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Last updated: August 8, 2018.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1885


1885:


1885 // Fish and alligator / Florida. [B; 621. See: 1885 July 25, (VI; 52).]


1885 // Polt / Ashfordby Rectory, Leicestershire / for ab. 30 years / See Aug 13, 1913. [B; 622. See: 1913 Aug 13, (D; 685).]


1885 // Wem—northern Shropshire / polt, Nov., 1883 / murders, ab. Jan 1, 1888. [B; 623. See: 1888, (B; 832).]


1885 / Mollie Fancher—cor Gates Ave and Downing Street, Brooklyn. [B; 624. Dailey, Abram Hoagland. Mollie Fancher, the Brooklyn Enigma. Brooklyn: Eagle Book, 1894, 8.]


1885 // The body at Blandford Churchyard, Petersburg, Va. / See Oct 27, 1888. [B; 625. See: 1888 Oct 27, (B; 964).]


1885 // Body of Mrs. W.I. Peters / Frankfort, Ind / See Dec. 22, 1888. [B; 626. See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1885 // H.H. / Patchogue, L.I.—See 1867. [B; 627. See: 1867, (A; 499).]


1885 // Trance girl / Maggie Beadling / Banksville, Pa / See Aug 5, 1884. [B; 628. See: 1884 Aug 5, (B; 610).]


1885 //Tingwick, Mass / Josephine Bedard / Fasting girl / See Ap. 20, 1889. [B; 629. See: 1889 Ap. 20, (B; 1024).]


1885 // Two hegiras / Star in Aug and Star in Dec. [V; 2089. See: 1885 Aug 6, (VI; 91); 1885 Aug, (VI; 87); 1885 Aug 17, (VI; 107); 1885 Aug, before 29, (VI; 118); 1885 Aug 31-Sept 1, (VI; 122); 1885 Aug 31, (VI; 324); 1885 Dec 13, (VI; 325); 1885 Dec 18, (VI; 326); 1885 Dec 21, (VI; 327); and, 1885 Dec 26, (VI; 329).]


1885 and 1852 and 1897 // Moodus Sounds / See Dec. 3. [V; 2090. See: 1897 Dec 3, (VIII; 141).]


1885 Jan to July / Bahama Islands / young girls in frenzies of seeing visions / Religio-Phil Jour, Jan 23-6-5, 1886, taken from L. Times. [B; 630. Matthews, F. Barrow. "Strange Visions of Young Girls." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 39 (no. 22; January 23, 1886): 6, (c. 3). Matthews, F. Barrow. “Religious Hallucination in the Bahamas.” London Times, December 26, 1885, p. 6 c. 1.]


1885 Jan 2 / 9:30 p.m. / q / Washington. / Maryland. / Va. / Sun 4-5-2 / Science 5/129. [V; 2091. “An Earthquake in Maryland.” New York Sun, January 4, 1885, p. 5 c. 2. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Earthquake of Jan. 2, 1885.” Science, s. 1 v. 5 (February 13, 1885): 129-130.]


1885 Jan. 2 / 9:12 p.m. / q and rumbling sound / Washington, D.C. / Science 5/44, 85 / Alleged another at 11 p.m., Alexandria, Va. [V; 2092. Winlock, William Crawford. “The Earthquake of Jan. 2.” Science, s. 1 v. 5 (January 16, 1885): 44. Dall, William Healey. “The Earthquake of Jan. 2.” Science, s. 1 v. 5 (January 30, 1885): 85. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 8.]


1885 Jan 2 / q / Science (?) 5/129. [V; 2093. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Earthquake of Jan. 2, 1885.” Science, s. 1 v. 5 (February 13, 1885): 129-130.]


1885 Jan 2 / midnight / Capt. Poldrugo, Austrian bark Filadelphia, from Cape Town to New York, felt a q and saw a large white spot on the water. In Lat 1°, 10' N; Long 24° W. / Science 5-141. [V; 2094. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 5 (February 13, 1885): 140-142, at 141.]


1885 Jan 3 / ab 2 a.m. / Very light shock / Laconia, N.H. / R—Jan. 2. [V; 2095. Refer to: 1885 Jan. 2, (V; 2092). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 9.]


1885 Jan 4 / 6:06 a.m. / Light q along lower Hudson / rumbling sound / Ref—Jan 2. [V; 2096. Refer to: 1885 Jan. 2, (V; 2092). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 9.]


1885 Jan 4 / N.Y.T. = Times, 1-3 / q. / Maryland to New Hampshire. [V; 2097. “An Earthquake Shock.” New York Times, January 4, 1885, p. 1 c. 3.]


1885 Jan 4 / Eruption, Mt. Tarumaim Yezo, Japan / Nature 35-472. [V; 2100. "Notes." Nature, 35 (March 17, 1887): 471-474, at 472. The Shikotsu volcano.]


1885 Jan 4 / Austria / q / I / BA '11. [V; 2101. Milne, 732.]


1885 Jan 4 / Repeated shocks in hot springs district of Southern Styria / [LT], Jan 6-5-d. [V; 2106. “Earthquake in Styria.” London Times, January 6, 1885, p. 5 c. 4.]


[1885 Jan. Wrong date. See: 1883, (V; 2102).]


1885 Jan 5 / Shock near Rome, at Velletri / [LT], Jan 6-5-c. [V; 2103. “The Earthquakes.” London Times, January 6, 1885, p. 5 c. 3.]


1885 Jan 6 and other / q. / Worthing / Knowledge 7/75. [V; 2098. Michaud, L. “An Earthquake in England.” Knowledge, o.s., 7 (January 23, 1885): 74.]


1885 Jan 12 / Siberia / Q / I / BA '11. [V; 2099. Milne, 732.]


1885 Jan 13 / Strong q / Irkutsk / (N.M.) / L'Astro 1885-93. [V; 2104. Flammarion, Camille. “Les Tremblements de Terre.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 81-99, at 93.]


1885 Jan 14 / China / great q / III / BA '11 / 15 = Cashmir. [V; 2105. Milne, 732.]


1885 Jan 15 / 4:10 a.m. / Shaefferstown, Pa / very light q / R—Jan 2. [V; 2107. Refer to: 1885 Jan. 2, (V; 2092). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 9.]


1885 Jan 15 / Srinagar, India / I / q / BA '11. [V; 2108.1. Milne, 732.]


1885 Jan 16 / Disap. / Stillman S. Conant / 26 days before, Dr. Richard C Brandeis, a well-known physician, had disappeared in N.Y. / See Dec 21. [B; 631. See: 1884 Dec. 21, (B; 619).]


1884 Jan 16 / Disap / NY / Editor Conant. [B; 632.]


[1885 Jan 29] / Myst disap of Conant / N.Y. Times, 1885, Jan 29-5-2 / 30-1-7 / 31-3-4 / Fe 8-6-7 / 9-1-7 / March 11-4-7 / 15-1-7 / 24-2-4 / Ap. 12-7-2. [B; 633. “Editor Conant Missing.” New York Times, January 29, 1885, p. 5 c. 2. “Mr. Conant Not in Chicago.” New York Times, January 30, 1885, p. 1 c. 7. “Mr. Conant Still Missing.” New York Times, January 31, 1885 p. 3 c. 4. “A Trace of Mr. Conant.” New York Times, February 8, 1885, p. 6 c. 7. “The Hunt for Mr. Conant.” New York Times, February 9, 1885, p. 1 c. 7. “Missing Editor Conant.” New York Times, March 11, 1885, p. 4 c. 7. “Mr. Conant in Florida.” New York Times, March 15, 1885, p. 1 c. 7. “Looking for Mr. Conant.” New York Times, March 24, 1885, p. 2 c. 4. “Not Mr. Conant's Body.” New York Times, April 12, 1885, p. 7 c. 2.]


1885 Jan 17 / Heavy snow storms continuing throughout Spain. New shocks in Granada. / [LT], Jan 19-6-b. [V; 2108.2. “The Earthquakes in Spain.” London Times, January 19, 1885, p. 6 c. 2.]


1885 Jan 18 / ab 5:30 a.m. / Garrettsville, Portgage Co, Ohio / very light q / R—Jan 2. [V; 2109. Refer to: 1885 Jan. 2, (V; 2092). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 9.]


1885 Jan 22 / q.'s / Spain, Malaga, etc. / [LT] 23-5-e. [V; 2110. “Spain.” London Times, January 23, 1885, p. 5 c. 5.]


1885 Jan 22 / Ice / Star-shape piece of ice 1½ inches in diameter that fell, 7 a.m., Owensborough, Ky. Neither raining nor snowing at the time. / Phil Public Ledger, Jan 23. [V; 2111. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 23, 1885.)]


1885 Jan 22 / 8:45 p.m. / Devonshire / q and sound as if of explosion / Trans Devonshire Assoc 17-282. [V; 2112. Parfitt, Edward. "On Earthquakes in Devonshire. Supplement." Report and Transactions of the Devonshire Association, 17 (1885): 281-284.]


1885 Jan 24 / ab 2:50 a.m. / The Guernsey fireball, ac to the Newport Times. But ab. 3 a.m. early morning of 24th, ac to Isle of Wight Journal. / Both were great illuminations. No detonation mentioned for 24th. / For 25th, “terrific explosion”. / Denning (Astro Reg 23-67) says the same and an error in date in one of them. [V; 2113.1, 2113.2. (Newport Times, ca. 1885.) (Isle of Wight Journal, ca. 1885.) Denning, William Frederick. “Aerolitic Fireball.” Astronomical Register, 23 (March 1885): 67. See: 1885 Jan 25, (V; 2117).]


1885 Jan 24 / 4 a.m. / A “tremendous meteor” over Huntington, L.I. / Sun 29-2-5. [V; 2114. “A Remarkable Meteor Seen on Long Island.” New York Sun, January 29, 1885, p. 2 c. 5.]


1885 Jan 24 / Liguria, Italy / q. / BA '11. [V; 2115. Milne, 732.]


1885 Jan 25 / q. / Iceland / III / BA '11. [V; 2116. Milne, 732.]


1885 Jan 25 / (Cut) / early morning / 3 a.m. / Isle of Wight and Guernsey / Terrific met explosion. Blaze of light so great that in Emsworth, I. of W., one observer thought the whole town was on fire. / Astro Reg 23-67. [V; 2117. Denning, William Frederick. “Aerolitic Fireball.” Astronomical Register, 23 (March 1885): 67. The Emsworth phenomena relates to the “January 24th” date. See: 1885 Jan 24, (V; 2113).]


1885 Jan 26 / [LT], 6-e / q. / Taunton. [V; 2118. “Earthquake in England.” London Times, January 26, 1885, p. 6 c. 5.]


1885 Jan 27  / Jupiter solid / White spot first seen by Denning. / Seen at every opposition up to 1890 when A.S. Williams so says. / M Notices 50-522. [V; 2119. Williams, Arthur Stanley. “On a coming Conjunction of a Remarkable Dark Spot on Jupiter with the Red Spot, and the relative Altitudes of these Objects.” Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 50 (June 13, 1890): 520-523, at 522.]


1885 Jan 27-28 / ab midnight / slight shock / West Chester and Brooklyn / Sun 30-2-5. [V; 2120. “Was it an Earthquake?” New York Sun, January 30, 1885, p. 2 c. 5.]


1885 Jan 27 / at Alhama, Spain / Shock and a “tremendous report / [LT], 29-5-c. [V; 2121. “The Earthquakes.” London Times, January 29, 1885, p. 5 c. 3.]


1885 Jan 30 / Remarkable prominence or explosion on sun / Flammarion, Pop. Astro, p. 274. [V; 2122. Flammarion, Camille. Popular Astronomy: A General Description of the Heavens. New York: D. Appleton, 1894, 274.]


1885 Jan 30 / Setif, Algeria / q. / L'Astro. 1885-94. [V; 2123. Flammarion, Camille. “Les Tremblements de Terre.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 81-99, at 94.]


1885 Feb 2 / (whirl) / 11:32 a.m. / Co. Kildare / Symons' 20/18 / Swooped upon a house. Carried heavy slates of roof 20 feet before dropping. Seemed to be “perfectly local”, touching nothing else but head of a tree ab. 200 yards away. [V; 2124. “Whirlwind in the County Kildare.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 20 (March 1885): 18.]


1885 Feb. 2 / 7:10 a.m. / seemingly confined to Wytheville, Wythe Co, Va / light q and sound like distant thunder / R—Jan 2. [V; 2125. Refer to: 1885 Jan. 2, (V; 2092). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 9.]


1885 Feb. 2 / Cummings, Ga. / Rumbling sound at “supper time, and again 9 p.m. / Phil. Public Ledger, 5th. [V; 2126. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 5, 1885.)]


1885 Feb. 3 / 8:15 pm. / Explosion in a square in NY? / rags found. / in Fenian period / Sun 4-1-4. [B; 634. “Something Explodes.” New York Sun, February 4, 1885, p. 1 c. 4.]


1885 Feb 3 / N.Y.T., 1-6 / q. / Wytheville, Va. [V; 2127. “A Virginia Earthquake.” New York Times, February 3, 1885, p. 1 c. 6. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 9.]


1885 Feb. 6 / See 1884. / Dust / Australia / China News 88/45 / N.S. Wales. [V; 2128. (China News, 88-45.) See: (1884).]


1885 Feb 6 / See 1885. / “Very severe dust storm / Narandera, N.S. Wales / R—Dec. 15, 1880. [V; 2129. Refer to: 1880 Dec 15, (V; 417). Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 36 (July, 10, 17. 24, and 31, 1903): 241-285, at 270-272. See: (1885).]


1885 Feb 6 / Dust at Narandera. Description like volcanic smoke clouds—“very wonderful—the clouds were rolling and rolling over and under one another—“total darkness lasted for 15 minutes, succeeded a like time by a sky so red, so brilliant you could scarcely look at it.” / Chem News. [V; 2130.1, 2130.2. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 88 (July, 10, 17. 24, and 31, 1903): 16-18, 32-34, 41-45, 55-58; at 45.]


1885 Feb 6 / Dust / Narandera, N.S. Wales / Chem News, 88-45 / A heavy dust storm—then suddenly “a black column (like the densest smoke in appearance) which made the place darker than the darkest night.” Writer says, “It was, in fact, the first occasion upon which I realised absolute blackness.” Came so suddenly and intensely that the writer could not see the window from which he had moved a moment before, and had to grope for matches. / As to the dust—“a very severe dust storm”. [V; 2131.1, 2131.2, 2131.3. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 88 (July, 10, 17. 24, and 31, 1903): 16-18, 32-34, 41-45, 55-58; at 45.]


1885 Feb 8 / Invaders / (Sun), 3-1 / Story of a traveling light and a seeming general phosphorescence in a valley. [B; 635. “Will o' the Wisp's Valley.” New York Sun, February 8, 1885, p. 3 c. 1.]


1885 Feb 14 / Religio-Phil Jour, 4-5 / Tiverton, Rhode Island / Luther W. Wilcox of T. goes insane. / Revival. [B; 636. "General Notes." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 37 (no. 25; February 14, 1885): 4, (c. 5).]


1885 Feb 19 / (bet 7-8 p.m.) / L'Astro, 1885-228, quotes Knowledge—that William Gray had seen in the little crater in the side of Hercules, a reddish light. 20th, not visible. [V; 2132. “Observations Curieuses sur la Lune.” Astronomie, 4 (1885)-227-228, at 228. Gray, William, Jr. “A Curious Lunar Phenomenon.” Knowledge, o.s., 7 (March 13, 1885): 224.]


1885 Feb. 19 / moon / bet. 7 and 8 p.m. / by Wm. Gray—Knowledge 7-224 / Small crater inside Hercules, usually black, shone a dull, deep red color. / Changed telescopic position several times without altering the appearance. / Knowledge 7-224 / On 20th, not visible. [V; 2133.1, 2133.2. Gray, William, Jr. “A Curious Lunar Phenomenon.” Knowledge, o.s., 7 (March 13, 1885): 224.]


1885 Feb. 21 / Rel-P-J., 5-1 / Bartville, Lancaster Co, Pa / ghst of a murdered man. [B; 637. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 37 (no. 26; February 21, 1885): 5, (c. 1-2).]


1885 Feb 21 (and 22) / (evening) / Lorenz Kropp, an astronomer of Paysandu, [Uruguay,] writes L'Astro 1885-227—saw in the crater Cassini, in dark part of the moon, a reddish smoke or mist. Watched it more than ½ hour and heard several other persons saw a bright star appear in its place. Next night spot shone out like the planet Saturn. [V; 2134.1, 2134.2. Kropp, Lorenzo. “Observation curieuses sur la Lune.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 227.]


1885 Feb 21 / Rel-Ph. Jour, 6-5 / Lewis Station, El Dorado Co., Cal. Vampire bat caught. Extended wings measured 21 inches. [V; 2135. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 37 (no. 26; February 21, 1885): 6, (c. 5). "Coast Notes." Daily Alta California, December 30, 1884, p. 2 c. 2.]


1885 Feb 22 / Metite fell. / Hierschfelde, near Saxe / L'Astro 4/155. [V; 2136. Mayer, J. “Uranolithe tombé à Hierschfelde, en Saxe.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 155. Geinitz, Hanns Bruno. “Zur Geschichte des angeblichen Meteoriten-Falles in Hirschfelde bei Zittau.” Verhandlungen der Kaiserlich-Königlichen Geologischen Reichsanstalt, 1885, 188-191. Geinitz wrote that, about 7:30 P.M., on February 7, 1885, a schoolboy heard a bang, as loud as a gunshot, and something had fallen on a rooftop, with a bang, but no investigation was conducted that evening. Two days later, (February 9), a damaged piece of slate slate was found to have fallen from near the ridge of the rooftop, and pieces of a supposed meteorite were also found, which was blamed for the noises and danage. Additional fragments of the meteorite were found on February 10; and, these were put on display in a public inn and reported in Zittau and Görlitz newspapers. However, when examined by investigating scientists, the stones were identified as lignite coal and marcasite, (white iron pyrites). Hirschfelde was a village, but is now identified as part of  the city of Zittau.]


