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Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1882


1882:


1882 // Body of Mrs. W.I. Peters / Frankfort, Ind / See Dec. 22, 1888. [B; 391. See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1882 // Tingwick, Mass / Josephine Bedard, Fasting girl / See Ap. 20, 1889. [B; 392. See: 1889 Ap. 20, (B; 1024).]


1882 // Particulars of Alaskan Auroras / Ref 1881 //. [V; 782. Refer to: 1881, (V; 425). Ray, Patrick Henry. Report of the International Polar Expedition to Point Barrow, Alaska. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1885, 361-441, at 369-410.]


1882 // Shower of small seeds, Statesburg, S. Carolina / Am. Notes and Queries, quoted in Phil Pub Ledger, Feb 10, 1892 / See Feb, 1882. [V; 783. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 10, 1892.) “That Shower of Manna.” American Notes and Queries, 8 (February 6, 1892): 162. “There have been several peculiar showers in the U. S., during the last quarter of a century: among others, a shower of  quivering flesh in Ky.; a shower of edible mushrooms in S.C.; a shower of small seeds in Statesburg, S.C., in 1882, and a shower of sulphur in the Indian Ter., in the spring of 1883.” “Two Singular Showers.” Los Angeles Herald, April 27, 1891, p. 5 c. 4. “On Saturday, Nov. 11, 1882, there was a shower of peculiar shaped seeds over an area of several square miles in the vicinity of Statesburg, S.C. The shower began about 11:30 a.m., and was noted for twelve miles in one direction and about seven and a half in the other. In the center of the district over which they fell the ground was almost covered, the noise made by them as they fell on the leaves much resembling that made by fine sleet. When examined under the microscope these seed, like granules, appeared wholly different from any seeds known to botanists of that part of South Carolina.” “In the following month, December, 1882, Huntington, Ind., and vicinity was treated to a shower of strange worms. They were only about the fourth of an inch in length and about the diameter of a small sewing needle. In some places they fell in such abundance as to cover the snow and ice to the depth of nearly half an inch.” “A shower of worms is reported in Huntington county....” Indianapolis News, December 22, 1882, p. 2 c. 3. (Cedar Rapids Evening Gazette, May 3, 1883; newspaperarchive.com. The shower of sulphur in Texas and Indian Territory was said to be pollen.) See: 1882 Feb., (V; 799).]


1882 // (N. Car) / Nor Car. / Siderites found, ac to Fletcher. / In Guilford Co. / Lick Creek, Davidson C. / Linnville Mt, Burke C. / Bridgewater, Burke Co. / on Smith. Mt., Rockingham Co. / Jewell Hill, Madison Co., Black Mountain / [15] miles east of Asheville / See ab. 1839. / Haywood Co. [V; 784.1, 784.2. Fletcher, 77-78. These are the Guilford County, Lick Creek, Linnville Mountain, Bridgewater, Smith's Mountain, Jewell Hill, and Black Mountain meteorites.]


1882 Jan 1 / 8:30 / Leicester / met / E Mec 34-424. [V; 785. Franks, W.S. “Daylight Meteor.” English Mechanic, 34 (no. 876; January 6, 1882): 424.]


1882 Jan 5 / 500 kegs of powder exploded at Oskaloosa, Iowa—said felt and reported other places as a q. / Sun 7-1-4. [V; 786. “500 Kegs of Powder Exploded.” New York Sun, January 7, 1882, p. 1 c. 4.]


1882 Jan. 5 / Knoxville, Iowa / 4 p.m. / violent shock / Sun 6-3-4. [V; 787. “Violent Earthquake Shock in Iowa.” New York Sun, January 6, 1882, p. 3 c. 4.]


[1882 Jan 5 /] 1882 Jan 28 / Ionian Island / Strong strange odor and in sea many fishes killed / La Nat 18/174. [V; 797. “Phénomènes Volcaniques dans la Mer Ionienne.” La Nature, 1882 pt. 1 (no. 454; February 11): 174.]


1882 Jan 14 / Rel-Ph-Jour, 6-1 / Haunted house / Peoria, Ill. / Raps / Faces at windows. [B; 393. "A Haunted House at Peoria, Ill." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 31 (no. 20; January 14, 1882): 6, (c. 1).]


1882 Jan 14 / The Tuesday before 14th // Deniliquin Pastoral Times of [Jan 14] / Air filled with dust so thick had in the distance a solid appearance. [V; 788. “Extraordinary Storm.” South Australian Register,  (Adelaide), January 11, 1882, p. 5 c. 5. (Deniliquin Pastoral Times, New South Wales, Australia, January 14, 1882.)]


1882 Jan 14 / Tuesday before [Jan 10] // at Denilquin / Intense darkness and red dust / Pastoral Times (Deni), Jan 14. [V; 789. “Deniliquin.” Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser, January 28, 1882, p. 162 c. 3-4. (Deniliquin Pastoral Times, New South Wales, Australia, January 14, 1882.)]


1882 Jan 15 / See Dec 19. [V; 790. See: 1881 Dec 19 and [1882] Jan 15, (V; 775).]


1882 Jan. 17 / See the phe of 1881, Nov 15. / Nature 25/450. [V; 791. “Notes.” Nature, 25 (March 9, 1882): 448-450, at 450. See: 1881 Nov. 15, (V; 749).]


1882 Jan 19 / Aurora / Phelps, N.Y. / Sun 22-7-2. [V; 792. “Brilliant Aurora Borealis.” New York Sun, January 22, 1882, p. 7 c. 2.]


1882 Jan 22 / Trib, 7-3; 9-3 / Aurora. [V; 793. “A Brilliant Aurora Borealis.” New York Tribune, January 22, 1882, p. 7 c. 3. “How the Aurora Is Formed.” New York Tribune, January 22, 1882, p. 9 c. 3.]


1882 Jan 22 / S / Dark / London / 122 / (D-223). [V; 794. The note copies information from page 223 of The Book of the Damned. Herschel, J. "The Mid-day Darkness of Sunday, January 22." Nature, 25 (January 26, 1882): 289.]


1882 Jan 26 / Severe shock at Centerville, Cal., preceded by a heavy fall of rain / NY Trib, Sept 1, 1886, 5-2+. [V; 795. “Shaken by an Earthquake.” New York Tribune, September 1, 1886, p. 1 c. 4-5 & p. 5 c. 1-2. “Heavy Earthquake Shock.” Sacramento Daily Record-Union, January 27, 1882, p. 1 c. 6.]


1882 Jan 28 / Obj and q? / N.Y.T., 5-1 / Comet seen in San Francisco. [V; 796. “A New Comet Seen in San Francisco.” New York Times, January 28, 1882, p. 5 c. 1. “A New Comet.” Alta California, (San Francisco), January 21, 1882, p. 1 c. 2.]


[1882 Jan 28. Wrong date. See: 1882 Jan 5, (V; 797).]


1882 Feb. 3 / (Hun) / (F) / 3:45 p.m. / Metites / Klausenburg, Hungary, Transylvania / Sc Am 46-212 / Not pebbles. [V; 798. Fletcher, 105. “Fall of a Meteor.” Scientific American, n.s., 46 (April 8, 1882): 212. This is the Mocs meteorite.]


1882 Feb. / See 1882. // In Guatemala for eight days objects in sky, visible only when they passed between the sun and the observer. "The populace thought that fire was falling from the sun." Said that was finally shown that they were seeds, "every one was enabled to satisfy himself of the fact by grasping a handful of them.” Self—but such duration and such seeds not known to the inhabitants. / Pop. Sci Mo., 21-142. [V; 799.1, 799.2. “Clouds of Seeds.” Popular Science Monthly, 21 (May 1882): 142-143. See: 1882, (V; 783).]


1882 Feb 4 / 4:15 a.m. / Det met / loud report / Iowa / M.W.R., Feb, p. 23. [V; 800. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 2; February 1882);  23-24, at 23.]


1882 Feb 7 / Nothing in Isle of Man Times. [V; 802.]


1882 Feb 7 / 2 to 2:30 p.m. / Isle of Man dense greenish-black fog, "almost absolute darkness", fall of black rain with soot. Cor thinks came from England; says that ac to "oldest inhabitants" nothing like it ever there before. / Symons, 17-26. [V; 803. Moore, A.W. “Dense Fog and Black Rain in the Isle of Man." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 17 (March 1882): 26.]


1882 Feb 15 / Trib, 1-2 / q. / Colorado. [V; 801. “Earthquake in Colorado.” New York Tribune, February 15, 1882, p. 1 c. 2.]


1882 Feb. 17 / Medium and Daybreak of / Polt phe, house in Frankfort St., Plymouth. / See Ap. 8. [B; 394. "Plymouth.—Richmond Hall, Richmond Street." Medium and Daybreak, 13 (no. 620; February 17, 1882): 108. See: 1882 Ap. 8, (B; 399).]


1882 Feb 17-18 / night / NNW of Treport, France / 17th, from 10 p.m. to 12, "bruit sound" and vibrations felt. / On 18th, from 4 to 5, again but more pronounced and prolonged. / La Nat, 18/222 / L'An. Sci 26-273. [V; 804. “Secousses de Tremblement de Terre dans la Somme.” La Nature, 1882 pt. 1 (no. 457; March 4): 222. “Des secousses du sol...." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 26 (1882): 272-273. The shocks occurred at Offeux, France, about 14 kilometres north-north-east from Le Tréport, (not “NNW”).]


1882 Feb 20 / Aurora / Norway and England / Nature 25/461. [V; 805. Koch, W.E. “Auroral Display.” Nature, 25 (March 16, 1882): 461.]


1882 Feb 21 / Large meteorite fell at Mirotch Planina (E. Servia). / Nature 25-471 / (N.M.) / Or page 470. [V; 806. “Notes.” Nature, 25 (March 16, 1882): 469-471, at 471. Brezina, Aristides. Die Meteoritensammlung des K. K. Mineralogischen Hofkabinetes in Wien am 1. Mai 1885. Vienna: Alfred Hölder, 1885, 226-228. According to Brezina, no meteorite was found from this detonating fireball.]


1882 Feb 26 / Trib, 9-2 / Visions of sane persons. [B; 395. “Faces in the Dark.” New York Tribune, February 26, 1882, p. 9 c. 2. Galton, Francis. “The Visions of Sane Persons.” Fortnightly Review, n.s., 29 (June 1, 1881): 729-740. “Faces in the Dark.” St. James's Gazette, February 10, 1882, pp. 5-6. “Faces in the Dark.” St. James's Gazette, February 15, 1882, pp. 5-6. “Faces in the Dark.” St. James's Gazette, February 20, 1882, pp. 13-14. Galton, Francis. Inquiries into Human Faculty and Its Development. New York: Macmillan, 1883, 166-167.]


1882 Feb 27 / Canton Lesser, Switzerland, strong q. / (N.M.) / Nature 25-450 / 9:15 a.m. / p. 492. [V; 807. “Notes.” Nature, 25 (March 9, 1882): 448-450, at 450. “Notes.” Nature, 25 March 23, 1882): 490-493, at 492.]


1882 March 5 / NY Times, 2-7 / 6-1-6 / Apparition, Virgin / Troy. [B; 396. “An Alleged Miracle in Troy.” New York Times, March 5, 1882, p. 2 c. 7. “The Alleged Troy Miracle.” New York Times, March 6, 1882, p. 1 c. 6.]


1882 March 5 / Trib, 9-3 / Menacing comet of 1880. [V; 808. “The Menacing Comet of 1880.” New York Tribune, March 5, 1882, p. 9 c. 3. Proctor, Richard Anthony. “The Menacing Comet.” Knowledge, o.s., 1 (February 17, 1882): 340-342. Proctor was erroneously credited with a prediction that this comet would crash into the sun in 1897, (a speculation suggested by Albert Marth), and result in a devastating nova. “The Astronomical Notice To Quit.” The Spectator, 55 (January 28, 1882): 113-114. Comet C/1880 C1.]


1882 March 6 / Mauthen / evening, ab. 9 / Meteor / Zeit Met. 17/206. [V; 809. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 17 (1882): 196-206, at 206.]


1882 March 8 / (repeats) / 8:30 p.m. / Fort Assiniboine[, Montana] / Said an enormous meteoric stone had fallen—loud report and q. At Fort Benton about 10 p.m., a shock like that of an earthquake was felt. / M.W.R., April. [V; 810.1. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 4; April 1882): 24-26, at 25.]


1882 March 9 / great detonations / Warsaw, Indiana / great met / blinding light in a heavy snowstorm / Trib, Ap. 23-9-1 / See Sci Amer this period. / Sc Am 46-245. [V; 810.2. “An Indiana Meteor.” New York Tribune, April 23, 1881, p. 9 c. 1. Kirkwood, Daniel. “The Great Meteor of March 9, 1882.” Scientific American, n.s., 46 (April 22, 1882): 245.]


1882 March 12-13 / Anti Radiant or Series / At Harm, Holland, a fireball at 8 p.m. At 1 a.m. (13th) another and at the same time one at Bergen but not the same—the first from SE to N.E., / the second opposite direction. See May 1 / Nature 26-245. See July 20, 1884. [V; 811.1, 811.2. Groneman, H.J.H. “Fireballs Observed in the Netherlands.” Nature, 26 (July 13, 1882): 245.]


