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Last updated: July 15, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1892

(January to June)


1892:


1892 / about / summer / B. rain / Ireland / Sc Gos., N.S., 4/294. [VII; 247. Kane, William Francis de Vismes. "Black Rain in Ireland." Science Gossip, n.s., 2 (no. 23; January 1896): 294.]


1892 Jan 3 / The Galignani Messenger / Here the story is that two men were seen in beach of Staten Island by quarantine officers. They suddenly disappeared but a moment later one of them floated past the pier. He dived below surface and not seen again. / On beach a hat found and a bottle marked "Starkie, Chemist, Grand Hotel Buildings, Charing Cross." [B; 1191.1, 1191.2. "Strange Affair on Staten Island." Galignani's Messenger, January 3, 1892, p. 1 c. 4-5. See: 1891 Dec 31, (B; 1190).]


1892 / Mice plague / Scotland / May 5, etc. / See L.T. Index, May. / See March 26. [B; 1192. Maxwell, Herbert. “The Destruction of Hawks and Kestrels.” London Times, May 14, 1892, p. 18 c. 6. See: 1896 March 26, (B; 1284).]


1892 / The Oxford hoax came soon after the publication of Peterborough story in most of the London newspapers, as if to discredit phe-stories. [B; 1193. See: 1892 March 1, (B; 1276).]


1892 / Steve Haven, sleepwalker, near Fowlerville, Mich. / See Nov. 18, 1892. [B; 1194. See: 1892 Nov. 18, (C; 77).]


1892 / Fires / Flushing, L.I. / See B. Eagle Index, "Arson" and "Fires". [B; 1195. “A Fire Scare in Flushing.” Brooklyn Eagle, May 9, 1892, p. 6 c. 3. “Flushing's Sunday Fires.” Brooklyn Eagle, May 30, 1892, p. 6 c. 9. “Firebugs in Flushing.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 5, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. “Another Fire Near Flushing.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 15, 1892, p. 10 c. 5.]


1892 / Look for woman in black to go with Aug 5, 1892. [B; 1196. (Refs.???)]


1892 [May 7] / Disap / St Boswells. [B; 1197. "Cases Received by the Literary Committee." Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 6 (November 1893): 144-151, at 146-150.]


1892 [May 7] / Disap / St. Boswells / [typescript] / Journal of the S.P.R., November, 1893. [B; 1198. Typescript note. "Cases Received by the Literary Committee." Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 6 (November 1893): 144-151, at 146-150.]


1892 / Famine in Russia / Forum * DA 13-575. [VII; 248. Edgar, William Crowell. “Russia's Land System: The Cause of the Famine.” Forum, (New York), 13 (July 1892): 575-582.]


1892 / Frgs / Cape Town / [Letter to Fort from Thipp Wodd, Benoni, Transvaal, 10/3/25]. [VII; 249. (Letter. Wood, Thipp, to Fort; 1925, 10/3.)]


1892 / World / Jan to Oct. [VII; 250.]


1892 / Chic. / Jan + July-Dec / Citizen / May-Dec / N. Or. / Jan-Dec / San Fran / Jan-May + July-ec / St. Louis / Jan-Feb + Ap-Dec. / Boston / July-Sept. 10 / Montreal Gazette / n.g. / Toronto W. Globe / July-Aug. [VII; 251.]


1892 / Metite that fell in the Sahara / 28.57 N / 0.49 W. / Sci Amer 67-308. [VII; 252. "An Aerolite Falls in the Great Desert of Sahara." Scientific American, n.s., 67 (November 12, 1892): 308. Meunier, Stanislas. "Fer météorique récemment tombé à Hassi Iekna, en Algérie." Comptes Rendus, 115 (1892 ): 531-533. This is the Hassi-Jekna meteorite, (which fell in 1890).]


1892 [May 4] / Soldiers of Bourges in Th storm / World, June 19-28-8. [VII; 253. (New York World, June 19, 1892, p. 28 c. 8.; not @ Newspapers.com.) “Recent Thunder Storms in France.” Western Electrician, 11 (July 16, 1892): 31, (illustration). See: 1892 May 4, (B; 1302).]


1892 / Boston Post / Have / Jan and Feb / n.g. [VII; 254.]


1892 / London Advertiser has a col. [VII; 255.]


1892 Jan-March / Mutinies. [B; 1199. (Refs.???)]


1892 Jan / Slasher / Brooklyn. [B; 1200. (Refs.???)]


1892 Jan / Slasher / See March 12. [B; 1201. See: (March 12.]


1892 Jan / Polt / Waterford, Ireland / Proc 12/77. [B; 1202. Podmore, Frank. "Poltergeists." Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, 12 (1897): 45-115, at 77-81.]


1892 Jan / Vamp / Story from NY Tribune, copied in Religio-Phil Jour, June 25, 1892, p. 73 / Third member of family of George T. Brown, of Exeter, R.I., died of consumption, and his belief there was a vampire. Third was his daughter, who died in Jan. He had the body dug up, and it was said that there were evidences of blood in a fresh, or uncongealed state, in the heart. [B; 1203.1, 1203.2. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, June 25, 1892, p. 73; not online.) "A Search for Vampires." San Francisco Morning Call, March 28, 1892, p. 2 c. 6. "A Rhode Island Superstition." Wichita Daily Eagle, July 21, 1892, p. 4 c. 6. There was a similar incident "some years ago" in Foster, Rhode Island, where a daughter was exhumed and cremated "to kill the vampire."]


1892 Jan. 1-22 / J des Deb. / Nothing of Polts in Paris. [B; 1204. Journal des Debats. See: 1892 Jan 2, (B: 1206 & 1207).]


1892 / ab Jan 1 / At Lydenburg, S. Africa, myriads of butterflies passed, taking four days. Some were white and some were yellow. / Cape Argus, Jan 5. [VII; 256. (Cape Argus, January 5, 1892; at OKQ microfilm.)]


1892 Jan 1 / Disap who returned / NY / See Indexes. / R.H. Warren. [B; 1205. (Refs.???)]


1892 Jan 2 / Polts / San Fran Chronicle 9-1-2 / Night of 2nd, in Paris, home of Mme. Boll, a widow, and her two adopted children, a boy and a girl. Were awakened at 11 p.m. by "an indescribable tumult" and sound from furniture. A window rose. Mme. Boll struck a light. Chairs and tables upset on the floor. On entering the boy's bedroom she saw a bowl on a table start up, describe a curve, and smash in the center of the room. Then other persons came in. They saw frames of pictures on the wall break. [B; 1206.1, 1206.2, 1206.3. “A Haunted House.” San Francisco Chronicle, January 9, 1892, p. 1 c. 2.]


1892 Jan 3 / Auriga? / 11 h., 57 [m] / Bristol / meteor the size of Venus from Auriga or Perseus / Observatory 15/117. [VII; 257. Denning, William Frederick. "Bright Meteors." Observatory, 15 (1892): 117.]


[1892 Jan. 3 /] 1892 Jan 11 / Auriga? / 8:05 p.m. / Bristol / a large slow meteor mag of Venus from Auriga or Perseus / See Nov 19, 1891. / Observatory 15-117. [VII; 312. Denning, William Frederick. "Bright Meteors." Observatory, 15 (1892): 117. Fort confused two entries on Denning's list of bright meteors; one was on January 3, at 11 h. 57 m., with a probable radiant in Auriga or Perseus; and, another was on January 11, at 8 h. 05 m. See: 1891 Nov. 19, (VII: 227 & 228).]


1892 Jan 3 / Conspicuous spot. / See '91, Nov. 9. / On Jan 4, a bright moderately well-defined plain spot. [VII; 258. See: 1891 Nov. 9, (VII; 224).]


1892 Jan. 3 / BO / 4:19 p.m. / Strong shocks / Japan / Cosmos, N.S., 21-375. [VII; 289. “Le tremblement de terre du Japon.” Cosmos, s. 4  (n.s.), 21 (March 5, 1892): 375.]


1892 Jan 3 / 4 p.m. / q., Nagoya, Japan. Earth cracked and threw out mud and water. / North China Herald (Shanghai), Jan 15 / Here was distinct q of Oct 28. [VII; 290. (North China Herald, January 15, 1892.)]


1892 Jan 4 / Hypnotism / San Fran. Chronicle of, 3-5 / Said that there was a mystery at the City and County Hospitals. At first an epidemic of sleepwalkers. Then a patient been found in a trance, in a corridor, walking like an ape. An unknown hypnotist was suspected but no victim had been orally commanded by anybody. About middle of Dec, 2 patients—two convalescents—had left their ward and at the gate had told the keeper, "word for word," that they were millionaires. Night of Jan 2, two patients were found lying on the ground outside the hospital, as if dead; they could not be aroused, but at 5 a.m. awoke together. The unusual circ. here is that if this story be accepted, it is of a hypnotist who controlled not orally. [B; 1208.1 to 1208.4. “Hospital Hypnotism.” San Francisco Chronicle, January 4, 1892, p. 3 c. 5.]


1892 Jan 4 / Fine display aurora Driffield, Yorkshire / Nature 45-223. [VII; 259. Lovel, A. “Aurora Borealis.” Nature, 45 (January 7, 1892): 223.]


1892 Jan 5 / Georgia phe / See July 31, 1888. / May 28, 1891 / ab Aug 16, 1869. [VII; 260. See: 1888 July 28, (IV; 1407); 1891 May 28, (VII; 107); and, 1869, Aug 13, (III: 2057 & 2058).]


1892 Jan 5 / Great met and fire / June 30, 1908. [VII; 261. See: 1908 June 30, (IX: 1010).]


1892 Jan 5 / See Jan 5, 1891. [VII; 262. See: (1891 Jan 5).]


1892 Jan 5 / Fiery whirl / See phe, France, May, 1883. [VII; 263. See (1883 May 17, (V: 1276 & 1280)???,  and, 1883 May 24, (V; 1295)???]


1892 Jan 4 / N.Y. Sun, 1-6 / Flood in Maine, Androscoggin River highest in 30 years. [VII; 264. “Flood in the Androscoggin.” New York Sun, January 4, 1892, p. 1 c. 6.]


1892 Jan 5 / See Index, “Hot”. [VII; 265. See: (“Hot”).]


1892 Jan / Fiery whirl / May 28, 1891. [VII; 266. See: 1891 May 28, (VII; 107).]


1892 Jan 5 / A whirl from a terrestrial volc / Aug 3, 1869. [VII; 267. See: 1869 Aug 3, (III; 1842).]


1892 Jan 5 / Fiery whirl / Aug 26, 1826. [VII; 268. See: 1826 Aug 26, (I: 1280 & 1281).]


1892 Jan 5 / Fiery whirl / See June 25, 1869. [VII; 269. See: (1869 June 25; not this date).]


1892 Jan / Fiery whirl and ice / Aug 26, 1823. [VII; 270. See: 1826 Aug 26, (I: 1280 & 1281).]


1892 Jan 5 / Nebraska / tornado / sheet of fire / Sept 29, 1927. [VII; 271. See: 1927 Sept 29, (XI; 1001).]


1892 Jan 5 / Fiery whirl / April 21, 1861. [VII; 272. See: 1861 Ap. 21, (III; 91).]


1892 Jan 5 / Fiery whirl / July 31, 1888. [VII; 273. See: 1888 July 31, (VI; 1407).]


1892 Jan 5 / Fiery whirl and dry fog / Sept. 9, 1911. [VII; 274. See: 1911 Sept 9, (IX: 2067).]


[The following eleven notes were clipped together by Fort. VII: 275-285.]


1892 Jan / Fiery tornado / July 18, 1881. [VII; 275. See: 1881 July 18, (V; 571).]


1892 Jan / Whirl affect cotton / May 28, 1891. [VII; 276. See: 1891 May 28, (VII; 107).]


1892 Jan / Whirl of fire / See Feb. 1, 1902. [VII; 277. See: 1902 Feb 1, (VIII; 1001).]


1892 Jan / Fiery whirl / May 22, 1902. [VII; 278. See: 1902 May 22, (VIII; 1192); 1902 May 22-23, (VIII; 1194); and, 1902 May 25, (VIII; 1193).]


1892 Jan / Fiery whirl / Aug 13, 1869. [VII; 279. See: 1869 Aug 13, (III; 2058).]


1892 Jan / Fiery whirl / May 23, 1894. [VII; 280. See: 1894 May 11, (VII; 1023).]


1892 Jan / Fiery whirl / India / Ap. 21, 1861. [VII; 281. See: 1861 Ap. 21, (III; 91).]


1892 (Jan) / Fiery whirl not fire but hot wind / Jan 13, 1913. [VII; 282. See: 1913 Jan 13, (MB-I: 300 to 304).]


1892 Jan / Fiery whirl / dry fog and woman's clothes burning / Sept 9, 1911. [VII; 283. See: 1911 Sept 9, (IX: 2067).]


1892 Jan / Fiery whirl / Georgia / July 31, 1888. [VII; 284. See: 1888 July 31, (VI; 1407).]


1892 Jan 5 / Fiery whirl / Ap. 21, 1861. [VII; 285. See: 1861 Ap. 21, (III; 91).]


1892 Jan 5 / See Forest Fires. / Sept, 1881 / Ap 2, 1889. [VII; 286. See: 1881 Sept, (V: 625, 684, & 686-688); 1881 Sept 3, (V: 635, 650, & 651); 1881 Sept 6, (V: 669, 689); 1881 Sept 14, (V; 707); and, 1889 Ap 2, (VI: 1609, 1610, & 1611).


1892 Jan 5 / Fiery whirl / burned. / May 23, 1894. [VII; 287. See: 1894 May 11, (VII; 1023).]


1892 Jan / Fiery whirl / July 18, 1881. [VII; 288. See: 1881 July 18, (V; 571).]


1892 Jan 5 / Whirl of fire / Feb. 1, 1902. [VII; 291. See: 1902 Feb 1, (VIII; 1001).]


1892 Jan 5 / Phe of July 31, 1888 / like effects from volc / June 15, 1888 / and May 8, 1902. [VII; 292. See: (1888 June 15), and, (1902 May 8).]


1892 Jan 5 / “Column of fire” / March 21, 1821. [VII; 293. See: 1821 March 21, (I; 856).]


1892 Jan 5 / Fiery whirl / Aug 19, 1845 / [note cut off]ture / [note cut off]8 to / [note cut off]157. [VII; 294. See: 1845 Aug 19, (II: 857, 858, & 859).]


1892 Jan 5 / Fires and dust storm / Feb 14, 1903. [VII; 295. See: 1903 Feb. 14, (VIII: 1694 & 1695).]


1892 Jan 5 / See Nov 3, 1825. / Aug 26, 1826. [VII; 296. See: 1825 Nov. 3, (I; 1219), and, 1826 Aug 26, (I: 1280 & 1281).]


1892 Jan 5 / Fiery whirl / Dec 12, 1846. [VII; 297. See: 1846 Dec 12, (II; 1085).]


1892 Jan 5 / 7 p.m. / Fayetteville, Ga / other places / Tornado like a funnel of fire / World 7-1-5. [VII; 298. (New York World, January 7, 1892, p. 1 c. 5; not @ Newspapers.com.)]


1892 Jan 5 / Georgia cyclone—Described in the Daily Picayune, N. Orleans, Jan. 7 / “A big, black, funnel-shaped cloud, filled with electric fire, in the center of which was a roaring, seething mass.” [VII; 299. “Wiped Out.” New Orleans Picayune, January 7, 1892, p. 2 c. 3.]


1892 Jan 5 / Reported only from Fayetteville, Ga, in the papers / Chic. Tribune, Jan 7, “'It was like a great canebrake on fire,' says an euewitness, 'but louder and wilder.'” Described as a great black cloud filled with fire and roaring like a cataract. [VII; 340. “Four Persons Killed in a Cyclone.” Chicago Tribune, January 7, 1892, p. 2 c. 6.]


1892 Jan 5 / Sig Aurora / Lyons, N.Y. / (no. 2) / Sc Am 66/292. [VII; 300. Veeder, Major Albert. "The Aurora." Scientific American, n.s., 66 (May 7, 1892): 293.]


1892 Jan 5 / BO / night / Shocks—Italy ([LT] 7-6-a) / Jan 11—shocks—Greece (12-6-a) / Jan 11—Vesuvius active—“fresh stream of lava from” (12-6-a) / Jan 23—disastrous shocks—Italy (25-6-a) / Jan 27—severe shocks—Tasmania and Australia (28-5-a). [VII; 301.[VII; 301. “Earthquake Shocks in Italy.” London Times, 1892: January 7, 1892, p. 6 c. 1. “Earthquakes in Greece.” London Times, January 12, 1892, p. 6 c. 1. “Earthquake Shocks in Italy.” London Times, January 25, 1892, p. 6 c. 1. “Australia.” London Times, January 28, 1892, p. 5 c. 1.]