1885 Feb. 22 / q. / Philippines / B.A. '11. [V; 2137. Milne, 732.]


1885 Feb. 23 / Date of attempted execution. In Lloyd's Weekly News, Jan 5, 1908, John Lee, after his release, tells his story. Sayshe dreamed that the excution would not take place. Tells of the extreme efforts. Warders jumped on and stamping on the trap to make it work. Each time when they tried, after he taken away, the bolt worked easily. Seemed that the bolt was drawn, but the board trap refused to fall as, with release of bolt, it should. So each time they stamped in vain on this trap. / Correct—no trouble with the bolt. / After first, according to his belief, a warder stood on the trap and clung to the rope, bolt drawn and trap and warder fell. Second time the sound he heard indicating that they were planing the edges of the trap, thinking that rain might have swollen the wood. / The story made a great sensation. Newspaper reporters ran from the prison shouting it in the streets. The subject was taken up in the House of Commons. / Commuted to lif imprisonment. I don't know when released—See March, 1905. [B; 638.1 to 638.5. (Lloyd's Weekly News, January 5, 1908; not at BNA.)]


1885 Feb. 23 / See similar case? / Dec. 26, 1930 / John Lee. [B; 639. See: 1930 Dec. 26, (F; 231).]


1885 Feb 24 / (D-260) / Sea Enter / bet. Japan and Ui / (Cut) / N. [V; 2138. The note copies information from page 260 of The Book of the Damned. "Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 5 (March 20, 1885): 242-244, at 242-243.]


1885 March / John Lee released in Dec., 1907. [B; 640. “Babbacombe Murder.” Western Times, (Exeter), December 19, 1907, p. 4 c. 5.]


1885 Feb / John Lee, under whom scaffold 3 times failed to work, murdered a mistress near Torquay. Told of in Weekly Dispatch, Jan 22, 1905 (not 1905). He died this Jan—See Times. [B; 641. “A Respite From Death.” London Times, February 24, 1885, p. 10 c. 4. (London Weekly Dispatch, January 22, 1905.; not at BNA.) Lee was released from prison in 1907.]


1885 Feb / Lee case.  In Medium and Daybreak, June 24, 1887, Mr Wm. Betts, 31 Goodiers Lane, Salford, writes that while trial of Lee in progress, the ghost of Miss Cassidy appeared to his son, telling that Lee was innocent. / Issue of July 1, corrects this—not week of trial but week of attempted execution. / Another cor pointed out victim's name Keys, not Cassidy. [B; 642.1, 642.2. (Medium and Daybreak, June 24, 1887.) The victim's name was Emma Keyse.]


[1885 Feb] // 1905 March 29 / Daily News of, 7-5/  John Lee, who had in Feb, 1885, killed an old lady for whom he had worked. The ex-hangman explains why he had not been hanged. He had been condemned to be hanged at (Devonshire) Exeter. "Three times he was placed on the scaffold, and each time the mechanism refused to act." Eventually his sentence was altered, to life imprisonment. Explained he was too heavy and iron catches on the trap door became locked. / See 1885//. [B; 643.1, 643.2. “How Lee Escaped Death.” London Daily News, March 29, 1905, p. 7 c. 5. See: 1885 Feb. 23, (B; 638).]


1885 Feb. 23 / date of attempted execution / John Lee released late year 1907. / W. Dispatch, Dec 22, 1907 / Been sentenced to 22 years. Berry, the hangman, pulled the lever, but the bolt not work. Berry and the warders stamped on the drop and the boards gave way a little, but the bolts were unmovable. Lee taken from scaffold. Drop tried again and worked satisfactorily. He was brought back. Berry pulled the lever with all his force and over and over, but the bolt would not work. Lee was taken to the basement of the prison, seeming to be i a cataleptic condition. For the third time he was summoned to the execution. The mechanism trefused to work, and he was taken back to his cell. In an interview with the chaplin, the Rev. John Pilkin, Lee said had dreamed he would not be hanged and had told 2 warders so, and had seen the lever pulled unavailingly. [B; 644.1 to 644.4. (London Weekly Dispatch, December 22, 1907.)]


1885 March 1 / Northamptonshire / (Like ships) / [illustration] / Jour Roy Met XI/315. [V; 2139. Davis, James. “Note on a Peculiar Form of Auroral Cloud Seen in Northamptonshire, March 1st, 1885.” Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 11 (1885): 315, (illustration).]


1885 March 5-6 / night / MWR, March, 1885 / That ac to the Chico Chronicle, a huge object of very hard material, weighing several tons, had fallen near Chico. See July 16. / Ab. 6 miles from Chico. [V; 2140. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 13 (no. 3; March 1885): 76-77, at 77.  See: 1885 July 16, (VI; 33).]


1885 March 6 / Knowledge of—copying Amer Druggist—Man killed by an aerolite—from a cloudless sky. [V; 2141. “We give the following....” Knowledge, o.s., 7 (March 6, 1885): 198. No reference to this event was found in the American Druggist. “Celestial Cannonading.” Daily Cairo Bulletin, (Illinois), December 2, 1884, p. 4 c. 3. “Chattanooga, Tenn., December 1.—News has reached this city of a strange and phenomenal accident near the Tennessee line, a few miles from Somerset, Ky. Julius Rabble, a farmer living in that vicinity, was instantly killed by a meteor descending through a tall tree, cutting the limbs off. The ball passed through Rabble's body from the shoulders obliquely and buried itself in the earth. It penetrated the earth several feet and was dug out by the natives. The aerolite was about the size of a teacup. The incident created great excitement and widespread alarm.”]


1885 March 7  R-Phil J, 6-3, from Chicago Tribune / Home of Lewis Kittle, Tucker Co., W. Va, visited by spectral Confederate soldiers. [B; 645. "Strange Scenes Said to Have Been Witnessed in a House at Rich Mountain." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 38 (no. 2; March 7, 1885): 6, (c. 3). “Ghosts Near a Battlefield.” New York Sun, February 17, 1885, p. 4 c. 1. Kittle recalled ghosts of rebel soldiers seen in his bedroom, in 1867, while lodging next to the 1861 battlefield of Rich Mountain, in Randolph County, West Virginia.]


1885 March 7 ./ Resus. / Rel-P-j, 6-2, from N.Y. Sun / John Wisholm, Centre Township, Perry Co., Pa, believed to have died, and returned to life—then died again. [B; 646. "Called Back to Life." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 38 (no. 2; March 7, 1885): 6, (c. 2).]


1885 March 8 / 20 h / Light q / Lancaster, Pa / R—Jan 2. [V; 2142. Refer to: 1885 Jan. 2, (V; 2092). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 10.]


1885 March 14 / Religio-Phil. Jour, 4-5 / That recently had been seen large number of meteors in Georgia—some people there thought world was coming to an end. [V; 2143. “General Items.” Religio-Philosophical Journal, 38 (no. 3; March 14, 1885): 4, (c. 5).]


1885 March 18 / 12 h / Contoocook, N.H. / very light shock / R—Jan 2. [V; 2144. Refer to: 1885 Jan. 2, (V; 2092). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 10.]


1885 March 21 / Rel-P-j, 5-1 / Revival sweeping the country. In Mohnsville, Pa., Miss Elizabeth Metz in a trance—said been to heaven—orthodox heaven of harps. [B; 647. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 38 (no. 4; March 21, 1885): 4, (c. 5), & 5, (c. 1).]


1885 March 27 / Lat 47 N—Long 33 W / 960 miles SW of Cape Verde Islands / 440 N.E. S. Amer. coast / Ent. Mo. Mag. 22-12 / Swarms of 2 kinds of insects upon a vessel—covering parts of rigging and spar. One kind identified as Deiopeia pulchella. [V; 2145. McLachlan, Robert. “A swarm of Deiopeia pulchella in the Atlantic Ocean.” Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 22 (June 1885): 12-13.]


1885 Mar 27 / Great q / Greece / [BA] '11. [V; 2146. Milne, 732.]


1885 March 31 / like M. Celeste / Schooner Beatrice, from Antigua to Yarmouth, fell in with an abandoned schooner, the Maria Vanuade, of Pekela. No water in hold. / Sun, Ap 10-3-4. [B; 648. “A Mystery of the Sea.” New York Sun, April 10, 1885, p. 3 c. 4.]


1885 / early in April // Shohola, Sullivan Co / Ghost—suddenly disa. / Then said seen later. / Sun 12-6-1. [B; 649. “A Ghost in Sullivan County.” New York Sun, April 12, 1885, p. 6 c. 1.]


1885 Ap. 5 / Etna / See May 2. [V; 2147. See: 1885 May 2, (V; 2165).]


1885 Ap. 6 / q. / Spain / BA '11 / Ap 5 and 6. [V; 2148. Milne, 732.]


[1885 Ap. 6 /] 1884 Ap. 6 / See 30's. / Stone like Feb 19 (of a common type) fell, Chandpur, India. / C.R. 102-96 / Ver that Fletcher puts this 1885. [V; 1910. Daubrée, Gabriel Auguste. "Météorites récemment tombées dans l'Inde les 19 février 1884 et 6 avril 1885." Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 96-97. Fletcher, 105. This is the Chandpur meteorite. See: 1838 June 6, (I; 2313), and, 1884 Feb. 9, (V; 1873). The Chandakapur meteorite, (which fell in 1838, in Berer province), is not the same as the Chandpur meteorite, (which fell in 1885, in the state of Uttar Pradesh). These are the Chandakapur, Pirthalla, and Chandpur meteorites.]


1885 Ap. 6 / (F) / (?) / Metite / Chandpur, N.W. Prov. / L'Astro 6/22 / See Ap 6, 1884. / See Jan 27, '86. [V; 2149. Fletcher, 105. Daubrée, Gabriel Auguste. "Météorites Récemment Tombées dans l'Inde.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 22-24. See: 1885 Ap. 6, (V; 1910), and, 1886 Jan 27, (VI; 375). This is the Chandpur meteorite.]


1885 Ap. 8 / (3) / Mr. R. Wilding, Curator of Preston Observatory, saw something like a star surrounded by a nebula. Unknown. He thought it Temple's Comet. / Observatory 8/221. [V; 2150. “The Alleged Discovery of Tempel's Comet.” Observatory, 8 (1885): 221. “Mr. R. Wilding....” Journal of the Liverpool Astronomical Society, 3 (April, 1885): 113. “Mr R. Wilding, Hon. Curator of Preston Observatory, announced the discovery of Tempel's comet. They had on favourable evenings been on the look-out for it, both in his own and at the Preston Observatory. On the evening of 8th April, one of his assistants had just glimpsed it as a 13th mag. star, surrounded by a faint nebulous mist. Its position was about 11h 59m R. A.—Dec. 19° 12'.”]


1885 Ap. 9 / N.Y. Times, 4-5 / Flying cats / Ed. [V; 2151. “Flying Cats.” New York Times, April 9, 1885, p. 4 c. 5.]


1885 Ap 9 / Like Ap. 10, 1884 / An illumination on a road / Lechlade / LT, Ap 15/7/f. [V; 2152. Sturges, Hubert Court. “A Celestial Phenomenon.” London Times, April 15, 1885, p. 7 c. 6. See: 1884 April 10, (V; 1911).]


1885 Ap. 9 / (Fr) / q. / Dome / BA '11. [V; 2153. Milne, 732.]


1885 (April) 9 / 10:35 / Lechlade / Cor in LT, p. 15/7/f—was driving home—suddenly road in front of him brilliantly lighted—lasting “some seconds but he saw a meteor. [V; 2154. Sturges, Hubert Court. “A Celestial Phenomenon.” London Times, April 15, 1885, p. 7 c. 6.]


1885 Ap 11 / (Like K bug) / Rel-Ph. Jour, 11-5 / At Windsor Castle, near Hamburg, Pa, young members of Fink family afflicted with a strange malady. One of them, a child, drank from a glass and cried,"O, my lip is stung!" Then she could not breathe, that something "squeezing" her life away. Other children aged from 2½ to 16 so affected. [B; 650.1, 650.2. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 38 (no. 7; April 11, 1885): 4, (c. 4-5).]


1885 Ap. 12 / Sun, 3-7-+ / New birds in Oregon City. [V; 2155. “Short Stories About Animals.” New York Sun, April 12, 1885, p. 3 c. 7.]


1885 April / birds / Essex Notebook of / A New Holland shell drake shot near Stratford. A few years before, a New Holland Spine Tailed Swift had been shot near Stratford. [V; 2156. “Capture of a New Holland Shell-Drake near Stratford St. Mary.” Essex Notebook and Suffolk Gleaner, no. 7 (April, 1885): 83.]


1885 Ap. 13 / near Benson, Vt. / At O'Donnell's Mills—in a field— 2 or 3 feet by 10 thrown up and water gushed 60 feet high. / Phil. Pub. Ledger, Ap. 17. [V; 2157. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, April 17, 1885.)]


1885 Ap 19 / 1:55 p.m. / Explosion shakes Dover, N.J. / Sun 20-1-2. [V; 2158. “An Explosion Shakes Dover.” New York Sun, April 20, 1885, p. 1 c. 2.]


1885 Ap 20 / Ascending met seen by Denning to him seemed only a few yards away. / Astro Reg 23/129. [V; 2159. “Royal Astronomical Society. Session 1885-86.” Astronomical Register, 23 (June 1885): 125-139, at 129.]


1885 Ap 22 / Disaps / Sun 25-3-5 / “Lynchburg, Ap. 24—Isaac Martin, a young farmer near Salem, Va, left his home Wednesday [22nd] and went into the fields to work, and nothing has been heard of him since. This is the second case of mysterious disappearance in that neighborhood in the last two weeks. The list of disappearances in the western portion of the State in the past few months is remarkable, quite a number having occurred during that time, and no clue has ever been discovered to any of them.” [B; 651.1, 651.2. “Mysterious Disappearance in Virginia.” New York Sun, April 25, 1885, p. 3 c. 5.]


1885 April 22 / met—rail / That a meteor was seen descending from zenith, in a straight line to a railway station in Östergötland, Sweden—Station-master picked up a brown stone about the size of a hand. / Nature, 32/36. [V; 2160. “Notes.” Nature, 32 (May 14, 1885): 34-37, at 36.]


1885 Ap 23, ab. / Floods / U.S. / See Tribune. [V; 2161. “Lives, Houses and Horses Lost by Floods.” New York Tribune, April 25, 1885, p. 1 c. 5.]


1885 Ap. 23 / [LT], 6-b / June-19-9-e // Volcs / Java. [V; 2162. “Volcanic Eruption in Java.” London Times, April 23, 1885, p. 6 c. 2. “Volcanoes in Java.” London Times, June 19, 1885, p. 9 c. 5. The Semeru, Krakatoa, and Kelut volcanoes, (Kelut did not erupt in 1885).]


1885 Ap. 28 / q and rain / 5:10 p.m. / Near New Haven, Conn, a severe shock followed by heavy thunder—20 minutes later lightning, rain and thunder. / MWR (1885/p. 107). [V; 2163. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 13 (no. 4; April 1885): 105-107, at 107.]


1885 May 2 / Leaves / Phil Public Ledger of / “A shower of leaves fell about a week ago in this vicinity, says the Lambertville (N.J.) Beacon. For about half an hour the air was filled with dried leaves mostly oak and chestnut, and they came from the west and fell to the earth in a variety of ways that was amusing to those that watched them. As far as the eye could see, the leaves could be seen floating. They must have come a long distance, as there was scarcely any wind at the time noticeable. [V; 2164.1, 2164.2, 2164.3. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 2, 1885.)]


1885 May 2 / Vesuvius / Etna since April 5 / L'Astro 4-228. [V; 2165. “Éruptions volcaniques.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 228-229.]


1885 May 3 / 9 a.m. / 2 very light shocks / Dover, Me. / R—Jan 2. [V; 2166. Refer to: 1885 Jan. 2, (V; 2092). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 13.]


1885 May 4 / [LT], 6-a / 5-5-d / June 1-6-b // Vesuvius. [V; 2167. “Eruption of Vesuvius.” London Times, May 4, 1885, p. 6 c. 1. “The Eruption of Vesuvius.” London Times, May 5, 1885, p. 5 c. 4. “Eruption of Vesuvius.” London Times, June 1, 1885, p. 6 c. 2.]


1885 May 7 / (red) / Near Castlewellan, Down, Ireland—red hail—mixed with ordinary, perhaps one to a hundred. A decided red and stained fingers of person who picked them up. / Nature 32-59. [V; 2168.1. Evans, C. “Red Hail.” Nature, 32 (May 21, 1885): 54-55.]


1885 May 7 (?) / Not 11 // Turtles / Sun 11-2-5 / 6:30 a.m. / Raleigh, N.C. / rain “exceedingly heavy—in fact” the bottom fell out”—“After the rain hundreds of tiny terrapins were picked up in all parts of the city.” [V; 2168.2. “A Shower of Terrapins.” New York Sun, May 11, 1885, p. 2 c. 5.]


1885 May 8 / Hinxton, Saffrom Walden / A gardener, Alfred Bard, sees in a cemetery, an apparition of a Mrs de Fréville, 7½ hours after her death. Myers, Human Personality, vol. 2, p. 66. [B; 652. Myers, Frederick William Henry. Human Personality and Its Survival of Bodily Death. London: Longmans, Green, 1904, v. 2, 65-67. Gurney, Edmund; Podmore, Frank, and, Myers, Frederic William Henry. Phantasms of the Living. 1st ed. London: Trübner, 1886, v. 1, 212-214.]


1885 May 9 / R-P. J., 6-5 / Revival at New Corner, Ind—70 converts in trances—told stories of visions. [B; 653. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 38 (no. 11; May 9, 1885): 6, (c. 5).]


1885 May 11 / L'Astro, 9/73 / Cor writes from Brazil that at 5 a.m., looking at the dark part of the moon, he was astonished to see two red points. He changed the eyepiece of his telescope but the luminous points were not changed. Succeeding days were cloudy, and the lights were not seen again. /// Shape / 12 / 48 / 92 / 112 / etc. // l[note cut off] / 173/ 251 / 270 / 312. [V; 2169.1, 2169.2. “L'observation de la Lune.” Astronomie, 9 (1890): 73-74.]


1885 May 16 / Rel-Ph. J., 6-3 / Sylvan Ave, New Haven, Conn. / Polt phe in home of a relative of General Benjamin Butler. [B; 654. "Spirits in New Haven." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 38 (no. 12; May 16, 1885): 6, (c. 3).]


1885 May 16 / Rel-Ph. Jour, 6-5 / Sacramento, Cal, invaded by swarms of bugs “of all sorts and sizes”. [V; 2170. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 38 (no. 12; May 16, 1885): 6, (c. 5).]


1885 [May 22] / Nature (?) 32/112 / On May 22, 1885, mirage seen in Sweden, island of Gothland. [V; 2171. “Notes.” Nature, 32 (June 4, 1885): 109-112, at 112.]


