thrown against the wall, and the brush and comb had also been shifted from one place to another. I told the girl to get into bed. When she had done so, 1 went into the room again, and then I saw the things moving mysself. By the side of the wall there was iron bedstead which I had not put up. Well, that was dancing up and down the floor; then the washstand was thrown over, and the heavy chest again moved. All this time the girl was in bed. There was more or less disturbance during the night; it was more than we could stand, and next morning my wife took the girl home.” “This was, in brief, the account heard from the lips of Mr. Jeffrey himself. The narrative is not, in most cases of a similar character, removed in the third or fourth degree from the actual observer. 'People may believe me or not,' Mr. Jeffrey said in conclusion, 'I can only bear witness to what I actually saw; I am quite certain there is something on the girl.” “The Bramford Ghost.” East Anglian Times, December 14, 1887, p. 8 c. 3. “The Bramford Spirit Medium.” East Anglian Times, December 23, 1887, p. 6 c. 3. “The Bramford Ghost Story.” East Anglian Times, December 27, 1887, p. 5 c. 5.]


1887 Nov 3 / Sun, 2-1 / Polt in Patterson / In a house built by a man named Might in 1872. He moved away. / The Ap 17, 1874, case in a Might's house. [B; 821. (New York Sun, November 3, 1887, p. 2 c. 1.)]


1887 Nov 3 / Sun, 4-7 / Flock of strange birds over Troy, Mo., “recently”. / About the size of a goose, black, long snake-like neck—one was caught. Believed be cormorant. [VI; 1173. (New York Sun, November 3, 1887, p. 4 c. 7.)]


1887 Nov. 5 / [LT], 5-d / q / Yorkshire. [VI; 1174. “Earthquake Shock in Yorkshire.” London Times, November 5, 1887, p. 5 c. 4.]


1887 Nov 7 / evening / Large det met / St. Cloud, Minn. / Sun 9-5-2. [VI; 1175. (New York Sun, November 9, 1887, p. 5 c. 2.)]


1887 Nov 12 / S / Light / Cape Race / (D-261) / N. [VI; 1176. The note copies information from page 261 of The Book of the Damned. “Notes.” Nature, 37 (December 22, 1887): 186-187, at 187. Nature identifies it as "globular lightning." "La foudre globulaire." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 76. Flammarion, Camille. Thunder and Lightning. London: Chatto & Windus, 1905, 68. Mendenhall, Thomas Corwin. "On Globular Lightning." American Meteorological Journal, 6 (February 1890): 437-447, at 442-443. “On the night of November 12, 1887, the British steamer Siberian encountered a 'fire ball,' which is thus described by Capt. Moore: At midnight, while off Cape Race, a large ball of fire appeared to rise out of the sea to the height of about fifty feet and come right against the wind close up to the ship. It then altered its course and ran along the ship to a distance of about one and one-half miles. In about two minutes it again altered its course and went away to the southeast against the wind. It lasted in all not over five minutes.”]


1887 Nov. 14 / evening / Large meteor exploded in Onondaga Co, N.Y. Loud explosions, Many frightened inhabitants running from their homes, / Phil P. Ledger, 17th. [VI; 1177. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, November 17, 1887.)]


1887 Nov 13 / The balloon / See L.T. 17-5-f / 19-5-e; 9-d / 22-5-f / 23-5-e / 25-9-f / 27-4-b. [VI; 1178. “Anxiety Respecting Balloonists.” London Times, November 17, 1887, p. 5 c. 6. (London Times, November 19, 1887, p. 5 c. 5; check Index.) “The Missing Aeronauts.” London Times, November 19, 1877, p. 9 c. 4. “The Missing Aeronauts.” London Times, November 22, 1887, p. 5 c. 6. “The Missing Aeronauts.” London Times, November 23, 1887, p. 5 c. 5. “The Missing Aeronauts.” London Times, November 25, 1887, p. 9 c. 6. (Sunday Times, November 27, 1887, p. 4 c. 2.)]


