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Last updated: July 15, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1900


1900:


19 / Templemore / Ap. of blood / Dec 25, 1887. [C; 438.2. See: (1887 Dec 25).]


19 / Aug. / Templemore / See pilgrims of Malden, Mass, Nov., 1927. [C; 438.3. See: 1929 Nov. 17, (F; 119).]


1900 / Mollie Fancher / Cor Gates Ave and Downing Street, Brooklyn. [C; 439.]


1900 / James Brandon lived in Nashville? / See Dec 21, 1930. [C; 440. See: 1930 Dec 21, (F; 225).]


1900 / Polt / Ashfordsby Rectory, Leicestershire / for ab. 30 years / See Aug 13, 1913. [C; 441. See: 1913 Aug 23, (D; 686).]


1900 / Have Sun for this year to May. [C; 442.]


1900 / Near Shipton, Oxon / E Mec, Oct. 3, 1919that for 20 years a moving light been seen here occasionally. [C; 443. “A Mystery.” English Mechanic, 110 (no. 2845; October 3, 1919): 128.]


1900 / about / and for years before // As told by the author J.S. Fletcher, in the Bookman (English), vol 77, p. 179, old house that was haunted, in East Hardwick, near Pontefract, Yorkshire. [C; 444. (Bookman, 77-179; @ Proquest.)]


[The following five notes were clipped together by Fort. C: 445-449.]


1900 / Phillips h. house / Moving out he took a place, two doors away, “The Quadrant,” for a term of 3 years. He left at end of a year, paying the rent for the remaining 2 years, but not occupying the place. / Charles G. Harper, “Haunted Houses,” p. 59 / Cent Circ 133.H / Phillips was poet and playwright. [C; 445.1, 445.2. Harper, Charles George. Haunted Houses. London: Chapman & Hall, 1907, 44-49.]


1900-[19]03 / Stephen Phillips polt / at Egham / W. Dispatch, July 7, 1907, 11-6 / Phillips moved from the house but continued to pay the rent until his 3-years lease expired, in summer of 1903. [C; 446. “Sounds of Mystery.” London Weekly Dispatch, July 7, 1907, p. 11 c. 6.]


1900 / The Stephen Phillips lawsuit / An. Psych Sci, April, 1907. [C; 447. “A Lawsuit over a Haunted House.” Annals of Psychic Science, 5 (no. 28; April 1907): 315.]


1900 (?) / Phillips / [The Ghost in the Wainscot.] / Evg News, Dec. 23, 1926. [C; 448. Newspaper clipping. (London Evening News, December 23, 1926.)]


1900 (Jan) / Psycho / Light, March 16, 1901 / Account of polt phe in the home of Stephen Phillips, the poet and dramatist, in Egham, near Windsor, and the damage suit won by the owner ag[ains]t Lightthe D. Express. [C; 449. (Light, March 16, 1901; not found here.)]


1900 Jan-Feb / Have Chic Trib. [C; 450.]


1900 Jan / Bear / Wolf / In Chicago Tribune, Jan 17-1-4, said that in the town of Bloom a wolf had been reported, and had been searched for in vain. On Jan 3, Gerhard Greiving of Bloom shot a wolf. This in Cook Co. (Chicago in Cook Co.). Greiving called upon the Co. to pay a bounty. But not a Commissioner knew whether there was a bounty on a wolf in Cook Co. One Commission said that now and then a wolf was seen in Bloom. Someone else thought the wolf had escaped from Lincoln Park, Chicago. Nothing said of any known wolf escaping. [C; 451.1, 451.2, 451.3. “Wants Bounty for a Wolf.” Chicago Tribune, January 17, 1900, p. 1 c. 4.]


1900 Jan / Bear and wolf / Chicago / See Aug 29, 1892. [C; 452. See: 1892 Aug 29, (C; 52).]


1900 / Stat / See 1878. / Dif falls in Fayette Co., Texas / Proc. U.S. Nat Museum 54-557. [VIII; 557. Merrill, George Perkins. “On the Fayette County, Texas, Meteorite of 1878 and 1900 and the Probability of Representing Two Distinct Falls.” Proceedings of the United States National Museum, 54 (1919): 557-561. These are the Bluff and the Cedar meteorites. See: 1878, (IV; 2298).]


1900 / Iron Hill, Maryland / little frogs, little fishing worms and “sea turtles” / R.H. Tingley, N.Y. American, Jan 31, 1926. [VIII; 558. (New York American, January 31, 1926; microfilm.) (Tingley, Richard Hoadley. “Fishes, Frogs and Snakes Out of the Sky.” San Francisco Examiner, February 7, 1926, p. 118; @ Newspapers.com premium.)]


1900 / about / Sun minimum time / ? / great spots / Sept, etc., 1898. [VIII; 559. (Refs.???) See: (1898 Sept).]


1900 / Few or no spots on sun / Pop Astro 11-372 / minimum timesee June 1. [VIII; 560. Lanneau, John Francis. “Sunspots in July.” Popular Astronomy, 11 (no. 7; August-September 1903): 372-374.]


1900 Jan 1 / places of the planets remarkable / B Eagle Dec 30-2-5, 1899. [VIII; 561. Campbell, Frederick. "Brilliant Skies in January." Brooklyn Eagle, December 30, 1899, p. 2 c. 5.]


1900 / ab Jan 1 / insects / At Moedling (Basse-Antriche), black snow. Found to be colored by small insects. Ac to an entomologists they were “puce de glaciers” and had probably been carried in a storm from Mt. Blanc. / Bull oc Astro de F, July, 1900. [VIII; 562.1, 562.2. “Neige noire.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 14 (1900): 342.]


1900 Jan 3 / Disap / Chic. Trib, 5-6 / Search for a missing manOddfellows take up the case of Augustus Jefferson Moore, who disappeared on Dec. 23.” Disap in Chicago. [C; 453. “Search For a Missing Man.” Chicago Tribune, January 3, 1900, p. 5 c. 6.]


1900 Jan 3 / [LT], 4-b / 12-6-a / q. / Russia. [VIII; 563. “Earthquake in Russia.” London Times, January 3, 1900, p. 4 c. 2. (London Times, January 12, 1900, p. 6 c. 1; not found here; not @ Newspapers.com.)]


1900 [Jan 4] / E / Myst dths / Jan 4/11/5 / Eagle. [C; 454. "Charles Wernz's Skeleton." Brooklyn Eagle, January 4, 1900, p. 11 c. 5.]


1900 Jan 4 / Explosions / morning / Chic Trib 5-4-6 / Explosion at the county infirmary, near Peru, Ind. Two sides of it demolished. Said been a natural gas explosion. / (See Jan 25.) / See the q ab. here later in month. / p. 5an explosion of natural gas near Lima, Ohio, had wrecked a boiler house. / p. 8at Anna, Ill, same afternoon, explosion said been a boiler explosion in a sawmill and 3 men killed. / On Jan 2 (Trib 3-1-6), dispatch from (Muncie) Ind., that at Albany, Ind., explosion damaged a hotelsaid been natural gas explosion. [VIII; 564.1, 564.2, 564.3. “Injured by Gas Explosion.” Chicago Tribune, January 3, 1900, p. 4 c. 3. “Panic in County Infirmary.” Chicago Tribune, January 5, 1900, p. 4 c. 4. (Chicago Tribune, p. 5, p. 8.; not found in January 5, 1900.) See: (Jan 25).]