1882 March 13 / 1 a.m. / Southern part of Pays-Bar, France / meteor that detonated like gunfire / L.A. Sci 26/17. [V; 812. "Bolides, Météorites." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 26 (1882): 16-18, at 16-17.]


1882 March 13 / Polt / Manchester Ev. News of, copied in Medium and Daybreak, March 17, 1882, in shop of Mr George Allington, a sail-maker, Fish Dock Road, Grimsby. Polt throwing things about for past 10 months. Said that one day, a foreman named Ward, returning from dinner, had found an apprentice boy hanging head downward on the beam. Boy told that while upon beam a rope had seized him and turned around his leg. [B; 397.1, 397.2. “A Ghost Story from Grimsby.” Medium and Daybreak, 13 (no. 624; March 17, 1882): 170. (Manchester Evening News, ca. March 1882; not at BNA.)]


1882 March 13 / Nothing of Polt in Grimsby Express. [B; 398.]


1882 March 17 / Bolide / C.R. 94/1213. [V; 813. “M. J. Vinot communique à  une Note relative à un bolide....” Comptes Rendus, 94 (1882): 1213.]


1882 March 19 / Fukutomi, Hizen, Japan / (F). [V; 814. Fletcher, 105. This is the Fukutomi meteorite.]


1882 March 26 / moon / Mare Crisium "one mass of light streaks and spots". / By A. Stanley Williams, who says the effect not unusual but the distinctness and brightness were. / Astro Reg 20-166. [V; 815. Williams, Arthur Stanley. "Mare Crisium." Astronomical Register, 20 (July 1882): 165-166.]


1882 March 27 / Nov 20, 1871 / Aug 31, 1877 // The Ray in Plato / L'Astro 1/302. [V; 816. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Observation Curieuse Faite sur la Lune." Astronomie, 1 (1882): 302.]


1882 March 27 / The flash-light across Plato / L'Astro., 1/302 / From 8:10 to 9, when the phe disappeared and the floor of the crater in darkness—this by Stanley Williams. [V; 817. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Observation Curieuse Faite sur la Lune." Astronomie, 1 (1882): 302. Williams, Arthur Stanley. “On an Abnormal Appearance during Sunrise on Plato, on the Evening of the 27th March, 1882.” Selenographical Journal, 5 (no. 52; May 17, 1882): 36-37.]


1882 March 27 / moon / (Cut) / by A Stanley Williams / On Plato "a curious, luminous, milky kind of light.” / Mem B.A.A. 13/72. [V; 818. “Section for the Observation of the Moon.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 13 (1904): 65-93, at 71-72.]


1882 March 28-Ap 5 / (Cut) / Distinct small round spot on cusp of Venus / by Denning / L'Astro 1882-222. [V; 819. Denning, William Frederick. “Observation Télescopique de la Planète Vénus.” Astronomie, 1 (1882): 221-225.]


1882 Ap. 2 / ab. 6:30 a.m. / 8:10 am. / q / Amsterdam, N.Y. / Sc. Am. 46-228. [V; 820. “Earthquake in Central New York.” Scientific American, n.s., 46 (April 15, 1882): 228.]


1882 April 4 / Aug / 3 p.m. / by M Cornillon. Observaory of Arles / Counted 25 shining bodies crossing field of telescope—either birds or insects—could not say. / L'Astro 5/429. [V; 821. Cornillon, Hippolyte. “Corpuscles devant le Soleil.” Astronomie, 5 (1886): 429-430.]


1882 April 8 / Augs / See April 4. / More. [V; 822. Cornillon, Hippolyte. “Corpuscles devant le Soleil.” Astronomie, 5 (1886): 429-430. See: 1882 April 4, (V; 821).]


1882 Ap. 8 / Western Daily Mercury of—ridicules story that a ghost been seen in a house in Frankfort Street, Plymouth. Copied in Medium and Daybreak, Ap. 14. [B; 399. "A Spurious Ghost." Medium and Daybreak, 13 (no. 628; April 14, 1882): 231. "And we find that towards dusk, upon the day that Mr. Ware's letter appeared in our columns, a figure clothed in white did suddenly appear at the window and as suddenly withdraw. Such recklessless is positively inexcusable. It is true, as we learn, that a gentleman in simple shirt arrayed, did, for one brief moment, look out of window, and that a speculating throng caught momentary sight of this snow-clad form. In these days of popular superstitions it is incredible that anyone should expose himself in his shirt." (Western Daily Mercury, April 8, 1882; not at BNA.) See: 1882 Feb. 17, (B; 394).]


1882 Ap-May / Stones falling on farm near Tours, France / Light 2/227. [B; 400. “Missiles Thrown by Unseen Agency.” Light, 2 (no. 71; May 13, 1882): 227-228.]


1882 April 11 / remarkable sunspot / E Mec 35-150 / and aurora—p. 171. [V; 823. “A Remarkable Sunspot....” English Mechanic, 35 (no. 891; April 21, 1882): 150. Peacock, H. “A Remarkable Sunspot—To 'F.R.A.S.'” English Mechanic, 35 (no. 892; April 28, 1882): 171.]


1882 / period of Ap. 16 // One of largest sunspots in years / U.S. / Trib, Ap 23-9-1. [V; 824. “Sunspots and Auroras.” New York Tribune, April 23, 1882, p. 9 c. 1.]


1882 Ap 17 and 20 / Strong magnetic perturbations at Shanghai, China. No aurora. / Nature 26-176 / These times equiv to Ap 16 and 19, Greenwich. See Nature for time, 26/207. / Same absolute time everywhere. [V; 825. Dechevrens, Marc. “Earthquakes in China.” Nature, 26 (June 22, 1882): 175-176, at 176. "Notes." Nature, 26 (June 29, 1882): 207-210, at 207.]


1882 Ap. 16 / Philadelphia / aurora / E Mec 35-193. [V; 826. Bridle, W.C. Herbert. “Aurora, April 16th—Sunspots.” English Mechanic, 35 (no. 893; May 5, 1882): 193.]


1882 Ap 16 / U.S. Eastern States / Aurora / Magnetic effects felt first in telegraph offices at 10:30 p.m. / Trib, Ap 17-1-5. [V; 827. “Lights in the Sky.” New York Tribune, April 17, 1882, p. 1 c. 5.]


1882 Ap 16 / Pennsylvania / night and morning / Auroral streams—converging from all parts of the horizon except from southeast to southwest, to a point ab 10 degrees south of zenith. / Great sunspot at time. / Sid. Mess. 1/31. [V; 828.1, 828.2. Langley, Samuel Pierpont. “Solar and Auroral Coincidence.” Sidereal Messenger, 1 (May 1882): 31.]


1882 Ap. 16 / Aurora / mag. storm / counted 111 spots on sun / Sci and Lit Rev 18-6 /// 524 / (E 89)/ [note cut off]auder. [V; 829. "Monthly Notices." Scientific Review and Scientific and Literary Review, 18 (January 1, 1883): 6. Larkin, Edgar Lucien. "Coincidence of Sun Spots and Auroral Displays." Kansas City Review of Science and Industry, 6 (no. 1; May, 1882): 17-20.]


1882 Ap. 17 / N.Y.T., 5-6 / 18-5-4 // Aurora, U.S., especially N.Y. State. [V; 830. “Brilliant Auroral Display.” New York Times, April 17, 1882. p. 5 c. 6. “The Light in the Sky.” New York Times, April 18, 1882, p. 5 c. 4.]


1882 / 17, 18, 19, 20 April // Great sunspot / L'Astro 2/223. [V; 831. Riccò, Annibale. “Le grand tache solaire du mois d'avril 1882.” Astronomie, 2 (1883): 223-224, (illustrations).]


1882 Ap. 17 / Trib., 1-5 / Aurora / Ap. 23-9-4-2 / Ap. 9. [V; 832. “Lights in the Sky.” New York Tribune, April 17, 1882, p. 1 c. 5. “Sunspots and Auroras.” New York Tribune, April 23, 1882, p. 9 c. 1.]


1882 April 19 / Beam / 1 a.m. / By passengers on a train between Syracuse and Albany—beam like tail of the great comet of 1882 but no nucleus. / NY Times, Feb 27-4-4 / On 16th had been great aurora with beams centering about Arcturus. [V; 833. “The Mysterious Stream of Light.” New York Times, April 21, 1882, p. 4 c. 7. The newspaper dispatch from Rochester does not mention Syracuse nor Albany. Larkin, Edgar Lucien. "Coincidence of Sun Spots and Auroral Displays." Kansas City Review of Science and Industry, 6 (no. 1; May, 1882): 17-20, at 19. "At 9 P. M., while viewing Wells' comet, it waned and disappeared. Looking out to learn the cause, its obscuration was found to come from the rising arc of an aurora. The advancing phenomenon presented a yellowish-green arc of a circle, whose altitude was eighteen degrees—nearly half way to Polaris—and whose ends rested on the eastern and western horizon. The thickness of the light was five degrees, clear sky showing the stars in Cassiopeia, being between it and the horizon. The center of the auroral arc did not appear to be on a line below the pole star, so we proceeded to measure its displacement with the declination circle on the telescopic axis. The eastern termination of the arc was only fifteen degrees north of the equator, while the western was twenty-five degrees, the center, therefore, being ten degrees east of the pole of the heavens. For nearly an hour the apparition developed no sign of coming grandeur, but at 10 P. M., three pillars of crimson light shot up to an altitude of forty degrees from the western extremity of the arc, a few yellowish streamers ascending in the east. These outbursts seemed to be a preconcerted signal with the celestial pyrotechnists, for within two minutes the whole arch flashed and trembled, and then expanded, ascending eight degrees. A halt was made, which lasted, however, not more than one minute, when two flashes in rapid succession were seen throughout the widened arc now twenty degrees broad. A mighty upheaval followed, the apex of the band at once rose to Polaris, filling the northern heavens with supernal light brilliant enough to read by; but the terminal points on the horizon, east and west, did not draw nearer the earth's equator. The altitude of the pole at this place is forty-one degrees, and as there was open sky under the band ten degrees wide the belt was thirty degrees broad. The great aurora reserved its forces a few moments and then discharged simultaneously hundreds of columns of scarlet, violet, and light yellow flames, instantly converging at the zenith."]


1882 Ap. 19 / Lyrids unusually active (Denning) / Nature 67/585. [V; 834. Henry, John R. "The Lyrid Meteors." Nature, 67 (April 23, 1903): 584-585.]


1882 April 20 (?) / England / Lyrids important / Nature 67-585. [V; 835. Henry, John R. "The Lyrid Meteors." Nature, 67 (April 23, 1903): 584-585.]


1882 Ap. 18 / Cyclone / Missouri / Kansas Review 6-245. [V; 836. Williams, W.H. "The Cyclone at Brownsville, Mo., April 18, 1882." Kansas City Review of Science and Industry, 6 (no. 4; August, 1882): 245-248.]


1882 Ap 20 / Again aurora in N. Zealand. People in streets gathering, watching it. / Symons 17-73 / Not so bright as that of 17th. [V; 837. “Sunspots, Magnetic Storm, and Aurora Australis." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 17 (June 1882): 72-74, at 73-74. ]


1882 Ap. 21 / One of the largest of measured sunspots / Flammarion, Pop Astro p. 256. [V; 838. Flammarion, Camille. Popular Astronomy: A General Description of the Heavens. New York: D. Appleton, 1894, 256.]


1882 Ap. 21 / Largest spotted solar area recorded / Observatory 7-112. [V; 839. “The Present State of Solar Activity.” Observatory, 7 (1884): 109-113, at 112.]


1882 Ap. 22 / Vapors seeming to go out from a great sunspot / L'Astro 1/392. [V; 840. Nagant, H. “Tache solaire singulière.” Astronomie, 1 (1882): 392.]


1882 Ap 22 / M / / (noon) / Reported by second officer of the s.s. "City of Paris" in 49° 03' N, 22° 00' W, a black spot near southwest edge of sun. / MWR, April—In report upon sunspots for month, nothing to account for this. [V; 841. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 4; April 1882): 24-26, at 25.]


1882 Ap. 23 / Nothing of volc in Iceland noted in Nature for year 1882. [V; 842. There was no volcanic activity associated with the "Black Sandstorm" in Iceland. See: 1882 Ap. 23-May 4, (V; 845).]


1882 Ap. 23 / Trib, 9-1 / Sunspots and Auroras. [V; 843. “Sunspots and Auroras.” New York Tribune, April 23, 1882, p. 9 c. 1.]


1882 Ap 23 / Trib., 9-1 / Meteor / Indiana. [V; 844. “Sunspots and Auroras.” New York Tribune, April 23, 1882, p. 9 c. 1.]


1882 Ap. 23-May 4 / See May 4. / Great dust storm in Iceland. Many domestic animals killed. / L.A. Sci 26-50 / Verify this date. [V; 845. "Tempête de Sable en Islande." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 26 (1882): 50. Crofts, Roger, and, Olgeirsson, Friðrik G. Healing the Land. Iceland: Soil Conservation Service of Iceland, 2011, 28-34. Deforestation, (in the production of charcoal), and overgrazing led to the exposure of underlying volcanic dust in the Rangárvellir district, which was blown about by the "Black Sandstorm," lasting ten days. See: 1882 May 4, (V; 850).]