1887 Nov. 13 / By cor to Times of Jan 10, 1888-5-e—He saw between Dieppe and Paris, at 10 a.m. (near Rouen), “a large balloon to the car of which were attached two smaller ones, the whole combined taking the form of the trefoil, which to me was [a] very remarkable [appearance].” / He thinks was M. L'Hoste's balloon. / M L'Hoste said to have taken 2 supplementary balloons—2-6-f. / This the balloon Arago. Fell in Channel on 13th. [VI; 1179.1, 1179.2. Coxwell, Henry. “The Lost Balloonists.” London Times, January 2, 1888, p. 6 c. 6. Daniell, S.P. “The Balloon Arago.” London Times, January 10, 1888, p. 5 c. 5.]


1887 Nov 15 / [LT], 5-f / (Fr) / q in France. [VI; 1180. “Earthquake in France.” London Times, November 15, 1887, p. 5 c. 6.]


1887 Nov 18 / 11:20 a.m./ Amsterdam, N.Y. / Huge metite reported. / Denied. / Sc Am 57/392 / Science 10-288. [VI; 1181. “An Aerolite Hoax.” Scientific American, n.s., 57 (December 17, 1887): 392. Kunz, George Frederick. “Meteor-Fall.” Science, s. 1 v. 10 (December 9, 1887): 288. (New York Sun, November 19, 1887.) (Amsterdam Democrat, November 19, 1887.) A newspaper hoax.]


1887 Nov. 18 / Destructive q. / St. Thomas, W. Indies / BA 1911-55. [VI; 1182. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 55.]


1887 Nov. 19 / Ohio River Valley / Dark Day / Sc Am 112-229. [VI; 1183. Talman, Charles Fitzhugh. "Dark Days and Forest Fires." Scientific American, n.s., 112 (March 6, 1915): 229.]


1887 Nov. 20 / In Symons' Met Mag 22/161, 177, said that many English newspapers had reported an earthquake felt in a dozen provinces but that it was concussion from a meteoric explosion. / L.T., Dec 1 / (Nature 60/139). [VI; 1184. (Meteorological Magazine, 22-161, 177.) “A Detonating Bolide.” London Times, December 12, 1887, 4 c. 6. Davison, Charles. “Spurious Earthquakes.” Nature, 60 (June 8, 1899): 139-141.]


1887 Nov 20 / 8:20 a.m. / Meteor seen as a brilliant body at Hertford. / Symons Met. 22-162. [VI; 1185. “A Bolide Exploded over Central England.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 22 (December 1887): 161-169. ]


1887 Nov 20 / See Dec 1. [VI; 1186. See: 1887 Dec 1, (VI: 1194 to 1196).]


1887 Nov 19 / [LT], 5-c and e / 22-5-f / 23-5-e / 25-9-f / Dec 27-4-b / See Index, Jan, 1888. / Missing balloon. One of them, anyway was rescued. [VI; 1187. “The Balloon Arago.” London Times, November 17, 1887, p. 5 c. 3. “The Balloon Arago.” London Times, November, 19, 1887, p. 5 c. 3. “The Missing Aeronauts.” London Times, November 19, p. 9 c. 4. “The Missing Aeronauts.” London Times, November 22, 1887, p. 5 c. 6. “The Missing Aeronauts.” London Times, November 23, 1887, p. 5 c. 5. “The Missing Aeronauts.” London Times, November 25, 1887, p. 9 c. 6. (Sunday Times, November 27, 1887, p. 4 c. 2.) (See Index, Jan, 1888.) “Scientific News.” English Mechanic, 46 (no. 1188; December 30, 1887): 412-413, at 412. Neither of the aeronauts, (M'Hoste, nor Mangot), was rescued; their balloon was observed landing upon the waves, during a gale, near the steamer Prince Leopold; the balloon's car capsized; and, before a boat could be launched or a rope thrown to them, the aeronauts were engulfed by the waves.]


1887 Nov. 20 / Explosion heard / 8:20 a.m. / terrific at Wantage / Symons 22-163 / At Saunderton a flock of sheep frightened. / Near Hitchin sheep and cattle panic-stricken. [VI; 1188. “A Bolide Exploded over Central England.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 22 (December 1887): 161-169. “The Doubly Observed Meteor of Nov. 4th, 1889. The Sheep Stampede of November 3rd, 1888.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 24 (December 1889): 161-163, at 163. Fordham, Herbert George. “The Meteorite of the 20th of November, 1887.” Transactions of the Hertfordshire Natural History Society and Field Club, 5 (1890): 33-62, (& plate 2). See: 1888 Nov 3, (VI; 1477).]