1900 Jan 5 / Disap / Chic Trib., 2-6 / “Sherman Church, a young man employed in the Augusta Mills (Battle Creek, Mich.), has disappeared. He was seated in the company's office, when he arose and ran into the mill. He has not been seen since. The mill has almost been taken to pieces by the searchers, the river, wood, and the country scoured, but to no avail. Nobody saw Church leave town, nor is there any known reason for his doing so. There is not the slightest clew to the mystery, although the officers have worked two days in secret, before making it public. Church has a young wife who is nearly crazed with grief. [C; 455.1, 455.2, 455.3. (Chicago Tribune, January 5, 1900, p. 2 c. 6; not found here.) “His Death Still a Mystery.” Chicago Tribune, January 10, 1900, p. 7 c. 3. “A Murder Mystery.” Indianapolis News, January 9, 1900, p. 1 c. 3-4, (photo). “Last week a letter was received from friends, at Augusta, saying that Sherman mysteriously disappeared, at the Augusta flour mills, which were in his charge, and a brother, Floyd, went to Augusta to search for him. A long letter was received, Saturday last, from Floyd, detailing facts regarding the disappearance of Sherman, and nothing more was heard until last evening, when telegrams were received stating that the body of the missing man had been found in the water at the mill.” “At first it was supposed, as the telegrams were without details, that he had been accidentally drowned while at work. To-day’s telegrams, however, throw more light on the finding of the body, and the circumstances are such as to warrant the family to believe that Sherman was the victim of foul play. A news telegram from Battle Creek, Mich., says that the people of Augusta are greatly stirred up over the finding of the body. Last Tuesday afternoon, it is stated, Henry Marvin, a leading resident of Augusta, visited the mills where Church was engaged at work. Marvin wanted a sack of grain and was given the same by Church, who accepted cash in payment. After receiving the money. Church went direct from the office of the establishment to the mill proper, just as Marvin was departing.” “That was the last seen of Church. His wife waited for him at home, with the evening meal ready, but he did not return, and she visited the mill in search of him. She learned that her husband had suddenly disappeared. The neighbors and employe[e]s were informed of the facts, and a thorough search was at once instituted, but Church could not be found. The entire community is startled by the mystery of the case. His brother, Floyd, of Indianapolis, was telegraphed for, and left immediately for Augusta. He organized searching parties, and the ice in the river was broken up in the hope of finding the body, but without avail.” “Yesterday evening, as a last resort, the water in the flume, which the residents of the neighborhood are certain was frozen over when Church disappeared, was allowed to run out. A horrible discovery followed. Church’s body was found, firmly pinned between the great water wheel and the bottom surface of the flume. It was with difficulty that the bloated and bruised corpse was extricated and taken to the bank of the river. It was found that both his hands were tied behind him, and to his left leg was bound a heavy piece of iron, weighing enough to keep the body beneath the water under any circumstances. The iron acted as a 'sinker.' A rigid investigation is now in progress.” “Veiled in Mystery.” Indianapolis News, January 10, 1900, p. 1 c. 6. “Finding of Coroner's Jury.” Indianapolis News, January 12, 1900, p. 8 c. 6. “A report yesterday from Augusta, Mich., states that the coroner's jury finally determined that Sherman Church, who was found under a water wheel in the river, had come to his death by his own hand.”]


1900 Jan 5 / Chic Trib, 4-7 / 9-1-6 / 10-1-4 / 28-1-4 / Myst disap of a nun. / Then her body found in a lake. / Priest myst wound. [C; 456. “Sister Goes in Mystery.” Chicago Tribune, January 5, 1900, p. 4 c. 7. “Find Body of Sister Augusta.” Chicago Tribune, January 9, 1900, p. 1 c. 6. (Chicago Tribune,  January 10, 1900, p. 1 c. 4; not found here.) “Mysterious Death of Priest.” Chicago Tribune, January 28, 1900, p. 1 c. 4.]


1900 Jan. 5 / 2 a.m. / q. / Jerusalem / BA 1911-52. [VIII; 565. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 52.]


1900 Jan 7 / Trib / Account by Mrs. Mary H. Ford, Hyde Park, Chicago. Books had been thrown from shelvesexplosion or sound as if of pistol fired at about height of a man's shoulder. [C; 457. (Chicago Tribune???, January 7, 1900; not found in Chicago Tribune.)]


1900 Jan 7 / Bear / Chicago Tribune, 1-2 / A bear reported running loose in West Chicago. At noon of 6th an inquiry from a police station whether a bear had escaped from the Lincoln Park Zoo. At the Zoo said that no bear had escaped. / 8-2-5Big bear hunt on 7th, but no one found who had seen the bear. The stories are of tracks that were seen and of dogs that had been excited nights. [C; 458.1, 458.2. “Plan Bear Hunt Today.” Chicago Tribune, January 7, 1900, p. 1 c. 2. “Big Bear Hunt, But No Bruin.” Chicago Tribune, January 8, 1900, p. 2 c. 6.]


1900 Jan 9 / Myst fire / Middle Island, L.I. / B. Eagle 11-7-2. [C; 459. "Mysterious Fire." Brooklyn Eagle, January 11, 1900, p. 7 c. 2.]


1900 Jan 9 / 2:55 p.m. / S. of England / great daylight meteor / Observatory 23-106. [VIII; 566. “A Brilliant Daylight Meteor.” Observatory, 23 (1900): 106-107.]


1900 Jan 9 / afternoon / A most brilliant meteor / South of England / Sci Gos, NS, 6-283. [VIII; 567. "Daylight Meteor." Science Gossip, n.s., 6 (no. 69; February 1900): 283.]


1900 Jan 9 / Lewesbrilliant meteor from place near the moon / Nature 61-279 / 2:55 p.m. [VIII; 568. “Notes.” Nature, 61 (January 18, 1900): 279-283, at 279-280.]


1900 Jan. 11 / (like Chile obj.) / Chic. Trib of, 1-3 / Battle Creek, Mich, Jan 10—“Diggers, while leveling ground for a park today, found several feet underground, a most peculiar coffin. It is shaped to fit the body of a woman as perfectly as if hot iron had been poured around her form. The head is enclosed in a helmet. On the breast is a silver plate on which is inscribed: 'Mary Mott.' The casket evidently had been in the ground for many years. People who have lived in Battle Creek for half a century say they never heard of Mary Mott, nor such a coffin.” / The peculiarity is that no altogether inconspicuous person could have gone to the expense of a specially made iron coffin. Several feet underground. Not made for a burial. If corroded underground many years not sure the inscription legible. / See Chile Meteor-Man. [C; 460.1 to 460.4. “Mystery in an Iron Coffin.” Chicago Tribune, January 11, 1900, p. 1 c. 4. Iron coffins were used to preserve a corpse before embalming and refrigeration were available. “Metallic Burial Caskets” were manufactured by Almond Dunbar Fisk, beginning in 1848, which resembled an ancient Egyptian sarcophagus, (closely formed around the body); and, owing to the expense, these coffins were used by wealthier patrons and for transporting bodies. See: (Chile Meteor-Man).]


1900 Jan 16 / Great explosion of dynamite near Turin. Heard at Lugano, 160 kilometres away. / Nature 61-451. [VIII; 569. “Notes.” Nature, 61 (March 8, 1900): 449-453, at 451.]


1900 Jan 19 / Mexico / q. / Colima . J.F. Institute 152/241. [VIII; 570. Haines, Caspar Wistar. “Remarks on the Earthquake in the State of Colima, Mexico, January 19, 1900.” Journal of the Franklin Institute,  152 (1901): 241-256.]


1900 Jan 19 / 11:45 p.m. / q / Colima, Mexico / BA '11/50. [VIII; 571. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 50.]


1900 Jan 20 / Beam / Following a slight auroral display in the northern sky, a fine bright beam of light from west to south horizon, 18 or 20 dges high. / Pop Astro 10-251. [VIII; 572. Hadden, David Edward. “Auroral Phenomena at Alta, Iowa.” Popular Astronomy, 10 (no. 5; May 1902): 249-251, at 251.]