1892 Jan 5 / Slight shocks in Italy / 6th—Rochester, N.Y. / 11th—Greece / 11th—new streams of lava from Vesuvius / Nature 45-259. [VII; 302. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (January 14, 1892): 257-260, at 259.]


1892 Jan 6 / Polt / Carriglea, Waterford, Ireland / Jour. Soc, 5-227 / a boy. [B; 1209. "The Waterford Ghost." Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 5 (March 1892): 227-228. An investigation by J.W. Haynes concluded that the disturbances were caused by the eldest chld in the family.]


1892 Jan 6 / Italy / around Lake Garda / q. / I / BA '11. [VII; 303. A class I earthquake. Milne, 736.]


1892 Jan. 7 / N.Y. Sun, 3-6 / For a month, home of H.H. Jennings, 211 Main Street, Bridgeport, family terrorized by rappings. A boarder, Miss Minnie Parrott, said had seen a ghost. Detective investigated and she confessed she rapped. Had been ill and had taken morphine. Had felt impelled to rap and had done so at first, for a joke, and then kept up because could not resist the temptation. [B; 1210.1, 1210.2. “Miss Parrott Was the Ghost.” New York Sun, January 7, 1892, p. 3 c. 6.]


1892 Jan 7 / [LT[, 6-a / 25-6-a / q / Italy. [VII; 304. “Earthquake Shocks in Italy.” London Times, 1892: January 7, 1892, p. 6 c. 1. “Earthquake Shocks in Italy.” London Times, January 25, 1892, p. 6 c. 1.]


1892 Jan 8 / Explosion / Chicago Citizen (a weekly) of 16th, tells of mysterious explosion in boiler room of the Warren Springer bilding, corner of Canal and VanBuren streets, Chicago. Four men killed and two other seriously injured. Nobody could tell how the explosion had occurred. / Same issue tells of boiler explosions at Norristown, Pa.; York, Pa; Ottuma, Iowa. [B; 1211.1, 1211.2. (Chicago Citizen, January 16, 1892' not @ Newspapers.com.)]


1892 Jan 8 / Laporte, Ind. / Pub Ledger, March 3, from a letter to the Pittsburg Dispatch / 2 powders, one gray and the other black, and, mixed with them, flakes that looked like sawdust and flakes that looked like scales of mica, or copper fillings. “The black powder appears to be made up of little pear-shaped, bug-like anamalculae. [VII; 305.1, 305.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 3, 1892.)]


1892 Jan 8 / BO / In La Nature 41-206, said that in opinion of M. Huston the analysis indicated volcanic origin. [VII; 306. “Analyse de neige colorée.” La Nature, 1893 pt. 2 (no. 1056; August 26): 206. Somers, A.N. “A Fall of Colored Snow.” Science, 21 (June 2, 1893): 303-304.]


1892 Jan 8 / A powdered substance fell with snow over an extended area in northern Indiana. Said that it approximated very closely to some of the recorded analyses of lava. “It is in all probability of volcanic origin.” / MWR, Jan., p. 21. [VII; 307. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 20 (no. 1; January 1892): 20-21.]


1892 Jan 8 / Science 21-303 / A.N. Somers writes that between 1 and 5 p.m. about one inch of reddish brown snow fell throughout northern half of La Porte Co. Ac to his analysis, not volcanic but plainly terrestrial. [VII; 308. Somers, A.N. "A Fall of Colored Snow." Science, s. 1 v. 21 (June 2, 1893): 303-304.]


1892 Jan 8 / Northern Indiana / Dark colored mineral matter with snow. Said not local origin. Probably of “volcanic origin.” / M.W.R., '92-20. [VII; 309. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 20 (no. 1; January 1892): 20-21.]


1892 Jan 9 / The Galignani Messenger / Mme Bolle, who lived in a small villa at the bottom of a garden in the Rue Ducouëdic, complained to the Commissary of Police of hauntings. Loud raps or shocks—a wardrobe toppled. But it was found that the house was situated over the Catacombs and that some slight depression of the earth had doubtless caused the disturbances. B: 1207.1, 1207.2. "Paris and Provinces." Galignani's Messenger, January 9, 1892, p. 3 c. 1-2.]


1892 Jan 9 / Religio-Phil. Jour, p. 520 / At Caldwell, Texas, Fannie Bremer—clairvoyance and trances. [B; 1212. "A Texas Miss Puzzles the Doctors." Religio-Philosophical Journal, n.s., 2 (no. 33; January 9, 1892): 520.]


1892 Jan 9 to 21 / The great sunspot / See back, Dec 12. / See up, Feb 5. [VII; 310. See: 1891 Nov. 15, (VII; 225); 1891 Dec 12, (VII; 236); 1892 Feb 5, (VII: 369 & 373); 1892 Feb 5, Feb 10, and Jan 21, (VII; 371); and, 1892 Feb, (VII; 374).]


[1892 Jan 9 /] 1892 / 1st week in Feb. / Meteorite fell in Alabama and ploughed a furrow in a field several feet deep. / Phil Pub Ledger 13-7-9. [VII; 370. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 13, 1892, p. 7 c. 9.) (“The Earth Shook.” Atlanta Constitution, January 13, 1892, p. 1. Provides date as previous Saturday night and names of hunters, Tom Burgess and John Jones, in Gadsden, Alabama.) (“Freak of a Meteor.” Pittsburg Dispatch, January 16, 1892, p. 4 c. 4.) (“Antics of a Meteor.” Cleburne New Era, (Alabama), January 16, 1892; @ Newspapers.com. “Early Saturday night many residents of Heflin were started by what appeared to be an earthquake shock accompanied by a heavy dull report. There was no after clap and nothing more was thought of the matter until reports were received from other parts of northern Alabama. The general belief was not an earthquake had occurred or a magazine had exploded. The true cause was established by Job Burgess and Tom Jones who were hunting near Gadsden. They say about 8 o'clock the heavens were illuminated by a bright and ghastly light and looking up they saw a large ball of fire up in the air approaching them at a swift space. It seemed about twice as large as a man's head and at almost a white heat. As it passed within a few yards of them it made a loud, whizzing noise and they felt the heat from it very sensibly. It approached nearer and nearer the ground until it passed out of sight. In a few seconds they heard the tremendous report which shook the whole country for miles around and created great consternation among the people. They were too badly frightened to follow it up Saturday night but early Sunday morning they went to the place where they last saw it and soon found where the meteor had struck the earth and plowed a furrow about as large as a flour barrel and three or four feet deep, and then came out of the ground and struck a large pine tree squarely about six feet from the ground, shivering the tree when it exploded, scattering its fragments in all directions, cutting down the small growth and tearing up the ground. A few pieces of the matter they found did not look like anything they had ever seen, and smelt strongly of burning sulphur.”)]


1892 Jan 10 (?) / (See Dec.) / Peterborough Advertiser of Jan 9—Home of Mr and Mrs Rimes, 22 Mayor's Walk, Ab. August, 1891, they had moved into the house, having come from Crowland, where they were inn-keepers. The first phe about last of Oct., 1891. Had 3 sons—one, named Arthur, called his mother, at night, saying something was [End of sentence.] A night later, 2 younger children in the bed with her, awakened her, crying that someone had pulled the bed clothes from them. Then her brother told her that something had so treated him. Noises were heard. A humming noise followed by loud crashes. No one could sleep. Her brother's name was Want. Reporter writes that the crashes were as audible to the next-door neighbors, the Butlers and the Goodes, as to the Rimes—sounds "like the explosion of a great gun, and shaking of the house and everything in it". Early in Jan, the Rimes moved to another house, in Monument street. There was a lodger, named Wright, who told of "dreadful banging". Another lodger, named Easy. / But Wright slept in the house, having been asked to investigate. His statement. He told of sounds like sacks of coal toppled down a flight of stairs. Nothing ghostly had been seen. / Owner of house was Mr. Rands, of Wisbech. After the Rimes left, no other phe. Interviews of neighbors published—sounds as if a giant were tearing up furniture—their houses shaken by sounds that seemed explosive. / Had been no phe before the Rimes went there. [B; 1213.1 to 1213.8. (Peterborough Advertiser, January 9, 1892.; this date not at BNA.)]


1892 Jan 10 / Polt Sounds / B. Eagle, 2-3 / Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Siggons move out of house at 420 Dean Street, Brooklyn—Siggons a policeman on night duty. Sounds in the house, nights—groaning sounds—icy hand on a sleeper's face. / Boy in family and been sick, whether fear or not. / Said been sounds before Sigs. moved in. [B; 1214.1, 1214.2. “Ghosts in Dean Street.” Brooklyn Eagle, January 10, 1892, p. 2 c. 3.]


1892 Jan 11 / (Celeste) / 150 miles west of Bermuda, the Nova Scotian bark, Hutchings Brothers, passed by the Italian bark, Columbo D., "drifting aimlessly like a phantom ship x x not a soul aboard".—No evidence to be seen of mishap. She had left Pernambuco on Dec 10, bound for N.Y. Had signalled because of erratic way sailing, but no response. Drew close and sailed around and around—could think of no reason why the vessel be so abandoned (Capt. Vigilani). / World, Jan 20-1-5, 1892 / Said 28-1-3—said that crew had been in Halifax since 22nd—abandoned vessel because leaked. [B; 1215.1, 1215.2, 1215.3. (New York World, January 20, 1892, p. 1 c. 5; not found here.) (New York World, January 28, 1892, p. 1 c. 3; not found here.) “A Whole Crew Destroyed.” Pittsburg Dispatch, January 20, 1892, p. 7 c. 5-6. “With all sails set and abandoned,” the speculation in this article was that the entire crew of the Hutchings Brothers had died from yellow fever.]


1892 Jan 11 / A fresh stream of lava from Vesuvius / Nature 45-258. [VII; 311. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (January 14, 1892): 257-260, at 259.]


[1892 Jan 11. Wrong date. See: 1892 Jan. 3, (VII; 312).]


1892 Jan 12 / P. Ledger of / Residents of Cole Harbor, N.S., are excited over a strange animal that has appeared in the woods there. It is about 7 feet in height and is said to look like a gorilla. [B; 1216. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 12, 1892.) “Looks Like a Gorilla.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, January 11, 1892, p. 5 c. 2.]


1892 Jan 13 / Animals / The two California pumas that had been playing havoc among cattle had been shot near Leipsic, Ohio. The carcasses were taken to Cincinnati. / (Jan 13) / San F. Chronicle 15-1-2. [B; 1217.1, 1217.2, “Killed At Last.” San Francisco Chronicle, January 15, 1892, p. 1 c. 2.]


1892 Jan 13 and ab a month before / Orange Free State / Blomfontein Express—copied in Med. and Dayb., March 11, 1892—in homes of 2 brothers named Smit, of Witkop District, Bethlehem, O.F. State. The houses bombarded by invisible agency. Almost all glass and crockery broken. Night and day. Grown-up persons could see nothing, but children said they could, and described "a black human figure with two heads, one like a man's and one like a dog's, and long out-stretched hands. The father gave a boy a knife and cried, "Stab him in the mouth." "The child did so, and the knife and the child's hand were full of slime." As to this savagery, said that the Smits were in a frenzy from the persecution. [B; 1218.1, 1218.2, 1218.3,1218.4. (Blomfontein Express, ca. Dec-Jan, 1892.) (Medium and Daybreak, March 11, 1892.)]


1892 Jan 14-15 / N.Y. Sun 17-2-3 / John Carson, a lawyer, known to have been drunk, found dead. Stabbed to death. No weapon found. Attributed to the "slasher". [B; 1219. “Carson's Strange Death.” New York Sun, January 17, 1892, p. 2 c. 3. Carson's throat had been cut. “The fact that there is no blood on his clothing except in the back indicates that he was lying on his back when the wound was made, and that he did not move afterward. But without moving he could not have made the wound himself.”]


1892 Jan 14 / BO / Tidal wave in Atlantic—near N.Y, / Galignani Messenger, 17th. [VII; 313. "A Tidal Wave Nearly Swamps a Steamer." Galignani's Messenger, January 17, 1892. p. 1 c. 5.]


1892 Jan 14 ./ BO / 2 a.m. / Shock—Memphis, Tenn. / S Francisco Chronicle 14-1. [VII; 314. “Earthquake at Memphis.” San Francisco Chronicle, January 14, 1892, p. 1 c. 7.]


1892 Jan 14 / ½ inch snow fell, in Mobile, Alabama. 1st fall in 5 years, and 5th in 70 years. / N.Y. Sun 21-6-7. [VII; 315. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, January 21, 1892, p. 6 c. 7.]


1892 Jan 14 / 2:30 a.m. / Jackson, Tenn / shock followed by a “fearful roaring”. / D. Picayune 15-4-4. [VII; 316. “Earthquake Shocks.” New Orleans Picayune, January 15, 1892, p. 4 c. 4.]


1892 Jan 15, about / Began volcanic activity in Tongariro, New Zealand—violent eruption Feb. 7. / Melb, Argus, 9th. [VII; 317. “Volcanic Eruption in New Zealand.” Melbourne Argus, February 9, 1892, p. 5 c. 5. The Tongariro volcano.]


1892 Jan 16 / N.Y. Sun, 1-6 / Floods in New Hampshire. [VII; 318. “In Peril From Floods.” New York Sun, January 16, 1892, p. 1 c. 6.]


1892 Jan 15-16-17 / BO / night / More qs in Japan / North China Herald, 29th. [VII; 319. (North China Herald, January 29, 1892.)]


1892 Jan 17 / (+) / mirage / afternoon / Lewiston, Montana / Mirage as if of party of hunters and Indians alternating charging and retreating. Indians superior in numbers and capturing the hunters, piling faggots and burning them at stake. “So far as could be ascertained last night, the Indians on the reservations are peaceable.” / Eagle 18-4-7. [VII; 320.1, 320.2. “Saw the Fight in the Air.” Brooklyn Eagle, January 18, 1892, p. 4 c. 7.]


1892 Jan 18 / At Traverse City, Mich, ab 8 p.m. water of Late Mich recede and then rush back. / Eagle 20-4-5. [VII; 321. “Phenomenon on Lake Michigan.” Brooklyn Eagle, January 20, 1892, p. 4 c. 5. “A few minutes before 8 o'clock the wells at the water works and the electric plants gave out simultaneously. Upon investigation the lake shore was found entirely bare for fully one hundred feet from its usual line. Steamboat docks were high and dry on the sandy beach and the waters had fallen just six and a half feet, as though an earthquake shock or great tidal wave had swept them from the bay. For fully an hour the city was in total darkness, and many townspeople assembled at the beach and upon the docks to view the curious freaks of the waves. The water rushed back with terrific force, and as in a mighty wave, as rapidly as they must have disappeared.”]


1892 Jan 18 / 2 explosions / morning. / new Cattletsburg, Ky. / Terrific powder mill explosion / S.F. Chron. 19-1-7 / Terrific explosion this morning of natural gas near Lancaster, Ohio. [VII; 322. “Two Big Explosions.” San Francisco Chronicle, January 19, 1892, p. 1 c. 7.]


1892 Jan 19 / Trib, 1-3 / Powder mill / Central City, W. Va. [VII; 323. "Blown Up by a Powder Mill." New York Tribune, January 19, 1892, p. 1 c. 3.]


1892 Jan 20 / A drought of 4 years broken in Durango, Mexico. / Jan 23-1-6, NY Sun. [VII; 324. “First Rain in Four Years.” New York Sun, January 23, 1892, p. 1 c. 7.]


1892 Jan 21 / Feb 5 / Feb 10 / Sunspots visible to n.e. / Pop Astro 1-287. [VII; 325. “Remarkable Sun Spots.” Popular Astronomy, 1 (no. 6; February 1894): 287.  See: 1891 Nov. 15, (VII; 225); 1891 Dec 12, (VII; 236); 1892 Jan 9 to 21, (VII; 310); 1892 Feb 5, (VII: 369 & 373); and, 1892 Feb, (VII; 374).] ]


1892 Jan. 22 / Severe shocks / Rome / Nature 45-304. [VII; 326. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (January 28, 1892): 302-307, at 304.]


1892 Jan 22 / P. Ledger, 27th / At Haverhill, Mass., a balloon-like mass of yellow fire came to rear of a drug store in Winter street and exploded. No substance found. [VII; 327. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 27, 1892; not @ Newspapers.com.)]


1892 Jan 22 / (It) / q and phe / See 1805. [VII; 328.  Refer to: 1805 July 26, (I; 146). Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 395-397.]


1892 Jan 23 / BO / 1 a.m. / Shocks / Sicily / Gal. Mess, 24th. [VII; 329. (Galignani Messenger, January 24, 1892; not found here, quake in Rome and Catania, only.)]


1892 Jan 24 / 2 a.m. / Le Mans, France / Shocks / Nature 45-304. [VII; 330. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (January 28, 1892): 302-307, at 304.]