1882 Ap. 23-May / Nothing in Times Index of volc in Iceland. [V; 846.]


[1882 April 28 /] 1905 // Wlf / Seal in Lake Onondaga / May 2, 1882. [C; 735. "Hair Seal Shot in Onondaga Lake." New York Times, May 2, 1882, p. 8 c. 7. “A Hair Seal Shot by a Hunter in Onodaga Lake.” Ogdensburg Journal, May 2, 1882, p. 3 c. 5. Note for 1882 was missing and was copied from 1905 note.]


1882 May / mirage / 3 hours in afternoon—over Lake Orsa, Sweden—large number of steamers in the sky—changed to a landscape—islands covered with vegetation instead of ships. Nature 26/209 / (Duhh. First of Sweden / but other phe before.) [V; 847.1, 847.2. "Notes." Nature, 26 (June 29, 1882): 207-210, at 209-210.]


1882 May 1 / Series of Anti Radiant / Fireballs in Holland / Nature 26/245 / at Groningen, Holland // 4 a.m.—S.S.E. to N.N.E. / great / said visible 50 seconds / Someone else said 13 seconds. // 3:45 a.m. near Groningen, West to E. // 5:12 a.m. another, S.W. to E. // See March 12. [V; 848. Groneman, H.J.H. “Fireballs Observed in the Netherlands.” Nature, 26 (July 13, 1882): 245.]


1882 May 1 / q, E. Greenwich, R.I. / May 8, 4 a.m., Concord, NH / A.J. Sci 3-25-356. [V; 849. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 12.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 25 (1883): 353-360, at 356.]


1882 May 4 / B. rain at Edrom, Berwickshire / fell later at Ashkirk, 30 miles away / Pearson's Weekly, May 30, 1900 / Chambers Jour 60/205 / N.Q. 9/6/516. [V; 850. "Black Rain." Berwickshire News and General Advertiser, May 16, 1882, p. 3 c. 4. "Black Rain." Berwickshire News and General Advertiser, May 30, 1882, p. 3 c. 4. "Black Rain." Western Gazette, (Yeovil), May 26, 1882, p. 2 c. 3. At Hardwick Vicarage, Hay, Herefordshire. "Serpent Storms and Spider Showers." Pearson's Weekly, (London), May 19, 1900, p. 756. "Black Rain." Chambers's Journal, s. 4 v. 20 (March 31, 1883): 205-206. Wallace, R. Hedger. "Showers of Snakes, Fish, Spiders &c." Notes and Queries, s. 9 v. 6 (June 30, 1900): 516. See: 1882 Ap. 23-May 4, (V; 845).]


1882 May 17 / Eclipse / Nature 25-587 / 26-51-181. [V; 851. “Total Eclipse of May 17.” Nature, 25 (April 20, 1882): 587-589. Lockyer, Joseph Norman. “Eclipse Notes.” Nature, 26 (May 12, 1882): 51-52, and, (June 1, 1882): 100-101. “Scientific Results of the Eclipse.” Nature, 26 (June 22, 1882): 181-182.]


1882 May 17 / On a photo of the eclipse, as observed at Sohag[, Egypt], was seen a bright comet near outer limit of corona. / Dolmage, Astronomy of Today, p. 95. [V; 852. Dolmage, Cecil Goodrich Julius. Astronomy of To-Day. 3rd ed. London: Seeley, 1910, 95 & Plate 1. Comet X/1882 K1.]


1882 May 17 / obj near in eclipse / Nature, 26/52 / Telegram from Times Special Correspondent with the English expedition to Egypt to observe the total eclipse of the sun of May 17; that a "fine comet" had been discovered close to the sun, its position determined by photographs. / Chambers, Story Comets—226. / (CR 94/1637). [V; 853.1, 853.2. “The Total Eclipse.” Nature, (May 18, 1882): 52. Trépied, Charles. “Eclipse totale du 17 mai.” Comptes Rendus, 94 (1882): 1636-1642, at 1641. Chambers, George Frederick. The Story of the Comets.... Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1909, 226-227, (figure 106). Comet X/1882 K1.]


1882 May 19 / moon / On western side of Mare Crisium, by John G. Jackson, of Hockessin, Delaware. / See July 17. / A mist or cloud—not found next day. / E Mec 35-326. [V; 854. Jackson, John G. “Lunar Phenomena.” English Mechanic, 35 (no. 899; June 16, 1882): 326. See: 1882 July 17, (V; 897).]


1882 May 21 / NY Times, 2-5 / Ghost / Sea. [B; 401. “Capt. Drisko's Ghost Story.” New York Times, May 21, 1882, p. 2 c. 5.]


1882 May 21 / NY Times, 2-2 / Sunspots as seen in Indiana. [V; 855. “Gleanings from Indiana.” New York Times, May 21, 1882, p. 2 c. 2.]


1882 May 22 / 2:30 a.m. / Clinton, Iowa / det met / M.W.R., May. [V; 856. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 5; May 1882): 20-21.]


1882 May 24 / Augs / More—but myriads this time. / See Ap. 4. [V; 857. Cornillon, Hippolyte. “Corpuscles devant le Soleil.” Astronomie, 5 (1886): 429-430. See: 1882 April 4, (V; 821).]


1882 May 26 / NY Times, 5-2 / Moon / Jackson's phe. [V; 858. “A Lunar Phenomenon.” New York Times, May 26, 1882, p. 5 c. 2.]


1882 June / H. Houses / 61 and 64 E 125th Street / Light, July 15, from N.Y. Trib. [B; 402. “A Haunted House in Harlem, New York.” Light, 2 (no. 80; July 15, 1882): 330. “A Haunted House in Harlem.” New York Tribune, June 5, 1882., p. 2 c. 3.]


1882 June / night / Aerolite fell near Quequen, terrifying the inhabitants. / B. Ayres Standard, June 20 / not said found. [V; 859. (Buenos Ayres Standard, June 20, 1882.)]


1882 June 3 / (Fr) / Angers, Maine et Loire / Shep. Collection / See the Handbook on Smithson Coll. [V; 860. Merrill, George Perkins. Handbook and Descriptive Catalogue of the Meteorite Collections in the United States National Museum. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1916, 176. The "1882" date is an apparent misprint for 1822. See: 1822 June 3, (I; 952). This is the Angers meteorite.]


1882 June 7 / 9:45 p.m. / Bridport / met from 5 degrees above Castor to 10 below Mars / Astro Reg., 20-166. [V; 861. Johnson, Samuel J. “Bright White Meteor.” Astronomical Register, 20 (July 1882): 166.]


1882 June 8 / NY Times, 4-5 / Noah's Ark. [B; 403. “Schliemann's Latest.” New York Times, June 8, 1882, p. 4 c. 5-6.]


1882 June 14 and 23 / Sounds and qs / at Lulea, Sweden / 65, 40 N / 22, 7 E / 2 p.m. / 7:30 a.m. / Nature 26-231 / Q's and rumbling sounds supposed subterranean but, "There was no disturbance of the sea." [V; 862. “Notes.” Nature, 26 (July 6, 1882): 229-232, at 231.]


1882 June 16 / Hail—icicles—frogs—grass / June / (D-175) / Dubuque, Iowa. ** [V; 863. The note copies information from page 175 of The Book of the Damned. "Precipitation." Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 6; June 1882): 12-14, at 14.]


1882 June 17 / Great tornado / Iowa // 18 / Ill, Kansas, Mich // Sun., 19th and 20th // 22—Iowa / 25—Iowa, etc. // 23—Ohio / Sun, June 27-3-3. [V; 864. “Freaks of the Whirlwind.” New York Sun, June 27, 1882, p. 3 c. 3.]


1882 June 18, et. / That—reported from Maritzburg, a brilliant comet had for several days been seen near the sun. / Daily News 19-5-7. [V; 865. “South Africa.” London Daily News, June 19, 1882, p. 5 c. 7. Comet C/1882 F1.]


1882 June 19 / Comet? / Astro Reg 20/196 / See M. Notices. [V; 866. “A Comet.” Astronomical Register, 20 (August 1882): 196. Tebbutt, John. “Observations of Comet Wells, 1882, at WIndsor, New South Wales.” Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 43 (December 8, 1882); 52-62. Comet C/1882 F1.]


1882 June 16 / Hundreds of persons in B. Ayres watch the comet in N. West. / B.A Standard, 18th. [V; 867. (Buenos Ayres Standard, June 18, 1882.)]


1882 June 15 / See comet in South first seen Sept 12 etc., 1882. [V; 868. See: 1882 Sept 12, (V; 940).]


1882 June 15 / Comet first seen by H.C. Russell. Observatory at Sydney. Says it was Comet 1882a. On 20th its position was R.A. 7h, 37 m.; Dec N. 15h, 1 m. / Syd. Morn. Herald 21-6-5. / Moving from the sun and becoming fainter. [V; 869. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. “The Comet.” Sydney Morning Herald, June 21, 1882, p. 6 c. 5. Comet C/1882 F1.]


1882 June 15 / Ab. 6 p.m. to 6:30 beam in sky like comet's tail at B. Ayres / B.A. Standard, 20th. [V; 870. (Buenos Ayres Standard. June 20, 1882.)]


1882 June 16 / Tornado / Iowa / 300 houses destroyed / An. Reg. [V; 871. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 1882: pt. 2, 1-135, at 24.]


1882 June 17 / Comet / Nothing in Cape Argus (Weekly Ed.) [V; 872.]


1882 June 26, etc. / (obj Venus) / In the Missionary Herald for Nov., 1882, Dr Nichols wrote from Bailundo, West-Central Africa. Wrote that a "notable comet" had been seen near Venus for week. Gen Hazen, of the Signal Service, Washington, inquired. Dr Nichols answered that the object had a small well-def[ined] nucleus. / Science 1/498. [V; 873.1, 873.2. "Intelligence has been received from Bailunda...." Missionary Herald, 78 (no. 11; November 1882): 409. "June 26 he wrote also, 'There has been a notable comet hanging in the sky near Venus for weeks, but the natives, so far from feeling any superstitious dread, seem utterly indifferent to it.' There is a light hanging in the sky over Bailunda, which is not that of a comet." “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 1 (June 1, 1883): 497-500, at 498. Bailundo, Angola.]


1882 June 17 / This obj near sun in south—when sun almost farthest north. [V; 874.]


1882 June 17 / night / Tornadoes / Iowa. [V; 875. “Destructive Storms.” New York Sun, June 19, 1882, p. 1 c. 6.]


[1882 June 19. Wrong date. See: 1882 July 19, (V; 876).]


1882 June 21-22 / night / Fog such as had never been seen before at B. Ayres. / BA Standard, 23rd. [V; 877. (Buenos Ayres Standard, June 23, 1882.)]


1882 June 17 / Comet / at Pietermaritzburg, Natal / Times of Natal, 19th—"A large sized comet was observable in the heavens on Saturday evening (17th). It seemed to be a very short distance from the moon. The nucleus appeared very brilliant and the tail of a good length. It was not observable after 7 o'clock, as the Town-hill at that time hid it from view." [V; 878.1, 878.2. (Times of Natal, June 19, 1882.)]


1882 June 17th / Times of Natal of 20th—On 17th at Lynedoch at 6:30 p.m. on 17th it was in the N.W. by N. when the head on level with horizon, tail 30 degrees toward zenith. [V; 879. (Times of Natal, June 20, 1882.)]


1882 June 17 / Times of Natal, of 26th / "The comet now visible was first discovered in America on the 18th of March, and on the 19th was noticed at the Ob. of Kiel. Its orbit as calculated by Dr. Oppenheimer, of Berlin. Gave the epoch of perihelion passage as June 16th, and it was then announced that we might look for a naked eye view about a fortnight or so before perihelion. Subsequent observations at Rome, Harvard, and Vienna showed some errors in the first calculations, and gave the time of perihelion passage as June 10th. From observations taken by Dr. Oppenheimer from April 6th to 14th, the mean of the perihelon distance from the earth was found to be less than 1/10th of the mean distance of the earth from the sun.: So close to the sun. [V; 880.1 to 880.4. (Times of Natal, June 26, 1882.)]


1882 June 16 / Severe shock in northern parts of South Australia / Brisbane Courier, 23rd. [V; 881. “South Australia.” Brisbane Courier, June 23, 1882, p. 3 c. 7.]


1882 June 16 / Comet seen at Claremont, Queensland at 6 p.m. and set at 6:40 p.m., bearing north "80° west from Claremont.” / Brisbane Courier, 19th. [V; 882. “Queensland News.” Brisbane Courier, June 19, 1882, p. 3 c. 6.]


1882 June 15 / Comet / Australia / Brisbane Courier, 21st, says comet was seen first on 15th. Then weather too unfavorable till night of 20th-21st. It was conspicuous in N-W sky and was moving rapidly eastward. Change of place from night to night very noticeable. Nucleus was in Gemini, tail to southern part of Cancer. So increasing altitude from sun. [V; 883.1, 883.2. “Wednesday, June 21, 1882.” Brisbane Courier, June 21, 1882, p. 2 c. 7. Comet C/1882 F1.]