1900 Jan 20 / Destructive q. / Mexico / BA 1911-59. [VIII; 573. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 59.]


1900 Jan 21 / Eagle, 4-5 / Ghst. [C; 461. "Policemen See Things." Brooklyn Eagle, January 21, 1900, p. 4 c. 5.]


1900 Jan 22 / Sun / 3 p.m. / by Caroline Furness, Observatory of Vasser College / Pop. Astro. 8-109 / Sun clear of spotsthen a very small one near the central one near the central region. others appeared but faded away, leaving the first. Sun then too low for observation. Nothing next morning. [VIII; 574.1, 574.2. “Rapid Change on the Surface of the Sun.” Popular Astronomy, 8 (no. 2; February 1900): 109.]


1900 Jan. 25 / 9:40 p.m. / Muncie, Ind, and towns around, q caused excitement. Dishes rattled and chairs moved. / Chic Daily Trib., 26/4 . (See Jan 4.) [VIII; 575. (Chicago Tribune, January 26, 1900, p. 4; not found here.) See: 1900 Jan 4, (VIII; 564).]


1900 Jan 26 / [LT], 9-f / q. / Syria. [VIII; 576. “Earthquake in Syria.” London Times, January 26, 1900, p. 9 c. 6. “The previous day had been in the forenoon bright and crisp and sunny; but at midday a sudden change came, and the town became shrouded in mist. Toward sunset one noticed towards the south a heavy bank of black clouds surmounted by a bright band of red.” The earthquake struck at 2:30 A.M.]


1900 Jan 27 / Chic Trib, 6-1 / “Otto Miller, a farmer, residing near Hastings, Neb., mysteriously disappeared. He was last seen on Friday night (26th or 19th). Drops of blood were found about his barn.” [C; 462. (Chicago Tribune, January 27, 1900, p. 6 c. 1; not found here.) “Mystery Cleared Up.” Chadron Record, (Nebraska), February 9, 1900, p. 6 c. 4. “The mystery surrounding the disappearance of Otto Miller one of Adams County’s prosperous farmers was cleared up when Sheriff Simmering received a dispatch from Miller’s brother at Julesburg, Colo., stating that he had found Otto Miller and team all right. The message did not give any information as to Miller’s mental condition, but it generally believed that he became temporarily insane and started westward without any destination in view.”]


1900 Jan 29 / evening / Charleston, Mo. / slight q. / Trib. [VIII; 577. "Slight Earthquake in Missouri." New York Tribune, January 31, 1900, p. 4 c. 1.]


1900 Feb 2 / Trib, 9-4 / Comet “at Nice”. [VIII; 578. (New York Tribune, February 2, 1900, p. 9 c. 4; not found here.)]


1900 Feb 4 / 10 a.m. / Dark cloud seen coming to London. Then great darkness. / La Nat Sup, Feb. 17. [VIII; 579. “Informations.” La Nature, 1900 pt.1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1395, supplement; February 17): 45.]


1900 Feb. 7 / Eagle, 18-2 / Bombsupposed relic Rev. War dug upexplodes. [C; 463. "Man Badly Hurt at City Island While Digging a Sewer." Brooklyn Eagle, February 7, 1900, p. 18 c. 2.]


1900 Feb 16 / It Sounds / Rome / Rombi at intervals of some minutes / See 1816. [VIII; 580. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 46. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1900 Feb. 21 / 6:45 a.m. / Daylight bolidegreat / Angers, etc. / Bull Soc Astro de F., March, 1900. [VIII; 581. “Bolide vu en plein jour.” Bulletin de la Societe Astronomique de France, 14 (1900.): 149.]


1900 Feb 21 / Trib, 4-4 / Colima / Volc. [VIII; 582. "Eruption of Colima Volcano" New York Tribune, February 21, 1900, p. 4 c. 4. The Colima volcano.]


1900 Feb. 24 / 10 women in Hll stabbed. On Dec 20, man named John Gray, charged, pleaded an alibi. / D. Telegraph, Dec 21-9-6. [C; 464. (London Daily Telegraph, December 21, 1900, p. 9 c. 6.)???]


1900 Feb 25 / Spiked hail stones, some size of turkey eggs, at Herbertsdale, Cape Colony / Nature 61-594. [VIII; 583. “Notes.” Nature, 61 (April 19, 1900): 592-596, at 594.]


1900 March / Floods / Argentine / N.M. / Symons 49/81. [VIII; 584. “Floods in the Argentine Republic.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 49 (June 1914): 81-82.]


1900 March 1-4 / Strong eruption / Mayon Volc, Philippines / Ref, Feb 1, 1814. [VIII; 585. Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


1900 March 4 / 5 p.m. (G.M.T.) / Rather severe q / Venetia, Italy / Nature 61-450. [VIII; 586. “Notes.” Nature, 61 (March 8, 1900): 449-453, at 450.]


1900 March 5 / Trance / N.Y. Herald, 10-3 / In New Haven Hospital, for 6 weeks, Pauline Fitz Gerald, in a trance. For first 4 weeks had been cataleptic. After that some slight consciousness but could not speak. Forced feeding. [C; 465. (New York Herald, March 5, 1900, p. 10 c. 3.)]


1900 March 5 / Lonely House / N.Y. Herald, 7-6 / Home of Dr. Dupingnac, aged 30, of Bensonhurst, wealthy retired physician. Wife 30 years younger. In October, 1899, she left the house, taking servants with her. He remained, but left in December. Nothing more heard of him. [C; 466.1, 466.2. (New York Herald, March 5, 1900, p. 7 c. 6. Aged of “30” obviously wrong.)]


1900 March 6 / Trance / Elida Wilbur diedSee Feb, 1898. [C; 467. See: 1898 Feb. 16, (C; 373).]


1900 March 8 / 12:30 a.m. / Binghampton, N.Y. / Broad band of light seemed to emanate from moon to horizon. / B Eagle 8-6-2. [VIII; 587. "Odd Lunar Phenomenon." Brooklyn Eagle, March 8, 1900, p. 6 c. 2. A light pillar.]


1900 March 15 / Nor Car / Black rain / Louisburg, N.C. / Science, NS, 15-1034. [VIII; 588. "Black Rain in North Carolina." Science, n.s., 15 (June 27, 1902): 1034.]


1900 March 20 / B. Eagle, 2-4 / Danbury, Conn. / Mrs Lee, in bed, confined after an operation, her mother in another room, saw spirit of her father, who had been dead 20 years, enter the other room and re-appear carrying her mother. Ran to other roomfound her mother dead. [C; 468.1, 468.2. "Mrs. Lee's Apparition." Brooklyn Eagle, March 20, 1900, p. 2 c. 4. "She screamed after the apparition had passed away and when her [Mrs. Lee's] husband made an investigation he found Mrs. Pettit dead in her bed, with the food he had carried to her bedside only a few moments before untouched."]


1900 March 26 / bet 14:30 and 15 h. / at Ath / Chalky substance in hail, Seemed to “fondre” with extreme slowness. / Bull Soc Astro de FJune, 1900. [VIII; 589. “Une curieuse grêle.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 14 (1900): 285. “Fondre,” (melt).]


1900 March 28 / Reading / at 8:30 p.m. / Reading, etc. / 2 vivid flashes / Nature 61-548 / Jour B.A.A. 12-282 / 3 distinct explosions were observed, followed by sound like roar of distant cannon. [VIII; 590. “A Brilliant Fireball.” Nature, 61 (April 5, 1900): 548. "A Brilliant Fireball." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 10 (1899-1900): 282.]