1892 Jan 24 / 2:15 p.m. / Worcester, Cape Colony. Thunderous report in a clear sky—thought been meteoric. / Cape Argus, Feb. 1 / Meteor said been seen, The meteor was seen at Cape Town, visible ab 6 seconds—Argus of 2nd. / 3 other cors in Argus, 4th, saw it at Cape Town, Heard, but not so loud as at Worcester. [VII; 331.1, 331.2. (Cape Argus, February 2, 1892.) (Cape Argus, February 4, 1892; at OKQ microfilm.)]


1892 [Jan 26] / (Sky fire) / Berlin, (Jan 26), 1892 / Roys light in the sky. Persons thought been a fire―Emperor telephoned to central fire brigade station to inquire. / Nature 45/324. [VII; 332. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (February 4, 1892): 322-325, at 324.]


1892 Jan 26 / Dr. Anderson almost certain that he had seen N.A. back to 26th. / Nature 45/365. [VII; 333. Anderson, Thomas David. “The New Star in Auriga.” Nature, 45 (February 18, 1892): 365.]


1892 Jan 27 / 2:47 a.m. / Severest shock ever known in Tasmania. Sharp shocks Victoria, Australia. / Melb Argus, 28th. [VII; 334. “Earthquake in Victoria and Tasmania.” Melbourne Argus, January 28, 1892, p. 5 c. 6.]


1892 Jan 28 / [LT], 5-a / q / Tasmania and Victoria. [VII; 335. “Australia.” London Times, January 28, 1892, p. 5 c. 1.]


1892 Jan 29 / Trib, 7-4 / Honey Brook, Pa. / Explosion. [VII; 336. "Terrible Explosion of Dynamite." New York Tribune, January 29, 1892, p. 7 c. 4.]


1892 Jan 30 / Ext. luminous cloud / Yorkshire / Nature 45/365 / 46/127. [VII; 341. Backhouse, Thomas William. “Nacreous Clouds.” Nature, 45, (February 18, 1892): 365. Clark, J. Edmund. “The Height of the Nacreous Cloud of January 30.” Nature, 46 (June 9, 1892): 127.]


1892 Jan 31 / N.Y. Sun, 24-7 / Plague of mice in Scotland. [VII; 337. “Overrun by Mice.” New York Sun, January 31, 1892, p. 24 c. 7.]


1892 Jan 31 / (Venus) / 6 p.m. / By M. [Albert] Rengel, Lyons, a great black, triangular spot on Venus, and near it a smaller and indeterminate shape. / L Astro XI/429. [VII; 338. "Tache sombre sur le disque de Vénus." Astronomie, 11 (1892): 429.]


1892 Jan 31 / morning / Dr. A discovered N. Aur. / See Feb. 1. [VII; 339. See: 1892 Feb 1, (VII; 342).]


1892 Feb. 1 / Nov. A / In Nature 45-365, Dr. Anderson writes that his knowledge of astronomical technicalities was of the “meagrest description” and that on morning of 31st when discovered N.A., he had only a small pocket telescope. [VII; 342. Anderson, Thomas David. “The New Star in Auriga.” Nature, 45 (February 18, 1892): 365. “...All the means at my disposal on the morning of the 31st ult., when I made sure that a strange body was present in the sky, were Klein's 'Star Atlas,' and a small pocket telescope which magnifies ten times.”]


1892 Feb 1 / New star in Auriga / See Jan 31, 1891. [VII; 343. See: 1891 Jan 31, (VII: 66 & 67).]


1892 Feb / The nova and phe / See month March, 1898. [VII; 344. See: 1898 March, (VIII; 221).]


1892 Feb 1 / Nov Aurig / RA —5-25-4 / Dec +30° -21 /  (See Ap 10, 1892.) [VII; 345. See: 1892 Ap 10, (VII; 453).]


1892 Feb 1 / Young's Manual, p. 525 / traced to Dec., 1891 / Nova Aurigae / or Jan 24 / Nature 45/365 / (Cut). [VII; 346. Young, Charles Augustus. Manual of Astronomy. Boston: Ginn, 1902, 525. Anderson, Thomas David. “The New Star in Auriga.” Nature, 45 (February 18, 1892): 365.]


1892 Feb. 1 / See March 21. / See Jan 8—dust. [VII; 347. See: 1892 Jan 8, (VII: 305 to 309), and 1892 March 21, (VII; 432).]


1892 Feb 1 (?) / Nova Aurigae discovered. / ab 5th mag / See phe, Dec 9, 1892. [VII; 348. (Refs.???) See: 1892 Dec 9, (VII: 791, 792, & 793).]


1892 Feb 1 / Nova Aurig. / See Jan 31, 1891. / See Nov. 19, 1891. / Observatory / Holden. [VII; 349. "The New Star in Auriga." Observatory, 15 (1892): 136-143. See: 1891 Jan 31, (VII: 66 & 67), and, 1891 Nov. 19, (VII: 227 & 228).]


1892 Feb 1 / det met / Phoenix, Arizona / meteor with a roaring noise / Pubs A. Soc Pac. 4/82. [VII; 350. “A Bright Meteor.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 4 (no. 22; March 1892): 82.]


1892 Feb 1 / On Dec 8, 1891, Dr. Max Wolfe, of Heidelberg, had taken a photo of the region, showing stars down to 9th mag—48 hours later in this blank space a bright star of 5th mag. / Observatory 15-335. [VII; 351. Clerke, Agnes Mary. “Nova Aurigæ.” Observatory, 15, (1892): 334-339, at 335.]


1892 Feb 1 / (Comets of 1892) / (Observatory 15-190) / March 18, Comet b, 1892 (by Denning) in Cephus 22h 42[m]; +59°—moving toward Cassiopeia (rest n.g.) / 1888 March 6 / Tarth dated [March 6] / b. snow had fallen / Cosmos, N.S., 9-423. [VII; 352. Denning, William Frederick. "Discovery of Comet b, 1892." Observatory, 15 (1892): 190. Pezous. “Neige noire." Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 9 (March 17, 1888): 423.]


1892 Feb 1 / “The Genesis of N. Aurigae” / Nature, May 4, 1893. [VII; 353. Gregory, Richard Arman. “The Genesis of Nova Aurigæ.” Nature, 48 (May 4, 1893): 6-8.]


1892 Feb 1 / Maximum was Dec 20. / = 4.4 mag. [VII; 354. (Refs.???)]


1892 Feb 1 / N. Aurigae / Dr. Vogel's calculation that the star moving away from the earth at rate of 300 miles a second. / E. Mec. 55-56. [VII; 355. "Scientific News." English Mechanic, 55 (no. 1407; March 11, 1892): 56. Clerke, Agnes Mary. “Nova Aurigæ.” Observatory, 15, (1892): 334-339, at 335. "All, however, that could be terrestrially identified proved to be displaced from their normal positionsthe bright lines towards the red, their dark companions, to a still greater extend towards the blue. Evidently, then, two oppositely moving bodies were concerned in producing a compound spectrum, the gaseous section of which testified to a recession from the earth of about 230 miles a second, while the juxtaposed absoprtion-rays crossed the otherwise continuous spectrum of a mass advancing with the exceptional, thought not altogether unprecedented, swiftness of 320 miles per second. Thus, a telescopically single star was resolved, by the analysis of its light, into two physically unlike, though chemically similar, components, accomplishing a daily journey of separation extending over close upon fifty millions miles! Possibly even a good deal more. Spectroscopic estimates of motion are always minimum values. They take into account only that portion of velocity directed along the visual rayl they necessarily neglect the portion directed across it. We are, however, in absolute ignorance as to how much of the speed of Nova  Aurigæ was thus directed. All that can be said is that the chances are enormously against the whole of it having been measured on the Potsdam and Tulse Hill negatives."

Walker, Merle F. "Nova T Aurigae 1891: A New Short-Period Eclipsing Binary." Astrophysical Journal, 138 (1963): 313-319. Walker would identify Nova Aurigæ 1891 as an eclipsing binary. McKenna-Lawlor, Susan M.P. Whatever Shines Should Be Observed. Springer, 2013, 93. William and Margaret Huggins, at Tulse Hill, would "correctly interpret the blue shifted line spectrum of Nova Aurigae as 'emitted from the sta's outwardly exploding envelope'"; thus, this part of their spectrum would measure the expansion of the nebular envelope away from these stars, rather than the motion of the stars away from the Earth.]


1892 Feb. 1 / Nov. A. / Aurigids are Nov. 28-Dec 9. [VII; 356. Denning, William Frederick. "General Catalogue of the Radiant Points of Meteor Showers and of Fireballs and Shooting Stars observed at more than one Station." Memoirs of the Royal Astronomical Society, 53 (1896-1899): 203-292, at 243. Denning identifies these dates for the α Aurigids, (in the north), but these dates are now associated with the December Phoenicids, (in the south).]


1892 Feb. / Theory of No. Aurigae / Nature 48/6. [VII; 357. Gregory, Richard Arman. “The Genesis of Nova Aurigæ.” Nature, 48 (May 4, 1893): 6-8.]


1892 Feb / New star and sunspots and auroras. [VII; 358.]


1892 Feb 1 / See following Dec for Aurigids. [VII; 359. See: 1892 Dec 9, (VII; 791).]


1892 Feb. 3 / Portland, Oregon / 8:30 p.m. / severe shock / N.Y. Sun 5-2-4. [VII; 360. “Earthquakes in the West.” New York Sun, February 5, 1892, p. 2 c. 4.]


1892 Feb. 3-4 / night / Hurricane / Madrid, Spain / N.Y. Sun 5-5-5. [VII; 361. “A Hurricane at Madrid.” New York Sun, February 5, 1892, p. 5 c. 5.]


1892 Feb. 3 / [LT], 8-d / 4-10-b / 5-6-? / 6-6-d / 8-10-e / Nova. Aur. [VII; 362. “New Star in the Milky Way.” London Times, February 3, 1892, p. 8 c. 4. “The New Star in Auriga.” London Times, February 4, 1892, p. 10 c. 2. “The New Star in Auriga.” London Times, February 6, 1892, p. 6 c. 4. “The New Star in Auriga.” London Times, February 8, 1892, p. 10 c. 3-4.]


1892 Feb / Sig Aurora / Lyons, N.Y. / Sc Am 66/292. [VII; 363. Veeder, Major Albert. "The Aurora." Scientific American, n.s., 66 (May 7, 1892): 293.]


1892 Feb. 3 / 10:30 p.m. / Slight shock / Omaha / S. Fran Chronicle 4-1-6. [VII; 364. “The Unsteady East.” San Francisco Chronicle, February 4, 1892, p. 1 c. 7.]


1892 Feb. 3 / 8:30 p.m. / Portland / Me. (?) / q, Portland / World 4-1-5. [VII; 365. (New York World, February 4, 1892, p. 1 c. 5.; not found here.) “An Earthquake in Oregon.” New York Tribune, February 4, 1892, p. 2 c. 5.]


1892 Feb 3 / 8:30 p.m. / Shock in Portland, Ore. Probably the severest ever felt there. / S.F. Chronicle 4-3-1. [VII; 366. “Oregon Cities Shake.” San Francisco Chronicle, February 4, 1892, p. 3 c. 1.]


1892 Feb 3 / Trib, 1-3 / Explosion / Newark, N.J. [VII; 367. "Killed by an Explosion." New York Tribune, February 3, 1892, p. 1 c. 3.]


1892 Feb / Unknown fish / Aug 8, 1888. [VII; 368. See: 1888 July 30, (VI; 1420).]


1892 Feb 4 / early morning / A slasher—was seen. / World 4-7-3. [B; 1220. (New York World, February 4, 1892, p. 7 c. 3; not found here.)]


1892 Jan 27 ./ N.Y. Sun, 7-5 / A slasher attempt to cut man in Lowell, Mass. Failed and ran, but was caught. [B; 1221. “At Large and Dangerous.” New York Sun, January 27, 1892, p. 7 c. 5.]


1892 Jan 14 / N.Y. Sun, 1-2 / Since Dec 29, 5 men had reported having been stabbed by someone. [B; 1222. “Is There a Slasher?” New York Sun, January 14, 1892, p. 1 c. 2.]


1891 Dec 29 / (+) / See Feb 4, 1892. / morning / Slasher / N.Y. / World, 1892, Jan 16-1-3, 1-1 / and on Jan. 9 and Jan 15 / all drunked men / (by assailant who "marvellously disappear"—17-6-1) / (Slashed caught—18-1-7) / (Another not caught—26-1-6). [B; 1223. (New York World, January 16, 1892, p. 1 c. 1 & 3.) (New York World, January 17, 1892, p. 6 c. 1.)  “Carson's Slayer.” New York Evening World, January 18, 1892, p. 1 c. 5-7. (New York World, January 26, 1892, p. 1 c. 6.) See: 1892 Feb 4, (B; 1220).]


1892 Jan 18 / Slashed and Hallucination / Drunken men slashed, Brooklyn, Jan, 1892. At same time girl had was said be hallucination of a slasher—after man arrested for the slashing. / B Eagle, Jan 18 1892/6/1, 4 / Indexes for slasher Dowd. [B; 1224. “The Slasher.” Brooklyn Eagle, January 18, 1892, p. 6 c. 1. “Was It Fancy?” Brooklyn Eagle, January 18, 1892, p. 6 c. 4.]


1892 Jan 17 / early morning / Henry G. Dowd, slashed, captured. Said he had cut with a knife only the one man who quarrel with him. Policeman who arrested him said had caught him in the act of slashing a drunken man. [B; 1225. “The Slasher.” Brooklyn Eagle, January 18, 1892, p. 6 c. 1.]


1892 Jan. 17 / N.Y. Sun 21-1-6 / Dowd was arrested 3:40 a.m., corner of Batavia and James streets. 20 minutes before, in Cherry street, a policeman had caught a man, who had seized a baker and was about to slash him. Was arrested with knife drawn. / Nothing of this case in papers till 21st. This man's name John Ahearn. But policeman of other arrest had been made a roundsman. / Said that Ahearn and Dowd were acquainted. [B; 1226.1, 1226.2. “Was He the Slasher's Partner?” New York Sun, January 21, 1892, p. 1 c. 6. (Ref.??? for Policeman Dugan being made a “roundsman.”)]


1892 Jan / Dowd pleaded not guilty. / His lawyer then pleaded not guilty but insane. / Was declared insane. [B; 1227. (Refs.???)]


1892 Jan 29 / Dowd committed to insane asylum for criminals, at Auburn. NY Times 30-9-6. [B; 1228. “Jack the Slasher.” New York Times, January 30, 1892, p. 9 c. 6.]


1892 Jan 15, ab / Began polt phe which continued in home of George Hodgton, of Palmyra, Maine. Centering about his little daughter, Flora. / Argus (Portland, Me.), March 17—copied in Med and Dayb of Ap 15. [B; 1229. (Medium and Daybreak, April 15, 1892.) (Portland Argus, Maine, ca.  January 15, 1892.) See: 1892 Feb., March, (B; 1241).]


1892 Jan 16 / Religio-Phil Jour, p. 529 / Girl in Dexter, Maine, blindfolded but describe objects in a picture by running a finger over. [B; 1230. "Topics of the Times." Religio-Philosophical Journal, n.s., 2 (no. 34; January 16, 1892): 529. "Almost Sees with Her Fingers." Portland Daily Press, (Maine), January 18, 1892, p. 6 c. 4.]


1892 Jan 16 / Brooklyn / Woman thought man in her room. Hallucination? / Eagle 18-6-4. [B; 1231. “Was It Fancy?” Brooklyn Eagle, January 18, 1892, p. 6 c. 4.]


1892 Jan. 17 / Dowd / See the 4 Johnstown murders. / N.Y. Times, Feb. 4-8-2. [B; 1232. “Mysterious Murders.” New York Times, February 4, 1892, p. 8 c. 2. See: 1892 Feb. 4, (B: 1251, 1253, & 1254).]


1892 Jan 19 / See Jan. 29. [B; 1233. See: (1892 Jan 29).]


1892 Jan 19 / B. Eagle, 4-7 / At the Retreat Poor House, near Wilkesbarre, Pa., was a Pole, John Mica, who had been asleep 13 months. Occasionally opened eyes and took a little nourishment. [B; 1234. “Asleep for Thirteen Months.” Brooklyn Eagle, January 19, 1892, p. 4 c. 7.]


1892 Jan 19 / (witch) / Religio-Phil Jour, May 28-7-3 / George Markert, near village of Jefferson, N.Y., murdered. Adam Heidt and son arrested and charged. Heidt said that M. had bewitched him—sickened when M touched him. [B; 1235. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, May 28, 1892, p. 7 c. 3; not online.)]


1892 Jan 22 / Pub Ledger of / Ghosts at Mitchell and at Tipton, Ind. [B; 1236. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 22, 1892.)]