1885 May 22 / (Liv) / “volc” in Maine / Bangor, Me / Sun 24-9-2 / Town of Blue Hill, a man and his son startled by “a noise followed by ascending smoke and rocks thrown violently skyward.” Found aperture in spot whence stones thrown and surrounding earth warm. [V; 2172. “Volcanic Eruption in Maine.” New York Sun, May 24, 1885, p. 9 c. 2.]


1885 May 23 / N.Y. Times, 4-6 / Snake story from Port Jervis / Ed. [B; 656. “A Terrible Tale.” New York Times, May 23, 1885, p. 4 c. 6.]


1885 May 23 / Fishes / Indiana. [B; 655.]


1885 May 23 / Liv / Rel. Ph. Jour, 6-5, in column of Miscellaneous / That, “the other day,” shower of fish, large and small, on farm of George Knight, Knox Co., Indiana. He gathered up almost a cart load. [V; 2173. “Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 38 (no. 13; May 23, 1885): 6, (c. 5). “Condensed State News.” Indianapolis News, April 29, 1885, p. 4 c. 3. “During a severe thunder-strom, a day or two ago, on the farm of Mr. George Knight, a well-to-do farmer living in Busseron township, Knox county, a peculiarly shafted cloud was observed, which rained down a large quantity ot all kinds of fish in a large meadow belonging to Mr. Knight. There was over a wagon-load of the fish when gathered up, all sizes and kinds, including eels and sunfish in abundance.”]

 

1885 May 24 / Trib, 4-2 / Ghst / railroad. [B; 657. “A Phantom Engineer.” New York Tribune, May 24, 1885, p. 4 c. 2.]


1885 May 27 / Animal / Phil Pub. Ledger of / Strange animal been reported different parts of Georgia. Then at home of Henry Wood, Greensborough, Ga, had attacked a dog. Said to have made "a peculiar, bellowing sound". / See May 30. [B; 658. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 27, 1885.)]


1885 May 30 / Phil Public Ledger of / "A strange animal was killed beyond Prairie Creek, Fla., one day last week. It was larger than a wildcat, had immense claws, and a head like a bulldog's: it was of a very gray color." [B; 659. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 30, 1885.)]


1885 May 30, etc. / See July 4. / morning 3 a.m. / Great q., Cashmere / also Simla. / Pioneer Mail (Allahabad) / heavy rain / greatest q known at Srinagar / June 5, shocks at Srinagar continues 6, or 7 daily, houses continuing to fall / June 14th, continuing less violently. / Mail, June 28, that 3081 persons perished, 70,000 dwellings ruined / 19th, 3:50 p.m., q and more damages at Srinagar / 24th, 25th, smart shocks / (BA '11): III. [V; 2174.1, 2174.2. (Pioneer Mail, ca. June, 1885.) Milne, 732. See: 1885 July 4, 9, (VI; 18).]


[1885 May 30 /] 1886 May 30 / India / Cashmir / q / III / BA '11 / See Jan.15 and June 6. [VI; 472. Milne, 732. See: 1885 Jan 15, (V; 2108), and, 1885 June 6, (VI; 481).]


[1885 May 31] / On May 31, 1885, in a house in Brookfield, Conn.(?), ac to Danbury News—3 watches and 2 clocks stopped at the same moment. / Phil Public Ledger, June 3 / In Nature, as to q, Ap, 1884, clock stopped in place where one q not felt. / (See before, one of the Reading series.) [B; 660.1, 660.2. (Danbury News, ca. May 31, 1885.) (Philadelphia Public Ledger, June 3, 1885.) See: 1884 Ap. 24, (V; 1931).]


1885 June / Michigan / balls of all colors in sky near sun / Amer Met Jour 3/486. [V; 2175. Alexander, S. “Remarkable Optical Phenomenon.” American Meteorological Journal, 3 (February 1887): 486. “The occurrence herein related took place from twenty to thirty minutes before sunset in the latter part of June of the year 1885. The weather was more than usually fine. The sky was clear with the exception of a few clouds of the cumulo-nimbus order a few degrees above and to the northward of the sun. Suddenly there appeared a peculiarly weird and hazy condition of the atmosphere. There was an indescribable commingling and general diffusion of all the hues of the rainbow. During this state of things there appeared in the sky, on the earth, and on the trees, innumerable balls of decomposed light, presenting all imaginable colors and apparently of about the size of a bushel basket. They were uniform in size and appearance. This phenomenon was confined to that region of the sky about the sun, extending but a few degrees each side of it. It lasted about twenty minutes, when it disappeared as suddenly as it came.”]


1885 / ab. June 1 / Repeating dust / Ohio / Phil Public Ledger of June 17 / “A mysterious shower of peculiar white dust caused a sensation in Bellaire, Ohio, a fortnight ago. It has since been repeated in that city and in much of the surrounding country.” [V; 2176. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, June 17, 1885.) (Other newspaper reports @ newspapers.com; nothing in MWR.)]


1885 June 3-4 / Most violent cyclone in 25 years off Aden / Pioneer Mail (Allahabad), 21st. [V; 2177. (Pioneer Mail, June 21, 1885.)]


1885 June 5 / night / Pine Grove, Pa / Shock / Sun 7-1-5. [V; 2178. “A Town Shakes.” New York Sun, June 7 1885, p. 1 c. 5.]


[1885 June 5 /] 1885 July 5 / ab. 11 p.m. / near Stockholm / Meteor / L'An. Sci 29-4. [VI; 19. “Bolides.” Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 29 (1885): 2-5, at 4.]


1885 June 6 / 1 a.m. / Det met / Texas / M..R. '85/163. [V; 2179. “Miscellanous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 13 (no. 6; June 1885): 162-164, at 163. Most reports of a meteor in Texas are “about midnight” but at “1 o'clock” for Dallas.]


[1885 June 6 /] 1886 June 6 / q / III / Cashmir / BA '11 / See May 30. [VI; 481. Milne, 732. See: 1885 May 30, etc., (V; 2174), and, 1885 May 30, (VI; 472).]


1885 June 8 and 10 / Bavaria / 6 / Southampton. / Luminous clouds / Symons Met (L) 20/133. [V; 2180. Backhouse, Thomas William. “The Luminous Cirrus Cloud of June and July.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 20 (October 1885): 133.]


1885 June 11 / Sunspots visible to naked eye / L'Astro 4-272. [V; 2181. “Taches solaires visibles à l'œil nu.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 272.]


1885 June 12 / BO / Stones / Tangier / Times of Morocco (Tangier)—crowd outside a house declaring that the Devil was pelting it with stones. [B; 661. (Times of Morocco, Tangier, June 12, 1885.)]


1885 June 12 / Luminous cloud from sun—a protuberance photographed at Rochester by H. C Maine / Sid Mess—5-243. [V; 2182. Maine, Henry C. “The Red Light.” Sidereal Messenger, 5 (October 1886): 237-251, at 243.]


1885 June [12-]13 / ab. 11 p.m. / Near the forest of Row, Sussex, England, saw a brilliant light some degrees west of north. / spreading gradually / L'Astro 5-193. [V; 2183. Slack, Henry G. ”Un flamme brillante à minuit.” Astronomie, 5 (1886): 193.]


1885 June 13 / Pondicherry / [typescript] / L'Astronomie, 1886-310. [B; 662. Typescript note. “Curieux phénomène météorologique.” Astronomie, 5 (1886): 310.]


1885 June 13 / R-Phil J., 6-5 / A very active red insect had appeared in great numbers in vineyards of Yolo Co., Cal. [V; 2184. “Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 38 (no. 16; June 13, 1885): 6, (c. 5).]


1885 June 14, 27 / Protuberances from Sun / R—Sept 26, '79. [V; 2185. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 254.]


1885 June 15 / Out at sea, near Oxelösund, Sweden, two wooded islands, on one construction, and two warships—said there were two Swedish warships at this time far to the north of Ox. / Cosmos, NS, 1-677 / Nature 32/231. [V; 2189. ("Le Mirage." Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), v. 1 (July 20, 1885): 677.) "Notes." Nature, 32 (July 9, 1885): 230-231, at 231.]


1885 June 18 / A colliery explosion and a q. one hour later / (York) / Nature 32/175 / p. 176 / q also in Scotland hours later. [V; 2186. “Recent Earthquakes.” Nature, 32 (June 25, 1885): 175-176.]


1885 June 19 / moon / Little gray spot in Cyrillus (?), by Gaudibert / L'Astro 4-412. [V; 2187. Gaudibert, Casimir Marie. “Les Points Sombres Énigmatiques Obserés dans les Cratères Lunaires.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 410-412, (illustration).]


1885 June 20 / Sunspot group and storm around. Photographed by H.C. Maine. / Sid. Mess 5-243. [V; 2188. Maine, Henry C. “The Red Light.” Sidereal Messenger, 5 (October 1886): 237-251, at 243.]


1885 June 21 / One of the largest of measured sunspots / Flammarion, Pop. Astro., p. 256. [V; 2190. Flammarion, Camille. Popular Astronomy: A General Description of the Heavens. New York: D. Appleton, 1894, 256.]


1885 June 21 / Trib, 1-6 / Cloudburst / Illinois. [VI; 1. “A Cloudburst in Illinois.” New York Tribune, June 21, 1885, p. 1 c. 6.]


1885 / ab June 21 // Iowa / child, dying, 3 years old / dropped in a field by a tornado / not traced / Sun 22-1-1 / 28-10-7. [VI; 2. “An Incident of the Iowa Tornado.” New York Sun, June 22, 1885, p. 1 c. 1. “Waifs from a Storm Cloud.” New York Sun, June 28, 1885, p. 10 c. 7.]


1885 June 21 and July 8 and 9 / Eruptions in Java / Nature 32-401. [VI; 3. "Notes." Nature, 32 (August 27, 1885): 400-402, at 401. The Raung and Semeru volcanoes.]


1885 June 22 / [LT], 6-f / q—Yorkshire / See index for the colliery explosion. [VI; 4. “The Earthquake Shock in Yorkshire.” London Times, June 22, 1885, p. 6 c. 6. “Colliery Explosions.” London Times, June 26, 1885, p. 12 c. 3. “It has not been mentioned in The Times that at very nearly the same hour as the disastrous explosion occurred at the Clifton-hall Colliery the tremulous motion of an earthquake, accompanied by a rumbling sound like distant cannon being fired, was distinctly felt at three places in the immediate neighbourhood, also near Pontefract, in Yorkshire, and in the East Riding of that county.”]


1885 June 23 / 29° 14 N / 133° 25 W / 11 a.m. / By the schooner Rosario. 2 violent shocks 1 minute apart. / Nature 32-495 / The sky was overcast but the sea was “remarkably smooth”. / also Science 6/180. [VI; 5. “Notes.” Nature, 32 (September 17, 1885): 493-495, at 495. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 6 (August 28, 1885): 180.]


1885 June 25 / Met near ship / Science 6/59. [VI; 6. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 6 (July 17, 1885): 58-60, at 59.]


1885 June 25 / Magnetic storm / Young, The Sun, p. 169. [VI; 7. Young, Charles Augustus. The Sun. New and revised edition. New York: D. Appleton, 1895, 169.]


1885 June 26 // Sept 7, 1871. [VI; 8. See: 1871 Sept 7, (IV; 511). Buss, A.A. "List of 25 exceptional Eruptive Prominences." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 18 (1908): 326.]


1885 June 26 / 2 gigantic prominences on sun / Flammarion, Pop Astro, p. 274. [VI; 9. Flammarion, Camille. Popular Astronomy: A General Description of the Heavens. New York: D. Appleton, 1894, 274.]


1885 June 27-July 1 / Violent th. storms, Austria and Hungary / 28th, 29th, q's in Styria / LT, July 2-5-d. [VI; 10. “Austria-Hungary.” London Times, July 2, 1885, p. 5 c. 4.]


1885 June 28 / Baltimore / 4.42 inches rain in 1½ hours / N.Y. Trib, June 3-6-3, 1889. [VI; 11. “A Flood in Baltimore.” New York Tribune, June 29, 1885, p. 1 c. 5. “An Extraordinary Summer Storm.” New York Tribune, June 3, 1889, p. 6 c. 3-4.]


1885 (June 30) / far north / Grasmere, Lake District / sounds like thunder and qs / 2 a.m. / 4:45 / 5:45 / Roper—p. 41. [VI; 12. (Roper, William. A List of the More Remarkable Earthquakes in Great Britain and Ireland During the Christian Era. Lancaster: n.p., 1889, 41.)]


1885 July / Sunspots / Sidereal Messenger 4-238. [VI; 13. Ferguson, R. Henry. “Sun Spots for July 1885.” Sidereal Messenger, 4 (October 1885): 238-240.]


1885 July-Sept / Gen Notes / N.Y. Times. [VI; 14.]


1885 July 1 / metite—railroad / Phil Public Ledger of / That ac to Quaker Bee, a meteorite weighing 20 lbs had fallen in a railroad park at Blair. [VI; 15. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, July 1, 1885.)]


1885 July 3 / The red sunsets return, Portland, Oregon. / Sid Mess 5-237. [VI; 16. Maine, Henry C. “The Red Light.” Sidereal Messenger, 5 (October 1886): 237-251, at 237.]


1885 July 4 / Spot seen to form / Seen at Rochester, spot of considerable size seen to form on sun to the east of a group that had been there a week. / NY Times 7-4-6. [VI; 17. “The Day's Drift.” New York Times, July 7, 1885, p. 4 c. 6-7.]


1885 July 4, 9 / Severe q's at Srinagar / intervals of several days / L.T. 10-5-e / See May 30. / See Aug 14. [VI; 18. “Earthquakes in Cashmere.” London Times, July 10, 1885, p. 5 c. 5. See: 1885 May 30, (VI; 472), and, 1885 Aug 14, (VI; 98).]


[1885 July 5. Wrong date. See: 1885 June 5, (VI; 19).]


1885 July 6 / ab. 11 p.m. / Meteor from E. to W. brilliantly illuminating the streets of Rochester / Sid Mess 4-178. [VI; 20. Brooks, William Robert. “Meteor Observations.” Sidereal Messenger, 4 (August 1885): 177-178.]


1885 July 6 / See July 17. / 11 p.m. / Phelps, N.Y. / meteor by Prof Brooks / another, morning of 8th / E Mec 41/475. [VI; 21. Brooks, William Robert. “Two Brilliant Meteors—Barnard's New Comet.” English Mechanic, 41 (no. 1062; July 31, 1885): 475. See: 1885 July 17, (VI: 34, 35, & 36).]


1885 July 6 / 11 p.m. / Phelps, N.Y. / and ab 1 a.m. on 8th / 2 mets / Prof. Brooks / Sc Am 53-67. [VI; 22. Brooks, William Robert. “Two Fine Meteors.” Scientific American, n.s., 53 (August 1, 1885): 67.]


1885 July 7 / Comet by Barnard / (no tail) / on 11th, RA—17h-14; Dec—6 / C.R. 101-150. [VI; 23. Bigourdan, Guillaume. “Observations de la nouvelle comète Barnard....” Comptes Rendus, 101 (1885): 149-150.]


1885 July 7 / at Valls, Spain / Stone fell into the courtyard of a prison. During the same day, sound like distant thunder had been heard. / L'Astro 4-353 / N.M. / Upon this day the people had heard sounds like distant thunder. but when the stone fell the sky was clear. / L'Année Sci 29/4. [VI; 24.1, 24.2. Comas, José. “Chute d'un uranolithe à Valls, Tarragone (Espagne).” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 353-354, (illustration). “Bolides.” Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 29 (1885): 2-5, at 4.]


1885 July 9 / Over 5 inches of rain / Oskaloosa, Iowa / NY Tribune, June 3-6-3, 1889. [VI; 25. “An Extraordinary Summer Storm.” New York Tribune, June 3, 1889, p. 6 c. 3-4.]


1885 July 9 / 13 h, 50 m / “Fine meteor from just east of Altair” from center near Alpha and Beta Capricorni / Nature 32-342. [VI; 26. Denning, William Frederick. “July Meteors.” Nature, 32 (August 13, 1885): 342.]


1885 July 10 / Sweden / ordinary identified mirage / Nature 32/279. [VI; 27. “Notes.” Nature, 32 (July 23, 1885): 278-280, at 279.]


1885 July 12, 22, 23, 24 / (NM) / White points crossing sun / See Ap. 4, 1882. [VI; 28. See: 1882 April 4, (V; 821).]


1885 July 12 / Magnificent protuberance from sun / R—Sept 26 '79. [VI; 29. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 254-255, (figure 86).]


1885 July 14 / Bengal / q / II / BA 30 / See June 6. [VI; 30. Milne, 732. See: 1885 June 6, (VI; 481).]


1885 July 14 / 6:30 a.m. / Severe shock / Calcutta / LT 15-5-c. [VI; 31. “India.” London Times, July 15, 1885, p. 5 c. 5.]


1885 July 16 / Combination of Mercury, Venus, Jupiter and Regulus / E Mec 45/32. [VI; 32. “Planetary Configurations.” English Mechanic, 45 (no. 1146; March 11, 1887): 32-33.]


1885 July 16 / 10:15 p.m. / Sharp shock / Chico, Butte Co., Cal / M.W.R. '85/187. [VI; 33. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 13 (no. 7; July 1885): 186-189, at 187.]


1885 July 17 / Remarkable meteor / Sid. Mess 4/218. [VI; 34. “Editorial Notes.” Sidereal Messenger, 4 (September 1885): 217-224, at 218.]


1885 July 17 / det. met. / 9:10 p.m. / Great met / Rochester / from Cygnus / Sid. Mess 4-218 / report heard . See July 6. [VI; 35. “Editorial Notes.” Sidereal Messenger, 4 (September 1885): 217-224, at 218. See: 1885 July 6, (VI: 20 & 21).]


1885 July 17 / (met and q ) / 9 p.m. / Syracuse, N.Y. / Large meteor seen and 10 minutes later heard a rumbling sound “thought by many to be an earthquake”. / This met was seen widely in Eastern states. / MWR 85/188. [VI; 36. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 13 (no. 7; July 1885): 186-189, at 188.]