1900 March 29 / Met train seen at Lick Observatory, Mt. Hamilton, ab. 9:55 p.m. / Astro Pubs Pacific 12-128 / Seen as far as Utah. [VIII; 591. “A Remarkable Meteor Train.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 12 (no. 74; June 1900): 128-129.]


1900 Ap. 1 / Woodford, Essex / 7:10 p.m. / still daylight / brilliant met / Sci Gos, N.S., 6-376. [VIII; 592. "Brilliant Meteor." Science Gossip, n.s., 6 (no. 72; May 1900): 376.]


1900 April 1 / Wallingford, Berks / fall dried beech leaves / Knowledge 23/109. [VIII; 593. Astbury, T.H. “A Cloud of Dried Beech Leaves.” Knowledge, 23 (May 1, 1900): 109-110. “At about four o clock on the afternoon of Sunday last (April 1st), my attention was arrested by the fall of numbers of dried beech leaves. On looking up I found that the leaves were passing in large numbers from east to west, and as high as the limit of vision. Many appeared to be mere specks, whose height and motion promised them a journey of some miles at least. The shower continued for perhaps twenty minutes. The fall was noticed by many persons here, who were unable to account for it, as there are no beech trees within two miles at nearest. Probably the leaves had been raised by a whirlwind, and at a very considerable distance east of this neighbourhood.”]


1900 Ap. 4 / Eagle, 13-3 / Mirage / Rockaway. [VIII; 594. "Mirage Off Rockaway." Brooklyn Eagle, April 4, 1900, p. 13 c. 3.]


1900 April 7 / [LT], 7-d / q's in France. [VIII; 595. “France.” London Times, April 7, 1900, p. 7 c. 4.]


1900 Ap. 7 / 1:17 a.m. / q near Manchester / See Feb 27, '99. / Nature 62/17. [VIII; 596. “Notes.” Nature, 62 (May 3, 1900): 15-19, at 17. See: 1899 Feb 27, (VIII; 409).]


1900 Ap 7 / 1:17 a.m. / Pendleton, near Manchester / q. like Feb 27, '99 / Geol Mag 1901-361. [VIII; 597. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1900.” Geological Magazine, s.4 v. 8 (1901): 358-362, at 361.]


1900 Ap. 11 / 6:45 a.m. / Great met / Port au Prince / Bull Soc Astro de F, Aug., 1900. [VIII; 598. Régnier, G. “Uranolithe.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 14 (1900): 381-382.]


1900 Ap. 16 / 7 p.m. / Great met / Cal and Oregon / Its cloud visible ½ hour. / Pubs-Pacific 12-132. [VIII; 599. “General Notes.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 12 (no. 74; June 1900): 132-136, at 132.]


1900 Ap. 24 / Wash. Co., Ala. / large met e. to w. / Clim and Crops, Ala Sec. [VIII; 600. (Climate and Crops, Alabama Section, ca. 1900.)]


1900 Ap 24-May, ab. 24 / Vesuvius / Nature 64-134. [VIII; 601. “Notes.” Nature, 64 (June 6, 1901): 132-136, at 134.]


1900 Ap. 29 / Trib., 9-6 / q / New Jersey. [VIII; 602. "Earthquake in New Jersey." New York Tribune, April 29, 1900, p. 9 c. 6.]


1900 May 1 / O / Mirage / Ap 4/13/3/ / May 1/9/3. [VIII; 603. (Refs.??? not New York Times, April 4, 1900, p. 13 c. 3.; May 1, 1900, p. 9 c. 3.)]


1900 May 1 / Trib, 2-5 / Rains / Colorado. [VIII; 604. "Heavy Rain in Colorado." New York Tribune, May 1, 1900, p. 2 c. 5.]


1900 May 3 / 7:41 p.m. / Great met  Austria / Bull Soc Astro de F, June, 1900. [VIII; 605. Howyan, G. “Un bolide remarquable.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 14 (1900): 283.]


[1900] May 9 / Trib, 1-6 / 10-1-4 / Vesuvius. [VIII; 606. "Mount Vesuvius in Eruption." New York Tribune, May 9, 1900, p. 1 c. 6. "Vesuvian Car Service Suspended." New York Tribune, May 10, 1900, p. 1 c. 4.]


1900 May 12 / Trib, 2-5 / q? [VIII; 607. (New York Tribune, May 12, 1900, p. 2 c. 5.; not found here.)]


[1900 May 15] / 1900 May 16 / Fishes / Providence, R.I. [C; 469. Gudger, Eugene Willis. “Do Fishes Fall from the Sky with Rain?” Scientific Monthly, 29 (no. 6,; December 1929): 523-527, at 526.  (Providence Daily Journal, ca. May 16, 1900) The shower of fish occurred on May 15, 1900. (Gudger, Eugene Willis. "More Rains of Fishes." Annals and Magazine of Natural History, s. 10 v. 3 (1929): 1-26. Try Summon Search @ OKQ.)]


1900 May 15 / Metite / Felix / Perry Co, Alabama / S. Kens. [VIII; 608. Merrill, George Perkins. "On a Stony Meteorite, Which Fell Near Felix, Perry County, Alabama, May 15, 1900." Proceedings of the United States National Museum, 24 (1902): 193-198. (Fletcher???) This is the Felix meteorite.]


1900 May 15 and 17 / Dry fog near Antwerp. Thickodor very strong. On 17th again, 10 a.m. and at 1 p.m. / La Nat, July, 1900. [VIII; 609. “Brouillard sec odorant.” La Nature, 1900 pt.1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1417, supplement; July 21): 52.]


1900 May 16 / Providence Journal of / Fall fishes / Providence. [VIII; 610. (Providence Journal, May 16, 1900.) See: 1900 May 15, (C; 469).]


1900 May 16 / Destructive q. / Mexico / BA 1911-59. [VIII; 611. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 59.]


1900 May 24 / Trib, 16-2 / Mine explosion / Nor. Car. [VIII; 612. "Twenty-Two Lost in Mine Explosion." New York Tribune, May 24, 1900, p. 16 c. 2.]


1900 May 28 / E Mec. 71/357 A.R. Schutz, of Worthingsaw objects he called snowflakes (near sun or moon) “dancing in the wind and all flying upwards.” [VIII; 613. “The Solar Eclipse.” English Mechanic, 71 (no. 1837; June 8, 1900): 357. Noble, William. “Auctor Pretiosa Facit.” English Mechanic, 71 (no. 1838; June 15, 1900): 376-377, at 377.]


1900 May 28 / N. Cadbury / and Sept 6Hereford / Sun pillar / Symons Met 37/33. [VIII; 614.  Boys, H.A. “A Sun Pillar.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 34 (June 1900): 75. Wood, James G. “A Sun Pillar.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 34 (September 1900): 117-118. Wood observed a sun pillar on September 5, (not September 6). "The Sun Pillar of March 6th." Symons' Meteorological Magazine, 37 (April 1902): 33-34, at 33. See: 1900 Sept 5, (VIII; 653).]


1900 June / France or Germany / series of Trombe / no influence around / An. Soc Met. de France 1900/239. [VIII; 615. (Annuaire de la Societe Meteorologique de France, 48 (1900):  (-239.)]


1900 June 1 / Sun / By J. Fényi, of the Observatory of Haynald, a protuberance upon the sun such as characterizes the greatest eruptions, and this in a period of minimum activity. / Bull Soc Belge d'Astro 6-132. [VIII; 616. Fényi, Gyula. "La Grande Protuberance Solaire du 1er June 1900, observée par M. J. Fenyi." Bulletin de la Société Belge d'Astronomie, 6 (1901): 129-132.]