1882 June / In South Africa the comet was supposed to be Comet 1882a (Wells). In Astro Reg, last recorded ob on this was on June 7 by Mr Barber, of Spondon, Derby, who saw it at 8:30 p.m. ab 10 minutes after sunset. Then no mention of the Comet in the south except the one copied here—by the sea Capt. / (No comet listed bet a of March and b of September.) [V; 884.1, 884.2. “A Comet.” Astronomical Register, 20 (August 1882): 196. Comet C/1882 F1.]


1882 June 17 / Meteor / "At Gladstone (Queensland) a meteor, resembling a ball of red fire, dropped vertically on Saturday (17th). It separated in three parts, lighting up the whole town, and a sound resembling thunder followed, lasting thirty seconds." / Sydney Morning Herald, 19th. [V; 885.1, 885.2. “Queensland.|” Sydney Morning Herald, June 19, 1882, p. 5 c. 7.]


1882 June 19 / Lat 28-48 S. / Long 38-17 W. / Capt Gillies, of the Royal Mail steamship Neva. saw a comet bearing N. 60° W. (true) ten degrees above horizon, tail toward zenith, ab 5 degrees long. / Astro Reg 20-196. [V; 886. “A Comet.” Astronomical Register, 20 (August 1882): 196. Comet C/1882 F1.]


1882 June 21 / Tree-like protuberance on sun / 26th, vast flame / on 28th, spots in the same place / R—Sept 26, '79. [V; 887. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 215-223, at 221-222, (figures 68. 69a, 69b, & 69c).]  


[1882 June 22. Wrong date. See: 1881 July 22, (V; 888).]


1882 June 25 / Trib, 9-1 / q's of 1881. [V; 889. “Earthquakes in 1881.” New York Tribune, June 25, 1882, p. 9 c. 1.]


1882 June 30 / night / Great det met / Muskegon, Mich / Sci Amer 47-52. [V; 890. "Fall of Meteors." Scientific American, n.s., 47 (July 22, 1882): 52.]


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

1882 July 1 / Kinston, N. Car. / bet. 8 and 9 p.m. / "terrific meteoric explosion” jarring windows and lighting up the streets / heard and seen ab. 9:30, New Berne, and Chim / M.W.R., July. [V; 891. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 7; July 1882): 18-20, at 18.]


1882 July 3 / (Cut) / triangular lights, then patches on moon / Lebanon, Conn. / D-255. ** [V; 892. The note copies information from page 255 of The Book of the Damned. ("A curious appearance of the Moon." Scientific American, n.s., 46 (January 28, 1882): 49. The date of the observation would probably be in 1881, (not 1882).)]


1882 July 6 / Slim obj (Jersey City) passed near Polaris and to Capricornus. / Sci Amer 47-53 / D-275. [V; 893. The note copies information from page 275 of The Book of the Damned. (N.S. Drayton. "A supposed meteor." Scientific American, n.s., 47 (July 22, 1882): 53.)]


1882 July 9 / MWR 07-391 / 7:50 p.m. / Arizona—met train—10 minutes. [V; 894. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (September 1907): 390-397, at 391.]


[1882 July 11 /]1882 Aug / Ice—80 lbs / Salina, Kansas / D-177. ** [V; 906. The note copies information from pages 177 to 178 of The Book of the Damned. "An Eighty Pound Hailstone." Scientific American, n.s., 47 (August 19, 1882): 119. “Considerable excitement....” Saline County Journal, (Salina, Kansas), July 13, 1882, p. 3 c. 3. “Considerable excitement was caused in our city last Tuesday evening by the announcement that a hail stone weighing 80 pounds had fallen six miles west of Salina, near the railroad track. An inquiry into the matter, revealed the following facts: A party of railroad section men were at work Tuesday afternoon, several miles west of town, when the hail storm came upon them. Mr. Martin Ellwood, the foreman of the party, relates that near where they were at work hail stones of the weight of four or five pounds were falling, and that returning towards Sallna, the stones increased in size, until his party discovered a huge mass of ice weighing as near as he could judge, in the neighborhood of 80 pounds. At this place the party found the ground covered with hail as if a wintry storm had passed over the land. Besides securing the mammoth chunk of ice, Mr. Ellwood secured a hail stone something over a foot long, three or four inches in diameter, and shaped like a cigar. These 'specimens' were placed upon a hand-car and brought to Salina. Mr. W.J. Hagler, the north Santa Fe merchant, became the possessor of the larger piece, and saved it from dissolving by placing it in saw dust at his store. Crowds or people went down to see it Tuesday afternoon, and many were the theories concerning the mysterious visitor. At evening its dimensions were 9x16x22 inches. Many considered it a fraud of the first water. Mr. Ellwood's statement is straight-forward, and he evidently believes that it was ice that came from the upper regions. He is known to be a reliable, honest man, and cannot possibly be a party to a fraud. The theory that the ice came from some passing railroad train does not seem to find favor, as it was some 100 feet from the track when found. In appearance it seems to have been worn and ground and perforated by the elements. Some think that the block may have been picked up from some destroyed ice house by the electric storm which evidently occupied the upper air Tuesday afternoon, and then deposited where it was found. It was imbedded some inches in the ground.”]


1882 July 13 / 6 p.m. / Siena, Italy. Violent q's. / An. Reg. [V; 895. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 1882: pt. 2, 1-135, at 28.]


1882 July 15 / obj—invalid / Religio-Phil Jour, 6-1, from N.Y. Sun / Boarding house, 52 Willoughby St., Brooklyn, kept by Mr and Mrs William Swift, formerly of Boston. In back parlor raps and several times a floating vaporous body shaped like a football. The effect was like an electric shock to one of the occupants, who was sick in bed. Loud raps. [B; 404.1, 404.2. "Mysterious Doings." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 23 (no. 20; July 15, 1882): 6, (c. 1). “Strange Stories.” New York Sun, June 25, 1882, p. 7 c. 2.]  


1882 July 15 / 11:55 p.m. / Large meteor / 20 seconds / N.Y. City / S. to N. / Sun, 6-1-2. [V; 896. “A Meteor.” New York Sun, July 16, 1882, p. 1 c. 2.]


1882 July 16 / NY Times, 2-2 / Lightning / soldiers. [B; 405. “Lightning Flash Through a Depot.” New York Times, July 16, 1882, p. 2 c. 2.]


1882 July 17 / Jackson writes saw mist again. See May 19. / E. Mec., 35-497. [V; 897. Jackson John G. “Feathery Mist on the Moon.” English Mechanic, 35 (no, 906; August 4, 1882): 497-498. “I am much impressed with the idea that volcanic action is constantly going on in that vicinity of a very interesting character, and that the evanescent 'cloud' is but one of its manifestations.” See: 1882 May 19, (V; 854).]


1882 July 17 / Laibach / Zeit Met 17/439. [V; 899. Earthquake. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 17 (1882): 427-445, at 439-440.]


[1882 July 19 /] 1882 June 19 / qs / Caucasia and Mexico / BA '11 / Sims / See Feb 18, 1889. [V; 876. Milne, 730. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1882 July 19 / Mexico / great q / [BA] '11. [V; 900. Milne, 730.]


1882 July 20 / N.Y. Times, 3-2 / Moon / Jackson's obj. [V; 898. Jackson, John G. “The Cloud on the Moon.” New York Times, July 20, 1882, p. 3 c. 2. See: 1882 May 19, (V; 854), and, 1882 July 17, (V; 897).]


1882 July 20 / 4 a.m. / q. / Cairo, Ill / M.W.R., July. [V; 901. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 7; July 1882): 18-20, at 19.]


1882 July 21 / about noon [12:15 P.M.] / Loud detonation heard at Rome / L'Astro 2/110. [V; 902. “Explosion d'un bolide.” Astronomie, 2 (1883): 110-111.]


1882 July 22 / met / Sci Am of / Ac to capt and sec officer of a ship that arrived in Dundee in June an immense meteorite had fallen into the sea a few cables' lengths from the ship. [V; 903. "Fall of Meteors." Scientific American, n.s., 47 (July 22, 1882): 52. The location given was latitude 51° South and 80° West, in the south of the Indian Ocean. (Nothing found in search of BNA.)]


1882 July 24 / English steamer Florence, 20 miles s.w. of Dungeness in a snow storm which lasted 10 minutes. / An. Reg. [V; 904. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 1882: pt. 2, 1-135, at 31. Rawlings, George. “Snow in July.” London Times, July 29, 1882, p. 4 c. 6.]


1882 July 28 / q / Ironton, Mo / AJ. Sci 3-25-356. [V; 905. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 12.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 25 (1883): 353-360, at 357.]


[1882 Aug. Wrong date. See: 1882 July 11, (V; 906).]


1882 Aug 1 / 6 p.m. // 15 / 10:30 a.m. // qs / mouth of St Lawrence / Am J. Sci 3-25-357. [V; 907. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 12.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 25 (1883): 353-360, at 357.]


1882 Aug 2 / Pavlovka, Saratov, Russia / (F). [V; 908. Fletcher, 105. This is the Pavolvka meteorite.]


1882 Aug 2 / moon / 11 h., 15 m / by Miss Ashley / several dark spots and long dark streaks in Mare Nectaris / (Astro Reg 21-68). [V; 909. Richards, Walter John Bruce. “Lunar Work for March, 1883.” Astronomical Register, 21 (March 1883): 68.]


1882 Aug 4 / night / Unprecedented rainfall / Lexington, Ohio / Sun 5-1-5. [V; 910. “Flood in Ohio.” New York Sun, August 5, 1882, p. 1 c. 5.]


1882 Aug 4 / ab. 10 p.m. / Auroral beam like comet tail nearly parallel to Chi and Psi Ursae Majoris and pointing toward Eta / Bloomington, Ind / Sc Am 47-117. [V; 911. Wylie, Theophilus Adam. “Auroral Phenomenon.” Scientific American, n.s., 47 (August 19, 1882): 117.]


1882 Aug 4 / Aurora and Met / Aurora / N.Y. / and a meteor at 11:15 / at Poughkeepsie, auroral belt and several meteors / plain aurora at Cincinnati / Sun 5-1-4. [V; 912. “A Spectacle in the Sky.” New York Sun, August 5, 1882, p. 1 c. 4.]


1882 Aug 4 / N.Y. / aurora and "fall of three meteors from the bowl of the Dipper” / Sc Am 47-112. [V; 913. “A Recent Aurora.” Scientific American, n.s., 47 (August 19, 1882): 112.]


1882 Aug. 4 / Montclair, N.J. / Aurora—man heard "at intervals of perhaps half a second each, separate short taps on the telephone diaphragm that gave a slight ringing sound.” / Sc Am 47/113. [V; 914. “Hearing the Aurora by Telephone.” Scientific American, n.s., 47 (August 19, 1882): 113.]


1882 Aug 5 / NYT, 2-7 / Aurora. [V; 915. “Another Auroral Display.” New York Times, August 5, 1882, p. 2 c. 7.]


1882 Aug 5 / Sept 13, 15, 17 // Spots / Jupiter // Observatory 5-303. [V; 916. Denning, William Frederick. “The Markings on Jupiter.” Observatory, 5 (1882): 303.]


1882 Aug 9 / 9 p.m. / Nashville, Tenn / met train / 2 minutes / MWR 07-391. [V; 917. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (September 1907): 390-397, at 391.]


1882 Aug 12 / 3 a.m. / Nashville, Tenn / met train / ab 1 minute / MWR 07-391. [V; 918. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (September 1907): 390-397, at 391.]


1882 Aug 12 / NY Times, 2-7 / Meteoric shower near NY City. [V; 919. “The Expected Meteoric Shower.” New York Times, August 12, 1882, p. 2 c. 7.]


1882 Aug. 13 / met / noon / Dark object seen to fall in Jamaica Bay / no detonation / Sun 16-1-7. [V; 920. “Hurled Out of the Air.” New York Sun, August 16, 1882, p. 1 c. 7.]


1882 Aug 14 / 4:25 a.m. / q. / Couchey, etc. (Côte d'Or) / 3rd in 3 years / C.R. 95-398. [V; 921. Guillemot, J. “Observations sur un tremblement de terre ressenti à Couchey (Côte-d'Or)” Comptes Rendus, 95 (1882): 398.]


1882 Aug 15 / Fires in different towns on or about 15th / Sun 16-1-4. [B; 406. “Fires Throughout the Land.” New York Sun, August 16, 1882, p. 1 c. 4.]


1882 Aug 18 / 10:30 p.m. / Nashville, Tenn / met train / ab. 3 minutes / MWR 07-391. [V; 922. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (September 1907): 390-397, at 391.]


1882 Aug 19 / 1:30 a.m. / Nashville, Tenn. / 1:30 a.m. / met train 32 seconds / MWR 07-391. [V; 923. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (September 1907): 390-397, at 391.]


1882 Aug 21-23 / Sept. 20 / Dec. 21 // W. Picard / by Williams / not op. Mars / Astro Reg 21-109. [V; 924. Williams, Arthur Stanley. “The White Spot West of Picard.” Astronomical Register, 21 (May1883): 109-112, at 111-112.]


