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Last updated: July 15, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1899


1899:


1899 / Snow brown, yellow, red / An. Soc. Met de France 47/166. [VIII; 390. Revue et Bulletin Bibliographique.” Annuaire de la Société Météorologique de France, 47 (1899): 145-173, at 166. (Rona. “Sanregen in Ungarn.” Meteorologische Zeitschrift. (April 1896): 38.) (Review of 1896 article, not phenomena in 1899.)]


1899 Jan. 1 / (assault) / B. Eagle 3-'99 / On evening of 1st, Mrs Annie Shephard, 419 Stone St, Brooklyn, felt a stinging pain in back of head, staggered, but recovered and continued work. Later, however, doctor sent for. He extracted a bullet that had flattened against her skull. But “the bullet was of the old-fashioned kind.” The police investigated. It was said that pistol shots had been fired in the neighborhood in celebration of the New Year. But ac. to the police “there were no bullet holes in the windows or doors and no opening [was found] through which a stray bullet could [have] possibly entered the room." Her nephew in the room at the time. Police theory that he had been cleaning a pistol which had accidentally discharged. He denied owning a weapon, and Mrs. S was positive that he had had nothing to do with the occurrence. The police "have not even a theory to give to the public concerning the [probable cause of the] accident.” [C; 390.1 to 390.4. "Police Have No Clew." Brooklyn Eagle, January 3, 1899, p. 16 c. 4.]


1899 Jan. 12 / Violent Storm / Nature 59/277. [VIII; 391. “Notes.” Nature, 59 (January 19, 1899): 275-279, at 277.]


1899 Jan 15 / Vesuvius / at night, more violent / L.T. 17-5-f. [VIII; 392. “An Eruption of Vesuvius.” London Times, January 17, 1899, p. 5 c. 6.]


1899 Jan 15 / Vesuvius violent / Nature 59-276. [VIII; 393. “Notes.” Nature, 59 (January 19, 1899): 275-279, at 276.]


1899 Jan. 18 / Op. Mars / (Al). [VIII; 394. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1899, 573.]


1899 Jan. 20 / [LT], 11-f / 25/11/d / Feb 6/6/c / (Jan 18 / Op Mars) / Jan 2-2-c / (Marc 20/15/c / 21/14/d; 12/c / 27/9/d / Feb 4-8-d. [VIII; 395. “Sir Robert Ball's Christmas Lectures.” London Times, January 2, 1899, p. 12 c. 4. “Strange Story of a Cape Mounted Policeman.” London Times, January 20, 1899, p. 11 c. 6. “The Strange Story of a Cape Mounted Policeman.” London Times, January 25, 1899, p. 11 c. 4. “Remarkable Story.” London Times, February 4, 1899, p. 8 c. 4. “The Story of a Remarkable Adventure.” London Times, February 6, 1899, p. 6 c. 3. “Reported Discovery of a New Satellite of Saturn. London Times, March 20, 1899, p. 15 c. 3.  (London Times, March 21, 1899, p. 14 c. 4; not found here.)  (Jan 18 / Op Mars) / (London Times, ???, p. 12 c. 3.) (London Times, March 27, 1899, p. 9 c. 4; not found here, nor January, nor February.)]


1899 Jan 21 / 1 p.m. / Richview, Ill / shock and roaring sound / Trib 22-4-5. [VIII; 396. "Earthquake Shocks in Illinois." New York Tribune, January 22, 1899, p. 4 c. 5.]


1899 Jan 22 / 9:30 a.m. / q in Greece / very destructive / [LT] 24-5-e / Continued at least to 27th. [VIII; 397. “The Earthquake in Greece.” London Times, January 24, 1899, p. 5 c. 5-6. “The Earthquakes in Greece.” London Times, January 28, 1899, p. 7 c. 4.]


1899 Jan 22 / q / Greece / 24 / Mexico / BA '11. [VIII; 398. Milne, 740.]


1899 Jan 24 / afternoon / Severe q, Mexico / 5:09 p.m. / More than 200 buildings destroyed / Nature 59-325. [VIII; 399. "Notes." Nature, 59 (February 2, 1899): 324-329, at 325.]


1899 Jan. 25 / Zomba, British Central Africa / (F). [VIII; 400. Fletcher, 107. This is the Zomba meteorite.]


1899 Feb 5 / ab. 3 p.m. / Southwest Va. / Sound like that of an explosion and shock / Trib 6-3-4. [VIII; 401. (New York Tribune, February 6, 1899, p. 3 c. 4; not found here.)]


1899 Feb 9 / morning / Shock / Maysville, Ky. / Trib 10-8-6. [VIII; 402. "Alarmed by Earthquake Shocks." New York Tribune, February 10, 1899, p. 8 c. 6.]


1899 Feb 11 / Shocks in Porter Co., Ind / Trib 13-3-6. [VIII; 403. "The Ground Heaved and Split." New York Tribune, February 13, 1899, p. 3 c. 6.]


1899 Feb 12 / great tempest / France and Eng / La Nat Sup, Feb 25, p. 52. [VIII; 404. “Tempêtes.” La Nature, 1899 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1344, supplement; February 25): 52.]


1899 Feb 12 / 10 degrees below zero at Dallas, Texas. The greatest recorded. / N.Y Sun, 1909, Jan 12. [VIII; 405. "Blizzard in the Southwest." New York Sun, January 12, 1909, p. 3 c. 2.]


1899 Feb 13 / 3:30 a.m., Ohio and Tenn / shocks / 4:35 a.m. , Nor. Car. / Trib 14-14-2 / N.M. [VIII; 406. "Earthquake Shocks Felt." New York Tribune, February 14, 1899, p. 14 c. 2.]


1899 Feb 14 / Eagle, 8-7 / Ghst. [C; 391. "An Irish Ghost Story." Brooklyn Eagle, February 14, 1899, p. 8 c. 7.]


1899 Feb 21, 25, 26 / Mars area known as “Argyre” “intensely brilliant”. / Mem. B.A.A. 11/91. [VIII; 407. “Section for the Observation of the Mars. Part I: Prolegomena.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 11 (1903): 85-92, at 91-92.]


1899 Feb. 21 / Enormous flocks of starlings / Beaufort (Kerry), Ireland / Field, Ap. 8, 1911. [VIII; 408. "Remarkable Influx of Birds in Ireland." Field, April 8, 1911, pp. 702-703.]


1899 Feb 27 / Sound / Pendleton, near Manchester / 10 p.m. / “A booming sound, like that of a gas explosion, accompanied by shock.” / Geol Mag 1900—p. 107 / Nature 62-17 / See Ap. 7, 1900. [VIII; 409. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 175-176. “Notes.” Nature, 62 (May 3, 1900): 15-19, at 17. See: 1900 Ap. 7, (VIII; 596).]


1899 Feb 28 / 7:45 p.m. / Isle of Wight / met passing between Orion and Canis Major / Sci Gos, NS, 5-346. [VIII; 410. Sich, Frank, Jr. "Meteor." Science Gossip, n.s., 5 (no. 59; April 1899): 346.]


1899 March / sunspot, aurora, and mag disturbance / Observatory 22/196 / Clerke, His Astro, p. 161. [VIII; 411. Anderson, William. “A Remarkable Solar Outburst.” Observatory, 22 (1899): 196-198. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 4th ed., (1902), 161.]