1900 June 5 and 10-12 / Dragon-flies / Great swarms of dragon-flies in Belgium. M. Lancaster reviews all circs (Ent. Mo. Mag., 2/11/222) and thinks those of 10-12 came from the sea. “But did they come from England or the open sea?” Then he thinks the swarm of the 5th went out to sea and returned on 10th-12th. So thinks that originally came from the east of Belgium, but says that nothing could be learned of their having been seen in Germany. On fifth, air black with them. / However, no record of them in England. On p. 189, considerable numbers of another species ab this time noted in Scarborough. [VIII; 617.1, 617.2, 617.3. “A probable case of migration in Leucorrhinia dubia, V. d. L.” Entomologist’s Monthly Magazine, 36 (s. 2 v. 11; August 1900): 189. "Abstract of an Article by Mons. A. Lancaster on Migrations of Libellula Quadrimaculata in Belgium in June, 1900." Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 36 (s. 2 v. 11; October 1900): 222-226.]


1900 June 10 / vast numbers of dragon-flies at Margate. / June 17 / Hundreds (Lib. quadrimaculata) arriving upon the coast of Berwick, England, / Entomologist 33/210 / p. 247were seen in Huddersfield, where, so far as the writer knew, they had never been seen before. [VIII; 618.1, 618.2. Lucas, W.J. "Migrations of Dragonflies." Entomologist, 33 (August 1900): 210-211. "Migration of Libellula Quadrimaculata." Entomologist, 33 (September 1900): 247.]


1900 June 11 / ab 10 p.m. / Vouziers, France / near Polaris, a luminous red object moving slowly / Bull Soc Astro de France, July, 1900. [VIII; 619. Adam, Albert. “Curieuse étoile filante.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 14 (1900): 341.]


1900 June 12 / metite / Forsbach / Cologne / S. Kens. [VIII; 620. (Fletcher???) (Refs.???) This is the Forsbach meteorite.]


1900 June 14 and 15 / Fog with a strong odor near Brussels / La Nat, July 1900. [VIII; 621. “Brouillard sec odorant.” La Nature, 1900 pt.1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1417, supplement; July 21): 52.]


1900 June 15 / (F) / Mass of iron fell at Nigoureyma, Soudan. / Le Naturaliste, May 1, 1901 / Sc Am Sup 55/22823. [VIII; 622. “The Meteor of the Soudan.” Scientific American Supplement, 55 (no. 1424; April 18, 1903): 22823.]


1900 June 20 / Black ring around diminished sun / N.Y. Tribune, June 21/11/5 / 22/8/5. [VIII; 623. "Remarkable Solar Phenomenon." New York Tribune, June 21, 1900, p. 11 c. 5. "There was much mystification caused here to-day by the appearance of a black ring around the sun. It was noticed from 12 [p.]m. to 12:15 p.m. by many persons. The strength of the sunlight was perceptibly diminished, and the appearance was as if clouds had passed over it, but the sky was perfectly clear. The shadow, or overcast condition, enabled one to look at the sun with the naked eye  Negroes who saw the phenomenon were much alarmed." "Solar Phenomenon Repeated." New York Tribune, June 22, 1900, p. 8 c. 5. "The phenomenon of a ring around the sun was again noticed to-day. It was slightly cloudy, however, and the ring was more luminous than yesterday. Many persons observed it with glasses. The weather is remarkably cool." "Local Intelligence." Fairfield News and Herald, (Winnsboro, S.C.), June 27, 1900, p. 3  c. 1. "A peculiar, dark ring around the sun was seen on Wednesday at noon by people in Colombia, and it was also seen in Spartanburg. The account of  it given in The State said that a number of people noticed that the sun was giving a peculiar light and upon looking up they discovered the ring. We have heard of no one here who saw the ring." Spartanburg is about 180 km., (about 110 miles), to the northwest of Columbia, with Winnsboro about 45 km., (about 27 miles), north of Columbia.]


1900 June 26 / Series whirls / Germany / Sc Am 84/340. [VIII; 624. "Whirlwinds Observed in Germany." Scientific American, n.s., 84 June 1, 1900): 340.]


1900 / summer / Flesh / a western state / New. [VIII; 625. (Refs.???)]


[1900 July 2, ab. / Jamestown, North Dakota./ “Shower of Fish.” Bismarck Daily Tribune, July 2, 1900, p. 1 c.. 5. “Jamestown, July 2.—A shower of fish dropped from the clouds during a rain storm near Geo. Nelson's ranch, in the western part of the county, and were scattered over the prairie and in the fields for a mile or more. The fish were the native bullheads of the streams, and some of them were immensely large. One is reported as over six inches in length and a good many two or three inches long.”]


1900 July 7 / Inf conjunction / Venus-sun. [VIII; 626. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1900, 574.]


1900 July 10 / [LT], 5-f / Submarine volc. [VIII; 627. “A Submarine Volcano.” London Times, July 10, 1900, p. 5 c. 6. The New Hebrides are now identified as Vanuatu.]


1900 July 13 / Trib, 1-4 / Met. / Mississippi. [VIII; 628. "Meteorite Wrecks a Store." New York Tribune, July 13, 1900, p. 1 c. 4. "Meteorite in Mississippi." New York Times, July 13, 1900, p. 2 c. 4. "Bellefontaine." True Democrat, (Saint Francisville, Louisiana), July 21, 1900, p. 4 c. 3. "Coffeeville, Miss.The little village of Bellefontaine, in Webster county, this state, thirty miles in the interior from this place, was made famous as the scene of one of nature's rarest phenomena. An aerolite, or meteoric, stone fell out of the heaven's at Bellefontaine, and completely wrecked the large storehouse of Hodge and Mabry and destroyed the stock of goods contained in it. The fall of the aerolite occurred between 9 and 10 o'clock during a perfectly clear moonlight night." "The destruction of the building was preceded by the appearance of a large ball of fire passing swiftly through the air. It gave off during its passage enough light to greatly increase the light from the moon, and attracted the attention of a party of gentlemen who were standing near the storehouse of Hodge and Mabry. It blazed forth with the intensity of a huge flame. As it came near a load explosion was heard and a shower of fire burst forth from all sides of the blazing mass having the appearance of hundreds of falling stars darting here and there like s[h]ooting spears of flame." "The storehouse was wrecked simultaneously with the explosion. The explosion of the aerolite caused a report like the sound of distant thunder or the roll of faraway cannon, and made the earth quake. When the fire ball struck the building it burst into countless fine fragments, each one bringing destruction with it." "The wrecked store has been visited by thousand of curious people. The debris is being cleared away in search of the aerolite. It has not yet been found. Some of the searchers say that its velocity buried it in the ground, others claim that the stone shattered into meteoric dust when the explosion occurred. Many cinders of a gray, gritty melted appearance have been found in the wreckage. The explosive force wrecked the building. The strange phenomenon is causing excitement."]


1900 July 13 / Eagle, 4-4 / Oct 17-3-1 / LI mets. [VIII; 629. "An Important Meteor." Brooklyn Eagle, July 13, 1900, p. 4 c. 4. An editorial. "A Brilliant Meteor." Brooklyn Eagle, October 17, 1900, p. 3 c. 1.]


1900 July 17 / unset met. Left streak visible ¾ hour. / Nature 62-399. [VIII; 630. Denning, William Frederick. “The August Perseids of 1900.” Nature, 62 (August 23, 1900): 398-399.]


1900 July 17 / Sunset / Scotland and N of England / soon after sunset / large fireball / Nature 62-491. [VIII; 631. Denning, William Frederick. "The Daylight Meteor of Sunday, September 2." Nature, 62 (September 13, 1900): 491-492.]