1892 Jan 26 / Belfast Telegraph of, copied in Med. and Dayb., Feb. 5. / In Ballytricking, a pensioner of Royal Irish Constabulary, named Kingworth, was with his family, occupying a house from which former residents had been evicted. Unearthly sounds and furniture dashed about by an invisible agency. After a while K. fled to Waterford. Here ac to him and neighbors phe followed—furniture smashed and a voice was heard. [B; 1237.1, 1237.2. (Medium and Daybreak, February 5, 1892.) "Alleged Supernatural Manifestations." Belfast Telegraph, January 27, 1892, p. 3 c. 4. "Curious Occurrence in Waterford." Irish Times, (Dublin), January 26, 1892, p. 5 c. 5.]


1892 Jan 26 / N.Y. Sun, 11-3 / George Markert, near Callicoon station, near village of Jefferson, Sullivan Co., murdered. Thought by neighbors who had accused him of sorcery. [B; 1238. “Suspected of Black Art.” New York Sun, January 26, 1892, p. 11 c. 3. (“Tried for Murder.” Middleton Times-Press, August 17, 1892, p. 3 c. 4-6.)]


[1892 Jan 27 /] 1892 Feb 4 / Strange Worms / Daily Picayune of , 4-4 / That ac to a cor. to the Bureau of Statistics at Liberty, Ind, a shower of unknown worms had fallen at Clifton, a few days before—“Nothing like them had ever been seen in that part of the country.” “They were about an inch in length, of a dark brown color and had six legs, which were well to the front of the body, the body being as large around as a ten-penny nail.” They fell in great numbers—“covered an area of five miles.” [VII: 394.1, 394.2, 394.3. “It Rained Worms.” New Orleans Picayune, February 4, 1892, p. 4 c. 4. “Shower of Worms.” Evening Republican, (Columbus, Indiana), February 1, 1892, p. 1 c. 5. The shower occurred on January 27, 1892.]


1892 Jan 29 / N.Y. Times, 5-2 / Near Bridgeport, Conn., at Fairfield, 5 incendiary fires in 2 weeks. [B; 1239. “Incendiaries in Fairfield.” New York Times, January 29, 1892, p. 5 c. 2.]


1892 Jan 29 / 7 a.m. / World 4-8-7 / Lat 44.50 / Long 43.46 / N. Atlantic / White Star Rumic passed the vessel Florida—which had sailed from Pascagoula to Derdrecht on Dec 21. Jan 8, at Havana and reported a mutiny on board. 2 mutineers put in irons in the vessel. "The vessel appeared to the Rumic officers to be seaworthy, and there was no apparent reason why she should have been deserted, even had the crew mutineed. / See 5-9-8. / Plassy arrives, Capt says in Jan 30, 8 a.m., he passed a tramp steamship with a yellow funnel lying alongside a full-rigged ship—appearing to be taking her people off—could not have been the Florida which was seen abandoned the day before. Details of obs from the Rumic. [B; 1240.1, 1240.2, 1240.3. (New York World, February 4, 1892, p. 8 c. 7.)]


1892 Feb., March / Polt / Palmyra, Maine / Polt raps and throwing things about / Sun 21-2-6. [B; 1241. “A Lively Spook in Maine.” New York Sun, March 21, 1892, p. 2 c. 6. “A Frolicsome Ghost.” Portland Daily Press, (Maine), March 18, 1892, p. 2 c. 3.]


1892 Feb. / Wild dogs—case before / Feb. 24-1-8 in World. [B; 1242. (New York World, February 24, 1892, p. 1 c. 8.)]


1892 / ab Feb 1 / Huntington, L.I. / ghst carrying a blue light / Eagle, Feb 8-6-2. [B; 1243. “Shooting at His Wife's Ghost.” Brooklyn Eagle, February 8, 1892, p. 6 c. 2.]


1892 Feb 1, ab / Sailor at sea making assaults / World, Ap 24-5-3 / on the Comet. [B; 1244. “A Bad Man at Sea.” New York World, April 24, 1892, p. 5 c. 3.]


1892 Feb. 3 / Lum obj / Brandon, Norfolk / under Lum Objs. [B; 1245. See: Luminous phe / 1892 / Feb 3, (SF-IV; 79).]


1892 Feb. 4 / Buried—drowned / Trance? / N.Y. Sun, 1-6 / Frances Burke of Dunkirk, N.Y., thought been buried alive in a trance. Relatives so sure of it, body exhumed—coffin full of water. Coroner's belief she was buried alive and drowned in her coffin. [B; 1246. “Was She Buried Alive?” New York Sun, February 4, 1892, p. 1 c. 6.]


1892 Feb. 4 / As if buried alive and in suicidal stress teleported water and drowned herself. [B; 1247.]


1892 Feb. 4 / See Birmingham Murders, Dec 17, 1888. [B; 1248. See: 1888 Dec 17, (B: 984, 985, 986, & 987).]


1892 Feb 4 / NY Times, 8-2 / 5-1-6 / The Florida / 28-8-6. [B; 1249. “Going Her Own Gait.” New York Times, February 4, 1892, p. 8 c. 2. “The Florida's Crew Safe.” New York Times, February 5, 1892, p. 1 c. 6. (New York Times, February 28, 1892, p. 8 c. 6; not found here.)]


1892 Feb. 4 / Reading / Myst disaps at Reading. / NY World, Ap. 17-18-3. [B; 1250. “Where Are These Missing People?” New York World, April 17, 1892, p. 18 c. 3.]


1892 Feb. 4 / Phil Pub Ledger of, 5-8 / "mysterious murders near Johnstown, Pa., within a radius of 12 miles, exciting the people. On Dec 4, 1891, body of a well-dressed man found in woods, with bullet hole in his head, no clue as to his identity. A week later, body found, hole in head, said identified as body of Geo. Meyers, who had disappeared from town of Frugately. Ab. last of Jan, body of another well-dressed man who could not be identified. A few nights later, an old couple named Kring were butchered and their bodies burned by unknown. [B; 1251.1, 1251.2, 1251.3. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 4, 1892, p. 5 c. 8.)]


1892 Feb 6 / World, 1-8 / (H H). [B; 1252. (New York World, February 6, 1892, p. 1 c. 8.)]


1892 Feb 4 / World, 7-4 / Five Myst. Murders / Johnstown, Pa / See Ap. 17. / See Dec 17, 1888. [B; 1253. (New York World, February 4, 1892, p. 7 c. 4.) See: 1892 Ap. 17, (B; 1293).]


1892 Feb. 4 / P. Ledger of—5 myst murders since Dec 4 in vicinity of Johnstown, Pa. 2 of the bodies not identified. / See Ap. 17. [B; 1254. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 4, 1892.)]


1892 Feb 5 / Fourth appearance of the great sunspot. See back, Jan 9. 5 times as large as Jan 9. Increased to 13th and then diminished, returning very much reduced on March 4th. / Knowledge 15-69. [VII; 369. Maunder, Edward Walter. “The Great Sunspot and Its Influence.” Knowledge, o.s., 15 (n.s., 7; April 1 & May 2, 1892): 68-70 & 89-93, at 69.  See: 1891 Nov. 15, (VII; 225); 1891 Dec 12, (VII; 236); 1892 Jan 9 to 21, (VII; 310); 1892 Feb 5, (VII; 373); 1892 Feb 5, Feb 10, and Jan 21, (VII; 371); and, 1892 Feb, (VII; 374).] ]


1892 Feb 5, Feb 10, and Jan 21 / Sunspots visible to n.e. / Pop. Astro 1-287. [VII; 371. “Remarkable Sun Spots.” Popular Astronomy, 1 (no. 6; February 1894): 287.]


1892 Feb 5 / Largest sunspot that had been photographed at Greenwich / Clerke, Hist Astro, appendix. [VII; 373. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 4th ed., (1902), 456.]


1892 Feb / Great (sun)spot-group survived through 5 complete rotations. / Clerke, Hist Astro, p. 161 / Monthly Notices 52-354. [VII; 374. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 4th ed., (1902), 160-161. "On the Large Sun-spot of 1892 February 5–18, and the Associated Magnetic Disturbance." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 52 (March 1892): 354-357.]


1892 Feb 6 / N.Y. Times, 1-4 / The Delaware hiccoughs. [B; 1255. “Victims of Hiccoughs.” New York Times, February 6, 1892, p. 1 c. 4.]


[1892 Feb 6 /] 1891 Feb 6 / or (1892?) / Venus and Jupiter / Conj / Trib 7-1-5. [VII; 70. "Venus and Jupiter Together." New York Tribune, February 7, 1892, p. 1 c. 3.]


1892 Feb. 6 / 5 a.m. / Conj. Jupiter, Venus. [VII; 372.  "Venus and Jupiter Together." New York Tribune, February 7, 1892, p. 1 c. 3. “A few minutes before 5 o'clock,” in New York. Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1892, 472. On February 5, 1892.]


1892 Feb. 6 / q. / Nicaragua / Nature 45-471. [VII; 375. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (March 17, 1892): 470-472, at 471.]


1892 Feb. 7 / 4 p.m. / Wood Co., Ohio / Tornado / 8-1-4, N.Y. Times. [VII; 376. “A Tornado in Ohio.” New York Times, February 8, 1892, p. 1 c. 4.]


1892 Feb. 7 / Violent eruption / N. Zealand / See Jan 15. [VII; 377. See: 1892 Jan 15, (VII; 317).]


[1892 / 1st week in Feb. Wrong date. See: 1892 Jan 9, (VII; 370).]


1892 Feb 8 / (BO) / N.Y. Sun, 8-2 / Woman in black dress, supposed ghost, appearing and disappearing, in Carbondale, Pa. / See Oct 16, 1920. [B; 1256. “A Black Ghost's Third Visit.” New York Sun, February 8, 1892, p. 8 c. 2. See: 1920 Oct 16, (D: 1159 & 1160).]


1892 Feb 8 / Woman in black / See Sept 15. [B; 1257. See: 1892 Sept. 15, (C: 54 & 55).]


1892 Feb. 8 / Woman in black / See Nov. 26, 1893. [B; 1258. See: 1893 Nov. 26, (C: 144 & 145).]


1892 Feb. 8 / Woman in black / Ghost in black / Feb. 5, 1889. [B; 1259. See: 1889 Feb 5, (B; 1010).]


1892 Feb 8 / B. Eagle, 6-2 / At Huntington, L.I., Truman Brown shooting at ghost of his wife, who carried a blue light, he said. [B; 1260. “Shooting at His Wife's Ghost.” Brooklyn Eagle, February 8, 1892, p. 6 c. 2.]


1892 Feb 8 (?) / (Ch) / Star-like object, oscillated in sky 10 hours. / newspaper story / E Mec (Eng) 55-34 / Ch 31. [VII; 381. Noble, William. "Harvard Observatory...." English Mechanic, 55 (no. 1406; March 4, 1892): 33-35, at 34. "But if we may judge from the following extract (which I translate from the Stockholm paper l'Aftonblad[et] of the 9th), he, in our popular slang, 'isn't in it' with his Swedish confrères. 'In the environs of Hochlanda,' says the paragraph in the Stockholm journal, 'there was seen, between 9 and 10 o’clock at night, in the direction of the North, to the west of the Great Bear, and pretty high up in the sky, a large star, which seemed to be of the first magnitude, and which rendered itself conspicuous by its extraordinary movement. At first it advanced with great rapidity, and in a straight line, towards the East for an estimated distance of 125yds. (!), appearing then to be oblong, and approximately 12in. long by about a quarter of that wide, and to be of a fiery-red colour. It then returned to its first position, afterwards to move not less rapidly towards the West, to regain, after about an equal interval, its original position; subsequently rising slowly, then descending considerably below it, and finishing by recovering it. It moved principally in straight lines, with a very slight elliptical curvature, but incessantly changing colour. This agitation (or movement) continued for 10 hours, when it ceased. The phenomenon was observed by several people. The sole hypothesis admissible at present,' the writer goes on to say, 'in the study of these meteors, which are bolides of which the trajectories are often perturbed in their initial direction, is that it may happen that after having encountered atmospheric strata of greater and greater density, the bolides experience a kind of ricochet, which prevents their further approach to the earth, and sends them back towards the upper regions of the atmospherecircumstances which may occasion changes in the form and curvature of the trajectories of bolides. We must, nevertheless, add that the symmetry of the movement in the present phenomenon is without precedent in the catalogue which treats of these phenomena.' I should think so. An elliptical bolide of a fiery red, but continually changing colour, which oscillates like a pendulum and remains visible for 10 hours!!! is not likely to be included in any 'catalogue which treats of these phenomena.'"]


1892 Feb 9 / Great parhelion / Lake Benton, Md. / World 10-1-2. [VII; 378. (New York World, February 10, 1892, p. 1 c. 2.)]


[The following fourteen notes were clipped together by Fort. VII: 382-395.]


1892 / Feb / Clifton is ab. 5 miles from Liberty, both in Union Co., Ind. [VII; 382.]


1892 Feb / Larvae / nothing in Phil Pub Ledger 23-29. [VII; 383.]


1892 Feb / Larvae / See unseasonable insects, Belgium, Feb, 1822. [VII; 384. See: 1822 Feb 6, (I; 924).]


1892 Feb / Unknown wrms. / Devonshire / wrms of April, 1837 / “Altogether unknown to the agriculturalists of the neighborhood.” / L.T., Ap. 24. [VII; 385. "An extraordinary  phenomenon...." London Times, April 24, 1837, p. 6 c. 3.  See: 1837 Ap. 24, (I; 2196).]


1892 Feb. / Unknown larvae / See March, 1816. [VII; 386. See: 1816 March, (I; 555).]


1892 Feb 4 / Insects time of dusts / See Jan 10 or 16, 1895. / Feb 17, 1898. [VII; 387. See: 1895 Jan 10 or 16, (VII; 1189); 1898 Feb 16-17, (VIII; 208); and, 1898 Feb 17, (VIII; 209).]


1892 Feb 4 / Larvae at time of great dustfall / Feb 25, 1903. [VII; 388. See: 1903 Feb. 25, (VIII: 1768 & 1769).]


1892 Feb 11 / BO / In “Insect Life”, published by the U.S. Dept of Agriculture, (Division of Entomology) 1892, p. 335, the Editor, Mr. C.V. Riley, writes: “On February 11, Mr. John Burroughs, of West Park, N.Y., sent us a number of half-grown larvæ, of Leucania phragmatidicola, which were found [on snow] in the fields and along the roads, usually not far from trees. This was immediately after a snowstorm, A week later, on February 18, another snowstorm occurred, and the worms were found again.” “On the 2d of March, Mr. Samuel Auxer, of Lancaster, Pa., reported a similar occurence of worms upon the surface of the snow, and the specimens which he sent proved to be the larvæ of some Dipterous insect of the family of Bibionidae. With the Bibionid larvæ were specimens of a Noctuid larva, differing from any with which we are familiar. Later advices from Lancaster, this time from Mr. J.R. Henkel, stated that these insects were found upon the umbrellas of 'some of our citizens,' indicating that they had come down with the snow.” “On February 27, Prof. S.F. Clark, of Williams College, Williamstown, Mass, sent in specimens of a larva of a Cecidomyia which had appeared in the vicinity of Blackinton, Mass, on the top of the snow, just after a heavy snowstorm. Prof. Clark wrote that the insects were present in great numbers and covered many acres, and were on and about a path over which a man had walked for a mile.” Mr Riley says of these insects that all hibernate in the larval state. He explains that some hibernating near surface of ground, were tempted out on warm sunshiny day; then a sudden freeze occurring were unable to return, the ground freezing solid. “This explanation, however, will not suffice for all cases, and we believe that in some instances the smaller larvæ actually snow down. In such cases they have been lifted from the earth by some severe storm in milder regions to the south, and carried in upper air currents to great distances, being precipitated again with the snow.” [VII; 389.1 to 389.10. “Insects on the Surface of Snow.” Insect Life, 4 (June 1892): 335-336.]


1892 / BO / Larvae if 1891 also. [VIIl 390. See: 1891 / about May 7, (VII; 101).]


[1892] / BO / With Larvae / That virtually all are not times when they plentiful, to a wind, [VII; 391.]


[1892] / BO / worms 1891 / Sci Amer, Feb. 21 / Crust of snow too strong for them to have come up from the ground. / Of the N.Y. larvae, Prof Riley said that by peculiar conditions had come up from ground. [VII; 392. "Snow Worms." Scientific American, n.s., 64 (February 21, 1891): 116. (Ref. for Riley, in 1892???) See: 1891 Feb 21, (VII; 71).]


1892 Feb. 14 / wrms in snow / (See Jan, 1924.) / San Fran Chronicle, [Feb. 14]-6-5 / “A man in Massachusetts, while walking in the woods a few days since, found the snow which lay among the trees filled with myriads of small scarlet worms. Several acres were covered with them, and they were so numerous that they gave the snow a crimson tinge. The worms were about three-eighths of an inch long and as brilliant as cochineal. They were found just after a brisk snow squall, and were evidently deposited by the falling snow.” [VII; 393.1, 393.2. “Colored Snow.” San Francisco Chronicle, February 14, 1892, p. 6 c. 5.]