1899 March 2 / Luminous object in sky in daytime from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. over El Paso, Texas. / Observatory 22/247 / Supposed been Venus—Venus was 2 months past secondary greater brill at the time. [VIII; 412. “A Remarkable Daylight Appearance of Venus.” Observatory, 22 (1899): 247. “The Lone Star.” El Paso Daily Herald, March 3, 1899, p. 5 c. 5. Venus had an absolute magnitude of about -5.1 and was at +45° elongation, on this date, at El Paso.]


1899 March 3 / night / Magnificent meteor and 3 loud detonations / Bellingen / In N.S. Wales, if Sydney is. / Syd. Morn Herald 8-7-7. [VIII; 413. "Bellingen, Tuesday." Sydney Morning Herald, March 8, 1899, p. 7 c. 7.]


1899 March 5 / 2:20 a.m. / Explosion of 50 tons of black powder at Lagoubran Naval Magazine. Heard and felt at Nice, 84 miles away. / Nature 59-447. [VIII; 414. "Notes." Nature, 59 (March 9, 1899): 446-449, at 447.]


[1899 March 5 /] 1899 March 15, about / near Toulon / great explosion / Lagonbran, France / La Nat and Sup of 18th. [VIII; 421. Gall, J.-F. L’Explosion de Lagoubran." La Nature, 1898 pt. 2 (no. 1347; March 18): 243. “Informations.” La Nature, 1899 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1347, supplement; March 18): 61.]


1899 March 8 / (obj) / by Dr Warren E Day, of Prescott, Arizona—a luminous object that travelled “along with the moon” all day until 2 p.m. Upon 7th the obj had been seen close to the moon by Mr. G.O. Scott, at Tonto—both were voluntary observers for the W. Bureau. / U.S. Weather Bureau Rept (Ariz. Sec), March, '99. [VIII; 415.1, 415.2. "Clearness of the Atmosphere in Arizona." Monthly Weather Review, 27 (no. 3; March 1899): 110. A daytime observation of Venus. (U.S. Weather Bureau Rept (Ariz. Sec), March, '99.)]


1899 March 11 / Galta Channel, Mediterranean / mud in a th. storm / Nautical Magazine 68-497. [VIII; 416. (Nautical Magazine, 68-497.)]


1899 March 12 / near Borgo, Russia / bet 9-10 a.m. / Great metite / was found = 850 lbs / M.B.A.A.—9-15 / In Daily Graphic, Ap. 17, 1899, sketch of cavity it made. Said been 12 feet in diam. and 7 feet deep. [VIII; 417. “Section for the Observation of Meteors.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 9 (1901): 1-26, at 15. (London Daily Graphic, April 17, 1899; not at BNA.) (The Bjurböle meteorite, 330 kg., broke thru sea-ice about 8:30 PM. Is this the same???)]


1899 March 12 / 9 p.m. / Great met / Sweden / Bull Soc Astro de F, June, 1899 / Appeared near E of Virgo. / Seen and detonated, St Petersburg, 9:45 p.m. [VIII; 418. “Un bolide extraordinaire.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 13 (1899): 281-283.]


1899 March / Metite in Finland / Fr Acad Sci, May 1, 1899 / See Meunier. [VIII; 419. Meunier, Stanislas. "Chute de météorite récemment observée en Finlande." Comptes Rendus,  128 (1899): 1130-1131. This is the Bjurböle meteorite.]


1899 March 12 / Bjurbole, Nyland, Finland / (F) / See Oct 21, 1901. / C.R. 130-434. [VIII; 420. Fletcher, 107. Meunier, Stanislas. "Examen de la météorite tombée le 12 mars 1899 à Bierbélé, ptès de Borgo, en Finlande." Comptes Rendus, 130 (1900): 434-436. See: 1901 Oct 21, (VIII; 918). This is the Bjurböle meteorite.]


[1899 March 15, about. Wrong date. See: 1899 March 5, (VIII; 421.]




1899 March 16 / 6:07 a.m. / daylight / Meteor moving from Jupiter toward Saturn. / E Mec 69-85. [VIII; 422. Wright, Frank H. "Daylight Meteor." English Mechanic, 69 (no. 1772; March 10, 1899): 85.]


1899 March 19 / Eagle, 1-4 / Myst arson / See Dec 8, '98. [C; 392. "Two Queer Fires." Brooklyn Eagle, March 19, 1899, p. 1 c. 4. See: 1898 Dec 8, (C; 386).]


1899 May 19 / See Cat-fire cases, 1905. / Sydney Morning Herald 20-9-1 / Mrs Mary Doyle, at Balmain, N.S. Wales, was seen standing in her room, 8 in morning, her night clothes afire. Her son-in-law was called and extinguished the flames. She said that “a rat upset the candle, which set the things alight.” She died. [C: 393.1, 393.2. "Death from Burns." Sydney Morning Herald, May 20, 1899, p. 9 c. 1-2. She was seen afire at 8 in the evening, (not the morning). See: (1905).]


1899 March 20 / Germany / meteor / Met Zeit 16/164. [VIII; 423. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 16 (1899): 164-180, at 164.]


[1899 March 28 /] 1889 March 28 / begin 9 a.m. / Dark day / Cincinnati / “It was the darkest morning in the city's history.” / Trib 29-11-1. [VI; 1591. “Dark Day in Cincinnati.” New York Tribune, March 29, 1899, p. 11 c. 1. “Darkest Day in Cincinnati.” Cincinnati Enquirer, March 29, 1899, p. 1 c. 4.]


[1899 Ap. 7 /] 1889 Ap. 7 / 8:45 p.m. / Berkeley, Cal / “a flock” of meteors ab 6 degrees southeast of Alpha Orionis. / Pubs-Pacific 11-120. [VI; 1620. Townley, Sidney Dean. "A Cluster of Meteors." Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 11 (no. 68; June 1899): 120-121.]


1899 April 16 / [LT], 7-f / rare butterfly. [VIII; 424. (London Sunday Times, April 16, 1899, p. 7 c. 6; not found here; recheck London Times index.)]


1899 Ap. 18 / It Sounds / Isernia / Rombi / See 1816. [VIII; 425. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 46. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1899 April 21 / (nova) / 7th mag then / First record of Nova Aquilae No. 1 when traced back. In July, 1900, it was found upon a plate taken in July, 1899. / Nature 72-494 / Nov. Aq. No. 2see Aug 10, 1905. [VIII; 426. “Nova Aquilæ No. 2.” Nature, 72 (September 14, 1905): 494. See: 1905 Aug 10 and 18, (IX: 5).]


[1899 April 27 /] 1899 Ap. 28 / 6:30 p.m. / Kirksville, Mo / Violent cyclone but pounce on one small spot. / La Nat. Sup., May 6, p. 89. [VIII; 427. “Informations.” La Nature, 1899 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1354, supplement; May 6): 89. The correct date was April 27, 1899, (not April 28, given in La Nature). The tornado’s path of destruction across Adair County missed the center of Kirksville but was not confined to one small spot.]


1899 May 1 / Vincennes, Ind / met. rail / Sc Am 80/294 / (D-113). [VIII; 428. The note copies information from page 113 of The Book of the Damned. "Fall of Meteors in Indiana." Scientific American, n.s., 80 (May 13, 1899): 294. "Newspaper Fakes." Monthly Weather Review, 27 (April 1899): 155.]


1899 May 2 / NY Times, 3-4 / Quartz Met, of Vincennes, Ind. [VIII; 429. “Two Meteors Fall in Indiana.” New York Times, May 2, 1899, p. 1 c. 3.]