1900 July 18 / President not leave Cherbourg that night. / Jour des Debats of the 20th, an account of festivities upon the 19th. Fireworks and cannonading evening of 18th. Time not stated. No sham battle mentioned. / Was sham battle at 10 p.m., exactly at. / (Le Figaro, 19th). [VIII; 632. (Journal des Debats, July 20, 1900.) (Le Figaro, July 20, 1900.)]


[The following three notes were folded together by Fort. VIII: 633-635.]


1900 July 18 / L. Times, July 19 / That M. Loubet had gone to Cherbourg on 18th to meet the Czar of Russia and had reached Cherbourg at 3:45 and had been saluted with 101 guns. Left Paris at 9 a.m. Went back when? [VIII; 633. “France.” London Times, July 19, 1900, p. 6 c. 1-2.]


1900 July 18 / 3s / q / Bognor / About 10:10 p.m., vibrations felt and a kind of deep (?) rumbling sound with distant pulsations. Lasted 10 minutes. Few minutes interval and againlasting 6 or 7 minuteslonger interval and againall about ½ hour. / LT 20-8-d / Times, 21, cor writes that the hour was exactly that of salute fired at Cherbourg for departing President. See French papers. M.N. Stevensonsee ab 1880. [VIII; 634.1, 634.2. Rivington, J.A. “Earthquake Shocks at Bognor.” London Times, July 20, 1900, p. 8 c. 4. “France.” London Times, July 21, 1900, p. 7 c. 6. (French newspapers, ca. July 18, 1900.) Bognor Regis, England, is about 150 kilometres from Cherbourg, France, (both are on the shores of the English Channel). See: (ab. 1880).]


1900 July 18 / Dr Davison, Geol Mag., 1901-362, says of the sounds "shortly after 10 p.m." [between Torquay and Brighton], "At first they were supposed to be earthquakes, but [they] were afterwards traced to the gun-firing during a sham fight which took place at Cherbourg, at the hour mentioned, in honor of the French President's visit to that town." [VIII; 635.1, 635.2. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1900.” Geological Magazine, s.4 v. 8 (1901): 358-362, at 362.]


1900 July 18 / Davison says that the sounds were obviously propagated through the air, "for they caused a drumming in the ears, and windows were shaken while floors were still." / Geol Mag. / Ac to Le Figaro, President not leave Cherbourg till 20th, but cannonading 18th at 10 p.m. [VIII; 636.1, 636.2. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1900.” Geological Magazine, s.4 v. 8 (1901): 358-362, at 362. (Le Figaro, ca. July 18, 1900.)]


1900 July 18 / The rumbling sounds heard at Torquay, 101 miles from Cherbourg. / Nature 62-373 / Ac to cor, “a few minutes after ten”. / See p. 378also at Plymouth, 123 miles, and near Liskeard136 miles and 5 from the sea. [VIII; 637.1, 637.2. “Notes.” Nature, 62 (August 16, 1900): 373-377, at 373. Davison, Charles. "The Distance to Which the Firing of Heavy Guns Is Heard." Nature, 62 (August 16, 1900): 377-379, at 378-379.]


1900 July 20 / Hail / Northampton / some at least 6 strata / Nature 62-341. [VIII; 638. Roberts, J.G. “A Remarkable Hailstorm.” Nature, 62 (August 9, 1900): 341. No mention was made herein of “6 strata.” (but might be counted in a photograph),]


1900 July 23 / New comet in Aries / by Brooks / Sc Am 83-75. [VIII; 639. "A New Comet." Scientific American, n.s., 83 (August 4, 1900): 75. Comet C/1900 O1.]


1900 / summer / Shower of fishes in street of Buffalo, N.Y. / An and Mag of Nat Hist 10-3-22. [VIII; 640. (Gudger, Eugene Willis. "More Rains of Fishes." Annals and Magazine of Natural History, s. 10 v. 3 (1929): 1-26, at 22.) (Wrong date? “It Rained Fish on Jewitt Ave.” Buffalo Times, May 12, 1899, p. 5 c. 1’ @ Newspapers.com; fell on May 11, 1899. Also: “It Rained Fish in Buffalo.” Buffalo Evening News, p. 16 c. 2-3.)]


1900 Aug / B / Johannsen / Chicago Tribune, Feb. 24, 1901. [C; 470. (Chicago Tribune, February 24, 1901; not found here.) See: 1900 Aug 30, (C: 473 & 474)]


1900 Aug 3 / flashes and star / Mr. J.N. Weed of Newburg[, New York]that at the moment of the rising of Formalhaut above mountains southeast saw gleam of lightnings just to the left of the starcontinued till 1 a.m. Sky cloudless at frequent intervals “all along the horizon from the point of origin to near the east point”Editor says that ac to weather map no distant storm to account for it, / M.W.R. 28-293. [VIII; 641.1, 641.2. “Lightning From a Cloudless Sky.” Monthly Weather Review, 28 (no. 7; July 1900): 292-293.]


1900 Aug 3 / “Lightning phe” seen also at Northfield (2), Mass., where meteorological records not account for it. / M.W.R. 28-556. [VIII; 642. “Lightning From Cloudless Skies.” Monthly Weather Review, 28 (no. 12; December 1900): 556.]


1900 Aug 7 / 5 p.m. / Cold Harbor, Hanover Co, Virginia / 2 men in a field struck by lightning from an apparently clear sky. / M.W.R. 28-293. / Editor says the weather map gave no indication of any thunderstorm or rain in the neighborhood at the time. [C; 471. “Lightning From a Cloudless Sky.” Monthly Weather Review, 28 (no. 7; July 1900): 292-293.]


1900 Aug 10 / at Bristol / Interfered with by full moon, but considered scanty / Perseids / Nature 62-398. [VIII; 643. Denning, William Frederick. “The August Perseids of 1900.” Nature, 62 (August 23, 1900): 398-399.]


1900 Aug 13 / It Sounds / S. Constanzo (Pesaro) / light q preceded several minutes by sound / See 1816. [VIII; 644. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 46. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1900 Aug 13 / It Sound / Arcevia (Ancona) / Rombi / See 1816. [VIII; 645. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 46. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


[1900 Aug 14. Wrong date. See: 1905 Aug 14, (VIII; 646).]


1900 Aug 20 / (Aude) / Man transported 150 feet (light). [C; 472. (Refs.???)]


1900 Aug 24 / dispatch dated so / Loud detonations and fall of meteoric stones / Jaen, Spain / Nature 62-421. [VIII; 647. “Notes.” Nature, 62 (August 30, 1900): 420-425, at 421.]


1900 Aug 25 / Great met seemed to explode within a few feet of a hotel at Rangeley Lake, Me. / Pop Sci News 34/223. [VIII; 648. “A Dissipated Meteor.” Popular Science News, 34 (November 1900): 223.]


1900 Aug 25 / Mayfield, Maine / bet. 7 and 8 p.m. / det met / Rept U.S.W.B., N. England Sec, Aug, '00. [VIII; 649. (Report of the U.S. Weather Bureau, New England Section, August 1900.)]


[The following four notes were folded together by Fort. C: 473-476.]