[1892 Feb 4. Wrong date. See: 1892 Jan 27, (VII; 394).]


1892 Feb / B / (upon snow larvae) / Ac / Albany State Museum / 41st Report / Lintner on worms / Colombo / 1910. [VII; 395. Lintner, Joseph Albert. "Report of the State Entomologist...." Annual Report of the Trustees of the State Museum of Natural History..., (Albany, New York), 41 (1887): 123-358, at 174-177. See: 1910 July, (IX: 1706 to 1713), and, 1910 July 27, (IX; 1705).]


1892 Feb 10 / N.Y. Sun 11-9-3 / Largest sunspot since 1883 at Dudley Observatory, Albany, estimated disturbed area 140,000 miles by ab. 100,000 miles. [VII; 379. “A Tremendous Sunspot.” New York Sun, February 11, 1892, p. 9 c. 3.]


1892 Feb 10 / 10 p.m. / ab. 38 N and 52 W / Capt Edwards of steamer Bernard Hall in rainstorm. Mass of fire fall into sea. / World, April 5-1-5. [VII; 380. “Pillars of Fire and Cloud.” New York World, April 5, 1892, p. 9 c. 5.]


1892 Feb 11 / P.L. of / Ghst at Williamsburg, N.Y. Said to have prostrated with fright a fireman, a policeman, and a milkman. [B; 1261. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 11, 1892.)]


1892 Feb 12 / Great sunspot said dated back to Nov. 15, 1891. / Knowledge 15-69. [VII; 396. Maunder, Edward Walter. “The Great Sunspot and Its Influence.” Knowledge, o.s., 15 (n.s., 7; April 1 & May 2, 1892): 68-70 & 89-93, at 69.  See: 1891 Nov. 15, (VII; 225); 1891 Dec 12, (VII; 236); 1892 Jan 9 to 21, (VII; 310); 1892 Feb 5, (VII: 369 & 373); 1892 Feb 5, Feb 10, and Jan 21, (VII; 371); and, 1892 Feb, (VII; 374).] ]


1892 Feb 13 / B. Eagle, 6-5 / 5 young girls disap, Detroit. Supposed been abducted by white slavers. [B; 1263. “Recent Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, February 13, 1892, p. 6 c. 5.]


1892 Feb. 13 / Religio-Phil. Jour., p. 595 / Mrs. W.M. Bashor, of Fredon, Pa., having trance experiences. [B; 1264. "The Religious Trance." Religio-Philosophical Journal, n.s., 2 (no. 38; February 13, 1892): 594. “Says She Saw God.” Chicago Inter Ocean, January 31, 1892, p. 2 c. 2.]


1892 Feb 13 / Sunspot of / See Index, Sci Amer, sunspot and mag. storm [VII; 397. “A Great Spot on the Sun.” Scientific American, n.s., 66 (February 20, 1892): 116. “The Present Sun Spot.” Scientific American, n.s., 66 (March 19, 1892): 177. “The Great Sun Spot of February, 1892.” Scientific American, n.s., 66 (April 16, 1892): 247. Brown, Stimson Joseph, and, Hoogewerf, John A. “The Magnetic Storm of February 13, 1892.” Scientific American, n.s., 66 (May 21, 1892): 323-324.]


1892 Feb 13 / March 11 / May 18 / July 16 / Aug 12 / (Cut) / listed by John R Henry / E Mec 103/90 / great mag storms / intervals / 27-68-59-27. [VII; 398. Henry, John R. “Large Magnetic Storms....” English Mechanic, 103 (no. 2657; February 25, 1916): 90. (“27-68-59-27” was probably Fort's own count of the days apart on these dates. Confirm.)]


1892 Feb 13 / P. Ledger of / Metite in Alabama, recently struck and shattered a tree. [VII; 399.(Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 13, 1892, p. 7 c. 9.) See: 1892 Jan 9, (VII; 370).]


1892 Feb 13-14 / Extraord magnetic perturbations / recorded Observatory of St. Maur / C.R. 94/(388, 352). [VII; 400. Moureaux, Théodule. "Perturbation magnétique des 13 et 14 fevrier 1892." Comptes Rendus, 114 (1892): 351-353.]


1892 Feb 13-14 / Aurora / France / Cosmos 21-346. [VII; 401. Rocquigny-Adanson, Guillaume de. “Aurore boréale.” Cosmos, s. 4  (n.s.), 21 (February 27, 1892): 346-347.]


1892 Feb 13 / One of the finest displays of aurora known in lat. of N.Y. / Nature 45-378. [VII; 402. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (February 18, 1892): 377-380, at 378.]


1892 Feb 13 / Great aurora Hudson River—like a river of red wine from reflection of it / Trib 14-1-4; 15-6-5 / From Atlantic to Iowa / Trib / (also great Feb 13, 1821, 1822, 1865, 1867). [VII; 403. "The Northern Sky Aflame." New York Tribune, February 14, 1892, p. 1 c. 4-5. "Why the Aurora Deserves Study." New York Tribune, February 15, 1892, p. 6 c. 5. See: (Feb 13, 1821; not found); (1822); 1865 Aug. 3, (III; 725); and, 1867 July 10, (III; 1100).]


1892 Feb 13 / Cut / Great aurora and surcharging of telegraph wires with electricity in New York State. / Nature 45/378. [VII; 404. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (February 18, 1892): 377-380, at 378.]


1892 Feb. 14 / Lum obj near Oakland, Cal. / See Lum Obj. [B; 1265. See: "Owl" / 1892 / Feb 14, (SF-IV: 82). Orland, California, (not Oakland).]


1892 Feb 14 / [source unidentified], 21-4 / Epidemic of hiccoughing on the Maryland-Delaware peninsula. Several cases fatal. [B; 1266. "Victims of Hiccoughs." Delaware Gazette and State Journal, (Wilmington), February 11, 1892, p. 2 c. 8. Only one fatality was reported. (Ref.???)]


1892 Feb. 15 / San Fran. Chronicle of, 2-4 / at Carson, Nev. / Spook—dressed in scarlet. / When chased, disappeared. [B; 1267. “Troubled with a Ghost.” San Francisco Chronicle, February 15, 1892, p. 2 c. 4. (”A Scarlet Spook.” Los Angeles Herald, February 15, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. “Carson is at present troubled with a ghost scare at an old building known as the red barn. The last few days 100 or more people have spent the evenings trying to rout the spectre from its quarters. It dresses in scarlet and disappears occasionally into the earth like any other phantom. Many people have seen it, but none have been able to corner it.”]


1892 Feb 15 / [LT], 6-a / Aurora in New York. [VII; 405.”The Aurora Borealis.” London Times, February 15, 1892, p. 6 c. 1.]


1892 Feb 17-19 / Violent gale / Tunis / La Nat Sup, Feb. 28. [VII; 406. (La Nature Supplement, February 28, 1892; wrong publication date, not found.)]


1892 Feb. 19 / q and tornado / Portugal / N.Y. Sun 20-3-2. [VII; 407. “Damage by Earthquake and Tornado.” New York Sun, February 20, 1892, p. 3 c. 2.]


1892 Feb 19 / [LT], 5-d / 20-13-d / Sunspots and Weather. [VII; 408. “Sun Spots and the Weather.” London Times, February 19, 1892, p. 5 c. 4. “Sun Spots and the Weather.” London Times, February 20, 1892, p. 13 c. 4.]


1892 Feb 19 / Ascend met / E Mec (Eng Soc) 54-574 / Cut. [VII; 409. Noble, Willaim. "Dimensons of the Saturnian System...." English Mechanic, 54 (no. 1404; February 19, 1892): 574.]


1892 Feb. 20 / Religio-Phil Jour, p. 611 / Haunted house, 257 Bedford Ave., Williamsburg, N.Y. Said phantoms been seen there. [B; 1262. "Cases for Investigation." Religio-Philosophical Journal, n.s., 2 (no. 39; February 20, 1892): 611.]


1892 Feb. 20 / R-P-J., p 611 / Story from Plesantville, N.Y. Girl's clothes stolen in the night. But doors and windows fastened. [B; 1268. "This incident is related...." Religio-Philosophical Journal, n.s., 2 (no. 39; February 20, 1892): 611. Religio-Philosophical Journal, n.s., 2 (no. 39; February 20, 1892): 611.]


1892 Feb 20 / Religio-Ph. J., p. 611 / Polt near Springfield, Ohio. Drove out a family of Edward Wallace. Place was Barr's Bottom. [B; 1269. "Cases for Investigation." Religio-Philosophical Journal, n.s., 2 (no. 39; February 20, 1892): 611.]


1892 Feb 20 / R-P-J, p. 611 / Mysterious breaking of glass for 2 months in Liege. / Belgium? [B; 1270. "Mysterious breaking of glass...." Religio-Philosophical Journal, n.s., 2 (no. 39; February 20, 1892): 611.]


1892 Feb. 20 / Waterspout at Queenstown, Ireland / Pub. Ledger 23-3-6. [VII; 410. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 23, 1892, p. 3 c. 6.) “The Provinces.” Freeman's Journal, (Dublin), February 22, 1892, p. 6 c. 1-3. “A phenomenal occurrence was witnessed with the greatest interest during the height of the storm, whilst huge seas came tumbling in from the Atlantic, roaring like thunder. As they broke on the rocks of the harbour, a gigantic volume of water, of spiral shape, suddenly rose and ascended a great height. Simultaneously a similar volume of water descended from the clouds until both spirals met, when as if by the result of concussion, both volumes of water spread and fell foaming into the sea as if from a monster fountain. Immediately afterwards loud peals of thunder boomed forth; lightning shot through the air, displaying in its pranks magnificent colours such as those usually observed in a rainbow.”]


1892 Feb 20 / Very noisy, but not destructive eruption—Mayon Volc., Philippines / Ref, Feb. 1, 1814. [VII; 412. Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


1892 / ab. Feb 21 / from St Paul Press / NY Sun, 28-18-5 / Yarn of a huge meteorite landing near Hamilton, Montana, protruding 100 from ground and giving out lava like a volcano. [VII; 411. “Who Flung That Cobble?” New York Sun, February 28, 1892, p. 18 c. 5.]


1892 Feb 22 / Glb Dem, 4-4—woman in Detroit accused of witchcraft. [B; 1271. “A Woman Accused of Witchcraft.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 22, 1892, p. 4 c. 4.]


1892 Feb. 23 / N.Y. Times, 8-4 / Floods many parts of Spain. [VII; 413. “Flood Damages in Spain.” New York Times, February 23, 1892, p. 8 c. 4.]


1892 Feb. 23 / night / Severe q / San Diego, Cal. / Public Ledger 25-1-4. [VII; 414. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 25, 1892, p. 1 c. 4.)]


1892 Feb., last / San Diego Co., Cal / severe shocks beginning Feb. 23 / Sci Amer 66-213. [VII; 415. "The San Diego Shake-up." Scientific American, n.s., 66 (April 2, 1892): 213.]


1892 Feb, ab. last / Glares and volc clouds reported in S.W. part of San Diego Co., Cal. / Sci Amer 66-213. [VII; 416. "A Volcano Near the Gulf of California." Scientific American, n.s., 66 (April 2, 1892): 213.]


1892 Feb. 27 / New Nebula Auriga / See March 21. [VII; 417. See: 1892 March 21, (VII; 432).]


1892 Feb. 29 / Myst explosion at Paris. Home of the Princess de Sagan. [B; 1272. "Paris Anarchists Blundered." Pittsburg Dispatch, March 2, 1892, p. 9 c. 1-2. Anarchists attacked the wrong building, (a residence, instead of the Spanish embassy which had already moved away from a nearby building).]


1892 Feb 29 / Sig Aurora / Lyons, NY / Sc Am 66/292. [VII; 418. Veeder, Major Albert. "The Aurora." Scientific American, n.s., 66 (May 7, 1892): 293.]


1892 March / Slayer in West Riding—a dog. / L and Water, March 19, p. 326. [B; 1273. (Land and Water, March 19, 1892, p. 326.)]


1892 March, early / New volcano reported in Cal. / Sci Amer, Ap. 2, 1892. [VII; 420. "A Volcano Near the Gulf of California." Scientific American, n.s., 66 (April 2, 1892): 213.]


1892 March 1 / Revival at Cincinnati. [B; 1274. (Refs.???)]


1892 March 1 / Med and Dbreak of 25th / At Ottawa, Kansas, ab Feb one, in home of Isaac O. Johnson, of Cypress Street, appeared on a window pane, a shadow of a hand. Glass taken out. It appeared on another part of the window. [B; 1275. (Medium and Daybreak, March 25, 1892.) “The Hand Mystery.” Ottawa Daily Republic, (Kansas), February 8, 1892, p. 4 c. 6-7.]


1892 March 1 / Stones / Hoax / London Globe of—from its Oxford correspondent / One of the undergraduates, Mr. Colthurst, had heard strange sounds on a staircase, of St Mary's Hall, one of the smallest of the Oxford Foundations. He and two others, named Ackerley and Nicholson, had investigated, early morning of Feb. 27. Clattering sound were heard, and a stone that could not be accounted for was found. Then five stones fell, and a piece of plaster from the ceiling fell with a crash. Said that the small stones, which were of flint, could not have fallen from the ceiling, in which there were no such stones. No more learned. / Globe, 3rd—manifestations still going on. / March 3—also published letter from another cor, who signs R. Harry Vincent, that he had played joke on Ackerley. / Globe, 4th—Mr. Fred G. Ackerley acknowledges it was a joke played upon him. [B; 1276.1 to 1276.5. “An Oxford Ghost Story.” London Globe, March 1, 1892, p. 2 c. 5. “The Oxford Ghost Story.” London Globe, March 3, 1892, p. 6 c. 2. Ackerley, Fred G. “The Oxford Ghost Story.” London Globe, March 4, 1892, p. 3 c. 3. St. Mary Hall, (not St. Mary's Hall).]


1892 March 3 / 6 h, 45 m / by Mr. Mee / Two bright spots on floor Hercules—Mems. B.A.A. 2-50. [VII; 419. "Report of the Lunar Section." Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 2 (1892): 29-52, at 50. "Hercules.—Mr. Mee has sent two interesting pencil drawings (1) 1892, March 3, 6h 45m, showing the formation nearly filled with shadow. Two bright spots appear on the floor; one involved in the shadow, a little E. of the centre, and the other, on the edge of the shadow, near the N. wall. (2) 1892, March 4, 6h 5m, represents the formation under a higher light. A minute object (? a craterlet) is shown N.W. of the central crater D, and two others as indentations in the shadow of the S.W. wall, S. of D."]


1892 March 4 / Pub Ledger of / At English, Ind., a family named Bennett abandoned their farm, declaring they were worried or haunted by a neighbor who took the form of a black cat. [B; 1277. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 4, 1892.) “A Black Cat.” Cincinnati Enquirer, March 3, 1892, p. 9 c. 3.]


1892 March 4 / Violent wind and rain / Balearic Isles / fall of “sulphur” / Science 20-103. [VII; 421. "Notes and News." Science, s. 1 v. 20 (August 19, 1893): 103. "Pioggia di Zolfo." Neptunia, 2 (May 31, 1892): 660.]


1892 March 5 / Light / Pub Ledger of / Ghost at Ashland, Ind. Form of a man carrying a light high above his head. / See first part 1888. / See Ap. 29. / See Feb. 1. [B; 1278. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 5, 1892. See: 1888 Ap. 7, (B; 894); 1892 / ab Feb 1, (B; 1243); and, 1892 Ap. 29, (B; 1296).]


1892 March 7 / Comet by Swift. Became bright in April. / Clerke, His Astro/368. [VII; 422. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1st ed., (1885); 4th ed., (1902), 368.]


1892 March 8 / San Fran. Examiner / Sun 21-6-5 / At time if the “recent earthquake shocks.”—returning prospectors told of phe—in Cocopan County, Col.? or Cal. / Felt the q and flames in the sky which they thought from a new volcano, and cloud of ashes. [VII; 423. “The Birth of a Volcano.” New York Sun, March 21, 1892, p. 6 c. 5. “That Volcano.” Los Angeles Herald, March 21, 1892, p. 3 c. 3. “Blazing Volcano.” San Francisco Call, March 9, 1892, p. 2 c. 1. The Cocopah territory ranges around the Colorado River in southern California and Arizona, and the mud volcanoes referred to are probably those near Niland, California.]


1892 March 9 / Daily Picayune of, 4-5, says that ac to a New York newspaper, a man living in 144th street, troubled by something that was stealing his chickens, set a trap and caught a large, red fox. [B; 1279. “A Fox in New York City.” New Orleans Picayune, March 9, 1892, p. 4 c. 5. “A Fox Trapped in Morrisania.” New York Sun, March 4, 1892, p. 3 c. 5.]