1887 Nov. 20 / Loud explosive meteor / S of England / Nature 37/151. [VI; 1189. Fordham, Herbert George. “The Supposed Earthquake in England.” Nature, 37 (December 15, 1887): 151.]


1887 Nov. 21 / 8:30 to 9 p.m. / Seen in Sweden a band of light. / Nature, Dec 22, p. 186. [VI; 1190. “Notes.” Nature, 37 (December 22, 1887): 186-187, at 186.]


1887 Nov. 23 / That Dr. Klein had published a curious observation made by M. de Spiessen at Winkel—ab. 5:35—in the crater Plato—a triangular-shaped light surrounded by darkness. / L Astro 1888-75 / (not for years the play of pl[note cut off] lights). Look for from no. 1 to no. 2 back. [VI; 1191.1, 1191.2. “Lueur observée dans le cirque lunaire de Platon.” Astronomie, 7 (1888): 75-76. “Lichtschein im Plato.” Sirius: Zeitschrift für Populäre Astronomie, 21 (1888): 20-21. “...Fiel mir sofort im Ringgebirge Plato eine eigentümliche Erscheinung auf. Die innere Fläche war ganz dunkel, mit Ausnahme eines dreieckigen hellen Streifens, der sich, auf etwa ⅓ der Länge beginnend, nach dem Ostrande etwas nach Süden zog, und dort am Ostrande l½" breit war. Mitten durch den keilförmigen Streifen schien eine dunklere Linie sich nach dem Ostrande hinzuziehen, doch kann dieses eine optische Täuschung gewesen sein, die Luft war freilich recht ruhig, aber ein leiser Dunst hinderte feinstes Detail zu sehen. Der Bergring des Plato war völlig erleuchtet und hell, nur am Nordwestrande war eine schmale dunkle Stelle. Die Lichtgrenze bildete fast genau eine Tangente au dem inneren Ostrande des Plato, also an dem Ostpunkte der inneren Fläche.” See: (Plato lights no. 1 & no. 2.); 1886 Oct. 16, (VI; 872); 1886 Nov. 14, (VI; 939); (others before 1887).]


1887 Nov. 26 / Sc Am of / Manna in Asia Minor. [VI; 1192. “Manna, the Heavenly Bread.” Scientific American, n.s., 57 (November 26, 1887): 342.]


1887 Nov. 30 / obj / Pub Ledger, Dec 5—that ac to the West Chester (Pa.) “Village Record” that in large part of southern Berks Co. thought been an earthquake but it was a crash and a rumble in the air. A few nights ago while heavy clouds hung over the sky, a luminous body was noted floating through the atmosphere and the testimony of those who witnesed it was that they were enveloped by the light. [VI; 1193.1, 1193.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 5, 1887.)]


1887 Dec 1 / Symons 22-180 / Similar detonation to Nov. 20 at Bolton and Chorley ab 6 a.m. Sound heard—no q. felt by people in streets. [VI; 1194. “Another Queer Earthquake Story.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 22 (January 1888): 180-181.]


1887 Dec 1 / (Cu[t]) / Bolton, Lancashire—6 a.m. / Chorley, Lancashire—7 a.m. / Quake and sound like distant thunder—houses shaken but people not in houses felt no quake—so another met explosion? / Symons Met 22/180. [VI; 1195. “Another Queer Earthquake Story.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 22 (January 1888): 180-181.]


1887 Dec 1 / q / Bolton, S.E. Lancashire, at 6 a.m. / at Chorley, N.E. Lancashire, at 7 a.m. / L.T., Dec. 2. [VI; 1196. “Earthquake Shock in Lancashire.” London Times, December 2, 1887, p. 10 c. 4.]


1887 Dec. 2 / P.L. of / Myst explosion at Hartford, Conn., “the other day. At first thought that the damage, windows ripped out and sidewalk torn up, was dynamite—then thought that incendiary fire had exploded gas. [VI; 1197. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 2, 1887.)]