1899 May 3 / q. / Greece / I / BA '11. [VIII; 430. A class I earthquake. Milne, 740.]


1899 May 3 / Alta, Iowa / beam in sky / Pop Astro 10-250. [VIII; 431. Hadden, David Edward. “Auroral Phenomena at Alta, Iowa.” Popular Astronomy, 10 (no. 5; May 1902): 249-251, at 250.]


1899 May 3 / Alta, Iowa / Comet-like beam of light in the N.W. skyresembled very much photograph of Brooks' Comet of 1893. / Pop Astro 10-250. [VIII; 435. Hadden, David Edward. “Auroral Phenomena at Alta, Iowa.” Popular Astronomy, 10 (no. 5; May 1902): 249-251, at 250.]


1899 May 8 / White spot on Jupiter / by Fauth / Observatory 22-320. [VIII; 432. “White Spot on Jupiter.” Observatory, 22 (1899): 320.]


1899 May 8 / D. Messenger (Paris) / A “recent” tidal wave / Marshall and Caroline Islands / “Terrible havoc.” [VIII; 433. (Daily Messenger, (Paris), May 8, 1899.)]


1899 May 11 / BO / Nothing of volcs in this period, in Nature. [VIII; 434.]


1899 May 11 / B rainrepeat / Letter from a Cor in Birmingham Daily Gazette 18-6-6, that he had seen nothing about it in the newspapers but on 11th at Upton-on-Severn been a black rain“about the color of ink”a heavy fall. / 22-8-3 / Three cors. The black rain “like weak ink had fallen near Gloucester and near Cheltenham. Third place not stated. / At the place not statedthe cor having sent the Editor his cardit fell at 2:15 p.m. Near Cheltenham it fell between 6:30 and 7 p.m. [VIII; 436.1, 436.2, 436.3. (Birmingham Daily Gazette, May 18, 1899, p. 6 c. 6.) (Birmingham Daily Gazette, May 22, 1899, p. 8 c. 3; not @ BNA.)]


1899 May 11 / Gloucester and Cheltenham / Black rain / area of 500 sq miles / Symons Met 34/73 / Central and S.W. Eng. / Nature 63/472. [VIII; 437. Jones, J.H. "Black Rain." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 34 (June 1900): 73-74. “Red Rain.” Nature, 63 (March 14, 1901): 471-472.]


1899 May 12 / Explosion / Explosion “probably without parallel” in England in the morning at St. Helens. Considerable part of the town wrecked. / Birmingham Daily Gazette 13-5-4 / ab. 10 a.m.. / Concussion felt miles around. In Chlorate of potash works, but c of p in itself not regarded as an explosivewed a slight fire. [VIII; 438.1, 438.2. (Birmingham Daily Gazette, May 13, 1899, p. 5 c. 4.)]


1899 May 15 / noon / Dalmatia / violent q / D. Messenger (Paris), 18th. [VIII; 439. (Daily Messsenger, (Paris), May 18, 1899.)]


1899 June / K. bug / Ghost touch and swellingsee Jan 17, 1891. [C; 394. See: 1891 Jan 17, (B; 1125).]


1899 June / Sounds heard by M. Behrmann, on Baltic, attrib by him to firing at a fortress 120 kilometres away. / Cosmos, NS, 42/192. [VIII; 440. “A propos des mistpoeffers.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 42 (February 17, 1900): 191-192. “Der Seebaer der Ostsee und die sogenannten Luftpuffe.” Gaea, 35 (1899): 647-648.]


1899 June 2 / 5:30 to 5:45 p.m. / Sounds like gunfire heard in London. / Nature 60-125. [VIII; 441. Sinclair, W.F. “Distant Sounds.” Nature, 60 (June 8, 1899): 125.]


1899 June 2 / Monkwearmouth / Curious aurora / E Mec 69/401. [VIII; 442. Ellison, William F.A. "ThanksCurious Aurora...." English Mechanic, 69 (no. 1786; June 16, 1899): 400-401.]


1899 June 7-9 / Kb / See Cardiff Daily Times, May 9, 1868. / Child left by its mother a while. Returns, finds it bitten on lips and cheekssupposed been a rat. [C; 395. (Cardiff Daily Times, May 9, 1868; not at BNA.)]


1899 June 17 / Menindie, N.S. Wales / Red dust / Nature 67/47. [VIII; 443. “Societies and Academies.” Nature, 67 (November 13, 1902): 45-48, at 47. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 36 (July, 10, 17. 24, and 31, 1903): 241-285, at 257-258.]


1899 June 23 / Reported from Boston / by telescope man on Boston Common / Very large sunspot sudden appeared in off-yeare[note cut off] eleventh year / N.Y. Times 27-1-5 / M.W.R. / No sunspot dept, this period, in M.W.R. [VIII; 444. “See Sun Spots in Boston.” New York Times, June 27, 1899, p. 1 c. 5.]


1899 June 25 / (frgs) / B Eagle 28-8-4 / Eastport, L.I., June 28—"Since the last storm in this section, Sunday afternoon, the ground wherever the hail fell has been covered with small frogs. These were not seen during the prevalence of the storm, as they were embedded in the icy hail, but when the ice melted they were released and so escaped in every direction." [VIII; 445.1, 445.2. "Frogs in the Hailstones." Brooklyn Eagle, June 28, 1899, p. 8 c. 4.]


1899 June 25 / Port-au-Prince / 12-minute bolide / La Nat Sup, July 29, p. 34. [VIII; 446. “Communications.” La Nature, 1899 pt. 2, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1366, supplement; July 29): 34. A luminous meteor train was observed for 12 minutes, at 7:30 P.M.]


1899 June 28 / Alta, Iowa, beam in sky / Pop Astro 10/250. [VIII; 447. Hadden, David Edward. “Auroral Phenomena at Alta, Iowa.” Popular Astronomy, 10 (no. 5; May 1902): 249-251, at 250.]


1899 June 28, 29 / cl. burst / “phenomenally heavy rains” in Central Texas, followed by heavy rains for four or five days in succession, flooded the Brazos river so that in places it was 12 miles wide. In a special bulletin issued by W. Bureau, Prof. Hazen said meteorologists could not explain “such a remarkable phenomenon, and so localized.” (Said that in 15 days volume of water in the Brazos was more than normal yearly volume.) [VIII; 448.1, 448.2. “Brazos Valley Flood.” Indianapolis Journal, July 16, 1899, p. 4 c. 2.]


1899 June 28 / Alta, Iowa / swiftly moving fans of light / Northeast sky / Pop Astro 10-250. [VIII; 449. Hadden, David Edward. “Auroral Phenomena at Alta, Iowa.” Popular Astronomy, 10 (May 1902): 249-251, at 250.]


1899 June 29, etc. / Texas Flood / New Orleans Daily Picayune, July 1, etc. / From all points in southern and central Texas, reports upon crops washed away, bridges gonein 48 hours, exceeded 18 inches at Brenham. In other places. At Calvert, a volume fell, called a “cloudburst”, wiping out part of the town. / On the Brazospeople safe far awayallegedly [indecipherable] cattle, roofs, beds, trunks, fence rails coming downPersons crossing the Brazoscapsizedsaved by swimming to trees. Families living in trees for 4 or 5 days, living in trees for 4 or 5 days, living on whatever they could catch as it rushed alongmelons sometimes. Story of one of them and their neighbor, a mule, braying in a tree. On the convict farm near Hempstead, 6 striped Negroes in one tree for 5 days150 persons upon an island where a town had been, and the water gaining rapidly, contracting them. Every day for a week reports water still risingand the families, convicts, and mules going up still higher in the trees. Great loss of life reported from somewherelater learned to be greatly exaggerated: only one of them was white. In one place a scene of carcasses bobbing in the flood. Someone had tied cattle to a place 10 feet higher than the Brazos had ever risen before. Floating down the riverdogsmules resting their heads on logschickens, dogs, pigs on roofs. [VIII; 450.1 to 450.6. “The Texas Flood Growing Worse.” New Orleans, July 2, 1899, p. 11 c. 5-6. “End of Flood Now in Sight.” New Orleans Picayune, July 11, 1899, p. 7 c. 4-6.]