1885 July 18 / Sounds / Religio-Ph. Jour, 6-4, from N.Y. Tribune / At Mt Kisco, N.Y.—home of Miss Lizzie Hubbell, thumping sounds. Tribune reporter heard them—"muffled thumps, at intervals. Said that any number asked for, give. [B; 663. "The Ghostly Mystery at Mt. Kisco." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 38 (no. 21; July 18, 1885): 6, (c. 4-5). "A Ghost in Mount Kisco." New York Sun, June 30, 1885, p. 1 c. 4. "A Ghost That Can Count." New York Sun, July 1, 1885, p. 1 c. 7.]


1885 July 18 / 8:40 p.m. / Great meteor at Mobile / N.Y. Times 21-3-6. [VI; 37. “A Southern Meteor.” New York Times, July 25, 1885, p. 3 c. 6.]


1885 July 20 and 21 / “Two terrible cyclones” over Sweden / Nature 32-355. [VI; 38. “Notes.” Nature, 32 (August 13, 1885): 352-355, at 355.]


1885 July 21 / near Washington / Ball of fire just before a rainstorm rolling between tracks after a train until it exploded. / NY Times 25-4-7. [VI; 39. “News and Notions.” New York Times, July 25, 1885, p. 4 c. 7.]


1885 July 22, (23) / obj / 9:45 / Knowledge—8/122 / Saw a dark object glide across face of moon. Cor. J Webb—in telescope. 5 seconds to cross—may have been bird-shaped, in that height greater than breadth, but no movement of wings. / Dark object against moon. Following night saw a bright object, or meteor, glide across sky, almost same course. [VI; 40.1, 40.2. Webb, J. “Meteors.” Knowledge, o.s., 8 (August 7, 1885): 122.]


1885 July 22 / 8:30 a.m. / Powder mill / Spring Grove, 12 miles from York, Pa / Sun 23-2-4. [VI; 41. “A Powder Mill Blown Up and Two Men Killed.” New York Sun, July 23, 1885, p. 2 c. 4.]


1885 July 23 / J.B.A. Watt, Davidson's Mains, Midlothian / “About ten o'clock in the evening of July 23, a party of four of us were standing at the head of the avenue leading to this house, when we saw a feebly-luminous flash appear on [Nature, 32-316] the ground at a distance of some thirty yards down the avenue. It rushed toward us with a wave-like motion, at a rate which I estimate at thirty miles an hour, and seemed to envelop us in an instant. My left hand, which was hanging by my side, experienced precisely the same sensation as I have felt in receiving a shock from a weak galvanic battery. About three minutes afterwards we heard a peal of thunder, but, though we waited for some time, we neither saw nor heard anything further.” / (other details) / page 343 / Another cor writes that this same evening at Dalkeith, N.B. He was startled by a peculiar sensation, or slight shock, travelling away down the road, rate of 20 miles an hour. “I heard no thunder and saw no lightning or meteor to account for the strange and weird-looking light.” [VI; 42.1 to 42.5. Watt, J.B.A. “Electrical Phenomenon.” Nature, 32 (August 6, 1885): 316-317. Lucas, Robert. “Electrical Phenomenon in Mid-Lothian.” Nature, 32 (August 13, 1885): 343.]


1885 July / Volcanic ashes that fell on the Pacific coast of Ecuador, 120 mile west of Cotopaxi. Deposit several inches thick. / See July 23. / Sun, 1888, March 31-4-7. [VI; 43. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, March 31, 1888, p. 4 c. 7. See: 1885 July 23, (VI; 46).]


1885 July 23 / Nature 32-428 / early morning / Cotopaxi / Said that the eruption began with “a terrible storm. [VI; 44. "Notes." Nature, 32 (September 3, 1885): 425-428, at 428.]


1885 July 23 / Marseilles / Object like a star—occupied almost 2 minutes to travel 6 or 7 degrees. / L'Astro 1885/394. [VI; 45. Lihou, B. “Bolide lent ou bradyte.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 394.]


1885 July 23 / 1 a.m. / Cotopaxi, Ecuador. Sounds like artillery at Guayaquil. / LT, Aug 15-5-d. [VI; 46. “Eruption of Cotopaxi.” London Times, August 15, 1885, p. 5 c. 4. The Cotopaxi volcano.]


1885 July 23 / Great q. / Philippines / BA '11. [VI; 47. Milne, 732.]


1885 July 24 / Bengal, etc. / BA '11. [VI; 48. Milne, 732.]


1885 July 24 / q / India / Bengal / II / BA '11 / See July 14. [VI; 49. Milne, 732. See: 1885 July 14, (VI; 30).]


1885 July 25 / Cloudburst / Colorado / M. Weather Review 1885-181. [VI; 50. “Navigation.” Monthly Weather Review, 13 (no. 7; July 1885): 180-182, at 181.]


[1885 July 25-Aug 6. Wrong date. See: 1895 July 25-Aug 6, (VI; 51).]


1885 July 25 / fish and alligator / Phil Public Ledger of / “After a recent rainstorm a Manatee (Fla) man found a lot of fish and an alligator in his yard, and as there is no water within half a mile of his home he is at a loss to know where they came from.” [VI; 52. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, July 25, 1885.)]


1885 [July 26] / Cosmos, N.S., 2/307 / That, July 26, 1885, an intense light had flashed from the sky at [end of note] [Lake Vättern, next to Jönköping, Sweden]. [VI; 53. “Phénomène lumineux.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), v. 2, (1885): 307. “Une lumière très intense parut subitement au nord où plusieurs nuages pareils à des banquises de glace semblaient toucher l'eau. Des décharges électriques partaient continuellement de ces nuages et leur donnaient une nuance bleue phosphorescente. Le lac était absolument tranquille, le ciel était serein, et il faisait un clair de lune magnifique. Le même phénomène a été observé dans le nord, à Katrineholm, prendant près d'une heure.” The same phenomenon was observed at Katrineholm, about 175 kilometres to the north, for about an hour.]


1885 July 26 / Sweden / Lake Welltern, near Jonkoping / elec discharges in sky / Cosmos, N.S., 2/307. [VI; 55. “Phénomène lumineux.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), v. 2, (1885): 307. Lake Vättern, (not “Welltern), at Jönköping, Sweden.]


1885 July 26, etc. / In Baden—aurora-like sunsets / Nature 32-437. [VI; 54. McLachlan, Robert. “Sunsets.” Nature, 32 (September 10, 1885): 437.]


1885 July 27 / L. Times of / q's in Bengal continue. [VI; 57. “Earthquake in Bengal.” London Times, July 27, 1885, p. 6 c. 6.]


1885 July 27 / evening / Great swarm extending five miles of Hydropsyche Instabilis / Ent. Mo. Mag. 22-94. [VI; 58. King, J.J. “A great swarm of Hydropsyche instabilis, Curt., in Inverness-shire.”  Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 22 (September 1885): 94. Hydropsyche instabilis is the caddis fly.]  


1885 July 27 / Stanislas Meunier. [VI; 56.]


1885 July 28 / All circs of substance in C.R. 103-837. [VI; 59. Meunier, Stanislas. “Substance singulière recueillie à la suite d'un météore rapporté àla foudre.” Comptes Rendus, 103 (1886): 837-840.]


1885 July 28 / (+) / Substance that fell, Luzerne, in a thunderstorm, fell with a flash of lightning—on trees and pavements in great abundance. Samples were sent to Meunier, who (C.R. 103-837, 848) considers them utterly extraordinary—a substance in drops like brownish glass but more like resin, pulverizing under little pressure—also when burned they spread much smoke and a resinous odor. Also some of it was remarkably fibrous. Meunier considers it similar to other substances bituminous and vicious that had fallen from the sky. / D-72. [VI; 60.1, 60.2. (D-72.The note copies information from page 79 of The Book of the Damned.) Meunier, Stanislas. “Substance singulière recueillie à la suite d'un météore rapporté àla foudre.” Comptes Rendus, 103 (1886): 837-840. Trécul, Auguste. “Rappel de l'observation d'une matiére incandescente, en fusion, tombée d'un nuage orageux....” Comptes Rendus, 103 (1886): 848-850. The substance fell at Luchon, (Bagnères-de-Luchon), France, (not Luzerne, Switzerland).]


1885 July 28 / A description of this substance in July 15, 1892, number of Le Naturaliste. It burned with a resinous odor and much smoke. Analysis simply that ab 1/5 of it oxygen and hydrogen and rest carbon / seems fibres werre only drawn out susbstance / fell in thunder storm. [VI; 61. Meunier, Stanislas. “Matière Singulière Recueillie à la Suite d'un Coup de Foudre.” Le Naturaliste, s. 2 v. 6 (no. 129; July 15, 1892.): 166-168, (illustration).]


1885 July 29 / [LT], 4-c / Avalanches in Piedmont. [VI; 62. “Avalanches in Piedmont.” London Times, July 29, 1885, p. 4 c. 3.]


1885 July 30 / afternoon / q near Malaga, Spain / Nature 32/329. [VI; 63. “Notes.” Nature, 32 (August 6, 1885): 327-330, at 329.]


1885 Aug 2 / q. / III / Russian Turkestan / BA '11. [VI; 65. Milne, 732.]


1885 Aug 2 / R—Sept 26 '79 / Group of great proturberances on sun. [VI; 66. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 256.]


1885 Aug 3 / Venus, Mercury, Jupiter, close together in a triangle / E Mec 45/32. [VI; 67. Markwick, Ernest Elliott. "Planetary Configurations." English Mechanic, 45 (no. 1146; March 11, 1887): 32-33, at 33.]  


1885 Aug 5 / L.T., 4-c / Groups of sunspots seen through darkened glass. [VI; 68. “A Large Sun Spot.” London Times, August 5, 1885, p. 4 c. 3.]


1885 Aug 6 / Prot. Sun. / R—Sept 26 '79. [VI; 69. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 256.]


1885 Aug 6 / At Sotteville in th storm fell many objects size of peas that burst into flames upon touching the ground. / Cosmos, N.S., 2-56. [VI; 70. "Phénomènes électriques." Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 5 (August 30, 1886): 111.]


1885 Aug 6 / Ac to E. W. Maunder, in L.T. 8-6-4—a "singular brightness" seen in the nebula of Andromeda, by Rev. S.H. Saxby, of East Clevedon, Somerset,—on the 9th, "whole central portion of the nebula [was] strikingly bright," but not a sign of a star-nucleus. / (But see Proctor's letter.) / Capt Tupman writes, "It is improbable that the new star is in any way physically connected with the Nebula." / W. T. Lynn (Sept 29) thinks much nearer than the neb. [VI; 91.1, 91.2. "The Great Andromeda Nebula." London Times, September 8, 1885, p. 6 c. 3-4. "The Andromeda Nebula." London Times, September 29, 1885, p. 4 c. 1. Lynn writes, "I must frankly confess that my own opinion is that the new star is not physically connected with the nebula, but is probably very much nearer us than it...."]


1885 Aug 8 - 9 / Comet—said been return of Tuttle's / (Gemini) / RA 7h-23m-[43s-]15 / Dec +28-1-24[s] / C.R. 101-425. [VI; 71. "M. Faye communique la dépèche suivante de M. Perrotin...." Comptes Rendus, 101 (1885): 425-427.]


1885 Aug 9 / Moon in perigee. [VI; 72.]


1885 Aug 10 / 4 a.m. / Fall of meteorites in Grazac (Tarn) / C.R. 104-1813. [VI; 73. Caraven-Cachin, Alfred. "Sur un essaim météorique tombé, le 10 août 1885, aux environs de Grazac et de Montpelegry (Tarn)." Comptes Rendus, 104 (1887): 1813-1814.]


1885 Aug 10 / Carbon / France / (Grazac) / (D-75). [VI; 74. The note copies information from page 75 of The Book of the Damned. Daubrée, and, Stanislas Meunier. "Observations sur la météorite de Grazac; type charbonneux nouveau qu'elle représente." Comptes Rendus, 104 (1887): 1771-1772. Caraven-Cachin, Alfred. "Sur un essaim météorique tombé, le 10 âout 1885, aux environs de Grazac et de Montpelegry (Tarn)." Comptes Rendus, 104 (1887): 1813-1814. The Grazac object is now identified as a pseudometeorite.]


1885 Aug 10 / Mets and [lightning (note cut off)] / Meteors and "at the same time a brilliant display of lightning" on the eastern horizon / Knowledge 8-163. [VI; 75. Grant, James. "Meteoric Display." Knowledge, o.s., 8 (March 21, 1884): 163.]


1885 Aug 10 / (Bracebridge) / meteors and lightning on horizon / Knowledge 8/163. [VI; 76. Grant, James. "Meteoric Display." Knowledge, o.s., 8 (March 21, 1884): 163. Bracebridge, England.]


1885 Aug 10, etc. / Extraordinary Perseids. [VI; 77.]


1885 Aug 10 / Perseids / Great in 1863. [VI; 78.]


1885 Aug 10, etc. / Perseids. / Denning said believed them more brilliant than usual. / Nature 32-415. [VI; 79. Denning, W.F. "The August Meteors." Nature, 32 (September 3, 1885): 415.]

 

1885 Aug 10 / Nothing of Perseids in Syd Morn Herald, Aug. 7-15. [VI; 80.]


1885 Aug. 11 / morning / Fontainebleau / daylight met seeming larger than the sun / C.R. 101-487, 540 / North to south / 7:20 a.m. / cloudless sky. [VI; 81. "M. Goetsche adresse à M. Faye la Lettre suivante...." Comptes Rendus, 101 (1885): 487-488.]


1885 Aug 12 / 5 p.m. / Norwood and Utica, N.Y. cloudbursts / Sun 13-1-7 // 13th, Penn, NY, and N.H. / 15-1-5. [VI; 82. “Tornado and Cloudburst.” New York Sun, August 13, 1885, p. 1 c. 7. “Damage by the Storms.” New York Sun, August 15, 1885, p. 1 c. 5.]


1885 Aug 13 / NY Times, 5-3 / Cyclone / Norwood, N.Y. [VI; 83. "A Cyclone in St. Lawrence." New York Times, August 13, 1885, p. 5 c. 3.]


1885 August / near Toulon / Very large ants, seemingly foreign / La Nat Sup, Jan 25, 1902, p. 30. [VI; 84. “Communications.” La Nature, 1902 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1496, supplement; January 25): 30.]


1885 Aug 13 / See the meteoric sand, Italy, etc., Oct 14, 1885. [VI; 85. See: 1885 Oct 14, (VI; 181), and, 1885 Oct 14-15, (VIL 179, 180, & 182).]


1885 Aug. / BO / Distance Andromeda Nebula (?) / Prof Hubble's function = 950,000 light years. / Nature, March 7, 1925. [VI; 86. "Our Astronomical Column." Nature, 115 (March 7, 1925): 349. The current estimate of its distance is 2.54 million light-years.]


1885 Aug / BO / Eng Mec, Sept 11 / Brother Saxby, 3 other amateurs, who saw it, one of them upon Aug 19th—not till 31st a professional in Germany saw it. [VI; 87. "The New Star in the Andromeda Nebula." English Mechanic, 42 (no. 1068; September 11, 1885): 23. The nova was discovered by Isaac W. Ward, of Belfast, on August 19, with his  4.3-inch (11 cm) Wray refractor. Ward, Isaac W. "New Star in Andromeda." Astronomical Register, 23 (1885): 232. Ward, Isaac W. "Messier 31 and Nova 1885 Andromedæ." English Mechanic, 42 (no. 1073; October 16, 1885): 138. Ward, Isaac W. "The Red Variable Star V Cygni—31 Messier Andromedae." English Mechanic, 44 (no. 1128; November 5, 1886): 217. Ward notes a brightening in M31, in 1886, and similar reports in current issue of the Astronomical Register, (citing the Astro. Nach.), that this was not seen in larger telescopes. "Ueber den neuen Stern im grossen Andromeda-Nebel." Astronomische Nachrichten, 112 (1885): 45-46. Prof. Ludovic Gully, at Rouen, also observed it, on the 17th, but thought the light was due to a defect of the new 20 cm Foucault reflector that he was testing, ("le résultat d'un défaut d'optique"). "Ueber eine Veränderung des grossen Andromedanebels. Astronomische Nachrichten, 112 (1885): 245-248. Ernst Hartwig, at the Dorpat Observatory in Estonia, observed it on August 20, but did not get its announcement sent until August 31, after he confirmed that it could be seen without moonlight. "Ueber den neuen Stern im grossen Andromeda-Nebel." Astronomische Nachrichten, 112 (1885): 283-288, at 286. Copeland reported that it was seem by M. LaJoye on August 30, at Rheims, and, by G.T. Davis on September 1, at Theale, near Reading. "Ueber den neuen Stern im grossen Andromeda-Nebel." Astronomische Nachrichten, 112 (1885): 355-360. De Vaucouleurs, Gérard Henri, and Harold G. Corwin, Jr. "S Andromedae 1885: A Centennial Review." Astrophysical Journal, 295 (August 15, 1985): 287-304, at 288. Ward's prior observation is "difficult to reconcile" and "an ill-documented claim," with Ward described as "an Irish amateur." Jones, Kenneth Glyn. "S Andromedae, 1885: An Analysis of Contemporary Reports and a Reconstruction." Journal for the History of Astronomy, 7 (February, 1976) 27-40, at 27-28. Also, in Hungary, Baroness de Podmaniczky, (nee Bertha Klara Mathilde Ferdinande, Gräfin von Degenfeld-Schönburg), told Dr. Ralph de Kövesligehty, on August 22 and 23, that she saw a little star in the nebula; but, due to the low power of her telescope, this was dismissed as the central part of the nebula becoming more prominent when moonlight could have obscured its details.]


1885 Aug. 15 / [LT]. 5-d / 27-5-f // Cotopaxi. [VI; 88. "Eruption of Cotopaxi." London Times, August 15, 1885, p. 5 c. 4. "Eruption of Cotopaxi." London Times, August 27, 1885, p. 5 c. 6. The Cotopaxi volcano.]


1885 Aug 16-18 / Intense glow that follows obscuration by volc ashes / See Sept, 1883. [VI; 89. See: (Sept., 1883).]


1885 Aug 15, etc. / Nothing in Eastern Star, Grahamstown, S. Africa. [VI; 90.]


1885 Aug / W // New star / RA 6 h., 1 m / Dec +13.59 / (Epoch 1875). [VI; 93. (Ref.???)]


1885 Aug 15 to Sept 15 / Afterglow at Stockholm / Nature 32-635 / See end of Oct. [VI; 94. "The after-sunglow...." Nature, 32 (October 29, 1885): 635. "The after-sunglow has again at times been visible in Stockholm, from the middle of August to the middle of September, being distinct from the ordinary evening aurora."]