1892 March 9 / Strange birds / at Brohopthorpe, near York, “The Naturalist 1892-252 / 2 Upland or Magellanic Geese (Bernicla magellanica). First recorded appearances in Europe—2 of them, in an exhausted condition. Joined some tame geese at B. and were driven to farm yard before noticed. One was killed and other forwarded to Zoological Society, where identified. Said a native of Patagonia or Falkland Islands. / p. 260—cor says not correct say never before in Europe. About year 1887 a pair killed off the island of Harris. [VII: 424.1, 424.2, 424.3. Waite, Edgar Ravenswood. "Escapes, with a Note on the Magellenic Goose." Naturalist: A Monthly Journal of Natural History for the North of England, 1892 (August): 251-253. Macpherson, Hugh Alexander. "More Escapes." Naturalist: A Monthly Journal of Natural History for the North of England, 1892 (September): 260.]


1892 March 10 / [LT], 6-a / Wtch / Hawaii. [B; 1280. “Terrible Murders in Hawaii.” London Times, March 10, 1892, p. 6 c. 1.]


1892 March 11 / [LT], 13-b / Great q in Japan. [VII; 425. “The Great Earthquake in Japan.” London Times, March 11, 1892, p. 13 c. 2.]


1892 March 11 / Magnetic perturbation / St. Maur and Ornble coup de grisou, Anderlues, Belgium / L'Astro 11/149. [VII; 426.  Moureaux, Théodule. "Pertrubation magnetique et aurore boréale de 6 mars 1892." Astronomie, 11 (1892): 148-149. The editor noted another magnetic disturbance observed at the Parc Saint-Maur observatory at the same hour as a gas explosion in a coal mine at Anderlues, Belgium. ("Ornble"???)]


1892 March 12 / B. Eagle, 4-7 / Slasher moved to Vienna? Dispatch from Vienna. "This city continues to be shocked by mysterious murders. The latest victim is Leopold Buchinger, who was stabbed to the heart by an undetected assassin in one of the most public places in Vienna. This makes the list of tragedies five in number, and there is a growing feeling of terror among the public." [B; 1281.1, 1281.2. “Another Mysterious Murder in Vienna.” Brooklyn Eagle, March 12, 1892, p. 4 c. 7.]


1892 March 12 / Look up "Austria". / L.T. Index / (See Ap. 9.) [B; 1282. (London Times Index.) See: 1892 Ap. 9, ([B; 1290).]


1892 March 12 / Great magnetic storm / E Mec 111/224 / (Cut). [VII; 427. Cotterell, Arthur E. “Magnetic Storms and Sunspots.” English Mechanic, 111 (no. 2880; June 4, 1920): 224.]


1892 March 12 / dispatch from Denison, Texas / (B Eagle, 19-6-3) / A cattleman's story of a huge meteorite that had fallen. [VII; 428. “Saw a Meteor Fall.” Brooklyn Eagle, March 19, 1892, p. 6 c. 3. “It was embedded at least twenty feet in the earth and protrudes twelve feet in the air.” “The meteoric stone was as hot as a furnace several hours after it descended to the earth.” “It was not until the following morning that Newell and his neighbors could approach near the meteor and then only to within a distance of about fifty yards.” Another newspaper hoax of a gigantic meteorite.]


1892 / ab March / German balloons said been seen over Russia. / See LT Index. [VII; 429. “On the other hand, the Russians....” Army and Navy Gazette, 33 (April 16, 1892): 325. “Russia and Germany.” London Evening Standard, March 22, 1892, p. 5 c. 5. “Russia.” London Evening Standard, March 29, 1892, p. 5 c. 3. “The Russian Frontier.” London Evening Standard, March 31, 1892, p. 5 c. 5. “Russia.” London Morning Post, March 26, 1892, p. 5 c. 3. “The official journal of Warsaw, the Warschawskij Dnewnik, also states that a large balloon was observed on the 7th of March in the neighbourhood of Dombrowa. The balloon was coming from the south-west and following a north-easterly direction along the Ivanogorod-Dombrowa Railway, and this in spite of the fact that a north-east wind was blowing. The balloon disappeared behind the clouds, but reappeared about 45 minutes later with a light burning (it was then half-past six in the evening), and following a course directly opposed to the former one. It is presumed that the balloon must have been provided with a highly-perfected steering apparatus.” At this time, the planet Mars was below the horizon, and Jupiter set on the western horizon about 40 minutes after sunset; however, Venus, (at about magnitude -4.08), was above the southwest horizon of Dombrowa, (now identified as Dąbrowa Górnicza. Poland). None of the reports in these British and American newspapers mention the presence of Venus, or its vicinity, in relation to these balloon sightings. “Russia.” London Morning Post, March 31, 1892, p. 5 c. 3. (Manchester Guardian, March 26, 1892, p. 8.) (Manchester Guardian, March 31, 1892, p. 8.) “Balloons as German Spies.” New York Times, March 26, 1892, p. 3 c. 2. “Military Laws Violated.” New York Times, March 30, 1892, p. 5 c. 2.]


1892 March 13 / 8:30 a.m. / Severe q. / Napa, Cal. / Nature 45-471. [VII; 430. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (March 17, 1892): 470-472, at 471.]


1892 March 14 / A brilliant green meteor over Madrid—For five minutes near the constellation of the Great Bear and then moved in a northwesterly direction. / P. Ledger, March 18. [VII; 431. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 18, 1892.)]


1892 March 16 / q. / Manila / Bull. Astronomique 1892-316. [VII; 434. De Bérard, (Adolphe Joseph Anne) Gabriel. “Secousses de Tremblement de Terre à Manille, le 16 Mars 1892.” Bulletin Astronomique, 9 (1892): 316-320.]


1892 March 17 / World, 9-3 / 3 diff disap men or all one? Searing—Ingalls—Lewis. [B; 1283. (New York World, March 17, 1892, p. 9 c. 3; not @ Newspapers.com.)]


1892 March 21 / new neb in Auriga / In Pubs Astro Soc Pacific, 4-85, J.M. Schaeberle, of Lick Observatory, writes, “On a plate which I exposed 150 m[inutes] on the evening of March 21st, I find a large and apparently new nebula.” It was in Auriga, RA 5h 9.5m, Dec +34.10. / Upon a photo taken Feb 27th appeared the object but less conspicuously. [VII; 432.1, 432.2. “A Large New Nebula in Auriga.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 4 (no. 22; March 1892): 85. This is IC 405, (the Flaming Star Nebula, or Caldwell 31).]


1892 March 25 / World, [note cut off] / from Chicago Herald / Reported from Iowa / 2 moons—inverted crescent and a black cross on moon. [VII; 433. (New York World, ca. March 1892.) (Chicago Herald, ca. March 1892.) “It Is Worrying Ft. Dodge.” Indianapolis News, March 17, 1892, p. 1 c. 5.]


1896 March 26 / Peterborough Advertiser of / Plague of field mice in Greece—fears that crops in Thessaly would be entirely destroyed. / See May. [B; 1284. (Peterborough Advertiser, March 26, 1892; date not at BNA.) "Telegrams received at Athens...." London Evening Standard, March 16, 1892. p. 4 c. 6. "Telegrams received at Athens from Larissa, in Thessaly, announce the outbreak of a plague of mice, similar to that in 1864, when the crops were entirely destroyed." See: (May).]


1892 March 27 / Sig Aurora / Lyons, N.Y. / Sc Am 66/292. [VII; 435. Veeder, Major Albert. "The Aurora." Scientific American, n.s., 66 (May 7, 1892): 293.]


1892 March 29 / Mars into quadrature. [VII; 436. Mars in quadrature. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1892, 472.]


1892 March 29 / World, 10-8 / Coins / symbols from drift / (+) geolog. [MB-I; 4. (New York World, March 29, 1892, p. 10 c. 8; not found here.)]


1892 March 30 / Sandfall / in South of Persia / Bull. Soc. Belge D'Astro 3-96. [VII; 438. "Description d'une tempète de sable dans le sud de la Perse." Bulletin de la Société Belge d'Astronomie, 3 (1898): 96-97.]


1892 March 31 / night / Off Cape Flattery. / Pacific Coast, U.S. / tremendous meteor exploded / San Francisco Chronicle, Ap. 3-15-2. [VII; 439. “A Meteor at Sea.” San Francisco Chronicle, April 3, 1892, p. 15 c. 2.]


[1892 March 31. Wrong date. See: 1898 March 31, (VII; 440).]


1892 / ab. last of March / Laguna, New Mexico (?) / meteor and quake / San Fran. Chronicle, Ap. 1-3-4. [VII; 437. “The Earth Quaked.” San Francisco Chronicle, April 1, 1892, p. 3 c. 4.]


1892 (April) / Have San Fran Chronicle for April. [VII; 444.]


1892 Ap. 1 / Myst explosion in Brooklyn. [B; 1285. "Dynamite." Brooklyn Eagle, April 2, 1892, p. 6 c. 1-2.]


1892 Ap. 1 / Tornado of “mad destructiveness / Kansas, Neb., Ill / St Louis Globe Dem, Ap. 2. [VII; 441. (St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 2, 1892, p.1 c. 1-4. Copy @ Newspapers.com ripped with title missing.)]


1892 Ap 1-2  Gelat / night / Port-en Bessin / Cor to Cosmos, N.S., 22-34 writes that in the morning he found his windows covered with a geltinous substance. It was composed of animalcules, visible to the magnifying glass. He learned that his neighbors had also been so visited during the night. [VII; 442.1, 442.2. Hamel, A. “Un fair curieux.” Cosmos, s. 4  (n.s.), 22 (April 9, 1892): 34.]


1892 Ap 1-4 / Aust / Tornados, Nebraska and Kansas, and unprecedented floods in Australia. [VII; 443. (Refs.???)]


1892 Ap 1 and Ap. 2 / Dry fog in Japan, Ab. 6 p.m., a yellow powder fell. Some fell upon a vessel 95 w. by s. of Nagasaki. / Nature, June 29, 1892 / On Ap. 1, fell in China. [VII; 445. Milne, John. “A Dust Storm at Sea.” Nature, 46 (June 29, 1892): 128.]


1892 Ap. 2 / Trib, 2-4 / Explosion / Birmingham, Ala. [B; 1286. "Six Men Killed By Dynamite." New York Tribune, April 2, 1892, p. 2 c. 4.]


1892 Ap. 2 / 12:45 a.m. / Explosion—cannister of powder? / Brooklyn / Sun 2-1-7 / 3-7-2. [B; 1287. “Bomb Explosion in Brooklyn.” New York Sun, April 2, 1892, p. 1 c. 7. “The Mysterious Explosion.” New York Sun, April 3, 1892, p. 7 c. 2.]


1892 Ap 2 / Ap 1-3 / (Dust) / Ab 128° E and 32° N, yellowish rain fell on vessel from Shanghai to Nagasaki. / 6 p.m. ac to John Milne (Nature, 46-128) sun yellow at Nagasaki morning of 2nd. Ap—fall of dust near Nawa and on 2nd in Gifu, Japan. [VII; 446. Milne, John. “A Dust Storm at Sea.” Nature, 46 (June 29, 1892): 128.]


1892 Ap. 3 / San Francisco Chronicle of / Queer noises in a house—Pleasanton, Cal. [B; 1288. “Is It a Hoax?” San Francisco Chronicle, April 3, 1892, p. 16 c. 5.]


1892 Ap. 4. See Ap. 1-4. / Tornado / Kansas. [VII; 447. See: 1892 Ap 1-4, (VII; 443).]


1892 Ap. 4 / storm of mud in Kansas. So thick that headlight of a locomotive was darkened by it. Trains came into towns of Onaga and Rossville plastered. / Sci Amer 66-241. [VII; 448. "A Rain of Mud." Scientific American, n.s., 66 (April 16, 1892): 241.]


1892 Ap. 4 / Aug. dark / Nimeguen (Holland) / by [André Marine du Celliée] Muller / Jour. B.A.A. 8/127. [VII; 449. Hopman, Frits. "On Dark Meteors." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 8 (1897-1898): 127-131. Celliée Muller, André Marine du. "Mededeeling Omtrent Verschijnselen, Waargenomen Bij De Maan." De Natuur, 13 (January 15, 1893): 21. Nimeguen is an English spelling for Nijmegen.]


1892 Ap. 6 / Stones / Polts? / In St Louis Globe-Democrat, Ap 7-6-4 / Dispatch from San Jose, Cal.—Strange noises in a house in Sunol street, owned by W.B. McCarley. Then the barn burned down, ab first of March, unknown origin. Ab last of March, stones began to fall. Policemen investigated. A thundering sound was heard and stones fell around them. But also said that a piece of scantling was from somewhere. [B; 1289.1, 1289.2. “Stone-Throwing Spooks.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 7, 1892, p. 6 c. 4.]


1892 Ap. 6, etc. / Solar protuberance / L'Astro 11/252. [VII; 450. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Protubérances Solaires Remarquables." Astronomie, 11 (1892): 249-252.]


1892 Ap. 6 / Cyclones on 5th in N.Y. / 6th, Miss. [VII; 451. (Refs.??? Not Eagle.)]


1892 Ap. 9 / B. Eagle, 6-5 / Excitement and alarm, Vienna—incendiary fires. / See back to March 12. [B; 1290. “Another Vienna Incendiary Fire.” Brooklyn Eagle, April 9, 1892, p. 6 c. 5. See: 1892 March 12, (B; 1281).]


1892 Ap. 9 / Polt or burglar / B. Eagle, 6-6 / In Chicago—numerous cases of a burglar who had entered homes, and slashed dresses and lace curtains, stamped on jewelry and smashed ornaments—stolen nothing. Mysterious how entered, unless had "a full equipment of skeleton keys and other burglars' tools". / no polt phe). [B; 1291. “A Burglar Who Destroys Plunder.” Brooklyn Eagle, April 9, 1892, p. 6 c. 6.]


1892 Ap 10 / World, 3-4 / Child myst burned? [B; 1292. (New York World, April 10, 1892, p. 3 c. 4; not found here.)]


1892 Ap 10 / Globe of light that changed color like different globes in drug store windows / 30 seconds / Cosmos, NS, 22/133, 194 / (Cow) / France. [VII; 452. De Froberville, P. “Un bolide.” Cosmos, s. 4  (n.s.), 22 (April 23, 1892): 131. Bonnard, F. “Le bolide du 10 avril.” Cosmos, s. 4  (n.s.), 22 (May 14, 1892): 194-195.]


1892 Ap 10 / Auriga / met / 8:20 p.m. / Bergerac / Cor in Cosmos, NS, 22-98, saw brilliant meteor appear not far from delta du Cocher. Cocher is Auriga. / At Orleans (p. 131) someone else saw it in a different aspect but does not state seeing origin. [VII; 453.1, 453.2. Goulard, X.E. “Bolide lent.” Cosmos, s. 4  (n.s.), 22 (April 23, 1892): 98. De Froberville, P. “Un bolide.” Cosmos, s. 4  (n.s.), 22 (April 30, 1892): 131.]


1892 Ap. 12 / 11:23, 11:25 (a.m.) / Mohawk Valley to Utica / shocks / World 13-1-4 / sound like distant thunder. [VII; 454. “Two Distinct Shocks.” New York World, April 13, 1892, p. 1 c. 4.]


1892 Ap 14 / Trib, 1-5 / Wilkesbarre, Pa. / Powder mill. [VII; 455. "Seven Men Blown To Death." New York Tribune, April 14, 1892, p. 1 c. 5.]


1892 Ap. 14 / 2-inch hail / Columbia, S. Carolina. [VII; 456. “The most terrific hailstorm....” Los Angeles Herald, April 16, 1892, p. 1 c. 4.]


1892 Ap. 16 / At Bishop's Wood abundance of one of the rarest of moths—Pachnobia leucographa / The Naturalist 1892-216. [VII; 457. Mansbridge, William. "Abundance of Pachnobia leucographa at Bishop's Wood." Naturalist: A Monthly Journal of Natural History for the North of England, 1892 (July): 216.]


1892 Ap. 16 / See back. / Active volcanoes in Lower California / World 28-1-4. [VII; 458. “Mountains Belching Flame.” New York World, April 28, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. No volcanoes were known to have erupted in California in 1892.]


1892 Ap. 17 / World, 18-3 / Myst disaps in neighborhood of Reading, Pa. / See H.H., Dec. 14, 1890. / See Feb 4, 1892. [B; 1293. “Where Are These Missing People?” New York World, April 17, 1892, p. 18 c. 3. See: 1890 Dec 14, (B; 1115), and, 1892 Feb. 4, (B; 1250).]


1892 Ap. 18 / 3 p.m. / Great powder mill explosion / Port Morris, N.J. / World 19-1-6. [VII; 459. “Workmen Blown To Bits.” New York World, April 19, 1892, p. 1 c. 6-7.]


1892 Ap 19 / Trib, 1-4 / Powder works / Lake Hopatcong. [VII; 460. "Eight Men Blown Up." New York Tribune, April 19, 1892, p. 1 c. 4.]