1899 June, last 4 days / (+) / (Cl burst) / Heaviest rainfall in the records of Texas. “An examination of the weather maps shows the remarkable fact that there was no serious disturbance of the atmosphere in Texas at the time of these rains.” / MWR, June '99. [VIII; 451. Hazen, Henry Allen. “Extraordinary Rainfall in Texas.” Monthly Weather Review, 27 (no. 6; June 1899): 249.]


1899 / summer / Brazilian hummingbird in Norfolk, England / South American Journal (London), Oct 14, p. 427. [VIII; 452. (South American Journal, (London), October 14, 1899, p. 427.)]


1899 / summer / Great year for b. fly / P. atalanta / Field, June 5, 1920. [VIII; 453. (Field, June 5, 1920; not at BNA.)]


1899 July 1 / Spon / In a department store in Plainfield, N.J., Mrs. S.J. O'Sullivan's clothing burst into flames. She was burned so badly that she died. See NY papers, Toronto Globe of 6th. / No known cause. Many persons in the store. Nothing seen. Thought she may have stepped upon a match or have brushed over a lighted cigar stub. [C; 396.1, 396.2. (Toronto Globe, July 6, 1899.) “Woman Burned in a Store.” New York Sun, July 2, 1899, p. 1 c. 7.]


1899 July 1 / According to data, a woman's clothing suddenly burst into flames in the presence of many witnesses. She was making purchases at the time. No assertion that sound of a match was heard. Smokers not likely in a department store. Evidently no stump of cigar or cigarette found. [C; 397.1, 397.2. (Toronto Globe, July 6, 1899.) “Woman Burned in a Store.” New York Sun, July 2, 1899, p. 1 c. 7.]


[The following seventy-six notes were clipped together by Fort. C: 348-423.]


1899 July 2 / N.Y. Times, 2-2 / 6 persons treated at Bellevue Hospital bitten on cheek, lip, armand greatly swollen. / July 11-4-64 persons treated at Bellevue, each bitten on lip. Great swellings3 or 4 times the normal. / Times 20-7-5ac to Dr L.O. Howard, Entomologist, Agricultural Dept., Wash., well-known bugthe Opsecoetes personatui. / See his other paper. [C; 398.1, 398.2. “More Kissing Bug Victims.” New York Times, July 2, 1899, p. 2 c. 2. “ Victims of Kissing Bug.” New York Times, July 11, 1899, p. 4 c. 6. “The Kissing Bug at Newport.” New York Times, July 20, 1899, p. 7 c. 5. “The Opsecoetes Personatui.” New York Times, July 20, 1899, p. 7 c. 5. See: 1899 / last of June, (C; 400).]


1899 July / K. Bug / Trib, July 12-3-2 / Prof [John B.] Smith, State Entomologist of N.J., says that the Metopic. can not inflict a dangerous bite. / 17-1-2woman in Baltimore stung on lip and cheek, swell to twice normal size. Bug found¾ inch longgrayishtriangle-shaped—and a dark square on its back. / See indexes. [C; 399.1, 399.2. "The Friend of the Kissing Bug." New York Tribune, July 12, 1899, p. 3 c. 2. "Kissing Bugs in Baltimore." New York Tribune, July 17, 1899, p. 1 c. 2.]


1899 / last of June / H1 / In Pop. Sci Mo., 56/31, Dr. L.O. Howard, Chief of the Division of Entomology, U.S. Dept of Agriculture, writes a paper to show that “no mysterious new insect need be looked for to explain remarkable cases.” He writes of six insects, all of them of uncommon occurrence, that could inflict dangerous bites, or punctures. In-as-much as the cases reported were not occasional, he likens them to, He considers it all a hysterical craze like those, in former times, in southern Europe, based upon supposed tarantula bites. He tells the origin of the craze—He publishes a letter received by him from James F. McElhone, a reporter for the Wash. Post, who learning, upon June 19th, of an unusual number of patients who had applied at the Emergency Hospital, Washington, for treatment for “bug bite”, had investigated, learning that “a noticeable number of patients were applying daily for treatment for very red and extensive swellings, usually on the lips, and apparently the result of an insect bite.” He wrote of the occurrences in the Washington Post, June 20, / Well, then suppose a craze did start up; still there had been a “very noticeable” number of cases before publication. So all depends upon what think of the newspaper cases. [C” 400.1 to 400.6. Howard, Leland Ossian. “Spider Bites and Kissing Bugs.” Popular Science Monthly, 56 (November 1899): 31-42. (“Bite of a Strange Bug.” Washington Post, June 20, 1899; not @ Newspapers.com.)]


1899 July 9 / N.Y. Herald of, gives list, names and addresses of 11 persons treated at Bellevue Hospital on the 8th. [C; 401. (New York Herald, July 9, 1899.)]


1899 / ab middle of June / Kb / other cases / Dr. J.C. Lincoln, of Hyde Park, Mass, noticed a pimple upon his nose. The next day his face began to swell. Other doctors could not identify the disordersuspected it was leprosy. Other features of it. Skin peeled off. Hair fell out. / Chicago Tribune, July 16-2-1. [C; 402.1, 402.2. “Doctor May Have Leprosy.” Chicago Tribune, July 16, 1899, p. 2 c. 6. “Severe Case of Erysipelas.” Boston Globe, July 15, 1899, p. 2 c. 7. “Dr Lincoln's illness is a severe case of erysipelas. He was taken down about six weeks ago, it beginning on his face about the eyes and nose. It extended all over his face and scalp, down his back as far As the hips, and down on to his chest and arms. He had a few spots on his legs, but they did not amount to much.” “Dr Gould said:” “Dr. Lincoln's illness is a worst form of erysipelas, due to depraved condition of the blood, brought on by attending a patient about four years ago. I emphatically say there are no signs of leprosy.” John Clifford Lincoln died on June 18, 1902.]


1899 June / No K. bug mentioned in Toronto Daily Mail. [C; 403.]


1899 July 18 / Chicago Tribune of / Chicago girl stung3 persons in Burlington, Iowa, all severelyhand, lip, leg. Specimens if the bug captured. La Salle, Ill., two persons severely bitten. “Numbers of the bug have been captured.” Cincinnati, Ohioa pony stungjaw and leg—swellings. [C; 404.1, 404.2. “Girl Stung by a Kissing Bug.” Chicago Tribune, July 18, 1899, p. 2 c. 2.]


1899 July 17 / K-bug / Chicago Tribune of / 2 cases in Auburn, Indiana, and a Chicago policeman stung by a large black bug—his face swollen to twice its normal size. [C; 405. “Tarantula Bites a Woman.” Chicago Tribune, July 17, 1899, p. 2 c. 4. “Fights Kissing Bug in Vain.” Chicago Tribune, July 17, 1899, p. 2 c. 6.]


1899 July 2 / Sun / 3 victims K. bug reported from Reading, Pa. / Sun 10-1-6 / Trenton, N.J.—child stung on leg and died. [C; 406. "The Kissing Bug." New York Sun, July 2, 1899, p. 2 c. 3. "Kissing Bug Bite Killed." New York Sun, July 10, 1899, p. 1 c. 6. The child in Trenton was stung on her leg, (not on her lip).]