1887 Dec 3 / Listed as a q. in BA '11. [VI; 1198. Milne, 734.]


1887 Dec 3 / q—(versus sky) / q. at Bisignano / Reported that a column of fire had been seen at Roggiano. Prof. Agamennone investigated and reduced all supposed witnesses to one, and he had spoken with little seriousness. / Cosmos 69-422. [VI; 1199.1, 1199.2. (Cosmos, 69-422.)]


1887 Dec 5 / Sun protub. / R—Sept 26, '79. [VI; 1200. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 255 & 257-258, (figure 96).]


1887 Dec 6th / (mirage) / Fort Maginnis, Montana, 1:30 p.m. / Buttes, woods and basin 60 miles away plainly seen and recognized. / MWR '87-333. [VI; 1201. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 15 (no. 12; December 1887): 332-333, at 333. See: 1888 Jan 23, (VI; 1244).]


1887 Dec / A substance resembling sulphur, floating in ponds, etc., fell in rain at Gracias, Honduras. / Sun, Feb 25-4-7. [VI; 1202. (New York Sun, February 25, 1888, p. 4 c. 7.)]


1887 Dec 8 / East Anglican Times of / Bramford Case after the "confession". Phe in home of Mrs. Parker. Said that the little boy had told that he had "confessed" to save himself from "a hiding"; his sister had said she could not explain. Phenomena had continued after the "confession". Things flying about the house, witnessed by scores of residents of Bramford. Little girl, Ellen, had been taken to home of her sister, Mrs Jeffrey, wife of a working man, at Stowmarket. Mr. Jeffrey told of phe here, such as moving of objects too heavy for the little girl to move—heavy chest, a wash stand, an iron bedstead. [B; 822.1, 822.2, 822.3. "The Bramford Ghost Story." East Anglian Daily Times, December 8, 1887, p. 4 c. 6 & p. 5 c. 1. See: 1887 Nov, (B; 820).]


1887 Dec. 8 / Wild Animals / P.L. of / Anniston, Ala., excited by a hyena that had escaped from a circus: prowling around and had entered a house but had done no harm. / Said that reports of maurauding animals in Duchess Co., N.Y. / Supposed to be animals that had escaped from Barnum's winter quarters during the fire. [B; 823.1, 823.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 8, 1887.)]


1887 Dec 10 and 18 / Mets / Norway, Sweden / Nature 37-258. [VI; 1203. “Notes.” Nature, 37 (January 12, 1888): 256-259, at 258.]


1887 Dec. 12 / 4:30 to 5:30 a.m./ Meximieux (Ain) / remarkable shower of meteors / CR 105-1295. [VI; 1204. “M. J. Vinot annonce que, le 12 decembre dernier....” Comptes Rendus, 105 (1887): 1295.]


1887 Dec. 10 / Immense unknown balloon over Owensboro, Ky. On 12th, found in a swamp and the emaciated remains of occupant several yards from it. / Sun 14-3-3. [VI; 1205. (New York Sun, December 14, 1887, p. 3 c. 3.)]


1887 Dec. 12 / Remarkable mets / Ain, France / C.R. 105/182. [VI; 1206. “M. J. Vinot annonce que, le 12 decembre dernier....” Comptes Rendus, 105 (1887): 1295.]


[The following two notes were clipped together by Fort. VI: 1207-1208.]


1887 Dec. 13 / BO / In Scientific News, N.S., April 13, 1888, reported a letter from M. Delauney, read at a meeting of the French Academy of Science. That on Dec 13, M. De. in a public conveyance in district of Tay-Ninh, in Cochin China—when conductor angrily asked him why he had scattered blood around from a cut in his hand. He saw that his had was stained with blood and passengers were spattered, but no cut. / (slightly coagulated) / The drops of blood had fallen from the sky. / Ac to another report blood had fallen at another place not far away. / The letter was from M. Thoraude, the “phu” of the district—or govt official. [VI; 1207.1, 1207.2, 1207.3. (Scientific News, n.s., April 13, 1888.) Thoraude. “Prétendue pluie de sang, qui serait tombée le 13 décembre dernier en Cochinchine.” Comptes Rendus, 106 (1888): 779-780.]