1885 Aug 14 / And, Dust / In a paper by Prof. A. Liversidge, read before the Royal Society of N. S Wales (Jour. and Proc. Roy Soc., N S. Wales, 36-241) / At Hay, N. S. Wales, about 10 a.m., a light, reddish-brown fog, which continued all day. A light reddish brown dust fell. At Kymba, came a yellow fog in which the sun was salmon-colored. Here fell rain and then mud. Could not have had local origin—“The country in this immediate neighborhood is too damp from the effects of recent rains to furnish any dust.” [VI; 95.1, 95.2, 95.3. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 36 (July, 10, 17. 24, and 31, 1903): 241-285, at 269-272.]


1885 Aug 14 / Hay, N. S. Wales / light reddish brown fog and fall of dust / R—Dec 15, 1880 / At Kymba red mud fell—said that in immediate neighborhood country too damp from recent rains to have given origin to dust. [VI; 96. Refer to: 1880 Dec 15, (V; 417). Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 36 (July, 10, 17, 24, and 31, 1903): 241-285, at 269-272.]


1885 Aug 14 / evening / Red mud fell at Gundagai, N. S. Wales. / Syd M. Herald 20-7-5. [VI; 97. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. "Red Rain." Sydney Morning Herald, August 20, 1885, p. 7 c. 5.]


1885 Aug 14 / Again qs in Cashmere / L.T. 15-5-e / See July 4. [VI; 98. “The Earthquakes in Cashmere.” London Times, August 15, 1885, p. 5 c. 5. See: 1885 July 4, 9, (VI; 18).]


1885 Aug 14 / 23 h, 5 m / Very light shock / Garrettsville, Portage Co., Ohio / Ref—Jan 2. [VI; 99. Refer to: 1885 Jan. 2, (V; 2092). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 14.]


1885 Aug 15 / No issue of Sydney M. Herald for 16th—and 15th not findable. In 16th says—for Aug 15, immense clouds of dust at Bombala, N.S.W. [VI; 100. “Country News.” Sydney Morning Herald, August 17, 1885, p. 8 c. 2.]


1885 Aug 16 / Brilliant protuberance on sun, by Trouvelot / Sci Amer 53-305 / Seemed detached and floated above surface like a cloud but was attached by a slender filament. [VI; 101. "Astronomical Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 53 (November 14, 1885): 305.]


1885 Aug 16 / "Mass of luminous cloud move out from the sun" / by Trouvelot / at Meudon, near Paris / Sid Mess 5-247. [VI; 102. Maine, Henry C. “The Red Light.” Sidereal Messenger, 5 (October 1886): 237-251, at 247.]


1885 Aug 16 / 7:23 p.m. / Orleans / 'Bruit sourd" and concussion / C.R. 101-584 / q also near Paris / q also near Paris. [VI; 103. Renou, E. "Sur une secousse de tremblement de terre, ressentie à Orléans." Comptes Rendus, 101 (1885): 584. Repeated phrase on reverse side of note.]


1885 Aug 16-18 / cold / Wild fowl leaving Sweden. Never known to leave so early before. Nature 32-427 / Coldest summer remembered. [VI; 104. "Notes." Nature, 32 (September 3, 1885): 425-428, at 427.


1885 August / Extreme cold and cosmic phe / See Sept 9, 1883. [VI; 105. See: 1883 Sept 9, (V; 1595).]


1885 Aug 16 / Metite / Sabetmahet (Gonda), India / R—Ap. 18—'38. [VI; 106. See: 1838 Ap. 18, (I; 2306).]


1885 Aug 17— / Nova An. said been seen by M. Ludovic Gully / 19th—11 p.m., by Mr. T. W. Ward, Belfast, Ireland / Pop. Astro 16-326. [VI; 107. These were Prof. Ludovic Gully and Mr. Isaac W. Ward. “The Great Nebula in Andromeda.” Popular Astronomy, 16 (May 1908): 325-327, at 326.]


1885 Aug 19 / The two new stars in Aquila / See Aug 18, 1905. [VI; 64. See: (1905 Aug 18).]


1885 Aug 19 / See Andromeda, 1898, Aug 29. [VI; 92. See: 1898 Aug 29, (VIII: 312 & 313).]


1885 Aug 19th / New star of Andromeda was bursting out of the nucleus of the nebula. By Isaac W Ward, of Belfast, [Aug 19th] / Athenaeum. Sept 12. [VI; 108. "Astronomical Notes." Athenæum, 1885 (no. 3020; September 12): 339. "On the 19th of that month, however, Mr. Isaac W. Ward, of Belfast, reports having noticed it at about 11 o'clock at night, so that the outburst must have occurred between those dates."]


1885 Aug 20 / bet 2 and 3 p.m. / Off Sheerness, a waterspout / Symons 20-140. [VI; 109. Mercer, R. Montague. "Waterspout Off Sheerness." Symons' Meteorological Magazine, 20 (October 1885): 140.]


1885 Aug 22 / Saigon (Cochin-China) / Ac to M. Réveillère, lieutenant of the vessel "Guiberteau", about 8:15, magnificent red star, larger than Venus, moving no faster than a cloud in a moderate wind, observed for 7 - 8 minutes and then lost sight of behind clouds. / C.R. 101/680. [VI; 110. Réveillère. "Sur un météore observé à Saigon, dans la soirée du 22 août." Comptes Rendus, 101 (October 5, 1885): 680. Réveillère was with the lieutenant of the Guiberteau, (he was not the lieutenant), when they observed this object. Saigon is also identified as Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam."]


1885 Aug 22 / Nova Andromeda seen by Baroness de Podmaniczky / See last of Aug. [VI; 111. “The New Star in the Great Nebula of Andromeda (Messier 31).” Observatory, 8 (1885): 330-335, at 331. See: (last of Aug.).]


1885 Aug 23 / N.Y. Herald, 5-5 / In Milwaukee man picked up an obj in his yard. It exploded, injuring him, 2 balls fastened in an oblong frame. [B; 664. “An Unlucky Find.” New York Herald, August 23, 1885, p. 5 c. 5.]


1885 Aug 23 / Colossal flaming protuberance from sun / R—Sept 26, '79 / First appeared on 21st. [VI; 112. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 255-256, (figure 88).]


[1885 Aug 23 /] 1885 Aug 25 / Oak Hill, Lancaster co., Penn. / Luminous object fell from sky and struck a tree. Large hole in ground. Not said obj found. / Sun, Sept 20-5-7. [VI; 115. “A Pennsylvania Meteor.” New York Sun, September 20, 1885, p. 5 c. 7. (No other reports, but “Robert A. Scott” owned land at Oak Hill, in 1883.)]


1885 Aug 25 / morning / Hurricane probably not been equalled in a hundred years at Charleston. / S.E. Atlantic Coast, but worst at Charleston / Sci Amer 53-178 / $1,000,000 at Charleston. [VI; 113. “A Hurricane at Charleston, S.C.” Scientific American, n.s., 53 (September 19, 1885): 178.]


1885 Aug 25 / Hurricane—at Charleston ¼ of the houses were unroofed. / Nature 32-427 / Along the Atlantic Coast, U.S.A., the mercury fell 40 degrees. [VI; 114. “Notes.” Nature, 32 (September 3, 1885): 425-428, at 427.]


1885 Aug, before 29 / by J.C. McClure, amateur observer of Red Wing, Minn. / Sid Mess 4-246 / Saturday before 29th / This new star appeared as a nucleus or new nucleus of the Andromeda nebula. [VI; 118. “Editorial Notes.” Sidereal Messenger, 4 (October 1885): 246.]


1885 Aug 25 / Cyclone / S.C. / Ab a foot of water fell in Charleston. / N.Y. Trib, June 3-6-2, 1889. [VI; 119. “An Extraordinary Summer Storm.” New York Tribune, June 3, 1889, p. 6 c. 3-4.]


1885 Aug 25 / Tornado / Charleston, etc. / Sun 27-1-1. [VI; 120. “Charleston's Big Cyclone.” New York Sun, August 27, 1885, p. 1 c. 1-2.]


1885 Aug 26 / Severe qs in Styrian Alps and Canary Islands / An. Register. [VI; 116. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 1885: pt. 2, 1-70, at 52.]


1885 Aug 27 / or 25 // Balloon / Bermuda / N / (D-251). [VI; 121. The note copies information from pages 251 to 252 of The Book of the Damned. Bassett, Robert T. "A Balloon Passed Bermuda." Royal Gazette, (Hamilton, Bermuda), September 8, 1885, p. 2 c. 4. Lefroy, John Henry. "A Lost Balloon." London Times, September 29, 1885, p. 7 c. 5. The date of the observation was “Thursday morning,” which was August 27, (not August 25). Harding, Charles. "A Lost Balloon." London Times, October 1, 1885, p. 6 c. 3. (Lefroy, John Henry. "A Stray Balloon." Nature, 33 (December 3, 1885): 99-100. There is nothing in Lefroy's letter to indicate that Gosling interviewed Mrs. Lowell. "Notes." Nature, 33 (December 10, 1885): 135-138, at 137.)]


1885 Aug 27 / Temperature of 51 degrees at N.Y. Not approximated to till Aug 27, 1927, when 53 degrees. This, too, in period of a new star. [VI; 117. (Refs???)]


1885 Aug 31-Sept 1 / See Aug 13-15. / Nova at maximum ab 7th mag. / Observatory 8-322 / See the Andromeda Meteors, Nov. 27. / See Oct 19, 1886. [VI; 122. Maunder, Edward Walter. “The New Star in the Great Nebula in Andromeda.” Observatory, 8 (1885): 321-325, at 322. See: (Aug 13-15);  (Nov 27, Andromeda mets.); and, (1886 Oct 19).]


1885 Aug 31-Sept. 1 / night/ In Scotland, temperature fell to a point lower than ever recorded for the date. / Nature 32-495 / At one place to 18 degrees, another to 15. [VI; 123. “Notes.” Nature, 32 (September 17, 1885): 493-495, at 495.]


1885 Aug 31 / (Cut) / Nova in Andromeda / La Nat 1885/2/240, 369. [VI; 124. Meunier, Stanislas. "Académie des Sciences." La Nature, 1885 pt. 2 (no. 641; September 12): 239-240. “Une Nouvell Étoile dans la Nébuleuse d'Andromède.” La Nature, 1885 pt. 2 (no. 650; November 14): 360-370.]


1885 Aug 31 / Comet by Brooks // on Sept 2 / RA 13-42-28 / Dec +36-38-1 // CR 101/560 / Near Cor. Caroli? [VI; 125. Bigourdan, Guillaume. Observayions de la nouvelle comète Brooks et de la nouvelle planète....” Comptes Rendus, 101 (1885): 560-561. Cor Caroli, (Alpha Canum Venaticorum), is the brightest (binary) star in the constellation Canes Venatici, (where the comet was then located).]


1885 September / Lackawana, Pa. / Rebecca McDonald started trances. some of them weeks at a time. / Religio Ph Jour, Dec 12-6-4. [B; 665. "That Strange Malady." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 39 (no. 16; December 12, 1885): 6, (c. 4-5).]


1885 Sept 3, 5, 6 / Particularly sunset phe / rose colored streamers from the sun / Nature 32-466 / at Clifton. [VI; 127. Burder, George F. “Red Rays after Sunset.” Nature, 32 (September 17, 1885): 466.]


1885 Sept 3 / Snails / Cor writes in Knowledge, 8/253, that during a downpour of rain a very thick shower of snails fell in Pembroke Dockyard, covering the ground in a space ab 100 yards diameter. Most of them alive and creeping around several days. / (see ab last Oct., '85.) / page 299—Cor writes that he had investigated. Says after the rain the snails had issued from their hiding places. Says the story false though hundreds of the workmen believed it. Says were on a plot of grass ab 20 yards square. “thousands were carried away, and thousands yet remain to be seen.” [V; 128.1, 182.2, 128.3. Reynolds, B. “A Shower of Snails.” Knowledge, o.s., 8 (September 18, 1885): 253-254. “Shower of Snails.” Knowledge, o.s., 8  (October 2, 1885): 299.]


1885 (Sept 4) / (Knowledge 19-122) / by W H S Monck / Light like Capt Noon's Comet-Tail / Pubs Pacific 9/34 / Met train / Dublin / Observatory 8/337. [VI; 129.1. (Knowledge, 19-122; not found here.) Monck, William Henry Stanley. “Remarkable Meteor-train.” Observatory, 8  (1885): 336-337. Monck, William Henry Stanley. “Some Luminous Appearances in the Sky.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 9 (no. 54; February 1897): 33-36, at 34.]


1885 Sept 4 / New comet by Brooks, who in Standard 8-3-6, gives position for the 7th / RA 14h-8 min / N. De. 39°-56 min / See Aug 3. [VI; 129.2. Common, Andrew Ainslie. “The New Comet.” London Standard, September 8, 1885, p. 3 c. 6. See: (Aug 3).]


1885 Sept 4 / night / Hailstones of immense size in E. Yorkshire / Standard 5-2-4. [VI; 126. “The Provinces.” London Standard, September 5, 1885, p. 2 c. 4.]


1885 Sept 4 / evening / At Dover—escape of a partially deflated balloon / Standard 5-5-6. [VI; 130. “Serious Balloon Accident.” London Standard, September 5, 1885, p. 5 c. 6.]


1885 Sept 4 / Flies or darn. / Evening Mercury (St. John's, Newfoundland) / “A flock of those peculiar insects known as devil's darning needles flew over a part of Carleton Co., N.B., last week, were so dense as to nearly obscure the sky, and were about an hour in passing.” [VI; 133. (St. John's Evening Mercury, September 4, 1885.)]


1885 Sept 5 / Morristown, N.J., dispatch / Ghostly object that had been seen along a railroad track / 1883 / (see another case some years back) / This obj had been seen there 2 years before. / Sun 6-2-6. [B; 666. “A Ghostly Visitor.” New York Sun, September 6, 1885, p. 2 c. 6.]


1885 Sept 5 / Trib, 4-3 / 11-4-6 // New star. [VI; 131. “The Creation of a Star.” New York Tribune, September 5, 1885, p. 4 c. 3. Brooks, William Robert. “The New Star in Andromeda.” New York Tribune, September 11, 1885, p. 4 c. 6.]


1885 Sept 5 / (mirage) / Huron, Dakota / There was a mirage and a town 18 miles away clearly visible—in mid air, represent[ation] of something said be a train of cars ab. 25 miles away. / MWR 85-238. [VI; 132. “Optical Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 13 (no. 9; September 1885): 237-238, at 238. See: 1884 Aug 30, (V; 2012).]


1885 Sept 6 / Moon in perigee. [VI; 135.]


1885 Sept. 9 / Eclipse sun / New Zealand / Clerke. [VI; 136. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 4th ed., 1902, 452.]


1885 Sept 10 / N.Y. Times, 1-3 / 11-2-6 / 13-5-4 // Tornado / Washington Court House. [VI; 137. “Wrecked by a Tornado.” New York Times, September 10, 1885, p. 1 c. 3. “Ohio's Great Storm.” New York Times, September 11, 1885, p. 2 c. 6. “Ohio's Tornado.” New York Times, September 12

3, 1885, p. 5 c. 4.]


1885 Sept 11 / 9 a.m. / Mt. View, N.J. / powder mill / concussion felt far / Sun 12-1-7. [VI; 138. “Explosion of a Powder Mill.” New York Sun, September 12, 1885, p. 1 c. 7.]


1885 Sept. 12 / Sweden / mirage or clouds in changing forms / Nature 32-541. [VI; 139. “Notes.” Nature, 32 (October 1, 1885): 540-542, at 541.]


1885 Sept 12 / 9:30 p.m. / Magnificent meteor over Stockholm / S to N. / Nature 32-515. [VI; 140. “Notes.” Nature, 32 (September 24, 1885): 513-516, at 515.]


1885 Sept 14 / See Sept 26. / Washington Co, Pa / great met, said been found later / Sc Am 54-341 / p. 384, said finding said be hoax. [VI; 141. “Finding of a Great Aerolite.” Scientific American, n.s., 54 (May 29, 1885): 341. “An Aerolite Hoax.” Scientific American, n.s., 54 (June 19, 1886): 384. See: 1885 Sept 26, (VI; 154).]


1885 Sept / See Oct 26, 1886. / A 3 / monster in N Zealand. [VI; 142. See: 1886 Oct 26, (B: 754 to 761).]


1885 Sept 16-19 / Protuberance on sun / R—Sept 26, '79. Great and splendid conflagration on the sun—reached greatest development on 19th and disappeared in less than an hour. [VI; 143. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 255-256, (figure 89).]


1885 Sept / 9 recorded captures of American butterfly Danais archippus in England / on 17, 21, 24, 29th of Sept / one in Oct, 1876, and Sept., 1881 / Field, Jan 16, 1886. [VI; 144. (Field, January 16, 1886.)]


1885 Sept 16-19 / Remarkable solar protuberance / L'Astro 4-446. [VI; 145. Riccò, Annibale. “Protubérance Solaire Remarquable.” Astronomie, 4 (1885): 446-447.]


1885 Sept 17 / q (small) / Benevento, Italy, and neighborhood / BA '11. [VI; 146. Milne, 732.]


1885 Sept 17 / (D-97) / St. Leonards-on-Sea, Eng / Aerolite said to have fallen in storm. [VI; 147. The note copies information from page 97 of The Book of the Damned. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 1885: pt. 2, 1-70, at 55.]


1885 Sept 18 / night / Longacre township, Beaufort Co, Nor. Car. / shock and a crevice / World, Oct. 4-1-5. [VI; 148. (New York World, October 4, 1885, p. 1 c. 5.)]


1885 Sept 20 / Fireball and ship / N. Atlantic / Sc Am 52-280. [VI; 149. “Captain Hanson....” Scientific American, n.s., 53 (October 31, 1885): 280. “Captain Hanson, of the bark Pauline, from Cardiff, at Quebec, recounts a strange phenomenon. In latitude 55 degrees north, longitude 46 degrees west, on
September 20, during a rainstorm, a brilliant ball of fire lodged on the deck, and for a few minutes played about from the cabin to the forecastle, prostrating the captain and two seamen. With a loud report the fiery visitor disappeared as suddenly as it appeared, without damaging the vessel.”]