1899 June 28 / Trib, 8/5 / Kissing bug appeared in Washington, where 20 persons went to the hospitals. Then in Paterson, N.J. / July 5-10-1 / On July 2—at Tarrytown, N.Y., man bitten on arm, which swelled enormously, “by black and white bug”. [C; 407. "Entomological Honor." New York Tribune, June 28, 1899, p. 8 c. 5. "The Kissing Bug Reaches Tarrytown." New York Tribune, July 5, 1899, p. 10 c. 1.]


1899 July 1 / K-bug / Probably no scare had reached Iowa then, / Chicago Tribune—That upon July 1, evening, at Cedar Falls, Iowa, Mary Vaughan had been bitten upon the lip. Her face swelled. Swelling extended to her body. She died upon the 3rd. Also a 4-year-old child had been bitten. / Chicago Tribune 15-3-5. [C; 408.1, 408.2. “Kissing Bug's Sting Is Fatal.” Chicago Tribune, July 15, 1899, p. 3 c. 5.]


1899 July 20 / 2 women in Springfield, Ohio—lip—great swelling. Ann Arbor, Mich.—boy—just above lip—bad swelling. / C. Trib 23-4-3. [C; 409. (Chicago Tribune, July 23, 1899, p. 4 c. 3; not found here.)]


1899 June / K.b. / One treatment would be to ignore the K.b. and find other data that otherwise never be published. [C; 410.]


1899 July / K-bug / Cases in the North are reported in the New Orleans Picayune (See Editorial page before July 10.) / But no cases or scare in the South. [C; 411. “Our Picayunes.” New Orleans Picayune, July 8, 1899, p. 4 c. 1.]


1899 July 18 / Unknown bug in Philadelphia. One attacked a man. Another attacked a dog. / Chic Tribune 19-1-3 / Brownish—like a huge locust—five inches from tip to tip. Said been recognized by an explorer as a blood-thirsty insect from N. Africa. [C; 412. “Now For the Strangling Bug.” Chicago Tribune, July 19, 1899, p. 1 c. 4. “The bug is nearly three inches in length, while its wings from tip to tip measure five inches.”]


1899 June, last—July / K-bug reminds me of Wlf, 1904-'05. Depredations somewhere and a bug found and blamed. [C; 413.]


1899 July 22 / K-bug. / Sci Amer. of / From Richmond, Va., to Augusta, Maine, there had been sensation-mongering in the newspapers. Dr. E. Murray-Aaron writes Says one would be led to believe in an entirely new insect, whereas it was “none other than the well known Melanolestes picipes. of the sub-family Piratina”—no commoner this year than any other. A biting insect but not poisonous. / My idea—Seems that the identification came from 2 persons being bitten by this bug, as occasionally every year someone is. Not so—see Washington. / Dr. M.-A. had heard of ab 40 cases. Says that in 3 the Melanolestes was the offender. All others only stable-flies or mosquitoes. [C; 414.1 to 414.4. Murray-Aaron, Eugene. "The Kissing Bug Scare." Scientific American, n.s., 81 (July 22, 1899): 54.]


1899 July 10 / N.Y. Herald, 3-4 / 2 men in Rochester bitten. [C; 415. (New York Herald, July 10, 1899, p. 3 c. 4.)]


1899 July 18 / New bug reported from Columbus, N.J.—N.Y. Herald, July 19—“long, black, and rakish”. “It has darkened the Heavens in New Jersey. [C; 416. (New York Herald, July 19, 1899.)]


1899 July 17 / Eagle, 10-7 / Kissing bug, as identified by entomologists, the Melanolestes picipes. 8/10 of an inch / black shining wings, antennae yellow-brown. [C; 417. "The Kissing Bug." Brooklyn Eagle, July 17, 1899, p. 10 c. 7.]


1899 June, last / Entomological News, Sept, 1899 / Editor writes that as to the Melanolestes picipes, “a hemipter of previously good character,” “has proven an alibi”. Said that many specimens had been sent to the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. Flies, bees, beetles, even a butterfly, but not one Melan etc. / As I interpret. That persons stung by the unknown, not one Melan in the neighborhood and blamed and captured. [C: 418.1, 418.2. Fox, William J. “Editorial.” Entomological News, 10 (September 1899): 205-206.]


1899 July / Sun. [C; 419.]


[1899 July] / See pony stung. [C; 420. (Refs.???)]


1899 July 8 / K-b / child / Chic. Trib of, 1-6 / In Chicago 3 cases of severe bites, and one death. / Trib, 10th—Chicago policeman and a child in Trenton, N.J. The child was 2 years old. The child, Helen Lersch, told her mother that she was bitten by a large black bug. “At the time of death the child's body had swollen to twice its normal size.” Point—very young child for scare stuff. [C; 421.1, 421.2. “Kissing Bug Bites Policeman.” Chicago Tribune, July 10, 1899, p. 1 c. 2.]


1899 July 11 / (+) / Toledo, Ohio; Notre Dame, Ind; and 3 cases in Rochester / (Chicago Tribune, 12-1-3) / All of them severe and causing extreme swellings. In case of a woman of Notre Dame, evidently not a sting, but a bite. “The marks of two small incisions could be seen.” [C; 422. "Weird Tales of Kissing Bug." Chicago Tribune, July 11, 1889, p. 2 c. 2. “Harvest For the Kissing Bug.” Chicago Tribune, July 12, 1899, p. 1 c. 6.]


1899 July 11 / B. Eagle, 7-7 / K. bug at Quiogue, L.I., Miss Ely and Supt. Hiram Wines of the Westhampton Golf Club stung. One on face, other on hand, bad swellings.— / At Bay Shore, L.I., 2-year-old daughter of Mr and Mrs George Doyle stung by a K bug—face badly swollen. “The bug was captured.” / 14-1-4—Paul Nichols, 50 years old, of 383 Wythe Ave., Brooklyn, bitten by bug—face swollen 2 days. It "had a head like a rat's and two long fangs.” [C; 423.1, 423.2. "Kissing Bug at Quiogue." Brooklyn Eagle, July 11, 1899, p. 7 c. 7. "Latest in Kissing Bugs." Brooklyn Eagle, July 14, 1899, p. 1 c. 4. Nichols suffered a swollen leg, (not his face).]


1899 July 3-4 / midnight / Pike's Peak illuminated with red fire. Was seen 75 miles away. / Sun 4-1-7. [VIII; 454. "Pike's Peak All Aglow." New York Sun, July 4, 1899, p. 1 c. 7.]


1899 July 4 / Big Bull Mt, near Victor, Col. / 5 tons of dynamite exploded on summit as celebration. / Heard 80 miles away. / Sun 5-7-4. [VIII; 455. "An Earthquake To Order." New York Sun, July 5, 1899, p. 7 c. 4.]


1899 July 1, 4, 5 / Mauna Loa / See June, '32. [VIII; 456. See: 1832 June 20, (I; 1700).]


1899 July / Pop Astro of / Reported that a metite had fallen at Holmesville, Minn. / 211. [VIII; 457. “A Large Meteor.” Popular Astronomy, 7 (no. 7; June 1899): 332. No other report of this meteor found.]


1899 July 4 / Mauna Loa / Violent eruption / Nature 60-298. [VIII; 458. “Notes.” Nature, 60 (July 27, 1899): 297-301, at 298. The Mauna Loa volcano.]