1892 Ap 19-21 / Shocks in Cal. / S.F. Chron. [VII; 461. “Earth Again Rocked.” San Francisco Chronicle, April 22, 1892, p. 3 c. 1-4.]


1892 April 19 / Severest q's in California since 1868 / Nature 45-614. [VII; 462. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (April 28, 1892): 612-616, at 614.]


1892 April 23 / Sig Aurora / Lyons, N.Y. / Sc Am 66/292. [VII; 463. Veeder, Major Albert. "The Aurora." Scientific American, n.s., 66 (May 7, 1892): 293.]


1892 [Ap 25] / Discov. / [LT], Ap 25/10/f. [VII; 464. “An Interesting Discovery.” London Times, April 21, 1892, p. 2 c. 5. Haes, Frank. “An Interesting Discovery.” London Times, April 25, 1892, p. 10 c. 6. Haes indicated that another skull of St. Oswald of Northumbria, besides that at Durham Cathedral, was also a relic in the Cathedral of Hildesheim, Germany. Stancliffe, Clare, and, Cambridge, Eric, eds. Oswald: Northumbrian King to European Saint. Stamford, England: Paul Watkins, 1995, 201-203. Richard N. Bailey wrote: The difficulty, however, is that there are at least four other candidates for the title of “St Oswald's head'.” In addition to the skull at Hildesheim, the top of a skull from a church at Zeddam was sent to the Rijksmuseum, Het Catharijneconvent, in Utrecht, Netherlands. No remains of other skulls were found at Zug auf Schaffhausen, Switzerland, nor at Echternach, Luxembourg, which had claimed them on their lists of religious relics. “There is, however, no possibility whatsoever that the Hildesheim, Utrecht, and Durham heads can all be reassembled to form a single skull.” Durham's claim has been considered the most legitimate.]


1892 Ap. 25 / Utrecht. / Light in sky—if aurora, no such ever been seen there before. / L'Astro 11/235. [VII; 465. "Aurores boréales." Astronomie, 11 (1892): 235.]


1892 Ap. 25-29 / Sunspots / See Ap. 27. [VII; 466. Meldrum, Charles. “The Hurricane at Mauritius.” Nature, 46 (June 9, 1892): 128-129, at 129. See: 1892 Ap. 27, (VII; 470).]


1892 Ap. 26 / Explosion in the Athenaeum Building, Chicago. [B; 1294. "Fire Destroys Art." Chicago Tribune, April 27, 1892, p. 3 c. 3.]


1892 Ap. 26 / Broad bands in sky, N.Y. / 2 towns / World 27-9-3. [VII; 467. “Northern Lights Visible.” New York World, April 27, 1892, p. 9 c. 3.]


1892 Ap. 27 / World, 9-8 / Disap / Mrs Peckinpaugh. [B; 1295. “Think She Is Deranged.” New York World, April 27, 1892, p. 9 c. 8.]


1892 Ap. 27 / Tornado / Chicago. [VII; 468. (Refs.???)]


1892 April 27 / [LT], 12-b / Aurora. [VII; 469. Kirkman, J.P. “An Aurora.” London Times, April 27, 1892, p. 12 c. 2.]


1892 Ap. 27 / night / Mauritius / great deal of thunder and lightning / Nature 46-129 / Director Melchum in here writing notes 5 to 6 sunspots from Ap 25 to 29. / Director of Mauritius Observatory. [VII; 470. Meldrum, C. “The Hurricane at Mauritius.” Nature, 46 (June 9, 1892): 128-129, at 129.]


1892 Ap 28 / P. Ledger of / b. snow recently / Geneva, Switzerland. [VII; 471. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, April 28, 1892.) “Black Snow.” Hampshire Advertiser, March 12, 1892, p. 4 c. 1.]


1892 Ap. 28 / afternoon / at Mauritius / Vivid lightning and thunder / Nature 46-108. [VII; 472. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (June 2, 1892): 107-110, at 108.]


1892 Ap. 29 / Lights / P. Ledger of / At Noblesville, Ind, a ghost. "The figure resembles that of a woman tossing globes of fire. / See March 5. / Feb 1. [B; 1296. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, April 29, 1892.) “Tosses Balls of Fire.” Owensboro Messenger, (Kentucky), April 27, 1892, p. 1 c. 2. See: 1892 / ab Feb 1, (B; 1243), and, 1892 March 5, (B; 1278).]


1892 Ap. 29 / Never before a hurricane at Mauritius between Ap 12 and Dec 1. / Nature 46-128 / Came with unparalleled sudddeness. [VII; 473. Meldrum, Charles. “The Hurricane at Mauritius.” Nature, 46 (June 9, 1892): 128-129, at 128.]


1892 Ap. 29 / morning / “most terrible” hurricane ever known at Mauritius. / Nature 46-84 / p. 108 / Ab. 1200 perished. [VII; 474. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (May 26, 1892): 83-86, at 84. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (June 2, 1892): 107-110, at 108.]


1892 Ap. 29 / The Mauritius Hurricane / Symons 27-65, 71. [VII; 475. "The Mauritius Hurricane, April 29th, 1892." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 27 (June 1892): 65-72.]


1892 Ap. 29 / Most destruc[tive] hurricane on record at Mauritius / Sun 22-3-3 / May 21-1-1 / ab a thousand killed. [VII; 476. “Almost a Thousand Dead.” New York Sun, May 21, 1892, p. 1 c. 1. “Storm Swept Mauritius.” New York Sun, May 22, 1892, p. 3 c. 3-4.]


1892 Ap. 30 / World, 1-2 / Odd—Another Florida wrecked and crew taken off. [B; 1297. “Is It the Florida?” New York World, April 30, 1892, p. 1 c. 2.]


[1892 May. Wrong date. See: 1892 May 18-19, (VII; 477).]


1892 May 1 / evening / Volcano reported on summit of Lone Mt., several miles from Nashville, Tenn. Thought at first earthquake. Found a chasm on mt and large stones been hurled far. / New Orleans Picayune 7-4-4. [VII; 478. “A Volcano in Tennessee.” New Orleans Picayune, May 7, 1892, p. 4 c. 4. “Volcanoes in Tennessee.” Ohio Democrat, (Logan, Ohio), May 7, 1892, p. 2 c. 5. “Sunday evening the people of Dayton experienced what seemed like an earthquake shock, for which they could not account at the time. Since then it has been discovered that a volcanic eruption occurred on the summit of Lone mountain, about two miles from the city. In a space covering three hundred yards long and one hundred yards wide, the earth sank considerable around the edges, causing large trees to fall into tho chasm made. Along the center of this area the earth seems to have been heaved up several feet high, and large stones wore hurled into the air with such force as to leave distinct marks on the surrounding trees.” Lone Mountain was formed by the erosion of the sandstone around the Cumberland Mountains, (not by volcanic eruptions).]


1892 May 3 / (+) / (Sun volc and smoke) / Violent eruption upon sun / L'Astro 11/252 / Next day in its place a great sunspot. [VII; 479. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Protubérances Solaires Remarquables." Astronomie, 11 (1892): 249-252, at 252.]


1892 May 3 / Fall of hail and dust. Dust from 1 to 8 p.m., Stockholm, and appeared to have extended as far as Christiana. / Nature, 46-108. [VII; 480. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (June 2, 1892): 107-110, at 108.]


1892 May 2, 3, 4 / Rain of sand in Russia / May 3, at Stockholm / C.R. 114-1244. [VII; 481. "M. A. De Tillo fait savoir àl'Académie...." Comptes Rendus, 114 (1892): 1244.]


1892 May 3 / Great fall of dust / Sweden and Russia / Ciel et Terre (L) 30/241 / CR 94/1244 / Stockholm great fall dust / Cosmos 22/319. [VII; 482. "Pluie de Poussière." Ciel et Terre, 13 (1892-1893): 244. "M. A. De Tillo fait savoir àl'Académie...." Comptes Rendus, 114 (1892): 1244. “Pluie de poussière.” Cosmos, s. 4  (n.s.), 22 (June 11, 1892): 319.]


1892 May 3 / 1 p.m. / Stockholm / abundant fall of dust with hail / Cosmos, NS, 22-223. [VII; 483. “Pluie de poussière.” Cosmos, s. 4  (n.s.), 22 (May 21, 1892): 223.]


1892 May 4 / Fishes / Forest City, near Scranton, Pa. / Great numbers of fishes 3 or 4 inches long, in a heavy rainstorm. Some were put in water and lived. Said that several persons went to a roof to see if any were there and found four. / World, May 5-1-4 / of species known as devil fish or “stonewallers”. [VII; 484.1, 484.2. “Fishes From the Clouds.” New York World, May 5, 1892, p. 1 c. 4. “Fresh Fish From Above.” Pittsburg Dispatch, May 6, 1892, p. 7 c. 6.]


1892 May [7] / Miss Scott's experience. / More in Frederick Myers, Human Personality, vol. 2, p. 397. [B; 1298. Myers, Frederick William Henry. Human Personality and Its Survival of Bodily Death. London: Longmans, Green, 1904, v. 2, 396-397. "Cases Received by the Literary Committee." Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 6 (November 1893): 144-151, at 146-150.]


1892 May / Another account by Miss Scott of another vanishing figure in this road. / Jour. Soc. 9-300. [B; 1299. "Cases." Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 9 (October 1900): 298-308, at 298-306. Further encounters by Miss Scott with the vanishing man occurred in the spring of 1897 and, twice in August of 1900, as well as an encounter by Mary Blamire Irvine, in the spring of  1894. "A young lady, who is a governess in this neighbourhood, told me this after noon of a meeting she had had with him this spring. She was returning home along the haunted road at about a quarter past four in the afternoon, when she was attracted by seeing in front of her a rather tall old man, dressed in a long black cloak, with one cape which came to a little below his shoulders; his hat, as on the occasions when my sisters and I saw him, was low-crowned, and the brim slouched over his eyes. My informant was much interested in this peculiar-looking person, and did not take her eyes off him, whilst she watched him walk backward and forward between the turn of the road and a heap of stones about a hundred yards lower down; he repeated this six times, the last time stopping as if he were speaking to a man who was cutting the hedge at the time. What struck Miss Irvine as peculiar was that the man who was hedge-cutting did not look round, and seemed quite unconscious of the other’s presence. Miss Irvine walked on, and was going to pass the old man, when, to her astonishment, he vanished when she was only about three yards from him."]


1892 May / Miss Scott's other experiences are told in S.M. Kingsford's Psychical Research for the Plain Man, p. 201 et seq. / Central Circ Library / 133.9 / K. [B; 1300. Kingsford, S.M. Psychical Research for the Plain Man. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner, 1920, 201-205.]


1892 May / Other disap. / Story by Moss C.B. / Proc SPR., 10-194 / At the top of Heigham Road, Norwich, New Year's Eve, ab 1879, 10 p.m.—an old woman, walking noiselessly, casting no shadow—vanish. [B; 1301. "Report on the Census of Hallucinations." Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, 10 (1894): 25-422, at 194. "At the top of Heigham Road, Norwich, on New Year's Eve, about the year 1879 or later, at 10 p.m., my elder sister and myself were walking home from a quiet evening spent with an aunt and uncle. To our right a row of houses were divided from a house enclosed in a high wall by a passage. Quietly out of the passage came an old woman about 5 feet in height, wearing dark brown dress, and large black shawl fastened across the chest, the point of it reaching nearly to the bottom of the dress, and a small poke bonnet. She walked before us some yards, exciting my wonder by her noiselessness upon the gravel path, and finally by the fact that she cast no shadow. Putting my hand upon my sister's arm I said, 'What a funny old woman,' but with the movement of my hand she disappeared, we being by the blank wall in which there was neither gate nor opening, with plenty of gas lights, so that she must have been seen crossing the road. I was in perfect health and peace of mind, and I think 17 at the time. The old woman was entirely strange to me, I had not for years seen anyone like her: she simply reminded me in dress of the old-fashioned type of respectable old age. My sister [who] was with me saw nothing."]


1892 May 4 / Bourges, France / 18 soldiers in a shower, starting to run for shelter—lightning mowed them down, 4 remaining for some time insensible, one dying. / San Francisco Chronicle, Sept 25-10-7, from the London Globe. [B; 1302.1, 1302.2. “Deadly Lightning.” San Francisco Chronicle, September 25, 1892, p. 10 c. 6. “Echoes of Science.” London Globe, July 8, 1892, p. 6 c. 3. “A Fatal Thunderbolt at Bourges, France.” Scientific American Supplement, 34 (no. 866; August 6, 1892): 13824.]


1892 May 4 / A J. the Rip. in Chicago. [B; 1303. (Refs.???)]


[End of Series B.]


1892 May 6 / 8:30 p.m. / Cor thought he saw a bright spot on Venus (not polar). / E. Mec. 55/310. [VII; 488. Kempthorne, Philip Henry. "Venus." English Mechanic, 55 (no. 1418; May 27, 1892): 310.]


[Beginning of Series C.]


1892 May 7 / St. Boswells case—Jour. S.P.R. 6/147. [C; 1. "Cases Received by the Literary Committee." Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 6 (November 1893): 144-151, at 146-150.]


1892 May 10 / 11 p.m. / Western sky / Tiflis—great met that broke into parts. Visible ab. 3 minutes. / Nature 46-108. [VII; 489. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (June 2, 1892): 107-110, at 108-109.]


[The following two notes were clipped together by Fort. C: 2-3.]


1892 May 11 / (Cut) / Novska, Slavonia / (Cut) / In a great whirl, a girl of 17 picked up and carried 90 metres without harm. Editor says hard not telling if this exaggerated, but well vouched for. / L'Astro—12-356. [C; 2.1, 2.2. "La trombe de Novska." Astronomie, 12 (1893): 356. "La trombe de Novska." Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 25 (June 24, 1893): 385. "Trombe." Ciel et Terre, 14 (1893-1894): 144. "Windhose bei Novska (Slavonien)." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 9 (1892): 320. "Als Kuriosum habe ich vergessen hervorzuheben, dass ein Mädchen von 17 Jahren von einer der Wasserhosen gefasst wurde und über 100 m weit oder mehr wiederum auf die Erde gesetzt wurde, ohne dass ihm was geschehen ist. Das hat mir vor der Bezirksbehörde das Mädchen selbst und ein Augenzeuge erzählt."]


1894 May 31 / Girl of 17 at Novska (Esclavonie) carried in a whirlwind 300 feet and landed unhurt. / An. Soc Met de F '94-248 / Have some other date / See 1893. [C; 3. "Revue et Bulletin Bibliographiques." Annuaire de la Societe Meteorologique de France, 41 (July-August-September 1893): 197-222, at 214. "Revue et Bulletin Bibliographiques." Annuaire de la Societe Meteorologique de France, 42 (October-November 1894): 199-248, at 248. See: (1893???)]


1892 May 11 / (Ec[lipse]) / Partial eclipse of moon / Mem. BAA 3/187. [VII; 490. Elger, Thomas Gwyn. "Total Eclipse of the Moon, 1895, March 10." Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 3 (1895): 180-191, at 187.]


1892 May 13 / Near Pesth an immense waterspout burst, flooding mines and drowning miners. / Glb-Dem 15-5-4. [VII; 491. “A Terrible Disaster.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 14, 1892, p. 2 c. 4. Pécs, Hungary, (not Perth).]


1892 May 14 / Skeleton (mummified) suspended from a telegraph wire in Washington—supposed be medical students joke. / Glb-Dem 15-24-6. [C; 4. “A Ghastly Lark.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 15, 1892, p. 24 c. 6.]


1892 May 15 / ab. 4 a.m. / Peterborough Advertiser, May 21—near Wormwood Scrubbs, London policeman caught a naked running man, who said incoherently he had been bathing and had left a friend by the Scrubbs Canal. This in Willisden. By the canal was found body of a man apparently drowned. [C; 5.1, 5.2. (Peterborough Advertiser, May 21, 1892; not at BNA.)]


1892 May 16 / World, 1-3 / 17-3-4 / 2 mad dogs / others in Ap and May / NY-Chicago / 23-1-3 / June 2-1-6 / 4 cases / June 5-1-6 / wild dogs” / one of them. [C; 6. “A Mad Dog in the Church.” New York World, May 16, 1892, p. 1 c. 3. “A Mad Dog on Sixth Avenue.” New York World, May 17, 1892, p. 3 c. 4. (“others in Ap and May” / NY-Chicago / 23-1-3 / June 2-1-6 / 4 cases / June 5-1-6 .)]


1892 May 17 / Great q. / N.M. / Sumatra / Nature 91-567. [VII; 485. "Notes." Nature, 91 (July 31, 1913): 564-568, at 567.]


1892 May 17 / early in morning / In W. Cornwall sound thought of an explosion and shocks / Peterborough Advertiser, May 21. [VII; 486. (Peterborough Advertiser, May 21, 1892; not at BNA.)]


1892 May 17 / q / West Cornwall / At first thought been an explosion. / Nature 46-61. [VII; 492. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (May 19, 1892): 61-64, at 61.]