1882 Aug 27 / 10:35 p.m. / Russell, Kansas / Whirlwind struck town, bounded upward where ab 2 miles high looked like a large revolving ball—preceded and followed by calm. / M.W.R., August. [V; 925. “Winds.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 8; August 1882): 14-15, at 14.]


1882 Aug. 29 / Pirgunje, Bengal, India / (F). [V; 926. Fletcher, 105. This is the Pirgunje meteorite.]


1882 Aug 30 / Ice / Davenport, Iowa / (D-176). ** [V; 927. The note copies information from page 176 of The Book of the Damned. “Precipitation.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 10; October 1882): 15-16, at 15.]


1882 Sept. 2 / 7:35 p.m. / Met. / Paris / L.A. Sci 26-17. [V; 928. "Bolides, Météorites." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 26 (1882): 16-18, at 17.]


1882 Sept 3 / Flies / LT-6-5-d / That on 3rd, between 1 and 2 p.m., "an extraordinary cloud of winged insects passed over Woolwich". First came a host of large flies, seemingly over the Thames from the Essex meadows. Then came "a dense host" of small drab light-colored insects which "filled the air like a misty rain, and smothered the clothing of all who where abroad". The cloud of insects was ab 2 miles wide and was ½ hour in passing. [V; 929.1, 929.2. “A Plague of Flies.” London Times, September 6, 1882, p. 5 c. 4.]


1882 Sept 3 / bet. 1 and 2 p.m. / Woolwich, Eng / Unusual number of larger flies and after them a "dense host of small drab-colored and light-winged insects,” cloud about 2 miles wide and occupied ½ hour in passing. / Sc Am. 47/242. [V; 930. “A Plague of Flies.” Scientific American, n.s., 47 (October 14, 1882): 242. “A Plague of Flies.” Dundee Evening Telegraph, September 5, 1882, p. 2 c. 1. ]


1882 Sept / Comet still visible Jan 10, 1883 / Knowledge 3/122. [V; 931. “The Great Comet―Magnetic Storm.” Knowledge, o.s, 3 (February 23, 1883): 122. Comet C/1882 R1 was still seen with the naked eye at Rio de Janeiro.]


1882 Sept / Sept 3 Comet seen at Auckland / Nature 27/108. [V; 932. Williams, C.J.B. “The Comet.” Nature, 27 (November 30, 1882): 108-110. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept / An October observation / myst disap of the comet / Nature 27/5 But see p. 29 (Miller). See p. 101. [V; 933. “The Comet.” Nature, 27 (November 2, 1882): 5-6. “The Comet.” Nature, 27 (November 9, 1882): 29-30. Herschel, John. “The Comet.” Nature, 27 (November 30, 1882): 101. John Herschel stated that he failed to see the comet on October 23; and, though others claimed to have seen it at that time, Herschel insisted that it had disappeared. “I have in fact seen the comet frequently since—as well as many times before—and am moreover  really experienced enough not to have made quite so gross a blunder; or at least to have found it out, it, when so many subsequent opportunities permitted.”]


1882 Sept 7 / Shock at Panama. Noted, as a remarkable fact, that all following shocks were between midnight and dawn. / L.T., Dec 13-11-f. [V; 934. “Earthquakes at Panama.” London Times, December 13, 1882, p. 11 c. 6.]


1882 Sept 7 / q. / Panama / Shocks continued 3 or 4 weeks. / BA 1911-43. [V; 935. Turner, Herbert Hall, et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 43.]


1882 Sept 7 / Tidal wave / Coast of San Blas, Panama / L.T., Nov 8-10-d / swept away villages. [V; 936. “Destructive Tidal Wave.” London Times, November 8, 1882, p. 10 c. 4.]


1882 Sept 7 / The comet in Australia / Nature 27-56. [V; 937. “The Comet.” Nature, 27 (November 16, 1882): 56-57. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. “Another Comet.” Sydney Morning Herald, September 9, 1882, p. 13 c. 5. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 7 / Earthquake wave / 3 villages swept away / Coast of San Blas / near Panama in Atlantic / Land and Water, Nov 11, p. 390. [V; 938. (Land and Water, November 11, 1882, p. 390.)]


1882 Sept 9 / Disap. / coat found / man said been seen later / Sydney Daily Telegraph, Jan 9, 1883. [B; 407. “A Mysterious Affair.” Sydney Daily Telegraph, January 9, 1883, p. 3 c. 5.]


1882 Sept 11 / [L], 4-a / Waterspout / Cuba / Time of phe, Cent Amer, Sep 7? /// B. [V; 939. “Cuba.” London Times, September 11, 1882, p. 4 c. 1.]


1882 Sept 12 / See comet in south. / June 15, 1882. [V; 940. See: 1882 June 15, (V: 868-870). Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 12 / Comet seen in Madras, ac to a cor. / Knowledge 3/59 / See Jan. 10. [V; 941. “The Comet.” Knowledge, o.s., 3 (January 26, 1883): 59. See: 1883 Jan 10, (V; 1092). Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 7 / But honors went to Dr. Cruls of Rio. / The comet discovered at Cape Town attributed by Dr David Gill to Mr. Finlay of the Cape Observatory, though he mentions that "There was something said about the comet having been seen on the previous day by a person travelling in a postcart". He says it is quite certain that no observations of value could have been made from the top of a post cart. Therefore the honor belonged to Mr. Findlay. Seen 6th or 7th in S. Af. and not till 27th in Europe. / See an "astro" note. / E. Mec 36/268. [V; 942.1, 942.2, 942.3. “The Great Comet As Seen at Cape Town.” English Mechanic, 36 (no. 922; November 24, 1882): 268. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept. / Comet / Ac to Mr. S.C. Chandler, of Harvard, elements, showed "a remarkable resemblance to those of Comet I. 1880 and I. 1843. / Observatory 5/320. [V; 943. “The Great Comet of 1882.” Observatory, 5 (1882): 319-325, at 320. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept / Comet, etc. / Observatory 5/320 / Said been cloud banks so comet not seen in N Europe before. [V; 944. “The Great Comet of 1882.” Observatory, 5 (1882): 319-325, at 320. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept. 8 / Lebanon, Pa / during a heavy th. storm a meteor weighing 1 lb. and 11 ounces / Sc Am 47/194. [V; 945. “Fall of a Meteor.” Scientific American, n.s., 47 (September 23, 1882): 194. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 9; September 1882): 26-29, at 27. (Lebanon Daily News, September 23, 1882, p. 1; @ Newspapers.com. The date of the fall was also given as September 7, 1882.)]


1882 Sept 10 / Comet "discovered" in Chili / Revue Scientifique 3/5/159. [V; 946. “La grande comète australe de 1882.” Revue Scientifique de la France et de l'Étranger, s. 3 v. 5 (February 3, 1883): 158-159. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 12 / Comet first seen in Madras / Knowledge 3/59. [V; 947. “The Comet.” Knowledge, o.s., 3 (January 26, 1883): 59. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept. 14 / Comet seen at Observatory of Chapultepec, Mexico. Nucleus like star of second mag. It was in constellation Sexlaus Uraniae, a little below and ab. half way between Alpha Hydrae [Alphard] and Regulus, between 5 and 6 a.m. 5:48 was sunrise. / Science 1-320. [V; 948.1, 948.2. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 1 (April 20, 1883): 320-322, at 320. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 13-16 / Great changes of a sunspot / L'Astro 1/390. [V; 949. Dessans, J. “Transformation curieuse d'une tache solaire.” Astronomie, 1 (1882): 390-392, (illustrations).]


1882 Sept 8, 13 / (J) / White spot on Jupiter large and very bright. On 17th very faint. / By A. Stanley Williams / Observatory 5-302. [V; 950. Williams, Arthur Stanley. "A Remarkable White Spot on Jupiter." Observatory, 5 (1882): 300-303, at 302.]


1882 Sept. 13 / At Plombières (Vosges), ab. minuit sound like gunfire and concussion. / L.A. Sci 26-271. [V; 951. "Un tremblement de terre a été ressenti à Plombières...." Scientifique et Industrielle, 26 (1882): 270-271.]


1882 Sept. 13 / evening / Slight shock / Caledonia, Livingston Co, N.Y. / Am J. Sci 3-25-356. [V; 952. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 12.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 25 (1883): 353-360, at 357.]


1882 Sept 13 / Comet seen in Mexico. Confirmed on 14th at Observatory of Chapultepec. / Science 1-320. [V; 953. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 1 (April 20, 1883): 320-322, at 320. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 14 / evening / Tornado / N.Y. and Conn / Sun 15-1-7 / 16-1-5. [V; 954. “Tornado in Connecticut.” New York Sun, September 15, 1882, p. 1 c. 7. “Connecticut's Cyclone.” New York Sun, September 16, 1882, p. 1 c. 5. Only severe wind and thunderstorms were reported in New York.]


1882 Sept 16 / The Comet / West Indies / Sun 27-1-6 / Oct 6-1-4. [V; 955. “A Comet with a Hook-shaped Tail.” New York Sun, September 27, 1882, p. 1 c. 6. “The Comet's Head Broken.” New York Sun, October 6, 1882, p. 1 c. 4. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 16 / Comet / Trib, 2-6 / 20-5-1 / 21-7-3 / Oct 8-9-2 / 26-1-3 / 29-9-1 / 31-3-6 / Dec 20-2-2. [V; 956. “The Comet in South America.” New York Tribune, September 16, 1882, p. 2 c. 6. “An Extraordinary Comet.” New York Tribune, September 20, 1882, p. 5 c. 1. “Return of an Old Visitor.” New York Tribune, September 21, 1882, p. 7 c. 3. “The Comet Cruls.” New York Tribune, October 8, 1882, p. 9 c. 2. “Observations of the Comet.” New York Tribune, October 26, 1882, p. 1 c. 3. “The Orbits of the Comet.” New York Tribune, October 29, 1882, p. 9 c. 1. “Observations of the Comet.” New York Tribune, October 31, 1882, p. 1 c. 6. “The Orbit of the Great Comet.” New York Tribune, December 20, 1882, p. 2 c. 2. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 16 / L.T. / M. [Luiz] Crul's announcement of the comet / Here we see how identified as Pons of 1812. With only one observation upon it, M Cruls says "It is probably the expected Comet Pons of 1812. [V; 957. (London Times, September 16, 1882.) Comet C/1882 R1. The Comet Pons of 1812, (12P/Pons-Brooks), had an orbit calculated by Encke as 70 years, but it was not rediscovered until September 2, 1883, by William Robert Brooks.]


1882 Sept 17 / At 10:45 seen in England, approaching the sun—west of it ab 6 minutes and ab ⅓ degree south. / L.T. 18-4-d. [V; 958. “The Comet.” London Times, September 18, 1882, p. 4 c. 4. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 17? / At noon, ac to a Melbourne newspaper, comet "plainly seen with the naked eye as a very bright object within 4° of the sun.” / E Mec 36/294. [V; 959. Webb, Thomas William. “The Great Comet.” English Mechanic, 36 (no. 923; December 1, 1882): 294. “The Comet.” Otago Daily Times, October 3, 1882, p. 3 c. 3. “The Comet.” The Age, (Melbourne), September 25, 1882, p. 3 c. 7. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 17 / Distance / Sun so close that when sun in the south (Sept 17-19, 1881), comet near it. Reported from S. Amer. and S.A. In north from Spain, Italy, etc. / See C.R./95/558. / Observatory 5/354. Like orbits of '43 and 80. Was seen at Cordova late as March 7, 1883. Then far from sun. / Later. See Observatory. [V; 960.1, 960.2, 960.3. “M. C. Flammarion communique à l'Académie des dépèches....” Comptes Rendus, 95 (1882): 557-558. “Meeting of the Royal Astronomical Society, Friday, 1882, November 10.” Observatory, 5 (1882): 349-358, at 354-355. Kreutz, Heinrich. “Ephemeris of the Great Comet, b 1882.” Observatory, 6 (1883): 311. “We learn that Dr. B.A. Gould succeeded in observing it at Cordoba so late as June 1.” Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 16 / (Comet) / [New York Times], 3-1 / 15-2-6 / 16-1-3 / 17-1-7 / 19-1-7 / 20-5-3 / 21-2-1-7 / 22-2-4 / 23-5-3 (See Dec 20-2-3.) / 28-4-7 / 26-2-7 / 30-1-4 // Oct 6-1-4, [6]-2-6 / 7-1-4 / 8-9-1 / 10-1-5 / 11-2-4 / 12-5-6 / 14-8-5 / 15-1-6 / 17-2-3 / 18-1-6 / 22-2-2 / [25-1-6 /] 26-2-4 // Nov. 17-3-5 / 12-5-6 / 18-1-7 // Dec 17-4-3 / 23-2-7 / 20-2-3. [V; 961.1, 961.2. “A Brand-New Comet.” New York Times, September 15, 1882, p. 2 c. 6. “A Comet Visible to the Naked Eye.” New York Times, September 16, 1882, p. 3 c. 1. “Watching the New Comet.” New York Times, September 17, 1882, p. 1 c. 7. “A Comet Near the Sun.” New York Times, September 19, 1882, p. 1 c. 7. “A Comet Visible by Daylight.” New York Times, September 20, 1882, p. 5 c. 3. “The Comet Near the Sun.” New York Times, September 21, 1882, p. 2 c. 1-2. “How He Found Comet B.” New York Times, September 21, 1882, p. 2 c. 7. “Watching the Comet.” New York Times, September 22, 1882, p. 2 c. 4. “Studying the New Comet.” New York Times, September 23, 1882, p. 5 c. 3. “Watching the New Comet.” New York Times, September 24, 1882, p. 2 c. 7. (New York Times, September 26, 1882, p. 2 c. 7.) “Negroes Alarmed by the Comet.” New York Times, September 28, 1882, p. 4 c. 7. “Topics of Interest Abroad.” New York Times, September 30, 1882, p. 1 c. 4-5. “Peculiarities of the Comet.” New York Times, October 6, 1882, p. 1 c. 4. “The Four Comets of the Year.” New York Times, October 6, 1882, p. 2 c. 6. “A Guess About the Comet.” New York Times, October 7, 1882, p. 1 c. 4. “The Comet's Head Not Broken.” New York Times, October 8, 1882, p. 9 c. 1. “Changes in the Comet.” New York Times, October 10, 1882, p. 1 c. 5. “Observing the Great Comet.” New York Times, October 11, 1882, p. 2 c. 4. “Another Comet Discovered.” New York Times, October 12, 1882, p. 1 c. 6. “The Nucleus of the Comet.” New York Times, October 14, 1882, p. 8 c. 5. “Gossip From Indiana.” New York Times, October 15, 1882, p. 1 c. 6. “National Capital Topics.” New York Times, October 17, 1882, p. 2 c. 3. “A Comet Seen at Panama.” New York Times, October 18, 1882, p. 1 c. 6. “The Great Comet.” New York Times, October 22, 1882, p. 2 c. 2. “The Discoverer of the Comet.” New York Times, October 25, 1882, p. 1 c. 6. “Examining the Great Comet.” New York Times, October 26, 1882, p. 2 c. 4. “The Fading Morning Comet. New York Times, November 12, 1882, p. 5 c. 6. “New Light in Science.” New York Times, November 17, 1882, p. 3 c. 5. “Observing the Great Comet.” New York Times, November 18, 1882, p. 1 c. 7. “Queer Doings of the Comet.” New York Times, December 17, 1882, p. 4 c. 3. “The Orbit of the Great Comet.” New York Times, December 20, 1882, p. 2 c. 3. “The Wells Comet.” New York Times, December 23, 1882, p. 2 c. 7. Comets C/1882 F1, C/1882 R1, C/1882 R2, and C/1883 D1.]