1899 July 5 / Invasion of little frogs at Lickay Village, near King's Norton / Nature 60-246. [VIII; 459. “Notes.” Nature, 60 (July 27, 1899):  , at 246.]


1899 July 7-10 / W. Indian hurricane / Florida on 12th / Nature 60-374. [VIII; 460. “Notes.” Nature, 60 (August 17, 1899): 373-377, at 374.]


1899 July 8 / at Canterbury / Lumps of ice 1½ inches in diameter precede “waterspout” burst. / D. News 10-5-4. [VIII; 461. “Remarkable Hailstorm at Canterbury.” London Daily News, July 10, 1899, p. 5 c. 4.]


1899 July 9 / N.Y. Herald, 6-6-1 (ver) / Wild man said to have lived many years in woods of Wisconsin. Finally caught and sent to jail “jabbering what is believed to be a mixture of French and Italian. [C; 424. (New York Herald, July 9, 1899, p. 6 c. 6.)]


1899 July 10 / 8 a.m. / Metite / Allegan, Mich / Science N.S., 10-770 / (F). [VIII; 462. Merrill, George P. "Preliminary Note on New Meteorites from Allegan, Michigan and Mart, Texas." Science, n.s., 10 (November 24, 1899): 770-771. Fletcher, 107. This is the Allegan meteorite.]


1899 July 13 / “Waterspout” / night / burst on Hartley Fell, Westmoreland / D. News 14-7-6. [VIII; 463. “Further Effects of the Storm.” London Daily News, July 14, 1899, p. 7 c. 6.]


1899 July 13 / 11 p.m. / London / met / Sci Gos, N.S., 6-92. [VIII; 464. "Meteor." Science Gossip, n.s., 6 (no. 63; August 1899): 92.]


1899 July 14 / Spon Comb? / Mrs Phoebe Hoffman / N.Y. City / Trib 15-1-5. [C; 425. "She Ran Blazing Downstairs." New York Tribune, July 15, 1899, p. 1 c. 5. "Woman Ablaze Rolled Down Flat House Stairs." New York Journal and Advertiser, July 15, 1899, p. 1 c. 2. Hoffman was lighting a gas jet, whereupon a lace curtain and her clothing caught fire, (no spontaneous combustion).]


1899 July 14 / sun-point / Ville-d'Avray / M. F. Grey at 4:45 p.m. saw point north of sun—lasted till 5:30. / La Nat Sup,, July 29, p. 34. [VIII; 465. “Communications.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 2, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1366, supplement; July 29): 34. Venus was to the west of the Sun, Castor and Pollux were the brightest stars to the north; but, at about 22 to 23° north of the Sun, a mock sun was probably observed, (as suggested by La Nature). “Beaucoup de cirrostratus légers dans le ciel. Quand l’un d’eux passe sur le point lumineux celui-ci s’accentue.”]


1899 July 19 / B Eagle, 16-6 / Etna. [VIII; 466. "Eruption of Mount Etna." Brooklyn Eagle, July 19, 1899, p. 16 c. 6. The Etna volcano.]


1899 July 19 / Etna explosion and later q. at Frascati, Marino, etc., Italy. / Nature 61/573. [VIII; 467. “Notes.” Nature, 61 (April 12, 1900): 571-573, at 573.]

1899 July 19 / q / Frascati / same time explosion of Etna and a cyclone along Adriatic coast / and preceded by torrential rains. [VIII; 468. (Refs.???)]


1899 July 19 / 2:19 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. / Shocks, Rome, and activity at Etna increases. / D. News 20-5-5. [VIII; 469. “Earthquake in Rome.” London Daily News, July 20, 1899, p. 5. c. 5.]


1899 July 19 / 8 a.m. / Etna / on 25th, a smaller eruption / La Nature 3/190 / Nature, 1899, p. 185. [VIII; 470. Riccò, Annibale. Éruption de l’Etna.” La Nature, 1899 pt. 2 (no. 1369; August 19): 190. “Notes.” Nature, 61 (1899): 184-187, at 185.]


1899 July 19 / Great explosion in Central cone of Etna / Nature 61-185. [VIII; 471. “Notes.” Nature, 61 (1899): 184-187, at 185.]


1899 July 19 / 8:15 p.m. / Great met / Lyons / Bull Soc A. de F, Aug., 1899. [VIII; 472. Rengel, A. “Bolide énorme.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 13 (1899): 372.]


1899 July 19 / morning / Etna begins. / Bull Soc A de F, Oct, '99. [VIII; 473. Ricco, A. “Eruption de l'Etna.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 13 (1899): 454-455.]


1899 July 19 and Aug. 10 / Shanghai / July 19—great display of lightning in northern sky—“almost constant blaze of light”—flashes coming from 2 centers—faint distant rumbling. / Aug—in S.W. but increasing till seen in zenith—not like ordinary lightning but networks—scarcely any sound—a low rumbling. / Nature 60-511/ (Cut). [VIII; 474.1, 474.2. “Notes.” Nature, 60 (September 21, 1899): 510-513, at 511.]


1899 July 21 / Hissar, in the Balkans / Light in sky, rose and formed a triangle and scintillated—then looked like a blood red object. / Cosmos, NS, 40/514. [VIII; 475. Chékib Effendi, Ohannès. “Phénomènes météorologiques dans les Balkans.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 40 (April 29, 1899): 514. Hisarya, Bulgaria.]


1899 July 21-22 / Violent storm / Paris / La Nat Sup. [VIII; 476. “Informations.” La Nature, 1899 pt. 2, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1366, supplement; July 29): 33-34.]


1899 July 22 / afternoon / Explosion on board a Torpedo Destroyer at Portsmouth / and at Woolrich Arsenal / D. News 22-6-7. [VIII; 477. “Dreadful Catastrophe on a Destroyer,” and, “Explosion in Woolrich Arsenal.” London Daily News, July 22, 1899, p. 6 c. 7.]


1899 July 26 / Severe q and eruption, Hawaii—200 deaths / D News 27-5-6. [VIII; 478. “Earthquake in Hawaii.” London Daily News, July 27, 1899, p. 5 c. 6. The Mauna Loa volcano.]


1899 July 27 / Etna / Violent / D. News, Aug 2-7-7. [VIII; 479. “Etna in Eruption.” London Daily News, August 2, 1899, p. 7 c. 7.]


1899 Aug to Dec / Drought in Lower Mississippi Valley. Severest ever known. Mississippi at Vicksburg foot and a half below any point before recorded. Drought broken about Dec 1. / N.Y. Sun, Dec 3-10-4. [VIII; 480. "Great Drouth Broken." New York Sun, December 3, 1899, s. 2 p. 10 c. 4.]


1899 August / Floods / Argentine / Symons 49/81 / N.M. [VIII; 481. “Floods in the Argentine Republic.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 49 (June 1914): 81-82.]


1899 / 1st week Aug / Centre Moriches, L.I. / ghst / “a figure” / Trib, Aug 11-10-2. [C; 426. "A Ghost at Centre Moriches." New York Tribune, August 11, 1899, p. 10 c. 2.]


1899 Aug 5 / Marching soldiers in Ireland, near Cork, struck by lightning. / Toronto Daily Mail 7-1-6. [C; 427. (Toronto Daily Mail, August 7, 1899, p. 1 c. 6.) “Terrific Thunderstorm.” Cork Daily Herald, August 7, 1899, p. 5 c. 5.]