1885 Sept 21 / Disap in NY of Alexander F. Oakey, well-known artist. / NY Trib, 1889, Jan 6-15-3. [B; 667. “The Army of the Missing.” New York Tribune, January 6, 1889, p. 15 c. 3.]


1885 Sept. 21 / Shocks at Benevento, Italy / Nature 32-515. [VI; 150. “Notes.” Nature, 32 (September 24, 1885): 513-516, at 515.]


1885 Sept 23 / mirage / Mackinaw City, Michigan—representation said been image of a schooner in mid air over Mackinaw Island, 10 miles away / M.W.R., 85-238. [VI; 151. “Optical Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 13 (no. 9; September 1885): 237-238, at 238.]


1885 Sept 24 / Nothing / Evening Mercury (St. John's). [VI; 152.]


1885 Sept 24 / huge red meteoric body that appeared near St John's, Newfoundland, and in 7 minutes traversed an arc between 30 and 40 degrees. / Sidereal Messenger 4-264. [VI; 153. “A Bright Meteor.” Sidereal Messenger, 4 (November 1885): 264-265.]


1885 Sept 26 / R-P-Jour, 5-6 / Woman in Allentown, Pa., who for 18 months had been sleeping 20 hours a day. In best of health. [B; 668. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 39 (no. 5; September 26, 1885): 5, (c. 6).]


1885 Sept 26 / S.W. Penn / great met and metite / “ite” said not verified, on p. 273 / Sc Am 53-224 / (See: 14 Sept.) / Science 6-336. [VI; 154. “The Pennsylvania Aerolite.” Scientific American, n.s., 53 (October 10, 1885): 224. “The Pennsylvania Aerolite.” Scientific American, n.s., 53 (October 31, 1885): 273. Langley, Samuel Pierpont. “False Report of the Fall of a Meteorite in Western Pennsylvania.” Science, s. 1 v. 6 (October 16, 1885): 336. See: 1885 Sept 14, (VI; 141).]


1885 Sept 26 / q. met / 16 h. / Washington Co., Penn / q reported, but ac Am J. Sci 3/32/14, had been a meteor. [VI; 155. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 14.]


1885 Sept 28-29 / night / Either very great fall of dead birds or great number struck against glow of lights of different kinds. / Said same thing occurred the year before. / Sun, Oct 4-5-5 / See Oct 5. / Cleveland, Ohio? [VI; 156. “Showers of Dead Birds.” New York Sun, October 4, 1885, p. 5. c. 5. See: 1885 Oct. 5, (VI; 167).]


1885 Sept 29 / [LT], 7-e / Notes on Lost Balloons / Time of Gower and Eloy. [VI; 157. Lefroy, John Henry. "A Lost Balloon." London Times, September 29, 1885, p. 7 c. 5.]


1885 Sep. 29 / Mirage ship in sky / Dorset, Eng. / LT, 1885, Oct. 1 / Copied Nature 32/552. [VI; 159. Billinton, Mary Frances. “A Mirage in Dorset.” London Times, October 1, 1885, p. 6 c. 3. “This afternoon, at 5 o'clock precisely, we witnessed from this hill, of 360ft. altitude, a most perfect reflexion in the clouds of a ship in full sail.” “It lasted for about three minutes, and then slowly faded out of sight.” “Notes.” Nature, 32 (October 8, 1885): 551-553, at 552.]


1885 Sept 29 / Chartiers Valley, 390 miles from Pittsburgh, Pa, a shock / Warsaw (Ill) Bulletin, Oct 2-1-2. [VI; 160. (Warsaw Bulletin, Illinois, October 2, 1885, p. 1 c. 2; on microfilm @ NYPL.) Chartiers Valley was also said to be 30 or 39 miles from Pittsburgh, (not 390 miles).]


1885 Sept 29 / Trib, 1-5 / Meteor. [VI; 161. “The Earth Shaken by a Meteor.” New York Tribune, September 29, 1885, p. 1 c. 5.]


1885 Sept 29 / Cloud forms or mirage (Sweden) / Nature 32/552. [VI; 162. “Notes.” Nature, 32 (October 8, 1885): 551-553, at 552.]


1885 // autumn /// Stones / Danbury / See June 30, 1886. [B; 669. See: 1886 June 30, (B: 697 & 698).]


1885 Oct 1 / [LT], 6-c / Lost Balloon. [VI; 158. Harding, Charles. “A Lost Balloon. London Times, October 1, 1885, p. 6 c. 3. See: 1885 Aug 27, (VI; 121).]


1885 Oct 1 / Jupiter opposition sun, [symbols]. [VI; 163. (Correction???)]


1885 Oct to Nov. 15 / Have World. [VI; 164.]


1885 Oct 1 / N.Y.T., 1-6 / Metite in Penn. / (or q.). [VI; 165. “The Pennsylvania Meteor.” New York Times, October 1, 1885, p. 1 c. 6.]


1885 Oct 4 / 1:15 p.m. / Westwood, N.J. / Cyclone / Sun 5-1-3 / Northampton, Mass, at 4 p.m. [VI; 166. “A Tornado Close at Home.” New York Sun, October 5, 1885, p. 1 c. 3.]


1885 Oct. 5 / See Sept 28. / 420 miles from Bermuda—no wind, no storm, great number of birds flying against lights of a vessel—alighting all over it. / 9 species / Men on board with 40 years experience, but had never known like this. / Sun 12-4-1. No breeze—some of the birds could not have flown from nearest land—carried in an upper current? [VI; 167.1, 167.2. “Land Birds Far at Sea.” New York Sun, October 12, 1885, p. 4 c. 1. See: 1885 Sept 28-29, (VI; 156).]


1885 Oct 8 / For birds killed at a lighthouse, see NY Times, 1886, Aug 2-5-5. [VI; 168. (New York Times, August 2, 1886, p. 5 c. 5; not found here.)]


1885 Sept-Oct / Invasion birds / See Oct 7—1887. [VI; 169. See: 1887 Oct 7, (VI; 1161).]


1885 (Oct) / Migratory hawks. Large flocks appeared in Tulbot Co. ab Sept 20. / NY Times '87-4-7-+ / April, '87 Times? [VI; 170. (New York Times, October??? 1887, p. 4 c. 7+.)]


1885 Oct 8 / Hawk hunting in Pa / Oct 25-10-1, N.Y. Times. [VI 171. “Hunting Owls and Hawks.” New York Times, October 25, 1885, p. 10 c. 1-2.]


1885 Oct. 8 / Fayettesville, Ark. / Supposed there that hawks not migratory birds, but that late evening of 8th, thousands were seen flying to tall timber where they roosted all night. About 50 killed next morning. Estimated that were 4,000 or 5,000. They came from northeasterly direction. / Sun 25-5-7. [VI; 172.1, 172.2. “Thousands of Hawks.” New York Sun, October 25, 1885, p. 5 c. 7. The “50 killed” were shot by two men, as thousands flew away from their roosts in the morning.]


1885 Oct 9 / 23 h, 36 m / q. / Virginia / R—Jan 2. [VI; 173. Refer to: 1885 Jan. 2, (V; 2092). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 14.]


1885 Oct 9 / bet. 9 and 10 a.m. / on Lis Island, parish of Sorunda, Sweden / Great th. storm and 2 shocks of earthquake. / Nature 33/18. [VI; 174. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (November 5, 1885): 16-18, at 18.]


1885 Oct 10 / Flood Rock, Hell Gate, blown up. [VI; 175. “Flood Rock Smashed Up.” New York Sun, October 11, 1885, p. 1.]


1885 Oct 11 / NY. Times, 9-5 / q / Virginia / Can't find volume. [VI; 176. “Earthquake in Virginia.” New York Times, October 11, 1885, p. 9 c. 5.]


1885 Oct 13 / New volcano / Pacific / Tonga Islands / Science 7/69. /// X. [VI; 177. “The New Volcano in the Pacific.” Science, s. 1 v. 7 (January 22, 1886): 69-70. “Large New Volcano in the South Seas.” New Zealand Herald, November 3, 1885, p. 5 c. 2. The Fonuafo'ou volcano.]


1885 Oct 14 / Falcon Island first thrown up, so far as known. / See Oct 11, 1927. [VI; 178. See: (1927 Oct 11).]


1885 Oct 14-15 / night / Meteoric sand not in Sicily but at Moncalieri and to the north of M / LT 30-8-b. [VI; 179. “Shower of Meteoric Sand in Italy.” London Times, October 30, 1885, p. 8 c. 2. Denza wrote: “Here at Moncalieri we had no signs of the phenomenon, and no reports have come to me from the other stations of Upper Italy. Nor, as I learn from telegrams sent to me from the observatory at Syracuse and other information, did it occur in Sicily, notwithstanding that the region was nearer the place of origin of the phenomenon.” Reports were received from Lombardy and Piedmont, in northern Italy, as well as in Umbria.]


1885 Oct 14-15 / Dustfall / Germany / Zeit Met 20/419 / Klagenfurt / on 16th—p. 258 // Kärnten / Met Zeit 3/76. [VI; 180. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 20 (1885): 409-421, at 419. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 20 (1885): 503-522, at 515-516. ( ???-258.) "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 3 (1886): 76-87, at 76-77.]


1885 Oct 14 / Rain of mud / Klagenfurt, Carinthia / Geol. Mag. 1886-122. [VI; 181. Schuster, M. “Atmospheric Dust.” Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 3 (1886): 122.]


1885 Oct 14-15 / Dust. “Remarkable shower of dust,” various parts of Italy. Ac to Denza, of the Observatory of Moncalieri, it was meteoric. / Nature 33/16 / thickest in latitude of Rome / in a violent gale. [VI; 182. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (November 5, 1885): 16-18, at 16.]


1885 Oct 15 / Bo / Stones / Delano (Minn) Eagle, copied in Religio-Phil Jour, Oct 31-5-2 / In potato field on farm of Mr. Crow on the shore of Swartout Lake—falls of stones, potatoes, sticks of wood, but not unless his son, aged 8, was present—People struck on head by stones, but received no injury. Said that "tufts of dirt" seen taken up and carried 20 or 30 rods and then fall, and potatoes rise from piles. [B; 670.1, 670.2. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 39 (no. 10; October 31, 1885): 5, (c. 2-3). (Delano Eagle, Minn., ca. October, 1885.)]


1885 Oct 15-16 / Nothing in Sydney Morning Herald. [VI; 183.]


1885 Oct 15 / Partenkirchen, Bavaria / Storm yellowish red rain / Jour Roy Met Soc 12/55. [VI; 184. Ward, Michael Foster. “The Storm of October 15th, 1885, at Partenkirchen, Bavaria.” Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 12 (1886): 55-60.]


1885 Oct 18 / Sandersville, Ga. / shock / Warsaw (Ill) Bulletin 23-1-3. [VI; 185. (Warsaw Bulletin, Ill., October 23, 1885, p. 1 c. 3; on microfilm @ NYPL.)]


1885 Oct. 18 / Met / Met Zeit 3/178. [VI; 186. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 3 (1886): 173-180, at 178.]


1885 Oct 19 / Gulf of Mexico, 400 miles from mouth of Mississippi / yellow water and dead fish for 20 miles / Warsaw (Ill) Bulletin, 30-1-6. [VI; 187. (Warsaw Bulletin, Illinois, October 30, 1885, p. 1 c. 6.; @ NYPL.)]


1885 Oct 19 / In Times of, said new volc in Sicily reported by a police officer. He had seen in mountains a glare and then a shower of red hot ashes, and had “waited for no more”. So no volc seen. [VI; 188. “A New Sicilian Volcano.” London Times, October 19, 1885, p. 4 c. 2. The Rocca Busambra is the highest peak in Sicily; but, despite the reported earth tremor and fall of “red hot ashes” reported by the small force of police, the mountain consists of an ancient shale and limestone outcrop, (not a volcano).]


1885 Oct 21 / 5 a.m. / Skaadö, s.e. coast Norway / remarkable meteor / Nature 33-61. [VI; 189. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (November 19, 1885): 61-62, at 61.]


1885 Oct 22 / ab. 6 p.m. / Slight shock / Ramsjö, Sweden / Nature 33/41. [VI; 190. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (November 12, 1885): 39-41, at 41.]


1885 / toward end of Oct // Remarkable sun glows again (sunset) at Stockholm / Nature 33-61. [VI; 191. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (November 19, 1885): 61-62, at 61.]


1885 Oct 24 / Venezuela / light—noise / myst. sores and trees affected. [B; 671. (Ref???)]


1885 Oct. 24 / before // See N.Y. Commercial Advertiser. / A cor. writes of a plant (fern) in cosmic dust. / Copied badly in Phil Pub Ledger, Oct. 24. [VI; 192. (New York Commercial Advertiser???) (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 24, 1885.)]


1885 Oct 26 / [LT], 6-c / Waterspout / Italy. [VI; 193. “Italy.” London Times, October 26, 1885, p. 6 c. 3.]


1885 / ab last of Oct // Snails / Phil Public Ledger of Nov. 4, ac to Hartford Courant / Shower of snails in Hartford, Conn, “one night last week” after a heavy shower—similar to those fell at H. about a year before. / (June 18, 1865) / (Sep 3, 1885) / (July 19, 1886) / See Nov. 11, 1883. / See 1851. [VI; 194.1, 194.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, November 4, 1885.) (Hartford Courant, ca. November 4, 1885.) See: (June 18, 1865) / (Sep 3, 1885) / (July 19, 1886) / (See Nov. 11, 1883. / See 1851).]


1885 Oct 27 / Strange, enormous flame on sun / Ref—Sept 26, '79. [VI; 195. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 255-256, (figure 91).]


1885 Oct 28 / Strange bird / Pub Ledger of / Unknown Amazon bird in Augusta, Mo. / size of a robin / black body and brown head. [VI; 196. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 28, 1885.)]


1885 / last Oct / Snails / See Sept 19, 1912. [VI; 197. See: (1912 Sept 19).]


1885 Oct 30 / [LT], 8-b / Nov 3-7-f // Meteoric dust. [VI; 198. “Shower of Meteoric Sand in Italy.” London Times, October 30, 1885, p. 8 c. 2. Abercromby, Ralph. “Shower of Meteoric Dust.” London Times, November 3, 1885, p. 7 c. 6. See: 1885 Oct 14-15, (VI; 179).]


1885 Oct 29 / See Sept. 13. [VI; 199. See: (Sept. 13).]


1885 Oct 31 / evening / Dazzling meteor near Newark, Delaware / Sid. Mess.—5-30. [VI; 200. “Brilliant Meteor.” Sidereal Messenger, 5 (January 1886): 30.]


1885 Aug 13-15 / Nebula of Andromeda brightened greatly. Number of observations by astronomers recorded. Several of them thought at first that they had discovered a new comet. / Observatory 8-330 / See Aug 19. (+) / Whole nebula brightened—yet I have a note that ac to astronomers it would take light 8 years from one end of this nebula to other end. The formation brightened up as the little island of Teneriffe brightened up when there is a glow from its volcano. [VI; 201.1, 201.2, 201.3. “The New Star in the Great Nebula of Andromeda (Messier 31).” Observatory, 8 (1885): 330-335. See: (Aug 19).]


1885 Nov / Adrianople, Turkey / Large light moving slowly / D-275. [VI; 202. The note copies information from page 275 of The Book of the Damned. "Bolides ou foudre en boule?" Astronomie, 5 (1886): 309.]


1885 Nov 4 / Pub Ledger of / Metite “recently” at Owatonna, Minn. [VI; 203. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, November 4, 1885.)]


1885 Nov. 5 / Ascent / M.W. Rev., Nov., 1885 / seen Nov. 5 / That Nov 5, 1885, chief officer of the s.s. “British Prince” had reported a large meteor in two parts; risen from the horizon; visible 90 seconds; disap behind a cloud. [VI; 204. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 13 (no. 11; November 1885): 288-290, at 289.]


1885 Nov. 7 / Religio Phil Jour, 6-1 / Witchcraft trial in a church at Belgrade, Minn. [B; 672. "Believers in Witchcraft." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 39 (no. 11; November 7, 1885): 6, (c. 1). "Believers in Witchcraft." New York Sun, October 16, 1885, p. 2 c. 5.]


1885 Nov. 9 / N.Y.T., 5-4 / Met. / Pittsburgh. [VI; 205. “The Meteorite Not Found.” New York Times, November 9, 1885, p. 5 c. 4.]


1885 Nov. 13 / Lehigh University, Pa. / bright meteor / 10:30 a.m. / Science 6/497. [VI; 206. Doolittle, Charles Leander. “A Bright Meteor.” Science, s. 1 v. 6 (December 4, 1885): 497.]


1885 Nov. 15 / Severe shock at Srinagar, Cashmere, followed by a series / Nature 33-62. [VI; 207. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (November 19, 1885): 61-62, at 62.]


1885 Nov. 15 / —2:15 a.m. / 18—9:25 p.m. / 20—5:45 a.m. // shocks / w. Switzerland / Nature 33-88 / Shock of 15th in region where a shock on Sept 26. [VI; 208. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (November 26, 1885): 87-89, at 88.]


1885 Nov. 17 / [LT], 6-b / q / Cashmere. [VI; 209. “Earthquake in Cashmere.” London Times, November 17, 1885, p. 6 c. 2.]


1885 Nov. 17 / Kohlenstaub auf dem Ocean / Met Zeit 3/367. [VI; 210. “Kohlenstaub auf dem Ocean.”  Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 3 (1886): 367.]


1885 Nov 18 / Animal (Mass) / Phil Pub Ledger of / "A strange animal about the size of a Newfoundland dog, and very ferocious, is committing depredations in parts of Massachusetts. [B; 673. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, November 18, 1885.)]


1885 Nov. 18 / 6:30 p.m. / or 6 h—30 m / Paris / met as if from moon / C.R. 101-1077. [VI; 211. Meunier, Stanislas. “Observation d'un bolide.” Comptes Rendus, 101 (1885): 1077.]


1885 Nov. 21 / Disap—Syracuse / William M. Rapalje, well-known artist and architect ./ N.Y. Trib, 1889, Jan 6-15-3. [B; 674. “The Army of the Missing.” New York Tribune, January 6, 1889, p. 15 c. 3.]


1885 Nov 21 / Mayon Volc, Philippines / Ref., Feb 1, 1814. [VI; 212. Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


1885 Nov. 23 / [LT], 4-e / Vanished island / Denmark // 3-7-f /West Coast. [VI; 213. “A Vanished Island.” London Times, November 23, 1885, p. 4 c. 5. (London Times, December 3, 1885, p. 7 c. 6; not found here.)]