1892 May 17 / Severe q / Sumatra / Nature, 52-129. [VII; 493. Delprat, Théodore. “Effects of Earthquake in Sumatra.” Nature, 52 (June 6, 1895): 129-130.]


1892 May 17 / Great (?) q. / Sumatra / N.M. / Nature 118-93. [VII; 505. (Nature, 118 (1926): 93.)]


1892 May 17 / See Nature 46/61. / q / Cornwall / 43 percent of obs described as an explosion. / Phil Mag 5/49/32. [VII; 494.“Notes.” Nature, 46 (May 19, 1892): 61-64, at 61. Davison, Charles. “On Earthquake-Sounds." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 5 v. 49 (1900): 31-70, at 34, (Table 1).]


1892 May 17 / Sim qs / Italy and Sumatra / qs / BA '11/ See June 24. / See Feb 18, 1889. [VII; 496. Two class I earthquakes. Milne, 736. See: (June 24), and, 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1892 / ab. May 18 / (Eels) / Philadelphia Times / copied in N.Y. Sun 29-5-5 / at Coalburg, near Birmingham (Ala?) / Toward evening a dense cloud over the townno wind, no rainab 11 p.m. a slight showersounds of falling objects and people investigating found the ground covered with what at first thought were snakes, but which were eels—most a few inches long, largest almost a foot in length. Said were of a species unknown locally, but said were known on southern Pacific coast of U.S. and Mexico. Numbers great—millions it is said—heaps of them start driving out inhabitants but the farmers used them for fertilizer. [VII; 487.1, 487.2, 487.3. "It Rained Strange Eels." New York Sun, May 29, 1892, s. 3 p. 5 c. 5. ("A Shower of Eels." Philadelphia Times, May 22, 1892, p. 14 c. 6. The date of the dispatch is May 20.) “Shower of Eels.” New York Evening World, September 14, 1892, p. 2 c. 5. Coalburg is in Alabama, but the late version of the article in the World identifies it as a “Georgia hamlet.” “A Shower of Frogs.” New York Evening World, May 19, 1892, p. 1 c. 3. Also, on this date, near Mexico, Missouri, a “heavy shower of frogs” took place. “The largest fall was on the farm of Phillips Shearer, who estimated the number that he saw at eight thousand or ten thousand. The frogs were of all sizes and alive.”]


1892 May 18 / [LT], 10-enc / q—Cornwall. [VII; 495. “Earthquake in Cornwall.” London Times, May 18, 1892, p. 10 c. 3.]


1892 May 18 / In N.W. Tasmania / Sunset at ab 4:50. Ab 7 p.m. above southern horizon light such as precedes sunrise—then bands of light—faded out—then 9 p.m. brilliant light in the s.e. / Nature 46/368. [VII; 497. White, William, “Aurora Australis.” Nature, 46 (August 18, 1892): 368.]


1892 May 18 / Aurora like search lights / Cork, Derby / Nature 46/79, 151. [VII; 498. Stock, Warington. “Aurora Borealis.” Nature, 46 (May 26, 1892): 79. Porter, James. “Aurora.” Nature, 46 (June 16, 1892): 151.]


[1892 May 18-19 /] 1892 May / (Cut) / Extraordinary auroral displays / Eng Mec (Eng) 55/312, etc. [VII; 477. "Aurora Borealis." English Mechanic, 55 (no. 1418; May 27, 1892): 312.]


1892 May 22 / Trib, 1-2 / Hartford, Conn / explosion. [VII; 499. "Blown Up With a Factory." New York Tribune, May 22, 1892, p. 1 c. 5.]


1892 May 24 / Cross Roads, Wilson Co., N. Carolina / (F). [VII; 500. Fletcher, 106. This is the Cross Roads meteorite.]


1892 May 24 / Lewisham / One of “those remarkably sudden appearances of Pluisa gamma. / Entomologist 25/159 / Report then from all around London. / Then Vanessa cardui—swarms of both, many places in England. Writer thinks that undoubtedly they had migrated from the Continent. Many accounts of them appearing in various places in “suddenly in extraordinary numbers” in succeeding nimbers of the Entomologist. / However, the invasion of Colius edusa given most attention—many pages. [VII; 501.1, 501.2, 501.2. Adkin, Robert. "On the Recent Abundance of Plusia Gamma and Vanessa Cardui." Entomologist, 25 (July 1892): 159-162.]


1892 May 25 / Polt / World, 1-4 / Greenville, near Albany, N.Y. / Polt—objects thrown around. / Also see 25-1-3. [C; 7. “Spooks in Adler's Flat.” New York World, May 25, 1892, p. 1 c. 3-4. “Missile-Flinging Ghosts.” New York World, May 25, 1892, p. 1 c. 4.]


1892 May 27 / Very destructive cyclone / Kansas / Nature 46-108 / was this Ap. 27? / Had given no sign of approach. [VII; 502. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (June 2, 1892): 107-110, at 108. See: 1892 Ap. 27, (VII; 468). “Winds.” Monthly Weather Review, 20 (no. 5; May 1892): 130-133, at 133. “At Wellington a tornado occurred at 9:30 p.m. The storm moved north of east in a path about 200 yards in width, its arrival being preceded by heavy rain. Its passage was attended by a continuous roar of thunder and an incessant blaze of lightning. The greatest destruction was observed in the southern part of the path, and articles were thrown from south to north; 12 persons were killed, and the destruction to property was estimated at $200,000. Two clouds were observed, one traveling from the northwest and one from the southwest. After the union a dark mass of cloud hung down and traveled with great velocity, attended by a roaring sound. When the cloud touched the ground it appeared like a mass of fire. A dead calm preceded the breaking of the storm over Wellington; the air apparently became rarefied, and breathing was difficult; the color of the lightning flashes changed from white to an intense blue; a roar was next heard, which grew louder as the storm approached. The storm struck timber 2 miles south of Kellogg, which is about 20 miles east of Wellington, and caused clamage to orchards, buildings, etc., in that section. On the north side of the track the debris was thrown west, and on the south side it was thrown east.”]


1892 May 28 / Peterborough Advertiser—arrest at Burpham, of man named George Holland, who had at dif. times killed 9 lambs. Said that it was from an irresistible impulse to shed blood. / He was considered mentally deficient but not insane. [C; 8. (Peterborough Advertiser, May 28, 1892; not at BNA.)]


1892 May 31, June 8, June 10, July 30 / Insects / Specimens of a rare hawkmoth captured in England. Editor of Field thinks they came from Southern Europe pr N. Africa. [VII; 503. "Deilephila Livornica." Field, August 6, 1892, p. 247.]


1892 May 31 / Hereford Times, June 4—tells of a chimney struck by lightning in th storm, afternoon, 31st. At Hereford, premises if Mrs. Carter, 21 Highmore-street, Westfield. No th. storm mentioned. [VII; 504. (Hereford Times, June 4, 1892; not at BNA.)]


1892 May 31 / th. stone . At Hereford reported that in violent th storm, object fallen in yard of house of Mr. Griffiths of Bath Street. A metallic ball which broke. / Symons' Met 27-73 / Mr Symons wrote to Mr. G., who sent specimens—nothing but "scales of iron rust, probably from the gutter of the house." [VII; 506.1, 506.2. "Thunderstorms of May 31st and June 1st." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 27 (June 1892): 72-75, at 73.]


1892 June 3 / NY Times, 5-1 / Aerolite in Caspian Sea. [VII; 507. “A Remarkable Aerolite.” New York Times, June 3, 1892, p. 5 c. 1.]


1893 June 5 / Clbrst / Oil City and Titusville, Pa / Cities flooded. Thought 200 lives lost. / Nature 46-133. [VII; 508. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (June 9, 1892): 131-134, at 133.]


1892 June 5 / Great snow storm raging in South Dakota. Said that nothing like it, in June, ever known before. / N.Y. Herald 6-5-4 / At Deadwood, 10 inches of snow. [VII; 509. “Ten Inches of Snow.” New York Herald, June 6, 1892, p. 5 c. 6.]


1892 June 6 / Eruption Vesuvius / D. News, June 8-5-5. [VII; 510. “Vesuvius in Eruption.” London Daily News, June 8, 1892, p. 5 c. 5.]


1892 June 7 / 7 p.m. / date of Sangir eruption / L.T., Sept. 2-8-e / all details here. [VII; 511. Ormsby, Nina. “The Eruption at Sangir.” London Times, September 2, 1892, p. 8 c. 5-6. The Awu volcano.]


1892 June 7 / ab. 6 p.m. / The terrific eruption of volc Gunona Awa, Great Sangir Island. / (Nature, 46-332) / Hundreds killed by showers of stones. [VII; 512. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (August 4, 1892): 331-334, at 332. The Awu volcano.]


[The following two notes were folded together by Fort. VII: 513-514.]


1892 June 7 / Great volc eruption, Sangir Island, near Philippines. Whole northwestern part of the island blown away. / D. News, July 25 / bet. Celebes and Philippines / News, 28th—its remarkable suddenness—hundreds killed by showers of stones. Lava in torrents carrying houses, etc. / This 17th? [VII; 513.1, 513.2. “The Great Volcanic Eruption in the East.” London Daily News, July 25, 1892, p. 6 c. 6. “The Volcanic Eruptions.” London Daily News, July 28, 1892, p. 5 c. 7. The Awu volcano erupted on June 7.]


1892 June 7 / See 7th. Sea Capt's report of eruption on Great Sangir Island / Toronto Weekly Globe, July 20-2-3 / He was looking at the cone. Shifted mt—terrible explosion—darkness—fall of ashes—mt. gone. [VII; 514. (Toronto Weekly Globe, July 20, 1892, p. 2 c. 3.)]


1892 / 1st of June / (+) / (moon) / June 8, in Phil. Press / copied in N.Y. Sun 12-4-1 / That for more than a week at Lexington, Mo., ab. 11 p.m. each night, “a peculiar, dark shadow” partly obscured the moon, travelling slowly, occupying about 30 minutes. Said that Negroes in the town were frantic with fear and several cases of insanity reported. [VII; 515.1, 515.2. “Wha' Dat ar on de Moon!” New York Sun, June 12, 1892, p. 4 c. 1. “For more than a week past the 700 colored inhabitants of Needmore, a suburb in the southern part of the city, have been wonderfully stirred up by a peculiar phenomenon visible at full moon.” As the new moon would have risen and set with the sun, (effectively invisible, at Lexington, Missouri), on May 25, and as the next full moon was not seen until June 9, this newspaper yarn was written by someone who wasn't aware of the lunar phases visible at that time.]


1892 June 8 / [LT], 5-e / Vesuvius / Aug. [VII; 516. “Italy.” London Times, June 8, 1892, p. 5 c. 5.]


1892 June 9-10 / Cyclone / Balasore, India / D. News, 11th. [VII; 517. “Cyclone in India.” London Daily News, June 11, 1892, p. 5 c. 3.]


1892 June 10 / Phantom army. / Sun, 6-7 / Story from Tishomingo, Indian Territory—That in a valley, a deputy U.S. Marshall, had seen spectral forms in a battle all around him and had heard sounds of battle. Said that Indians had told of frequent occurrences of this scene there. [C; 9.1, 9.2. “Warring Phantoms.” New York Sun, June 10, 1892, p. 6 c. 7. “In this valley, full of those little mounds, the Indians claim they have, on several occasions, seen the warring tribes in deadly combat, and closely following the ghostly battle came trouble to the Indians.” This newspaper yarn apparently confuses the Pharr Mounds in the Chickasaw homelands, near Tishomingo, Mississippi, with their new capital at Tishomingo, Oklahoma, (then, Indian Territory), founded in 1852. The marshal heard an invisible battle, (trampling hoofs, rushing men, and blows being struck), and rode away on his frightened horse, only to learn later of the legendary “phantom tribe” haunting this valley which was shunned by the Indians. Skinner, Charles Montgomery. Myths and Legends of Our Own Land. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1896, v. 2, 237-238.  [C; 9.1, 9.2. “Warring Phantoms.” New York Sun, June 10, 1892, p. 6 c. 7. “In this valley, full of those little mounds, the Indians claim they have, on several occasions, seen the warring tribes in deadly combat, and closely following the ghostly battle came trouble to the Indians.” This newspaper yarn apparently confuses the Pharr Mounds in the Chickasaw homelands, near Tishomingo, Mississippi, with their new capital at Tishomingo, Oklahoma, (then, Indian Territory), founded in 1852. The marshal heard an invisible battle, (trampling hoofs, rushing men, and blows being struck), and rode away on his frightened horse, only to learn later of the legendary “phantom tribe” haunting this valley which was shunned by the Indians. Skinner, Charles Montgomery. Myths and Legends of Our Own Land. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1896, v. 2, 237-238. Skinner's “A Battle in the Air” supposedly occurred in May, 1892. See: 1892 Jan 17, (VII; 320).]


1892 June 10 / Brilliant point of light on Mars, by M. Perrotin, of Observatory of Nice. / Ciel et Terre 30/335 / July 2 and 3. [VII; 518. "Observations de la Planète Mars." Ciel et Terre, 13 (1892-1893): 335-337. See: 1892 July 2-17, (VII; 561), and, 1892 July 3, (VII; 560).]


1892 June 14 / ab 2 p.m. / Ontario and Quebec / Cyclone / N.Y. Herald 16-5-2. [VII; 519. “In the Path of Cyclones.” New York Herald, June 16, 1892, p. 5 c. 2.]


1892 June 14 / In Pub. Ledger, 21st, quoted a cor to N.Y. Evening Post, that 14th, ab 7 p.m., he walking westward through W. 57th Street. Saw clouds open for a small space and in the space saw a blood red cross upon a dome, Clouds crossed it and it vanished. [VII; 520. “Constantine's Sign.” New York Evening Post, June 20, 1892, p. 4 c. 6. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, June 21, 1892.)]


1892 June 14 / Violent qs, Guadalajara, Mexico, and Colima active / Nature 46-209. [VII; 521. “Notes.” Nature, 46 (June 30, 1892): 208-211, at 209. The Colima volcano.]


1892 June 17 / Remarkable solar eruption / Haynald Observatory, Hungary / Sci Amer 66-96. [VII; 522. "A Violent Eruption of the Sun." Scientific American, n.s., 66 (February 13, 1892): 96.]


1892 June 17 / Eruption / Great Sangir Island / N.Y. Herald, July 19-7-4 / 28-7-3. [VII; 523. “Sangir Overwhelmed.” New York Herald, July 19, 1892, p. 7 c. 4. “Rivers of Molten Rock.” New York Herald, July 28, 1892, p. 7 c. 3.]


1892 June 20 / A Kaspar Hauser in Toronto. Found tied on island—said been a prisoner all or most of life. / Montreal Gazette, on or ab, July 2. [C; 10. “Toronto's Kaspar Hauser.” Montreal Gazette, July 2, 1892, p. 7 c. 1-2.]


1892 June 24 / night / and 25, daylight / Shocks, Mexico. / Colima in eruption. / N.Y. Herald, 28th, p. 3, col. 5. [VII; 524. “Earthquake Shocks in Mexico.” New York Herald, June 28, 1892, p. 3 c. 5. The Colima volcano.]


1892 June 24 / Mexico / 24—Italy / 30—Italy / q's / BA '11. [VII; 525. Milne, 736. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1892 June 27 / NY Times, 1-3 / 28-8-6 / Myst collision at sea / 27-[note cut off]. [C; 11. “Cut Down in Midocean.” New York Times, June 27, 1892, p. 1 c. 3. “The Vega Safe in Port.” New York Times, June 28, 1892, p. 8 c. 6.]


1892 June 27 / Tornado / Penn. / MWR '92/309. [VII; 526. “Tornado at Eagles Mere, Pa., June 27, 1891.” Monthly Weather Review, 20 (no. 11; November 1892): 309-310.]


1892 June 28-29 / night / Great rains in England / Symons Met 27-81. [VII; 527. "Great Rains on June 28th." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 27 (July 1892): 81.]


1892 June 29 / Rel-Phil. Journ, July 30, p. 145—Hypnotist named Mrs Mary Martin convicted at Oakland, Cal., of hypnotically inducing her friend Miss Leonard to transfer to her all her property, valued at $4,000. [C; 12. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, July 30, 1892, p. 145; not online.)]


1892 June 29 / Wlf / animal / 11 p.m. / B.F. Cox, of Fairfield, Iowa, heard a sound on his porch. He stepped outside and was attacked by a wolf. His son-in-law went to his assistance and with axes they killed the wolf. It was a prairie wolf. lean and gaunt. Said that the town had 4000 inhabitants. / San Fran Chronicle, July 1, p. 1. [C; 13.1, 13.2. “A Gaunt Wolf at His Door.” San Francisco Chronicle, July 1, 1892, p. 1 c. 2.]


[1892 June 30. Wrong date. See: 1896 June 30, (VIII; 46.1).]

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