1882 Sept 18 / An observation at sea (tropics) on comet / Nature 44-82. [V; 962. Ellacott, William. “A Comet observed from Sunrise to Noon.” Nature, 44 (May 28, 1891): 82. Ellacott owned a plantation on Ra'iātea and operated a trading ship in the Society Islands of French Polynesia. I saw, with the naked eye, the comet travel about 90° of the circle of the sun's disk, between sunrise and noon; but what made it most remarkable to us was that it should be possible for us, in a perfectly clear sky, to be able to watch it all, from sunrise to noon, with very little more distress to the eye than if in a clear night looking at a full moon.” The observation was made midway between Maupiti and Bora Bora, (16° 25' S., 151° 57 W.). Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 18 / Comet obs. but recorded later / Nature 44-82. [V; 963. Ellacott, William. “A Comet observed from Sunrise to Noon.” Nature, 44 (May 28, 1891): 82. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 18 / (+) / Comet / Suddenly appeared. Astronomers calculated differently in U.S. and Europe. / Sc Am 47-241. [V; 964. “The Great Comet of 1882.” Scientific American, n.s., 47 (October 14, 1882): 241. “Commander Sampson, Assistant Superintendent of the Naval Observatory, Washington, sends to the astronomers of Europe, this computation of the elements of the new comet as embodying the conclusions of the naval astronomers—24th of September, Washington mean time:” “Time of perihelion passage Sept. 17, noon.” “Longitude of perihelion 57° 23' 8''.” “Longitude of node 346° 26' 41".” “Inclination of orbit 142° 11' 40".” “Perihelion distance •0086. Closely resembling comet of 1880.” “Lord Crawford sends to the astronomers of America, through the Harvard Observatory, the following computation of the elements of the new comet—25th September, Greenwich mean time:” “Time of perihelion passage Sept. 17, 0h. 37m.” “Longitude of perihelion 48° 7' 58".” “Longitude of node 342° 39' 34".” “Inclination of orbit 140° 16' 46".” “Perihelion distance •003279.” “What can ordinary observers do when doctors disagree?” Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 17 / Southern Hem discovered / great comet near sun. / Look this up in U.S.A, etc? / Seemed to enter the sun. Seen near sun in Italy, Spain, Algeria, Southern France. / Clerke, His Astro / 359 / Plenty of obs in north in 1882. Outlying bodies seen in Oct. / great beam—tail. [V; 965.1, 965.2. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1st ed., (1885), 401-404; 4th ed., (1902), 358-361.


1882 Sept 20-22 / Great storm / Symons' Met Mag 17-168 / Ciel et Terre 4-310. [V; 966. “Great Rainfall in the North East of the United States." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 17 (December 1882): 168-170. “Les Pluies Extraordinaires.” Ciel et Terre, 4 (1883-1884): 310-311.]


1882 Sept 21 / [New York Sun], 3-1 / (q) /The Comet / 23-1-7. [V; 967. "The New Comet's Orbit." New York Sun, September 21, 1882, p. 3 c. 1. "It is worth while, to examine the question whether the observations of the present comet, combined with the discovery of Cruls on Sept. 10, can be reconciled with the supposition tthat this is a return of the 1880 comet. This has been done to-day by Prof. Boss with the startling result of an affirmative answer." "The New Comet's Position." New York Sun, September 23, 1882, p. 1 c. 7. Benjamin Boss of the Dudley Observatory, later, states:  "As computed by these gentlemen the accordance of the elements above given with those of the great comet of 1880 is all that could have been expected, even were it known to a certainty that the two bodies are one and the same. The perihelion distance of this comet 800,000 miles is among the four or five smallest on record. The element in the present computation which is theoretically the most certain is the inclination, and this, as has been seen, differs less than one degree from that of the 1880 comet. Furthermore, when the present elements are projected backward to find the place of the comet on Sept. 11, it is found that the place of the Rio Janeiro comet of that date is not very well represented. At that date the present comet must have been a bright object in the southern hemisphere, and could not fail to be detected. Since only one comet was reported by Cruls, there is no escape from the conclusion that one must have been identical with the one now seen. It follows, from the fact that the Cruls comet was west of the computed position, that the perihelion distance as now computed is considerably too great." "The most troublesome point in the case is the difficulty of supposing that the 1880 comet has suddenly been reduced from thirty-seven years to less than three." Plummer, William Edward. "The Great Comet of September 1882." Observatory, 12 (1889): 140-142. Using "upwards of a thousand" observations by "no less than sixty different observatories," Heinrich Kreutz re-calculated its orbit to discover a period of "772 years with a probable error of 2.9 years." "Dr. Kreutz raises the hypothesis that two bright comets may have been visible nearly simultaneously, and that the one of the two seen in daylight may have been an early apparition of the comet of 1882." If a comet is expected to return, calculate its orbit to agree with the prediction; if its calculated orbit disagrees with a contemporary observation, reduce its orbital period to agree with some other comets; and, if the orbital period is re-calculated to be too great for any predictions, suspect that two comets were mistaken as "one and the same" by the astronomers. Comet C/1882 R1 is now associated with C/1843 D1 and C/1880 C1 as one of the Kreutz Sungrazers, possible fragments of X/1106 C1. See: 1843 March, (II; 589).]


1882 Sept 20 / Moon / See Aug 21-23. [V; 968. See: 1882 Aug 21-23, (V; 924).]


1882 Sept 21 / Comet visible in morning daylight in Haiti / Sun, Nov 13-1-3. [V; 969. “The Comet's Effect in Hayti.” New York Sun, November 13, 1882, p. 1 c. 3. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Sept 27 / 4:20 a.m. / Somewhat severe q / Ill, Ind, Ky, Mo / See Oct 14-15. / Others reported from 2:15 a.m. to 5:05 a.m. / Am J. Sci 3-25-358. [V; 970. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 12.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 25 (1883): 353-360, at 358.]


1882 Sept 27 / from 3 to 4:30 [A.M.] / Shocks / Mo./ Ill / Ind. / Sun 28-1-6 / (MWR, Sept). [V; 971. “Earthquake in Missouri and Ilinois.” New York Sun, September 28, 1882, p. 1 c. 6. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 9; September 1882): 26-29, at 27-28.]


1882 Sept 29 / First sight of the comet, 4:40 a.m., Hong Kong / '82 / Nature 27/52 / So how about cloudy weather in N. Europe preventing. [V; 972. “The Comet.” Nature, 27 (November 16, 1882): 52. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1882 Oct. 2 / Auroral display and "remarkable nebulous meteor descending from the zenith, ac David Packer / E Mec 74/178. [V; 973. (English Mechanic, 74 (no. 1906; October 4, 1901): 178. David Elijah Packer.)]


1882 Oct 2 / Aurora / England / LT, 4-9-e. [V; 974. “The Aurora Borealis.” London Times, October 4, 1882, p. 9 c. 5.]


1882 Oct 2 / Aurora / Budapest, etc. / Zeit Met 17/438. [V; 975. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 17 (1882): 427-445, at 437-439.]


[1882 Oct 2 /] 1882 Oct 4 / Aurora climbing rel to stars. / C.R. 95-653 / In "Cocher". [V; 978. Renou, E. “Observation de l'aurore boréale du 2 octobre 1882.” Comptes Rendus, 95(1882): 651-653, at 653. “Cocher” is the constellation Auriga; however, it was not mentioned in this article]


1882 Oct 3 / Venus / transit / Dec 6. [V; 976. The transit of Venus occurred on December 6, 1882.]


1882 Oct 3 / [LT], 5-f / 4-9-e // Aurora. [V; 977. “Aurora Borealis.” London Times, October 3, 1882, p. 5 c. 6. “The Aurora Borealis.” London Times, October 4, 1882, p. 9 c. 5.]


[1882 Oct 4. Wrong date. See: 1882 Oct 2, (V; 978).]


1882 Oct. 4 / 7:50 p.m. / Dakota / met train / MWR 07-391. [V; 979. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (September 1907): 390-397, at 391.]


1882 Oct 9 / No sunspots / Science, Nov. 14, 1884. [V; 980. Todd, David Peck. “Sun-spots.” Science, s. 1 v. 4 (November 14, 1884): 453.]


1882 Oct 11 / N.Y.T., 4-7 / q. / Canada / Vol not found, Oct., 1922. [V; 981. “Earthquake in Canada.” New York Times, October 11, 1882, p. 4 c. 7.]


1882 Oct 12 / Shock "preceded by thunder" / South side Lake Geneva / Nature 26-611 / Night of 13th, shock at Geneva. [V; 982. “Notes.” Nature, 26 (October 19, 1882): 611-613, at 611.]


1882 Oct 13 / India / Assam / q / II / BA '11. [V; 983. Milne, 730.]


1882 Oct 13 / First of the shocks in Murcia, Spain. By Jan 19, 1883, had been 130. / D. News, Jan 20-6-7. [V; 984. “The Earthquakes in Spain.” London Daily News, January 20, 1883, p. 6 c. 7.]


1882 Oct 14 / Comrie / Wm. Roper / "List of Earthquakes” / See Ap 8 '86. [V; 985. (Roper,  .) See: 1886 April 8, (VI; 415).]


1882 Oct 14-15 / Region of Sept 27 again affected. / Am J. Sci 3-25-358 / See Nov. 14. / See Jan 11, 1883. [V; 986. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 12.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 25 (1883): 353-360, at 358-359. See: 1882 Nov 14, (V; 1015), and, 1883 Jan 11, (V; 1094).]


1882 Oct 14 / 3 a.m. / Comrie / shock and sound like booming of distant cannon / Nature 26-611. [V; 987. “Notes.” Nature, 26 (October 19, 1882): 611-613, at 611.]


1882 Oct 15 / q. / Illinois / series of qs / MWR, Oct. [V; 988. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 10; October 1882): 21-24, at 22-23.]


1882 Oct 14 / See / Cometary masses 6 degrees from great comet and not seen later. / Sun 31-2-6 / S lat. masses illuminated by comet? /// 1882 Nov 16 / Comet / Cor, Sun 17-2-5, writes that he saw a most brilliant comet morning of 16th above the great comet. / or—See Oct 14. [V; 989.1, 989.2. Barnard, E.E. “Strange Objects Near the Comet.” New York Sun, October 31, 1882, p. 2 c. 6. Scott, C.H., Jr. “It is the Same Comet.” New York Sun, November 17, 1882, p. 2 c. 5.]