1885 Nov 23, etc., to 27 / qs / S.E. France / Sc A Sup. 19/7618. [VI; 214. “The Recent Earthquakes in France.” Scientific American Supplement, 19 (no. 477; February 21, 1885): 7618.]


1885 Nov. 25-Dec. 31 / N.Y. Trib. / Have. [VI; 215.]


1885 Nov / (D-114) / Lapstone / Italy / 49. [VI; 216. The note copies information from page 114 of The Book of the Damned. Johnston-Lavis, Henry James. "The Supposed Fall of an Aërolite in Naples." Nature, 33 (December 17, 1885): 153.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Falsely predicted / See Nov 27, 1885. [VI; 217. See: (1885 Nov 27).]


1885 Nov. 27 / Geminids predicted / no record of / Dec 12, 1926. [VI; 218. (Refs???)]


1885 Nov. 27 / Calculation astray / Ap 19, 1905 / Nov. 15, 1905 / Ap 19, 1906 / Nov 15, 1906. [VI; 219. See: (Ap 19, 1905 / Nov. 15, 1905 / Ap 19, 1906 / Nov 15, 1906.)]


1885 Nov. 27 / John Henry predicted mets and not come, / See if missed predicting for Ap. 20, 1909, when did come. [VI; 220. See: (1909 Ap. 20).]


1885 Nov. 27 / Mets calculated (?) / Nov. 13-16, 1908. [VI; 221. See: (1908 Nov. 13-16.)]


1885 Nov. 27 / Vs. Biela's / See Nov 21, 1904. / See 1905 or 1906. [VI; 222. See: (1904 Nov 21), (1905 or 1906).]


1885 Nov. 27 / Predicted mets / See a note on Prophecy. / right twice at first. [VI; 223. See: (Prophecy.)]


1885 Nov. 27 / Prediction / In N.Y. Times, Nov 15, 1876, column editorial of amusing comments upon the predictions of the astronomers for a big display Nov. 26, and nothing coming off. [VI; 224. “One Too Often.” New York Times, November 15, 1876, p. 4 c. 6-7.]


1885 Nov. 24 / [LT], 9-e / 27-14-c / Dec 28-9-e // Expected mets. [VI; 225. “Expected Meteoric Display.” London Times, November 24, 1885, p. 9 c. 5. “Expected Meteor Shower.” London Times, November 27, 1885, p. 9 c. 5. (London Times, December 28, 1885, p. 9 c. 5; not found here.)]


1885 Nov. 27 / Prediction / See Ap. 19, 1906. [VI; 226. See: (1906 Ap. 9)]


1885 Nov. 27 / Predicted meteors from a comet—failed // N.Y. Times, 1892, Nov. 26-1-4 / 27-2-5 / 28-1-1 / 30-5-2. [VI; 227. (New York Times, November 26, 1892, p. 1 c. 4; not found here.) “Fireworks in the Skies,”  and, “Will Look for Meteors.” New York Times, November 27, 1892, p. 2 c. 5. “No Show in the Heavens.” New York Times, November 28, 1892, p. 1 c. 1. “A View of the Comet.” New York Times, November 30, 1892, p. 5 c. 2.]


1885 Nov 27 / Prediction / Observatory, March, 1926 / Denning says the Biela's Comet meteors probably return in 1926, or 1927. [VI; 228. Denning, William Frederick. “Meteor Notes.” Observatory, 49 (1926): 98-100, at 99. “It will probably return in 1926 or 1927, or 13½ years appear to be the mean interval between the richer returns.”]


1885 Nov 27 / Observatory, 48-296 / Denning writes that had expected a pretty bright return of Perseids in 1925, but was disappointed. [VI; 229. “Meteor Notes.” Observatory, 48 (1925): 295-297, at 296-297.]


1885 Nov. 27 / evening / Ishpeming, Mich. / great met display / Sc Am 53-406. [VI; 230. “Display of Meteors.” Scientific American, n.s., 53 (December 26, 1885): 406.]


1885 Nov. 27 / No mention of meteors in Melbourne Argus. [VI; 231.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Andromedids / Seen near Mandalay, India, shower, 450 to 600 a minute, 10 p.m. The shower radiated from a point between Gamma and Beta Andromedae “to each point of the horizon”. / Nature 33/221. [VI; 232. “The Recent Star-Shower.” Nature, 33 (January 7, 1886): 220-221.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Nothing in New Zealand Times. [VI; 233.]


1885 Nov. 27 / (+) / (Direct) / Beyrout, Syria, from soon after sunset to midnight. At 6:30 p.m., 850 counted in 5 minutes. At 7:50, seven observers, each taking a zone, counted 525 in one minute—radiant 2 or 3 degrees NW of Gamma And. “Three time during the evening I saw meteors appear at this point, grow brighter, and die away at the same place, as though coming directly toward the observer.” Word is last observer. [VI; 234.1, 234.2. "The Recent Star-Shower." Nature, 33 (December 17, 1885): 150-153, at 152.]


1885 Nov. 27 / At Lurgan, Ireland, when the clouds gathered and stars lost to view, still a great many of the meteors were visible. / Scientific Inquirer 1-8 / (Pat Office). [VI; 235. (Scientific Inquirer, 1-8; not listed in Wcat, Hathi., NYPL, BL.)]


1885 Nov. 27 / Shower of mets—radiant Andromeda / ab. 3 hours / 2 to 6 per minute / South Hadley, Mass. / Sid Mess 5-29. [VI; 236. Bardwell, Elisabeth Miller. “A Star Shower.” Sidereal Messenger, 5 (January 1886): 29.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Off Straits of Gibraltor—ac to cor they radiated from a point about the nebula of Andromeda. / Nature 33-151 / The largest invariably went from a se to sw direction. [VI; 237. "The Recent Star-Shower." Nature, 33 (December 17, 1885): 150-153.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Nothing of Andromedids / Jour. Roy Soc N.S. Wales, 1885, '86. [VI; 238.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Nothing in “Roy Soc of Tasmania Papers,” 1885-86. [VI; 239.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Nothing of meteors in Trans Roy Soc. of Victoria. [VI; 240.]


1885 Nov 27 / Straight from Androm. At Chepstow, E.J. Lowe sw 5 in the radiant point at Gamma Andromedae that blazed out and died away without moving; 2 were in apparent size = to Sirius. / Nature 33-152. [VI; 241. "The Recent Star-Shower." Nature, 33 (December 17, 1885): 150-153, at 152.]


1885 Nov. 27 / In Jour. and Proc. Roy. Soc. of N.S. Wales, 1885-86, no mention of meteors. [VI; 242.]


1885 Nov. 27 / See the E.J. Lowe note.—He saw several pass between him and a hill. Yet in all the world only one mass of substance fell—or thatmeteors are electric appearances—when a meteorite falls with them it looks like electric translation of matter. [VI; 243. See: 1885 Nov 27, (VI; 241).]


1885 Nov. 27 / Identified with Biela's so Prof Erman identified Comet III, 1862 with the Perseids and Comet I, 1866 with the Leonids. / Nature 38-394. [VI; 244. Denning, William Frederick. “A History of the August Meteors.” Nature, 38 (August 23, 1888): 393-395, at 394.]


1885 Nov. 27 / In Switzerland a cor set up a torsion electrometer and found that the air was charged with electricity. / Nature 33-152. [VI; 245. "The Recent Star-Shower." Nature, 33 (December 17, 1885): 150-153, at 152.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Mets / Australia / See Nov 24-27, 1909. / See an August N. Zealand note. [VI; 246. See: (1909 Nov 24-29), and, (August N. Zealand note).]


1885 Nov. 27 / Succeeded by a new comet. [VI; 247. Comet C/1885 X1 was discovered  on December 1, 1885; and, Comet C/1885 X2 was discovered on December 3, 1885.]


1885 Nov. 27 / In Montreal Daily Witness, Nov. 30, a dispatch from Syracuse, N.Y., upon the meteors, but no mention for Canada. [VI; 248. (Montreal Daily Witness, November 30, 1885; not found here.)]


[1885 Nov 27 and Dec 28. Wrong date. See: 1884 Nov 27 and Dec 28, (VI; 249).]


1885 Nov. 27 / Nature 33, p. 152—at Princeton, N.J.—rather slow. [VI; 250. "The Recent Star-Shower." Nature, 33 (December 17, 1885): 150-153, at 152.]


1885 Nov. 27 / E J Lowe writes that 2 of these passed between him and a hill. / Nature 33-152. [VI; 251. "The Recent Star-Shower." Nature, 33 (December 17, 1885): 150-153, at 152.]


1885 Nov. 27 / “The Story of Biela's Comet” / Nature 33-392. [VI; 252. Newton, Hubert Anson. “The Story of Biela's Comet.” Nature, 33 (February 25, and, March 4, 1886;): 392-395, 418-421.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Great meteor / Niederösterreich / Met Zeit 3/177. [VI; 253. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 3 (1886): 173-180, at 177.]


1885 Nov. 27 / A.J. Sci—3/31/414 / “As the earth has a velocity of 18.5 miles a second, and its orbit has an inclination to the stream of 12° 33', the earth's motion perpendicularly to the stream is 14,500 miles per hour, or 87,000 miles in 6 hours. The really dense portion of the stream was then less than 100,000 in breadth and nearly all of it was included in a belt 200,000 miles in thickness.” 100,000 miles subtends at the sun an angle of 3.7'. [VI; 254.1, 254.2. Newton, Hubert Anson. “The Biela Meteors of November 27th, 1885.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 31 (1886): 409-426, at 414.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Geminids predicted and not ? / Dec 12, 13, 1926. [VI; 255. See: (1926 Dec 12, 13.)]


1885 Nov. 27 / Biela's meteors were predicted some months ahead by the astronomers. / That Biela's or the met. had a period of 6.6 years so if Nov, 1872, to be expected, now 1885. But also were they predicted for 1892 “and with” still more: probability if 1905. [VI; 256. (Refs.)]


1885 Nov. 27 / As to astro prediction—said in Nature 33-424 that an old wise man at Bagamoyo (6 south and 36 east) had shortly before predicted that fire was to fail from the heavens. [VI; 257. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (March 4, 1886): 423-425, at 424. “La Pluie d'Étoiles Filantes dans l'Afrique Équatoriale.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 3 (February 15, 1886): 284-285, (illustration).]


1885 Nov. 27 / At Vaison, France, most of the display over by ten p.m. Had been great; people out from their houses to watch. / E. Mec 42-278. [VI; 258. Gaudibert, Casimir Marie. “Display of Meteors—β Delphini.” English Mechanic, 42 (no. 1080; December 4, 1885): 278.]


1885 Nov. 26-27 / The meteors, ac to Denning, travelled very slowly as should, because orbits so that the meteors were overtaking the earth. / Times, Dec 1-9-a. [VI; 259. “The Great Meteoric Display.” London Times, December 1, 1885, p. 9 c. 1.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Andromeda meteors / See new Star in Andromeda, Aug 31-Sept. 1. / At Bristol—by Denning / mets and fireballs / some as bright as Venus / many equal to Jupiter / greater than display of 1872 / Observatory 9-76 / several hours and noted at Bristol. [VI; 260. Denning, William Frederick. “Relative Brilliancy of the Meteors in the Great Showers of November 27, 1872 and 1885.” Observatory, 9 (1886): 76-77. See: 1885 Aug 31-Sept 1, (VI; 122).]


1885 Nov. 27 / Great star shower / from Cassiopeia / Ireland and Mentone / also England / Sci Gossip 1886/21, p. 14 / (1886)/22. [VI; 261. Browning, John. “Astronomy and Meteorology.” Science Gossip, 22 (no. 253; January 1886): 14-15. Lett, H.W. “More November Meteors.” Science Gossip, 22 (no. 253; January 1886): 21-22. “Shooting Stars.” Science Gossip, 22 (no. 253; January 1886): 22.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Mazipi, Mexico / details of the fall / L'Astro 6-283. /// [note cut off]u Roscr[note cut off]. [VI; 262. [Árbol y] Bonilla, José. “Uranolithe Tombé au Mexique Pendant la Pluie d'Étoile Filantes du 27 Novembre 1885.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 281-284. This is the Mazapil meteorite.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Metite / Mazipil, State of Zacatecas, Mexico. [VI; 263. This is the Mazapil meteorite.]


1885 Dec 13 // N.Y. Trib 18-2-3 / In Philadelphia, family of George M Palmer, 1430 Otter St., 6th myst death since May, 1884. [B; 675. “Six Mysterious Deaths in a Family.” New York Tribune, December 18, 1885, p. 2 c. 3.]


[The following five notes were clipped together by Fort. VI; 264 / VI; 268.]


1885 Dec 17 / [source unidentified], 6-3 / Lavis / See Nov lapstone. / Dr Lavis rejects because organic substances upon it—no sign of friction with the air—no iron in it. [VI; 264. (Refs.???)]


1885 Nov / after 27th // Naples / “Yesterday, at 10:25 A.M., an aerolite fell [here] in the Via del Giorentini. It is cuneiform, presenting a superficial patina, and weighs over six kilogrammes, without counting the fragments that fell from the apex in its rapid flight earthward. In these fragments were found mineral crystals such as those on account of which the illustrious Gustavo Rose named some of the aerolites euchroites. Some of the people who witnessed the fall of the aerolite were as terrified as though they had felt the shock of an earthquake.” [VI; 265.1, 265.2, 265.3. “Fall of an Aerolite at Naples.” New York Sun, December 27, 1885, p. 7 c. 4. Gustav Rose identified the eucrite crystals in the  achondrite meteorites, which are now believed to have originated from the surface of the minor planet Vesta. Binzel, Richard P., and, Xu, Shui. “Chips off of Asteroid 4 Vesta: Evidence for the Parent Body of Baslatic Achondrite Meteorites.” Science, n.s., 260 (April 9, 1993): 186-191.]


[1885 Nov.] / BD / Naples / Piccolo / Italian newspapers, etc., by Prof del Gaizo / Naples obj / Nov., 1885 / after Nov. 27. [VI; 266. The note copies information from page 114 of The Book of the Damned. Johnstone-Lavis, Henry James. “The Supposed Fall of an Aërolite in Naples.” Nature, 33 (December 17, 1885): 153.]


1885 / sometime after Nov 27 // Ac to Prof. [Modestino] del Gaizo, in Naples Piccolo, a stone fell in Naples—“cuneiform” and “presenting a superficial patina”. / Sun, Dec 27-7-4 / (Prof. of the University of Naples). [VI; 267.1, 267.|2. “Fall of an Aerolite at Naples.” New York Sun, December 27, 1885, p. 7 c. 4.]


1885 Nov 27 / See / in Nov. all lapstone / B.D., p. 114 / Nature 33-153. [VI; 268. The note copies information from page 114 of The Book of the Damned. Johnstone-Lavis, Henry James. “The Supposed Fall of an Aërolite in Naples.” Nature, 33 (December 17, 1885): 153.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Andros not right time / See Nov. 21, 1904. [VI; 269. See: (1904 Nov 21).]


1885 Nov. 27 / List of “aerolites” last of Nov. / See Nov 29, 1809. [VI; 270. See: 1809 Nov. 29, (I; 311).]


1885 Nov. 27 / Other predictions of Androm wrong / Nov 17, 1905 / See Nov. 18. / See for instance Lyrids, Ap 19, 1906. / See Nov 13, 1906. [VI; 271. See: (1905 Nov 17), (Nov 18), (1906 Ap 19), and (1906 Nov 13).]


1885 Nov. 27 / Ab. same local time everywhere. [VI; 272.]


1885 Nov. 27 / See 1880, Nov. 27, predicted for. [VI; 273. See: 1880 Nov. 27, (V; 402).]


1885 Nov. 27 / “These meteors, radiating from γ [gamma] Andromedae, travel very slowly, as they are moving in the same direction as this earth and have to overtake us.” / Nature 100-212. [VI; 274. “Our Astronomical Column.” Nature, 100 (November 15, 1917): 212.]


1885 Nov. 27 / With exception of 1892 I don't see that were any more Andromedes. [VI; 275.]


1885 Nov. 27 / But the Perseids were active. [VI; 276.]


1885 Nov 27 / See Nov 23, 1892. [VI; 277. See: 1892 Nov 23, (VII: 743, 745, 747, 748, 749, 750, 751, 753, 754, 756, 758, 762, 763, 764, 765, 766, and 770).]


1885 Nov. 27 / At Pastenkirchen, Bavaria / Symons Met 1885-164 / chi, not gamma And. / p. 188, corrected to chi. / At 5:45 p.m. the sky “became suddenly alive” with meteors, all from gamma Andromdae. Up to midnight then only a few. [VI; 278. “The Biela Meteors.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 20 (December 1885): 162-165, at 163. “The Biela Meteors.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 20 (January 1886): 188.]


1885 Nov. 27 / by European observers / Radiant near gamma Andromedæ. / E Mec 43/30. [VI; 279. Ballot, John. “Comet Biela's Meteor Train, and the Earth's Gravitation.” English Mechanic, 43 (no. 1094; March 12, 1886): 30.]


1885 Nov 27 / Andromedids (?) (spelling) / especially at Amsterdam. / Holland / Sc A Sup. 21/8501 / Also small comet in Andromeda. [VI; 280. “The Shooting Stars of November 27, 1885.” Scientific American Supplement, 21 (no. 532;  March 13, 1886): 8500-8501, (illustration). Comet C/1885 X1. See: 1885 Dec. 1, (VI: 310 to 312). Comet C/1885 X1.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Nothing of Perseids of 1863 in Sydney Morning Herald, Aug 7-15. [VI; 281.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Gibraltor mets made lines like skeleton umbrella from point in Andromeda. / Nature 33-151. [VI; 282. "The Recent Star-Shower." Nature, 33 (December 17, 1885): 150-153, at 151.]


1885 Nov. 27 / At Constantinople (Nature 33-152), numbers fell perpendicularly, a very few e. and n.e., but most of them s. and s.w.—all bright whitish-yellow here. / In Syria, some bluish white, mostly reddish. [VI; 283. "The Recent Star-Shower." Nature, 33 (December 17, 1885): 150-153, at 152.]


[1885 Nov 27] / Active Androms of Nov 27, 1885, followed by star in Orion, Dec 13. [VI; 284. (Refs???)]