1899 Aug 6 / Black rain at Grahamstown, S.A.—like that of Aug 14, 1888—ac to Major Eddie, “preceded by a continuous bombardment of muffled growling thunder varied by one smart deafening peal.” / Knowledge 23/19. (Says that organic substance present, Swarms of spores.) [VIII; 482.1, 482.2. Eddie, Lindsay Atkins. “The Black Rain of August 6, 1899.” Knowledge, o.s., 23 (January 1, 1900): 19-21.]


1899 Aug 6 / (B. Rain) / Grocott's Daily Mail (Grahamstown) (7th) / That “at the very remarkable hour for such atmospheric manifestations, of 3:30 a.m., yesterday (6th) a tremendous crash of thunder aroused many a slumbering head from a comfortable pillow.” Says that crash after crash and dazzling lightning and torrents of rain. No b. rain mentioned. / (In issue of 9th, says that in the train of this th. storm fell black rain.) Also in Grocott's says that floods had been falling several days before this storm in other aparts of S.A., such as had not been seen since 1888. / See Jan 4, 1880. [VIII; 483.1, 483.2, 483.3. (Grocott's Daily Mail, Grahamstown, South Africa, August 7, 1899.) (Grocott's Daily Mail, Grahamstown, South Africa, August 9, 1899.)]


1899 Aug 7 / 13 h., 17 m / =1:17 a.m. / Det met / Colorado / Pop Astro 7-448. [VIII; 484. Howe, Herbert Alonzo. “A Brilliant Fireball.” Popular Astronomy, 7 (no. 8; October 1899): 447-448.]


1899 Aug 8-9 / night / Tidal wave / enormous damage / Chile / D. News 11-6-4. [VIII; 485. “Tidal Wave in Chili.” London Daily News, August 11, 1899, p. 6 c. 4.]


1899 Aug 8-9 / night / Tidal wave attributed to sea-quake, / S. American Journal, Aug 12, p. 174. [VIII; 487. (South American Journal, August 12, 1899, p. 174.)]


1899 Aug 8-9 / “Tidal Wave” / doubted in S. Amer. Jour., Aug 19, [p.] 202. [VIII; 488. (South American Journal, August 19, 1899, p. 202.)]


1899 Aug 9 / Corsica? / 11 p.m. / 2 q's and sounds like thunder / Corte en Corse / La Nat Sup, Aug 19, p. 40. [VIII; 486. “Informations.” La Nature, 1899 pt. 2, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1369, supplement; August 19): 45-46.]


1899 Aug 10 / Deluges in Brazil / South American Journal, Sept 9, p. 288 / Drought in Argentina / p. 289. [VIII; 489. (South American Journal, September 9, 1899, p. 288-289.)]


1899 Aug 10, about / S. American Journal, Sept 16, p. 314 / Torrents rushing through streets of Valparaiso—people in a panic. / Drought in Brazil / p. 316 / Not a village in southern part of Chile where there was not suffering. / p. 374 (Sept 30). [VIII; 490. (South American Journal, September 16, 1899, p. 314, 316.) (South American Journal, September 30, 1899, p. 374.)]


1899 Aug 10 / Display lightning / Shanghai / See July 19. [VIII; 491. See: 1899 July 19, (VIII; 474.)]


1899 Aug 10, etc. / Perseids, at Bristol, of “average importance”, ac to Denning. / Nature 60-378. [VIII; 492. Denning, William Frederick. “The Recent Perseid Meteoric Shower.” Nature, 60 (August 17, 1899): 377-378.]


1899 Aug 10 / (+) / nova / In 1910, discovered by Miss Cannon that on Aug 10, 1899, a new star had appeared in Sagittaurius. / Nov. Sag No. 3. It had appeared 20 M. (ver)  east of Nov. Sag., No. 2. It was a conspicuous object of ab the 8th magnitude, appearing suddenly and declining rapidly. / Nature 85-248 / get when the other novae in Sag—See p. 552. Found on plates up to Oct. 3, 1901. [VIII; 493.1, 493.2. “Discovery of Another Nova, Sagittarii No. 3.” Nature, 85 (December 22, 1910): 248. “Nova Sagittarii No. 3, H.V. 3306.” Nature, 85 (February 23, 1911): 552.]


[1899] Aug 10 / See Sag. nova, March 8, 1898. / phe similar. [VIII; 494. See: 1898 March 8, (VIII: 233 & 234.]


1899 Aug 12-13 / Met train / C.R., Aug 21, '99. [VIII; 495. André, Charles. "Sur la cause des traînées lumineuses persistantes qui accompagnent certaines étoiles filantes." Comptes Rendus, 129 (1899): 404.]


1899 Aug 13 / 12:53 / Paris / met train / MWR 07/391. [VIII; 496. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (no. 9; September 1907): 390-397, at 391.]


1899 [Aug 14] (+) / q and rain /  Lisbon, Aug 14 / Earthquake accompanied by torrential rain in Central Portugal. / B Eagle 14-2-7 / See 25th. [VIII; 497. "Earthquakes in Lisbon." Brooklyn Eagle, August 14, 1899, p. 2 c. 7. See: (25th).]


1899 Aug 16 / Terrific gales and floods continue in Chile. / D. News 17-5-7. [VIII; 498. “Gales in Valparaiso.” London Daily News, August 17, 1899, p. 5 c. 7.]


1899 Aug 16 / Eagle, 11-2 / Met det over L.I. [VIII; 499. "Brilliant Meteor Seen." Brooklyn Eagle, August 16, 1899, p. 11 c. 2.]


1899 Aug. 22 / 10 p.m. / Dozen or more faint points of light in Mare Crisium / E Mec 70/185 / Again Carnival / See back ab. 1886. [VIII; 500. [VIII; 500. Stielow, C.H. “α Lyræ....” English Mechanic, 70 (no. 1802; October 6, 1899): 184-185. See: 1832 July 4, (I; 1705); 1881 May 9, (V; 490); and, 1882 March 26, (V; 815).]


1899 Aug 25 / 1 a.m. / See 14. / Oporto, Portugal / meteor and “slight shock / B Eagle 25-1-6. [VIII; 501. "Meteor and Earthquake." Brooklyn Eagle, August 25, 1899, p. 1 c. 6.]


1899 Aug 27 / 10:15 [P.M.] through Auriga toward Perseus / Sci Gos, NS, 6-154 / Trowbridge, Wilts. [VIII; 502. Boileau, J.P.H. "Meteor." Science Gossip, n.s., 6 (no. 65; October 1899): 154.]


1899 Aug 30 / Denning—Bristol / While “sweeping” for Mercury—bright objects—some swift and some slow. / Observatory 37/418 / Now and then one halted—[illustration]. Nevertheless Denning thinks were light seeds. [VIII; 503. Denning, William Frederick. "Showers of Telescopic Meteors seen near the Sun." Observatory, 37 (November 1914): 417-419, at 418.]


1899 Sept / Tarr—“Earthquake at Yakut Bay, Alaska” / PTB / U S. [VIII; 504. Tarr, Ralph Stockman, and, Martin, Lawrence. The Earthquakes at Yakutat Bay, Alaska, in September, 1899. United States Geological Survey. Professional Paper 69. Washington, Government Printing Office, 1912. The shelf mark at the New York Public Library for this book is “PTS+.” A series of powerful earthquakes shook Alaska on September 3, 10, 15, 17, 23, 26, & 29, 1899.]]


1899 Sept 3 / See 1898. / Mobile, Ala. / Situs—met / Y-mark / Sc Am Sup 49-20125. [VIII; 505. “Struck by a Fragment of a Meteor.” Scientific American Supplement, 49 (no. 1255; January 20, 1900): 20125. See: 1899 Sept 3, (C; 381).]