1887 Dec 13 / D-41 / Rain of blood at Tayninh, Cochin-China, told by M. Thoraude, an official of the government, and read before French Acad by M. Daubrée. / (C.R., 106-779) / M. Thor. writes that he was travelling in a coach near Tayninh, he found blood on his hands and clothes. Upon closer examination it looked like coagulated blood. Other passengers were so spotted, some greatly. Said that at the time of the fall the sky was overcast and no one had noticed the substance falling. Said that been a similar fall at Hiep-Ninh. [VI; 1208.1, 1208.2, 1208.3. The note copies information from page 41 of The Book of the Damned. "Prétendue pluie de sang." Année Scientifique et Industrielle (Paris), 32 (1888): 75-76. Thoraude. “Prétendue pluie de sang, qui serait tombée le 13 décembre dernier en Cochinchine.” Comptes Rendus, 106 (1888): 779-780. Tayninh, Cochin-China is now identified as Tây Ninh, Vietnam.]


1887 Dec 13 / Cor from California. Large sunspot of great activity. That night brilliant auroral display in northeast 9:30 p.m.—2 a.m. / Sid Mess 7-124. [VI; 1209. Soule, Frank. “Suns Spots and Auroræ.” Sidereal Messenger, 7 (March 1888): 124.]


1887 Dec 15 / 6 p.m. / Violent q., S.W. China. In one province, 10,000 said to have perished. / L.T., 1888, March 31-7-4. [VI; 1210. “News from the Far East.” London Times, March 31, 1888, p. 7 c. 4.]


1887 Dec 16 // 88 / Jan 14 / Ap. /// Big q's / China / [BA] '11. [VI; 1211. Milne, 734.]


1887 Dec 22 / Sun, 1-2 / Polts in a Fall River rectory—began about time a servant girl was hired. / See Jan 1. [B; 824. (New York Sun, December 22, 1887, p. 1 c. 2.) See: (Jan 1).]


1887 Dec 24, 25 / Mets / Sweden / Nature 37-283. [VI; 1212. “Notes.” Nature, 37 (January 19, 1888): 282-284, at 282-283.]


1887 Dec 25, about / Polts / St Louis Globe Dem, Aug 25, 1888, from Oshkosh (Wis.) Northwesterner / In home of Wm. Roberts, a farmer, living with his two children and wife near Princeton, Wis. About Christmas he saw a spot of blood on sheet of his bed. Sheets changed and the spot reappeared. Pool of blood under the bed. Letters "B" and "R" drawn on the wall in blue ink. His wife would set table, turn away, find it stripped—some things—bread, knives, forkls, salt cellar vanished—sometimes found later in out-of-the-way places, or never found again. One day in March, he took his children to school in a sleigh, and, meeting a neighbor, Mrs Albright, asked her to ride. That night the children told that their lunches had been wound around with longhuman hairs, Whereupon he accused Mrs A of being a witch. For protection against him she brought proceedings against him before the Justice, at Danford, Wis. No outcome stated. [B; 825.1 to 825.5. (St. Louis Globe-Democrat, August 25, 1888.) (Oshkosh Northwesterner, ca. August, 1887???)]


1887 Dec 25 / See Aug 11, 1888. [B; 826. See: 1888 Aug 11, (B; 940).]


1887 Dec 26 / East Anglican Times (Ipswich) / A mongoose shot at Sturry, near Canterbury. [B; 827. “An extraordinary capture....” East Anglian Times, December 26, 1887, p. 4 c. 5. “An extraordinary capture has been made in the woods at Sturry, near Canterbury. A farmer resident in the neighbourhood, named Fleet, was out shooting, when he saw and and secured an animal which proved to be a mongoose or gray ichneumon. In its native state the habits of this animal are nocturnal, and during the day it remains in its hole or burrow. It devours crocodiles eggs by thousands, and eats snakes, lizards, and all kinds of reptiles, small quadrupeds and birds. This specimen killed at Sturry was remarkably fat, and on dissection it was found to have been feeding on pheasants and rabbits.”]

 
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