1885 Nov. 27 / In a circular from Dun Echt Observatory, meteors predicted for 27th. / Times (24th) / Also there probable appearances in 1892 and still more probable in 1905—See. [VI; 285. “Expected Meteoric Display.” London Times, November 24, 1885, p. 9 c. 5. See: (1892), and, (1905).]


1885 Nov 27 / 7-11 p.m. / Bagamoyo / great display of mets. / Nature 33-424. [VI; 286. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (March 4, 1886): 423-425, at 424.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Pleiades and Delta Persei visible in Sydney. / See Jan 7, 1902. [VI; 287. See: 1902 Jan 7, (VIII; 963).]


[1885 Nov 25. Wrong date. See: 1884 Nov 24, (VI; 288).]


1885 Nov. 25 / Violent and sudden dust storm, Nagambie. / On 26th, evening, heavy dust storm at Winton, Queensland. / Melb. Argus 28-12-5. [VI; 289. “Agricultural Intelligence,” and, “Pastoral Intelligence.” Melbourne Argus, November 28, 1885, p. 12 c. 5.]


1885 Nov. 27 / In Nature, Andromedes, not dids. [VI; 290. “The November Meteors.” Nature, 33 (December 3, 1885): 101-104.]


1885 Nov. 27 / See how close Gamma And is to new star. / See its position. [VI; 291. The apparent distance between Gamma Andromedae and SN 1885A (Supernova 1885), in the Andromeda Galaxy, is more than an hour in right ascension and more than a degree in declination.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Auroral appearances noted at Rugby / Nature 33-128. [VI; 292. "The Recent Star-Shower." Nature, 33 (December 10, 1885): 127-128.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Meteors seen everywhere, were special coming from Andromeda. / [illustration]. [VI; 293. Tupman, George Lyon. “Observations and Orbit of the Meteor Shower of  1885, November 27.” Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 46 (January 1886): 79-81, at 79-80. “About one half, perhaps, of them radiated from a point midway between γ and 51 Andromedæ, in R.A. 27°, δ + 44°; but nothing was more remarkable than the fact that the other half did not radiate from that point. The tracks of many characteristic Andromedes, when carried mentally backwards, did not pass within 10° of it.”]


1885 Nov. 27 / No Perseids in Australia findable / Aug., 1901. [VI; 294. See: 1901 Aug, (VIII: 867 & 870).]


1885 Nov. 27 / Times of India, Dec 4 / From 6:30 p.m. watched till 11:30 p.m., and 30,000 estimated. / In Dec 11, cor from Sukkur quoted—they came from all quarters, the brightest from between the Pleiades and Sirius. Fell in all directions but the majority seemed to come from the Pleiades and to fall toward the west. [VI; 295.1, 295.2. (Times of India, December 4, 1885.)]


1885 Nov. 27 / Mets began at sunset—India, Lat 31 N, Long. 77 E—cor writing to The Pioneer (Allahabad), Dec. 9 / From a center in Cassiopeia, they appeared to go in all directions toward the horizon. [VI; 296. (Allahabad Pioneer, December 9, 1885.)]


1885 Nov. 27 / See 1872. / If they overtook this earth, should not move from n. to s. / though deflected every way. [VI; 297.]


1885 Nov / Il Piccolo and Il Pungalo / Naples, Dec 8-9, 9-10 / Roma and Corriere El Mattino, Dec 9, 10 “L'Italie,” Rome, 9, 10, 12 Dec. [VI; 298.]


1885 Nov. 27 / Nothing in the Englishman (Calcutta). [VI; 299.]


1885 Nov. 27 / (+)(-) / The meteors as seen in S. Africa / E. Mec 42-424 / In a southerly direction between Alpha Arietis and Beta Triangulum / meteors in volleys / Are A and T below Andromeda. [VI; 300. Ballot, John. “The Meteor Shower on Evening of 27th November, 1885, as Seen in the Transvaal, S. Africa.” English Mechanic, 42 (no. 1087; January 22, 1886): 424.]


1885 Nov. 27 / In Cape Argus, 28th—“Several brilliant shooting stars were seen in the heavens last night.” / N.M. [VI; 301. (Cape Argus, November 28, 1885.; not found here.)]


1885 Nov. 27 / No Andromedids mentioned in the Sydney Daily Telegraph. [VI; 302.]


1885 Nov. 27 / First issue after, of Eastern Star, Grahamstown, S. Africa, is missing. [VI; 303.]


1885 Nov. 28 / 7:50 / At Brussels, during a violent storm—a luminous region of spherical form. / by M. Terby / (Nature 33-524) / Diameter 5 to 8 degrees, ab 60 degrees above southern horizon. It returned at 8:05 behind clouds. [VI; 304. “Scientific Serials.” Nature, 33 (April 1, 1886): 523-525, at 524. Terby, François. “Note sur la pluie d'étoiles filantes du 27 novembre et sur un phénomène lumineux énigmatique observé le 28 novembre 1885.” Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, s. 3 v. 10 (1885): 751-756, at 755-756.]


1885 Nov. 28 / Rains last and floods in Tasmania. / Sydney Daily Telegraph, 30-5-7. [VI; 307. “Floods in Tasmania.” Sydney Daily Telegraph, November 30, 1885, p. 5 c. 7.]


1885 Nov 30 / wrms / Phil Pub. Ledger of / ab a week before // Shower of angle worms at Truckee, A.T. They fell upon ground covered with snow. [VI; 305. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, November 30, 1885.) “Pacific Coast Items.” Sacramento Daily Record-Union, November 23, 1885, p. 2 c. 5. “At Truckee, Wednesday morning, hundreds of angle worms were seen crawling about on top of the snow, seemingly having been dropped from the sky in the storm of the previous night.” Truckee is located in northern California, near the Nevada border, (not in the Arizona Territory); and, this article indicated the night of November 17-18, 1885.]


1885 Nov 30 / [LT], 7-e / Dec 1-13-c / 2-11-c / 3-11-f / 4-7-f / 5-12-b / 7-11-f / 8-7-d // Rain and flood / Thames Valley. [VI; 306. “Heavy Rainfall.” London Times, November 30, 1885, p. 7 c. 5. “Floods in the Thames Valley.” London Times, December 1, 1885, p. 13 c. 3. “The Floods on the Thames Valley.” London Times, December 2, 1885, p. 11 c. 3. "The Thames Valley Floods." London Times, December 4, 1885, p. 7 c. 6. “The Upper Thames Floods.” London Times, December 5, 1885, p. 12 c. 2. “Floods in the Thames Valley.” London Times, December 7, 1885, p. 11 c. 6. “Floods in the Thames Valley.” London Times, December 8, 1885, p. 7 c. 4.]


1885 Nov. 30 / Ice / Near Sydney, fell not hail, it is said, but lumps of ice 2 or 3 inches in diameter. / Sydney Daily Telegraph, Dec 2-3-7. [VI; 308. “Hailstorm at North Shore.” Sydney Daily Telegraph, December 2, 1885, p. 3 c. 7.]


1885 Nov 30 / [LT], 8-d / Dec 1-9-a / 2-6-d // Great met. display. [VI; 309. “The Meteors.” London Times, November 30, 1885, p. 8 c. 4. “The Great Meteoric Display.” London Times, December 1, 1885, p. 9 c. 1. Ommanney, Erasmus. “The Meteoric Shower.” London Times, December 2 1885, p. 6 c. 4.]


1885 Dec. 1 / At Paris—new comet in Andromeda near the square of Pegasus—moving towards Pisces. / E. Mec 42-297. [VI; 310. “Scientific News.” English Mechanic, 42 (no. 1081; December 11, 1885): 297-298. Comet C/1885 X1.]


1885 Dec. 1 / C.R. 101-1121 / In the evening ab. 8 o'clock, comet by M. Fabry, of the Observatory of Paris / ab 12th mag. / RA—0 h- 39m – 8s / Dec. + 21-2-16 // on 4th—0-31-49 / + 20-57-21. [VI; 311. Fabry. “Découverte d'une comète à l'observatoire de Paris.” Comptes Rendus, 101 (1885): 1121-1122. Comet C/1885 X1.]


1885 Dec 1 / New comet in Andromeda, by M. Fabry of the Paris Observatory / See Holmes in 1891. / Times, Dec 3-6-c / 5-6-f / 7-6-f / 30-5-f. [VI; 312. “A New Comet.” London Times, December 3, 1885, p. 6 c. 3. “The New Comet.” London Times, December 5, 1885, p. 6 c. 6. “Another New Comet.” London Times, December 7, 1885, p. 6 c. 6. "Another New Comet." London Times, December 30, 1885, p. 5 c. 6. See: (Holmes Comet was in 1892, not in 1891). Comets C/1885 X1, C/1885 X2, and 17P/1892 V1.]


1884 Dec 3 / [LT], 14-a / Ext wind at Ramsholt. [VI; 313. “Extraordinary Wind.” London Times, December 3, 1885, p. 14 c. 1.]


1885 Dec 3 / 6:45 a.m. / Gateshead, England / vibrations / Nature 33-129. [VI; 314. Newall, R.S. “Earthquake.” Nature, 33 (December 10, 1885): 129.]


1885 Dec 3 / Comet by Barnard / 4 h-21-56 / + 4-45 / CR 101-1236. [VI; 315. Bigourdan, Guillaume. “Observations de la nouvelle comète Barnard...” Comptes Rendus, 101 (1885): 1236. Comet C/1885 X2.]


1885 Dec 6 / Trib, 9-5 / Met. / Penn. [VI; 316. “The Pennsylvania Meteor.” New York Tribune, December 6, 1885, p. 9 c. 5. See: 1885 Sept 26, (VI; 154).]


1885 Dec 8 / evening / Tornado / Chester, Ill. / N.Y. Tribune 10-1-2. [VI; 317. “Tornado Wrecking a Penitentiary.” New York Tribune, December 10, 1885, p. 1 c. 2.]


1885 Dec. 9 / Fish / night / N.Y. Trib. 11-2-3 / Shower of fish at Cumberland, Maine. Railway station strewn with them—found for about a mile. About one inch long and looked like young smelt. [VI; 318. “Raining Fish in Maine.” New York Tribune, December 11, 1885, p. 2 c. 3-4. “Last night there was a shower of fish at Cumberland, and this morning for a mile or so small fish were found in abundance. The depot at Cumberland was strewn with them and passengers on trains secured specimens. Some of them have been brought to this city [Portland, Maine] and placed in Natural History rooms. The fish are about one inch long and have the appearance of young smelts. It is supposed that they wee taken from the bay in a whirlwind or waterspout, the wind being high last night.”]


1885 Dec 10 / Venus conjunction moon. Moon in apogee. [VI; 319. Written in astronomical symbols.]


1885 / 8 Dec / (q-sound) / Puget Sound / 10:35 p.m.—3 shocks / 10:40—2 very heavy shocks and noises as of explosion / 11:15—2 slight shocks / 11:50—1 heavier shock / “Eery few minutes could be heard what sounded like the booming of cannon.” / Amer Met Jour. 2/431. [VI; 320. “Earthquake on Puget Sound.” American Meteorological Journal, 2 (February 1886): 430-431.]


1885 Dec 11 / See May 5, 1886. [VI; 321. See: 1886 May 5, (VI; 433).]


1885 Dec. 11 / Metite / At Hawaii, night, many meteors. / 12th, at 1:30 p.m., near Hawaii, the masthead of the schooner J.C. Ford set on fire and “metallic-looking substance” at foot of mast—red hot—no shock felt. / LT, 1886, Feb 10-13-a. [VI; 322. Hopkins, Manley. “December Meteors in the Pacific.” London Times, February 10, 1886, p. 13 c. 1.]


1885 Dec 12 / met ship / Story in Nature 33/516, taken from the Sydney Echo, of schooner J.C. Ford, from Pacific coast to Kahului, Maui—a chewed up sail was seen burning at the main mast head—great mystery—metallic masses supposed meteoric found at base of main mast. [VI; 323. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (April 1, 1886): 516-518, at 516.  “The Meteor.” Pacific Commercial Advertiser, (Honolulu), December 29, 1885, p. 2 c. 2. “The following letter, giving details of the remarkable accident to the schooner J.C. Ford on her voyage from the Pacific Coast to Kahului, Maui, has been kindly placed at our disposal for publication. It will be read with interest by all classes, but especially by scientific men. Professor D.W. Alexander has forwarded Van Slyck, and expects to procure another fragment for presentation to the National Museum:” “Kakului, December 22, 1885.” “Hon. S.G. Wilder:” “Dear Sir— As you request, we present you with a statement of the fire which took place on the schooner J. C. Ford on her recent trip to Kahului. On Saturday, the 12th instant, being in lat. 23.53 N., long 143.26 W., at 1:30 o'clock p.m., the weather being fine and wind moderate, the First Mate, Mr. Mercer, discovered the mizzen-staysail, which was clewed up, to be in flames at the mainmast head. With all possible speed the fire was put out by means of water, beating and cutting away. The staysail was destroyed, the main peak halyard block charred badly, the masthead was burnt about half an inch deep. It is needless to say that all hands wondered at a fire occurring at the masthead, but the finding of fragments of some metallic-like substance showed us that something of a meteoric nature the cause. Those on the deck were picking up burning fragment and throwing them overboard. The pieces of the strange substance were found at the base of the mainmast. A piece as large as a man's hand was thrown overboard quite hot by Mr. Weight, and a piece as large or larger, which was burning the mainsail, was thrown overboard by one of the hands. The above are the facts as we remember them, and as they are recorded on the ship's log.” “In the night previous the weather was clear, but meteors were very numerous, and the Mate and man at the wheel noticed their frequency and numbers, and also that they would burst in a manner resembling a rocket.” “In regard to the list of questions furnished by Mr. Geo. Bishop, we cannot answer anything satisfactorily. No shock was noticed, the first intimation of the occurrence being the staysail in flames. Our theory is that the substance formed is the crust of a meteor or fragment projected laterally. As there was a large quantity of kerosene and other combustible matter on deck, there were doubtless more than the two pieces thrown overboard in our anxiety to avoid disaster. As so many have wanted specimens, we can send but a small piece of the substauce. We remain yours truly,” “T.H. Griffiths, Captain.” “B.J. Weight, Passenger.” “Notes from Kahului.” Honolulu Daily Bulletin, December 19, 1885, p. 3 c. 3.] “On the 17th inst. the tern J.C. Ford, Capt. Griffiths, arrived here 17 days from San Francisco, with general cargo. The captain reports that on the 12th inst., when in lat. 22 north, long. 148 west, the weather being fine, the vessel was struck by a fiery meteor, which set fire to the mainmast head and burnt up the stay sail, large pieces of the burning scoria or molten matter falling upon the deck and burning up sails and deck covering. For a few moments great excitement prevailed on board, but the captain and crew quickly set to work to put out the fire on mast and sails, the latter of which were cut away and thrown overboard. Water was hauled up in buckets from the masthead and the fire soon extinguished. Pieces of the meteor which fell on deck were red hot and resembled burning lava. The captain preserved several pieces, which are now of course in a cool state.”]


1885 Dec 13 / New star Orion / ab. 6th mag / Bull Astronomique 1886-51. [VI; 324. “Découverte d'ume étoile nouvelle dans la constellation d'Orion.” Bulletin Astronomique, 3 (1886): 51. Gore, John Ellard. “On the New Star in Orion.” Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 46 (January 1886): 108.]


1885 Dec 13 / Gore's star in Orion / Then said be a variable star. If so, never seen before. [VI; 325. U Orionis is a long period variable star.]


1885 Dec 18 / First ob. of new star in Orion, at Washington Naval Observatory / N.Y. Trib 23-5-2. [VI; 326. “The New Star in the Firmament.” New York Tribune, December 23, 1885, p. 5 c. 2.]


1885 Dec 21 / Nova in Orion / La Nature 1886/1/158 / (Cut). [VI; 327. “L'étoile nouvelle d'Orion.” La Nature, 1886 pt. 1 (no. 662; February 6): 158.]


1885 Dec 22 / Moon in perigee. [VI; 328.]


1885 Dec 24 / Polt—or Elec / Phil Pub. Ledger of, quoting Cincinnati Enquirer / "An electric-boy" in Youngstown, Ohio. Upon his approach chairs and tables dance, and heavy objects beyond his strength to move tottered—See Jan. [B; 676. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 24, 1885.) (Cincinnati Enquirer, ca. 1885.) See: (Jan.)]


1885 Dec 26 / Nova And. “may be said to have practically disappeared”. / Prof. Swift. / Sid Mess 5-59. [VI; 329. Swift, Lewis. “Disappearance of the New Star in the Andromeda Nebula.” Sidereal Messenger, 5 (February 1886): 59.]


1885 Dec. 26 / 7:05 p.m. / Bloomington, Illinois (sic) / Loud explosion heard. / M.W.R. 85/313. [VI; 330. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 13 (no. 12: December 1885): 312-315, at 313. Bloomington, McLean County, Illinois, (not Bloomington, Indiana).]


1885 Dec. 28-29 / night / Bloomington, Ill. / q and sound like gunfire / Sun 30-4-1. [VI; 331. “Earthquake Shocks.” New York Sun, December 30, 1885, p. 4 c. 1.]


1885 Dec 28 / Sound / Sci Amer 75-123 / W.S. Cooper, of New Castle, Ky, writes that shortly after sunrise on Gulf of Mexico he heard reports like distant gunfire at intervals of 5 minutes. A companion of his had said that he had often heard such sounds on still mornings. [VI; 332. Copper, W.S. “Barisal Guns.” Scientific American, n.s., 75 (August 1, 1896): 123.]


1885 Dec 29 / bet. 4:30 and 5:30 a.m. / Hartford (Conn) / several sharp shocks / Sun 30-4-1. [VI; 333. “Earthquake Shocks.” New York Sun, December 30, 1885, p. 4 c. 1.]


1885 Dec 30 / Gundaroo / Great dust cloud / R., Dec 15, 1880. [VI; 334. Refer to: 1880 Dec 15, (V; 417. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 36 (July, 10, 17, 24, and 31, 1903): 241-285, at 272.]


1885 Dec 31 / Phil Pub Ledger, page 2 col. 2 / At New Orleans, an Italian organ grinder leaned against an electric light pole and received a fatal shock, and a companion who seized him was severely burned. But the company had not begun to operate yet and no current in the wires. [B; 677.1, 677.2. (Philadelpha Public Ledger, December 31, 1885, p. 2 c. 2.)]


1885 Dec 31 / Meteor / Serajewo / Met Zeit 3/81. [VI; 335. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 3 (1886): 76-87, at 81.]

 
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