1900 Aug 30 / BO / Ap. in a boat / LightJan 5, 1901:In August, 1900, Capt Peter Johannsen and his son made the voyage in an open boat; the Lotta, from Gibraltar to Charlotte, U.S.A. (See if N. Car.) / Ac to cor to Light, Capt. [Lionel Aubrey Walter] Barnes-Lawrence, Captain of the Port of Gib., had received extracts from J's log book, telling that upon Aug 30, ab. 30 miles n. east of the Island of Grand Canary, 4 men appeared on board. One dressed in Moorish costume, one with an iron foot. They shouted as if someone in the distance but no other ship visible. They spoke in a strange language. Night came and the four men lay down and slept. Next morning, early, J awoke and saw one of them scanning horizon. Fell asleep, woke again at sunriseall disappeared. Ab 5 p.m. of 31st, appeared again. 2 of them swung the jib back and forth as if signaling, but no other ship in sight. In the evening all disap again. [C; 473.1 to 473.5. Badeley, M.B. “A Sea Romance.” Light, 21 (no. 1,043; January 5, 1901): 3. ((London Daily Telegraph, December 18, 1900, p. 10 c. 7; issue not @ BNA.) Charlotte Harbor is on the west coast of the Florida Peninsula, (not in North Carolina). The Lotta departed Gibraltor, on August 20, and arrived at Pine Island, Florida, on October 21, 1900. Pine Island is about 40 kilometres south of Charlotte Harbor, Florida, (not in North Carolina). “An Adventurous Atlantic Voyage.” " St. James's Gazette, August 25, 1900, p. 7. Details of the the Lotta, (an open boat, 29½ feet in length and a beam of 7½ feet), and Johannsen's planned voyage were reported.]


1900 Aug 30 / For accounts of J's voyage, see L.T., Aug 21, 25. [C; 474. “An Adventurous Voyage.” London Times, August 21, 1900, 7 c. 5. “Captain Johansen's Voyage.” London Times, August 25, 1900, p. 4 c. 2.]


1900 Aug 30 / This is by cor to Daily Telegraph, Dec 18-10-7, 1900. / Capt J reached Pine Island, Florida, Oct. 21. [C; 475. (London Daily Telegraph, December 18, 1900, p. 10 c. 7; issue not @ BNA.)]


[1900 Aug 30] / BO / As told in L.T., Aug 21 and 25, 1900, Capt. J left Gibraltar, with son aged 12, in boat 29 feet long, on Aug 20, to sail to coast of U.S.A. [C; 476. “An Adventurous Voyage.” London Times, August 21, 1900, 7 c. 5. “Captain Johansen's Voyage.” London Times, August 25, 1900, p. 4 c. 2.]


1900 [Aug 30] / E / Myst dis. / Eagle, Aug 30/2/4 / 31/4/3 / Sep 1/2/4. [C; 477. "An Evangelist Missing." Brooklyn Eagle, August 30, 1900, p. 2 c. 4. (No title.) Brooklyn Eagle, August 31, 1900, p. 14 c. 3. (Torn copy online; no headline.) "David Loynd Still Missing." Brooklyn Eagle, September 1, 1900, p. 2 c. 4. David and Alice Loynd made further evangelist appearances in the United States and Canada, but they perished when the Lusitania was sunk in 1915.]


1900 Sept / (N) / Entomological News of, p. 547 / Kissing bug appeared again in Philadelphia. More than 100 cases treated in the Jefferson Hospital. [C; 478. “Notes and News.” Entomological News, 11 (September 1900): 547-548.]


1900 Sept 2 / Sunset / 6:52 p.m. / Just before sunset, north of England and Scotland, great met. Left column of white smoke visible 10 minutes. / Nature 62-491. [VIII; 650. Denning, William Frederick. "The Daylight Meteor of Sunday, September 2." Nature, 62 (September 13, 1900): 491-492.]


1900 Sept 2 / 6:55 p.m. / Brilliant fireball at Keswick, etc.  L.T.-6-5-c / 8-9-f. [VIII; 651. “A Meteorite.” London Times, September 6, 1900, p. 5 c. 3. “A Meteorite.” London Times, September 8, 1900, p. 9 c. 6.]


1900 Sept. 3 / By Denning at Bristol. Swarms of luminous objects floating about near the sun and moving in various directions. / Observatory 37/418. [VIII; 652. Denning, William Frederick. "Showers of Telescopic Meteors seen near the Sun." Observatory, 37 (November 1914): 417-419, at 418.]


1900 Sept 5 / Sun pillar / by cor travelling between Scotland and London / LT, March 13, 1902. [VIII; 653. “The Solar Phenomeonon.” London Times, March 13, 1902, p. 15 c. 1. See: 1900 May 28, (VIII; 614).]


1900 Sept 7 / 11 p.m. / Metite at Calvi (Sheloncato) / Corsica / Bull Soc Astro de F, Oct., 1900. [VIII; 654. “Chute d'un aérolithe.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 14 (1900): 461.]


1900 Sept 8 / Disastrous hurricane / Louisiana and Texas / Nature 62-489. [VIII; 655. “Notes.” Nature, 62 (September 13, 1900): 489-491, at 489-490.]


1900 Sept 8 / Galveston / Hurricane. [VIII; 656. (Ref.???)]


1900 Sept 10 / Slight shock near Madras / 17at Bombay, slight / Nature 62-578. [VIII; 657. “Notes.” Nature, 62 (October 11, 1900): 577-581, at 578.]


1900 Sept 12 / dispatch from NaplesVesuvius been in eruption for some days. / L.T. 12-4-c. [VIII; 658. “Eruption of Vesuvius.” London Times, September 12, 1900, p. 4 c. 3.]


1900 Sept. 17 / Scotland / Sound / q / 3:30 p.m.Menstrie / 10:05 p.m.Alva / Sept 18, 2 a.m.Alva / 18, 2:55 a.m.Bridge of Allan / Geol Mag 1901-358. [VIII; 659. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1900.” Geological Magazine, s.4 v. 8 (1901): 358-362.]


[1900 Sept 20. Wrong date. See: 1909 Sept 20, (VIII; 660).]


1900 Sept 26 / 4:10 p.m. / Germany / a detonation heard / Met Zeit 17-523. [VIII; 661. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 17 (1900): 515-524, at 523.]


1900 Oct 5 / White spot / Mars / E. Mec 73/119. [VIII; 662. Bolton, Scriven. “The Crater MariusMars.” English Mechanic, 73 (no. 1878; March 22, 1901): 119.]


1900 Oct. 9 / Alaska / q. / area of 120,000 sq. miles / BA '11/44. [VIII; 663. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 44.]


1900 Oct 18 / Trib, 9-1 / Met. / Kingston, NY. [VIII; 664. "Meteorite Fell at Kingston." New York Tribune, October 18, 1900, p. 9 c. 1.]


1900 Oct. 20 / Bristol / Geminids more active than Orionids. / Nature 98-176 / See Oct. 20, 1903. [VIII; 665. “The Orionid Shower of 1916.” Nature, 98 (November 2, 1916): 177. See: (1903 Oct 20).]


1900 Oct 20 / Orionids / See Oct 20, 1901. [VIII; 666. See: 1901 Oct 20, (VIII; 916).]


1900 Oct 24 / Eagle, 7-6 / Ghst. [C; 479. "A Spook at Freeport." Brooklyn Eagle, October 24, 1900, p. 7 c. 6.]


1900 Oct 27 / 11:42 p.m. / Bristol / met train / MWR 07/391. [VIII; 667. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (no. 9; September 1907): 390-397, at 391.]


1900 Oct 29, etc. / Severe qs / Venezuela / L.T., Oct. 30-4-a / 31-4-a / See Nov. 2-3-e. [VIII; 668. “Earthquake in Venezuela.” London Times, October 30, 1900, p. 4 c. 1. “Earthquake in Venezuela.” London Times, October 31, 1900, p. 4 c. 1. “The Earthquake in Venezuela.” London Times, November 2, 1900, p. 3 c. 5-6.]


[1900 Oct 30 /] 1899 Oct 30 / Trib, 1-2 / 31-1-2 / Nov 1-7-6 / 14-8-3 / q / Venezuela. [VIII; 525. "Caracas Stricken Again." New York Tribune, October 30, 1900, p. 1 c. 2. "Venezuelan Town Destroyed." New York Tribune, October 31, 1899, p. 1 c. 2. "The Earthquake in Venezuela." New York Tribune, November 1, 1899, p. 7 c. 6. "Tells of Caracas Earthquake." New York Tribune, November 14, 1899, p. 8 c. 3.]