1882 Oct 16 / [LT], 6-b / q / Scotland. [V; 990. “Earthquake in Scotland.” London Times, October 16, 1882, p. 6 c. 2.]


1882 Oct. 19-25 / Sunset glows in Spain time of mets. / See Dec. 10-11. [V; 991. See: 1882 Dec 10-11, (V: 1048 & 1049).]


1882 Oct. 21 / Typhoon / Manila / 20 vessels lost / L.T., Nov. 2-5-e / 29-10-f. [V; 992. “Manila.” London Times, November 2, 1882, p. 5 c. 5. (London Times, November??? 29, 1882, p. 10 c. 6.; Nov. 2-1-4?)]


1882 Oct. 22 / L / 4:19 o'clock (sic)  [p.m.] / q. / Wichita, Kansas / Sun 24-3-2 / (M.W.R.—Oct.)—Ar, Kan, Mo, Texas. [V; 993. “Earthquake in Kansas.” New York Sun, October 24, 1882, p. 3 c. 2. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 10; October 1882): 21-24, at 22.]


1882 Oct 22 / 12:10 a.m. / Greenville, Bond Co, Ill / slight q / A.J. Sci 3-25-359. [V; 994. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 12.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 25 (1883): 353-360, at 359.]


1882 Oct 24 / N.Y.T., 5-2 / q. / Kansas. [V; 995. “Kansas Feels an Earthquake.” New York Times, October 24, 1882, p. 5 c. 2.]


1882 Oct 24 / [LT], 5-6 / q / Sichar. [V; 996. (London Times, October 24, 1882, p. 5 c. 6.; not found here.)]


1882 Oct 25 / sunspots / Wicklow, Dakota / 3 large spots / n.e. / not quite like other reports / MWR, Oct. [V; 997. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 10; October 1882): 21-24, at 21.]


1882 Oct 25 / (J) / An intensely dark spot N of Red spot / on 29th almost entirely disappeared / by Denning / Observatory 5-375. [V; 998. Denning, William Frederick. “Changes on Jupiter.” Observatory, 5 (1882): 375-376.]


1882 Oct 25-Nov 5 / Streak of spots on Jupiter / L'Astro 2/50. [V; 999. Denning, William Frederick. “Observations de Jupiter.” Astronomie, 2 (1883): 49-51, at 50.]


1882 Oct. 27 / Town of Grindelwald, Switzerland / Cyclone, Almost every roof in the valley taken off. Similar disaster at Lugano. / L.T., Nov 4-5-e. [V; 1000. “Switzerland.” London Times, November 4, 1882, p. 5 c. 5.]


1882 Oct 27 / L.T., Nov 7-8-c / At G. it blew 24 hours. [V; 1001. “The Hurricane at Grindelwald.” London Times, November 7, 1882, . 8 c. 3.]


1882 Oct 31 / [LT], 5-f / Etna. [V; 1002. “Italy.” London Times, October 31, 1882, p. 5 c. 5-6.]


1882 Oct 31 / 2 p.m. / Sun shining brilliantly / Venus visible / Kandy, Ceylon / Land and Water, Dec. 2. [V; 1003. (Land and Water, December 2, 1882.)]


1882 Nov. / Serviss, in "Curiosities of the Sky", describes similar thing in New York. [V; 1004. Serviss., Garrett Putnam.  Curiosities of the Sky. New York: Harper, 1909. 147-148. "This exhibition occurred in Central New York, a latitude in which the Aurora Borealis is seldom seen with so much splendor. I remember another similar one seen from the city of New York in November, 1882. On this last occasion some observers saw a great upright beam of light which majestically moved across the heavens, stalking like an apparition in the midst of the auroral pageant, of whose general movements it seemed to be independent, maintaining always its upright posture, and following a magnetic parallel from east to west. This mysterious beam was seen by no less than twenty-six observers in different parts of the country, and a comparison of their observations led to a curious calculation indicating that the apparition was about one hundred and thirty-three miles tall and moved at the speed of ten miles per second!"]


1882 Nov. 1 / See Feb 12, 1883. [V; 1005. See: 1883 Feb. 12, (V; 1131).]


1882 / ab. Nov. 1 // Snow insects / Toronto Globe of Feb 10, 1883, from NY Sun / That upon decks of the British steamship Glenchester, from Hull to Montreal, during a snow squall fell in great numbers minute white insects. Sent to Philadelphia and identified as snow fleas of Eastern Siberia, never before that year having been seen anywhere else. Ac to a member of the Phil Ac Nat. Sciences they had been found in Philadelphia this season in great numbers during snowstorms. [V; 1006.1, 1006.2. (Toronto Globe, February 10, 1883.) (New York Sun, ca. Nov 1882-Feb 10'83.) (“The Snow Flea.” Butler Citizen, February 14, 1883, p. 1 c. 5.]


1882 Nov 3 / 12:20 a.m. / Brilliant meteor / New York City / Sun 3-1-6. [V; 1007. “A Brilliant Meteor.” New York Sun, November 3, 1882, p. 1 c. 6.]


1882 Nov 6 / (obj) / Said that an experienced observer had reported "a large, bright comet two hours preceding Aldebaran, due west.” / Sc. Am 50-153 / McKeesport, Pa. [V; 1008. “False Comets.” Scientific American, n.s., 50 (March 8, 1884): 153.]


1882 Nov. 8 / Ab. midnight, England, place not stated, vivid auroral flashes, at intervals of about a minute. Night cloudless. / Natural History Notes 3-11. [V; 1009. (Natural History Notes: A Monthly Magazine for Students, 3 (January 1883): 11; not online.)]


1882 Nov 8 / N.Y.T., 5-5 / 13-5-1 // q. / Colorado and Wyoming. [V; 1010. “Earthquake Shock in Wyoming.” New York Times, November 8, 1882, p. 5 c. 5. “Colorado's Earthquake.” New York Times, November 13, 1882, p. 5 c. 1.]


1882 Nov 12-25 / One of the greatest of sunspots / Flammarion, Pop. Astro., p. 291 / meridian on 18th. [V; 1011. Flammarion, Camille. Popular Astronomy: A General Description of the Heavens. New York: D. Appleton, 1894, 291-292.]


1882 Nov 12 / Trib, 9-1 / Meteors. [V; 1012. “The November Meteors.” New York Tribune, November 12, 1882, p. 9 c. 1.]


1882 Nov 12-25 / Sunspots / L'Astro 2/332. [V; 1013. Tacchini, Pietro. “Taches Solaires et Protuberances.” Astronomie, 2 (1883): 332-333.]


1882 Nov. 14 / N.Y.T., 1-6 / Aurora. [V; 1014. “Grand Auroral Display.” New York Times, November 14, 1882, p. 1 c. 6.]


1882 Nov 14 / See Oct 14-15. / light shock same region / A.J. Sci 3-25-359. [V; 1015. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 12.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 25 (1883): 353-360, at 359. See: 1882 Oct 14-15, (V; 986).]


1882 Nov 14 / q and local sunspots? / q / Panama / and steamship Capt reported 3 sunspots of extraordinary size. One on the lower left limb, like an ornamental letterpress T. / See if this acc to sunspots in Sc Am and M.W.R. / Sun 26-1-5. [V; 1016. “Earthquakes, Sun Spots, and High Tides.” New York Sun, November 26, 1882, p. 1 c. 5. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 11; November 1882): 19-21, at 19.]


1882 Nov 14-18 / Enormous sunspot change rapidly. / The Sunspot, Nov., 1925. [V; 1017. (The  Sunspot. (Santa Clara University??? v. 11; @ NYPL). November, 1925.)]


1882 Nov 14-19 / Magnetic storm earth-wide / The Sunspot, Nov., 1925.  [V; 1018. (The  Sunspot. (Santa Clara University??? v. 11; @ NYPL). November, 1925.)]


1882 Nov 15 / At this time enormous sunspot transforming rapidly / L.T. 20-6-f. [V; 1019. Brodie, Frederick. “Spot on the Sun.” London Times, November 20, 1882, p. 6 c. 6.]


1882 Nov. 17 / Aurora / great details / Nature 27-83. [V; 1020. “Magnetic Storm and Aurora.” Nature, 27 (November 23, 1882): 82-87.]


1882 Nov. 17 / In Norway electric disturbances accompanied by a sound said been thunder. But it is said that thunder is almost unknown this time of year in Norway. / Nature 27-89. [V; 1021. “Notes.” Nature, 27 (November 23, 1882): 88-91, at 89.]


1882 Nov. 17 / One of the largest of measured sunspots / Flammarion, Pop. Astro, p. 256. [V; 1022. Flammarion, Camille. Popular Astronomy: A General Description of the Heavens. New York: D. Appleton, 1894, 256.]


1882 Nov 17 / Great magnetic storm / E Mec 111/224 / Sc Am 47-353 / Cape Horn / Am J. Sci 3/25/308. [V; 1023. (English Mechanic, 111 (1920): 224.) “An Electric Storm.” Scientific American, n.s., 47 (December 2, 1882): 353. “Magnetic Storms.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 25 (1883): 308-309. Mascart, Éleuthère Élie Nicolas. “Observation d'un orage magnetique au cap Horn.” Comptes Rendus, 96 (1883): 329.]


1882 Nov 17 / Torpedo light / England and Holland / (D-281). ** [V; 1024. The note copies information from pages 280 to 281of The Book of the Damned. "The Aurora." Knowledge, o.s., 2 (November 24, 1882): 419-420. Capron, John Rand. "The Auroral Beam of November 17, 1882." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 5, 15 (1883): 318-339. "The Magnetic Storm and Aurora." Nature, 27 (November 23, 1882): 82-87. "The Aurora." Nature, 27 (November 30, 1882): 99-100. Groneman, H.J.H. "Remarks On and Observations of the Meteoric Auroral Phenomenon of November 17, 1882." Nature, 27 (January 25, 1883): 296-298. "The Aurora of November 17, 1882." Nature, 27 (February 1, 1883): 315. Saxby, Stephen H. "Meteor of November 17." Nature, 27 (February 8, 1883): 338. Taylor, H. Dennis. "Meteor of November 17." Nature, 27 (February 15, 1883): 365.  Groneman, H.J.H. "The Auroral Meteoric Phenomenon of November 17, 1882." Nature, 27 (February 22, 1883): 388. "The Auroral Meteoric Phenomenon of November 17, 1882." Nature, 27 (March 1, 1883): 412-413. H. Dennis Taylor. "The Meteoroid of November 17, 1882." Nature, 27 (March 8, 1883): 434. Groneman, H.J.H. "The True Orbit of the Auroral Meteoroid of November 17, 1882." Nature, 28 (May 31, 1883): 105-107. Maunder, Edward Walter. "The Auroral Beam of 1882, November 17." Observatory, 6 (1883): 192-193. Maunder, Edward Walter. "A Strange Celestial Visitor." Observatory, 39 (1916): 213-215. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, November 20, 1882, p. 6 c. 6. “I observed a most magnificent luminous mass, shaped somewhat like a torpedo, moving majestically from east to west over a large arc of the heavens....”]


1882 Nov. 17 / Aurora / France / 5:20 p.m. / formed in Cocher / luminous disk, etc. / C.R. 95-1013. [V; 1025. M. le Secrétaire Perpétuel communique à l'Academie quel-ques-uns des documents....” Comptes Rendus, 95 (1882): 1013-1015, at 1013. “Cocher” is the constellation Auriga.]


1882 Nov. 17 / Aurora / Germany / Austria / Zeit Met 17/473. [V; 1026. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 17 (1882): 468-490, at 473-475.]


1882 Nov 18 / Meridian of sunspot / See Nov 12. [V; 1027. See: 1882 Nov 12-25, (V; 1011).]


[1882 Nov. 18. Wrong date. See: 1881 Nov 18, (V; 1028).]


1882 Nov 19 / Great aurora / N.Y. / Sun 20-1-2. [V; 1029. “Another Brilliant Aurora.” New York Sun, November 20, 1882, p. 1 c. 2.]


1882 Nov. 19 / 1:10 a.m. / Met streak / ½ hour / Red Sea / Nature 27-149. [V; 1030. Branfill, Brydges Robinson. “An Extraordinary Meteor.” Nature, 27 (December 14, 1882): 149.]


1882 Nov. 20 / [LT], 6/f / Meteor. [V; 1031. Ramus, C.M. “A Meteor.” London Times, November 20, 1882, p. 6 c. 6.]


1882 Nov 20 / [LT], 6-f / Sunspot / Not accounted for in M.W.R.? [V; 1032. Brodie, Frederick. “Spot on the Sun.” London Times, November 20, 1882, p. 6 c. 6.]


1882 Nov 21 / N.Y.T., 8-2 / Aurora. [V; 1033. “A Brilliant Auroral Display.” New York Times, November 21, 1882, p. 8 c. 2.]


1882 Nov. 22 / NY Times, 5-2 / Sunspots // 26-5-6 / Sunspot seen at Panama. [V; 1034. “A Large Spot on the Sun.” New York Times, November 22, 1882, p. 5 c. 2. “Central and South America.” New York Times, November 26, 1882, p. 5 c. 6.]


1882 Nov. 23 / Springfield, Mass. / Large n.e. sunspot not accounted for—? / M.W.R., Nov. [V; 1035. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 11; November 1882): 19-21, at 20.]