[1900 Oct 30 /] 1899 Oct 30 / Trib, 1-4, 4-2, etc. / Tarrant Co Explosion / NY City. [VIII; 526. "Ruin, Death; Many Injuries." New York Tribune, October 30, 1900, p. 1 c. 4-5 & p. 3 c. 1-4. This issue of the Tribune was filled with numerous articles regarding this explosion.]


1900 Nov 1 / Trib, 1-6 / q. / Ohio. [VIII; 669. (New York Tribune, November 1, 1900, p. 1 c. 6; not found here.)]


1900 Nov 2 / It Sounds / Spoleto / rombi / times given / See 1816. [VIII; 670. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 46. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1900 Nov. 8 / 5:15 p.m. / Biarritz, etc. / France / great met. Ac to one observer, appeared near Beta of Andromeda. / Bull Soc Astro de F., Dec., 1900. [VIII; 671. “Bolides remarquable du 8 Novembre.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 14 (1900): 546.]


1900 Nov. 10 / 9:30 p.m. / Newcastle, W. Australia / From 100 to 200 meteors in 30 seconds / Nature 63-209. [VIII; 672. “Notes.” Nature, 63 (December 27, 1900): 208-211, at 209.]


1900 Nov 12 / expectations of preceding years “grievously disappointing”, ac to W.F Denning, in Nature, Nov 8, 1900. [VIII; 673. Denning, William Frederick, “The Leonid Meteoric Shower.” Nature, 63 (November 8, 1900): 39-40.]


1900 Nov 12 / In Nature, Nov. 1, Drs. G.J. Stoney and A.M.W. Downing, with diagrams explain why in 98 and 99 few Leonids and why conditions still more unfavorable for 1900. / SelfBut in 1897 did not explain. [VIII; 674. Stoney, George Johnstone, and, Downing, Arthur Matthew Weld. “The Leonidsa Forecast.” Nature, 63 (November 1, 1900.): 6.]


1900 Nov 12 / No mention of Leonids in Nature. [VIII; 675. (Confirm.)]


1900 Nov 14 / “As was anticipated, the Leonid meteors failed to appear in any numbers.” / Nature 63-92. [VIII; 676. “The Leonid Meteors.” Nature, 63 (November 22, 1900): 92.]


1900 Nov 18 / Trib, 11-2 / Met / N.Y. [VIII: 677. Marsh. Margaret C. "One Meteor Seen in This City." New York Tribune, November 18, 1900, p. 11 c. 2.]


1900 / early in Dec / Shaft of light from Mars, lasting 70 minutes. / Reported from the Lowell Observatory. Ac to Prof. Pickering absolutely inexplicable. / Sc. Am 84/179. [VIII; 678. "Science Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 84 (March 23, 1901): 179.]


1900 Dec / Tesla at this time / flash of light from Mars / Trib, Jan 16/4/1. [VIII; 679. "Shaft of Light From Mars." New York Tribune, January 16, 1900, p. 4 c. 1.]


1900 Dec 7 / afternoon / Extraordinary meteorsaid to have rivalled the sunpassed over Colorado and Wyoming. / Pop Astro 9/107. [VIII; 680. Howe, Herbert Alonzo. “The Great Fireball.” Popular Astronomy, 9 (no. 2; February 1901): 107-108.]


1900 Dec. 7 / Projection from Mars, by Douglass, at Flagstaff. It shot back and forth with values of /1/1/1½. / Lowell, Pop Astro 10/187 / See back several years about same time. [VIII; 681. Lowell, Percival, “Explanation of the Supposed Signals from Mars of December 7, and 8, 1900.” Popular Astronomy. 10 (no. 4; April 1902): 185-194, at 187. See: (before 1900); 1897 Feb. 16, (VII; 1685); 1898 Aug. 15, (VIII; 303); 1898 Aug. 19, (VIII; 306); and, 1898 Sept 9, (VIII; 325).]


1900 Dec 7 / The Met in Colorado / loud detonation / Jour BAA 12-87. [VIII; 682. "The Great Fireball of 1900 December 7." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 12 (1901-1902): 87. Howe, Herbert A. “The Great Fireball.” Popular Astronomy, 9 (October 1901???): 107-108.]


1900 Dec 7, 8, 9 / Hurricane of unparalleled violence at New Britain / Victoria (B.C.) Colonist, Jan 29, 1901. [VIII; 683. (Victoria Colonist, January 29, 1901.)]


1900 Dec 8 / A projection from Mars (the second) / Pop Astro 10/188. [VIII; 684. Lowell, Percival, “Explanation of the Supposed Signals from Mars of December 7, and 8, 1900.” Popular Astronomy. 10 (no. 4; April 1902): 185-194, at 188.]


1900 Dec 13 / [LT], 14-c / Aurora. [VIII; 685. “The Aurora Borealis.” London Times, December 13, 1900, p. 14 c. 3.]


1900 Dec 16 / met and lightning / 4:40 p.m. / N.W. Germany / Great met mistaken for lightning, but left behind trail of smoke. / Sc Am 84-375. [VIII; 686. "Meteor Seen in Daylight." Scientific American, n.s., 84 (June 15, 1901): 375.]


1900 Dec 17 / In Woods of Eggenburg, near Vienna, appeared a large tiger, “evidently escaped from a menagerie”. / D. Telegraph 18-9-1 / Hunted and shot at but escaped. [C; 480. (London Daily Telegraph, December 18, 1900, p. 9 c. 1.)]


1900 Dec. 22 / Story of the postman shocked into insensibility (near Harlow, Essex). A meteorite that fell near him. / Sci Gos., N.S., 7-239. [VIII; 687. "Science Gossip." Science Gossip, n.s., 7 (no 80; January 1901): 239. "Christmas Meteorite." Leicester Daily Post, December 25, 1900, p. 7 c. 3. A local postman stated that he was blinded and stunned by a brilliant flash of light. The news service article reported that he was found unconscious "in the roadway, and did not recover until medically attended at home." "Stunned by a Meteor." Savannah Morning News, January 24, 1901, p. 5 c. 6-7. "'It was about six o'clock,' he told a Daily Mail representative, 'when I saw a big, bright light rushing across the sky. The fog made it look all red-like. 'Oh,' says I, ‘a fireball.' says I. Well, this thing it fell in a field about a hundred yards, as I reckon, from where I was. I went walking on. and never felt nothing for a few yards, and then all of a sudden I came over faint-like, and was awful queer.'" "Armour staggered into a village shop and asked for a seat. As the people saw he was bad. they sent for the local publican, who arrived with brandy. And by that time Armour began to feel so very much worse that he slipped gracefully into unconsciousness." "How he could be affected by the aerolite is difficult to say, for Armour is positive that he felt nothing strike him. The effect of whatever happened, however, was plain enough. His right hand and his right leg went 'dead' for some time, 'and my neck and the top of my back were all sort of burned and smelt awful strong of sulphur,” as is most gravely corroborated by the shopkeeper and the publican." "Armour had to commandeer the local sub-postmaster to finish his round on Saturday evening, and he was attended by a doctor. Most of the Sunday he spent in getting the circulation back to his numb hand and leg."]


1900 Dec 25 / 11:20 p.m. / q and sound like an explosion / second time in the year / Chambéry / La Nat Sup., Jan 12, 10 / Times 27-2-c. [VIII; 688. “Chronique Météorologique.” La Nature, 1901 pt. 1 (no. 1442, supplement; January 12, 1900): 25. “France.” London Times, December 27, 1900, p. 3 c. 3.]

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