1882 Nov. 27 / 6:30 p.m. / Severe shock along Welland Canal, bet. Lakes O and Erie. / A.J. Sci. 3-25-360. [V; 1036. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 12.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 25 (1883): 353-360, at 360.]


1882 Nov 29 / Rainstorm flooded Maritzburg, S. Af., so that a kaffir was drowned in a street. / L.T., Dec 26-3-c. [V; 1037. “South Africa.” London Times, December 26, 1882, p. 3 c. 3.]


1882 Nov 1, ab / See Feb. 12, 1883. [V; 1038. See: 1883 Feb. 12, (V; 1131).]


1882 Dec / L'Astro of / That metite reported to have fallen at Aix (Ariège) not true. [V; 1039. “Prétendue chute d'un uranolithe.” Astronomie, 1 (1882): 393.]


1882 Dec 1 / Breath Fire / N.Y. Sun, 2-5 / Statement by Dr. L.C. Woodman of Paw Paw, Mich., that he was convinced that phe of William Underwood, aged 27, were genuine. "It is certainly no humbug, but what is it? "He will take anybody's handkerchief and hold it to his mouth, rub it vigorously, with his hands, while breathing on it, and it immediately bursts into flames and burns until consumed. He will strip, and rinse out his mouth thoroughly, wash his hands, and submit to the most rigid examination to preclude the possibility of any humbug, and then by his breath blown upon any paper or cloth envelop it in flames. He will, when out gunning, lie down, after collecting dry leaves, and by breathing on them start a fire, and then cooly take off his wet stockings and dry them. It is impossible to persuade him to do this more than twice a day, and the effort is attended with the most extreme exhaustion. Said that he was unable to explain, and discovered the power when he breathed upon a handkerchief, which burst into flames. This statement of Dr. Woodman's ius copied from the Michigan Medical News. [B; 408.1 to 408.6. "The Remarkable Statement of a Paw Paw Physician." New York Sun, December 1, 1882, p. 2 c. 5. "A Singular Phenomenon." Michigan Medical News, 5 (no. 17; September 11, 1882): 263.]


1880 / [Dec 1, 1882] // fire-breath / Religio-Phil Jour, May 1, 1880, p. 6, copying from the Paw Paw Courier. / Negro, of Paw Paw, A.W. Underwood, aged 24—that from age of 12 could breath[e] articles afire. Reporter of Courier had set a piece of paper before a large crowd—The summer before, he out with a hunting party and had made a fire by breathing upon a handful of dried leaves. [B; 409.1, 409.2.  

"A Fiery Breath." Religio-Philosophical Journal, May 1, 1880): 6, (c. 1). (Paw Paw Courier, ca. 1880.)]


1882 Dec. 1 / Breathed things on fire / See 1927 // See May 1, 1880. [B; 410. See: 1880 May 1, (B; 289), and, (1927).]


1882 Dec 3 / No sun spots / Science, Nov. 14, 1884. [V; 1040. Todd, David Peck. “Sun-spots.” Science, s. 1 v. 4 (November 14, 1884): 453.]


1882 Dec. 4 / Henry Rich disap / no trace to—World, July 19, 1883. [B; 411. (New York World, July 19, 1883).]


1882 Dec 4 / Disap of Henry Rich / See June 4 '83. [B; 412. See: 1883 June 4, (B; 505).]


1882 Dec 6 / 9:19 a.m. / A group of spots observed at Stonyhurst Observatory, which ac to Rev. S.J. Perry were unlike any reported that day of the transit from any other observatory. They moved rapidly across the disk of sun. He thinks that a flock of wild birds hasd passed. / Astro Reg 21-85. [V; 1041.1, 1041.2. Perry, Stephen Joseph. “Sun Spot.” Astronomical Register, 21 (April 1883): 85-86.]


1882 Dec 6 / Light spot on Venus in transit, by Prof Langley. Considered by him inexplicable. / Sun 9-1-5. [V; 1042. “Prof. Langley's Mysterious Spot.” New York Sun, December 9, 1882, p. 1 c. 5.]


1882 Dec 6 / Inferior conj and transit Venus. [V; 1043.]


1882 Dec / For instance of Venus behind the sun, see Nov 28, 1894. [V; 1044. See: 1894 Nov. 28, (VII; 1172).]


1882 Dec 6 / Augs / (3) / Dark bodies that looked like sunspots but were reported nowhere else / visible about 3 seconds / had penumbra like sunspots—may have been flock of birds / Stonyhurst Observatory / Astro Reg 21-86. [V; 1045. Perry, Stephen Joseph. “Sun Spot.” Astronomical Register, 21 (April 1883): 85-86.]


1882 Dec 7-12 / 5 shocks in Almeria, Spain / L.T. 13-5-d. [V; 1046. “Spain.” London Times, December 13, 1882, p. 5 c. 4.]


1882 Dec 8 / N.Y. Sun, 3-2 / Home of Anthony Mors, "an untutored German,” Syracuse, N.Y. Sounds, gentle raps, and tremendous thumps that shook house and knocked off plaster. Always ab 10 p.m., and in one room of the house. 4 years before, Mrs. Havrouck, Mors' sister, had died, leaving her little daughter Mary, in his charge, and leaving him $500 to care for the child. A few months before, the child had been taken from Mors on the ground that she was ill-treated, and sent to an Orphan Asylum. Mors, believing that the sounds were protests by his dead sister, had applied for restoration of the child. [B; 413.1, 413.2, 413.3. “Frightened by Strange Noises.” New York Sun, December 8, 1882, p. 3 c. 2.]


1882 Dec 10-11 / Afterglow time of met stream / See Dec 10, 1886. [V; 1047. See: 1886 Dec 10, (VI; 953), and, 1882 Dec 10-11, (V; 1048).]


1882 Dec 10-11 / Afterglows at Paris. In C.R. 97-1450, M. Chapel notes they correspond with date of met swarm and says same lights in Spain with October mets of Oct 19-25. [V; 1048. Chapel. “Sur la coïncidence des phénomènes lumineux crépusculaires avec le passage des essaims cosmiques.” Comptes Rendus, 97 (1883): 1450-1451.]


1882 Dec 11 / 5:45 / p.m.? // Birkenhead / near // large met as if from Saturn / E Mec 36-337. [V; 1049. Espin, Thomas Henry Espinelle Compton. “A Fine Meteor.” English Mechanic, 36 (no. 925; December 15, 1882): 337.]


1882 Dec 10 / 2 a.m. / Hermagor (Carinthia) / q. preceded by a terrible th. storm / Nature 27-248. [V; 1050. “Notes.” Nature, 27 (January 11, 1883): 246-248, at 248.]


1882 Dec 12 / ab. 5 p.m. / Lat 38 sic / Long 134 sic / Great det met reported by an officer of U.S. steamer Alaska. Met cloud like great distaff. Aglow with bluish light. / Sun, Jan 2, '83, 1-6. [V; 1051. “A Brilliant Meteor Seen at Sea.” New York Sun, January 2, 1883, p. 1 c. 6.]


[1882 Dec 12 /] 1883 Dec 12 / 4:57 p.m. / at sea / Lat 38° N / Long 134° W / met and trail 15 minutes / Science 1/4 / Sc Am 48-22. [V; 1768. A Singular Meteoric Phenomenon.” Science, s. 1 v. 1 (February 9, 1883): 4-6. “Meteors.” Scientific American, n.s., 48 (January 13, 1883): 22.]


1882 Dec 14 / W. / Meteors in North and dust in South. [V; 1052.]


1882 Dec. 14 / Uralla, New S. Wales / red dust / Nature 67/47 / See Dec., 1880. [V; 1053. “Societies and Academies.” Nature, 67 (November 13, 1902): 45-48, at 47. Refer to: 1880 Dec 15, (V; 417). Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 36 (July, 10, 17, 24, and 31, 1903): 241-285, at 255-256.]


1882 Dec 17 / Trib, 9-1 / Sunspots. [V; 1054. “Magnetic Storms and Sun Spots.” New York Tribune, December 17, 1882, p. 9 c. 1.]


1882 Dec 17 / NY Times, 4-3. [V; 1055. “Queer Doings of the Comet.” New York Times, December 17, 1882, p. 4 c. 3.]


1882 Dec. 19 / 5:25 p.m. / q in New Hampshire and sound like of a heavy explosion / MWR, Dec. [V; 1056. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 12; December 1882): 23-26, at 24.]


1882 Dec. 20 / N.Y.T., 1-7 / q. New Hampshire / near Maine border? [V; 1057. “Earthquake in New Hampshire.” New York Times, December 20, 1882, p. 1 c. 7.]


1882 Dec 20 / Trib, 1-4 / q. / New Hampshire / See Dec. 31. [V; 1058. “Earthquake Shocks in New Hampshire.” New York Tribune, December 20, 1882, p. 1 c. 5. See: 1882 Dec. 31, (V: 1065, 1067, 1068, and 1069).]


1882 Dec. 21 / (Ch) / (B.D.) (275) / Bright object reported near the sun, Dec 21, 1882. / Knowledge 3/13. [V; 1059. The note copies information from page 275 of The Book of the Damned. Gore, John Ellard. “Bright Star Near the Sun.” Knowledge, o.s., 3 (January 5, 1883): 13. See: 1882 Dec 21, (V; 1062).]


1882 (Dec 21) / Gore's opinion that it was a new star. / Knowledge 3/13. [V; 1060. Gore, John Ellard. “Bright Star Near the Sun.” Knowledge, o.s., 3 (January 5, 1883): 13. See: 1882 Dec 21, (V; 1062).]


1882 Dec. 21 / Moon / See Aug 21-23. [V; 1061. See: 1882 Aug 21-23, (V; 924).]


1882 Dec 21 / L'Astro, 1883/109 / Venus and the obj said been 23 degrees / said that position Mercury accords better. [V; 1062. “Vénus visible près du Soleil.” Astronomie, 2 (1883): 108-109. "Strange Phenomenon." Dundee Advertiser, December 22, 1882, p. 5 c. 5. "The Peculiar Phenomenon in the Heavens." Dundee Advertiser, December 25, 1882, p. 7 c. 4. “The Broughty Ferry correspondent who writes in yesterday's Advertiser of the peculiar phenomenon in the heavens does not seem to aware that the planet Venus can seen with the naked eye at any time during the day when she is within few weeks her greatest brilliancy. The phenomenon which he records was easily witnessed in Dundee yesterday in bright sunshine, and from this time till about the middle February it can daily the sky is clear. The description which he gives of it makes it quite certain that it was the planet Venus, and no other. It is at present a little to the west of the sun, and above it. It will continue recede from the sun, going westwards from it, till the beginning February. At present it of a crescent shape; but as it continues to course round the sun it will exhibit more and more of the fully rounded form till September 20th, when it will in superior conjunction with the sun, and again appear evening star. The planet attains its greatest brilliancy on January 10th, when it will be quite easy for the most unskilled eye see Venus in the day time.”]


1882 Dec 22, to Jan 4, 1883 / Floods / Switzerland / Symons Met Mag 18-26. [V; 1063. Ward, Michael Foster. “The Recent Floods in Western Europe." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 18 (March 1883): 26.]


1882 Dec 31 / "Shower of mud" at Fresno, Cal, and Modesto / 14% organic matter / Amer. Naturalist 17-1054. [V; 1064. “Atmospheric Dust and Disease Germs.” American Naturalist, 17 (1883): 1054-1055.]


1882 Dec. 31 / 10 p.m. / q, Rockland, Me—followed by "a tempest of thunder and lightning / bet 11:30 and 12, shock at Halifax / World 2-8-5. [V; 1065. (New York World, January 2, 1883, p. 8 c. 5.)]


1882 Dec 31-Jan 1 / night / Brilliant meteor, Concord, N.H., in southeast / World 2-8-5. [V; 1066. (New York World, January 2, 1883, p. 8 c. 5.) “A New Year Meteor.” New York Times, January 2, 1883, p. 8 c. 5.]


1882 Dec 31 / ab 10 p.m. / Rockland, Maine / A q "followed two hours later by a tempest of thunder and lightning" and ab two hours later a q. in Halifax. / N.Y. Times, Jan 2-8-4. [V; 1067. “Earthquake in the North-East.” New York Times, January 2, 1883, p. 8 c. 4.]


1882 Dec 31 / 10:05 p.m. / Halifax / q and faint flash of lightning / Nature 27-293. [V; 1068. “Earthquakes.” Nature, 27 (January 25, 1883): 293. “The country was covered with a thick white mantle of snow, the air was perfectly calm, there had been no rain drops, nor hail, but a faint flash of lightning (unaccompanied by thunder) occurred about a minute and a half or two minutes after cessation of the shock.”]


1882 Dec 31 / 10:05 p.m. / decided shock, Halifax / Bangor, Maine—9:30 p.m. / Am J. Sci 3/25/360. /// 188. [V; 1069. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 12.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 25 (1883): 353-360, at 360.]


1882 Dec. 31 / q., 9:55 p.m., Eastport, Maine / 7:00 p.m., Ashwood, Tenn. / Meteor seen at Eastport on 31st. / MWR, Dec. / See Dec 20. [V; 1070. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 10 (no. 12; December 1882): 23-26, at 24. See: 1882 Dec 20, (V: 1057 & 1058).]

 
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