[1899 Sept 3 /] 1898 Sept 3 / [typescript] / Scientific American Supplement, 49-20125 / Look up Amer Druggist. [C; 381. Typescript note. “Struck by a Fragment of a Meteor.” Scientific American Supplement, 49 (no. 1255; January 20, 1900): 20125. “Struck by a Fragment of a Meteor.” National Druggist, 29 (no. 10; October 1899): 323.]


1899 / Sept 3-10, 10-17 / Yakutat Bay, Alaska. Strongest on 10th. Clouds of smoke from the volc. / BA '11/44. [VIII; 506. A class III earthquake. Milne, 740. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 44. The Wrangell volcano.]


1899 Sept 3-29 / Series q's Alaska / Sept 10 = strongest / Nature 85-179. [VIII; 507. “Notes.” Nature, 85 (December 8, 1910): 176-180, at 179.]


1899 Sept 4 / at Kingston, N.Y. / At noon suddenly a swarm of thousands of butterflies descended upon Kingston,—not known where they came. / Trib 5/2/6 / Reached N.Y. City afternoon of the 7th. / 8-14-3. [VIII; 508. "Butterflies Descend Upon Kingston." New York Tribune, September 5, 1899, p. 2 c. 6. "Swarms of Butterflies in Town." New York Tribune, September 8, 1899, p. 14 c. 3.]


1899 Sept 9-10 / Denmark / Aurora—large sunspot and elect. bells ring in telegraph offices. / Pubs Astro Soc Pacific 11/32 / Repeats '98. [VIII; 509. Köhl, Thorvald. “Astronomical Observations in 1898.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 11 (no. 66; February 1899): 26-32, at 32. See: 1898 Sept 9, (VIII; 320).]


1899 Sept 12-22 / 22, 25 / q / Alaska / Trib. [VIII; 510. "Earthquake in Skaguay." New York Tribune, September 12, 1899, p. 2 c. 2. An earthquake was reported "a few days ago."]


1899 Sept 14 / metite / Sycamore, south of Tiffin, Ohio / Great met. Blinding light and deafening roar. “It weighed over 500 pounds and burst into many pieces.” / Eagle 15-1-4. [VIII; 511. "Fall of a Big Aerolite." Brooklyn Eagle, September 15, 1899, p. 1. c. 4.]


1899 Sept 20 / q and great loss of life, neighborhood of Smyrna / Nature 61-302. [VIII; 512. “Notes.” Nature, 61 (January 25, 1900): 301-305, at 302-303.]


1899 Sept 20 / Near Boston, Mass, “unprecedented rain” / 51 millimetres an hour. / Bull Soc Astro de France, March, 1900. [VIII; 513. “Une pluie extraordinaire.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 14 (1900): 150.]


1899 Sept 22 / B. Eagle / Young alligator ab 18 inches long found in a pool that had collected in an excavation behind a building, at 175 McKibben Street, Brooklyn. Said that there was a story of someone who had been south and returned with young alligators. [C; 428. "Think It Is An Alligator." Brooklyn Eagle, September 22, 1899., p. 9 c. 4.]


1899 Sept. 23 / Donga Kohrod, Cent Provs, India / (F) / (Bilaspur). [VIII; 514. Fletcher, 107. This is the Donga Kohrod meteorite.]


1899 Sept. 23 / Bilaspur and Darjeeling 600 miles apart. [VIII; 515. The distance from Bilaspur to Darjeeling is about 500 miles, (or, about 800 km.).]


1899 Sept. 24 / Clbrst / From 2 p.m. till 8 a.m. 25th (34 hours) were 28 inches of rain. / Times of India (Bombay) Sept. 30 / At Darjeeling. / Also cyclone, It moved from Calcutta. Simultaneously another cyclone moved from Rangpur westward through Purnea to Monghyr. / 1,000 lives lost in the floods. 10,000 cattle swept away (Oct 14-7-2). The flood wave was “very local”. / Here said that flood came ab. 2 a.m. of 24th and had been torrents since 23rd. / Flood wave was ten feet high, down a tributary to the Ganges. This wall of water topped with bodies of men and cattle and parts of houses and trees. / Bodies seen floating past Calcutta, the first indication there of a great catastrophe (Oct 14—p. 366). / All the q's were called land-slips. [VIII; 516.1 to 516.4. (Times of India, September 30, 1899.) (Times of India, October 14, 1899, p. 7 c. 2.) (Times of India, October 14, 1899, p. 366; not @ BNA.)]


1899 Sept 25 / Oct 3 / Asia Minor / q / Trib. [VIII; 517. "Earthquake in Asia Minor." New York Tribune, September 21, 1899, p. 2 c. 2. "Earthquake Killed 1,000." New York Times, September 29, 1899, p. 7 c. 1. "Fifteen Hundred Killed." New York Tribune, October 3, 1899, p. 1 c. 2. The earthquake occurred on September 20, 1899. See: 1899 Sept 20, (VIII; 512).]


1899 Sept 25 / Trib, Oct 3-1-2 / q. / Asia Minor / Nov. 20-5-5. [VIII; 518. "Earthquake Killed 1,000." New York Times, September 29, 1899, p. 1 c. 1. "Fifteen Hundred Killed." New York Tribune, October 3, 1899, p. 1 c. 2. "Earthquake Victims in Asia Minor." New York Tribune, November 20, 1899, p. 5 c. 5. The earthquake occurred on September 20, 1899. See: 1899 Sept 20, (VIII; 512).]


1899 Sept 23, 25 / Like Sept 13, 18, 1897. [VIII; 519. See: 1897 Sept 13, 18, (VIII; 92).]


1899 / autumn / Eng / lum. birds / LT Index, 1907, 1908, “Birds”. [C; 429. Pigott, Thomas Digby. “A Luminous Owl?” London Times, December 14, 1907, p. 16 c. 5. “A Luminous Owl.” London Times, December 26, 1907, p. 2 c. 6. Pigott, Thomas Digby. “Luminous Owls.” London Times, January 9, 1908, p. 6 c. 3. Rawnsley, Hardwicke Drummond. “Luminous Birds.” London Times, January 14, 1908, p. 6 c. 2. Crawford, Oswald. “Luminous Birds.” London Times, January 18, 1908, p. 7 c. 3. “Luminous Birds.” London Times, January 22, 1908, p. 17 c. 6.]


1899 Oct 1 / Eagle, 37-3 / Ghst. [C; 430. "Chicago Stories of Ghosts." Brooklyn Eagle, October 1, 1899, p. 37 c. 3-4.]


1899 Oct 5 / Trib, 10-2 / Sleep Experience. [C; 431. (New York Tribune, October 5, 1899, p. 10 c. 2; not found here; not found in Index.)]


1899 Oct 5 / Ref—Dec 15, 1880 / All over the township of Pambula (Eden), N.S. Wales, a thick red fog of dust. [VIII; 520. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 36 (July, 10, 17. 24, and 31, 1903): 241-285, at 257. See: 1880 Dec 15, (V; 417). ]


1899 Oct 8 / Typhoon and tidal wave / Japan / wave 35 feet high / B. Eagle 16-3-4. [VIII; 521. "Tidal Wave in Japan." Brooklyn Eagle, November 16, 1899, p. 3 c. 4.]


1899 Oct 24 / Trib, 6-2 / Hallucination. [C; 432. "Has an Hallucination About Money." New York Tribune, October 24, 1899, p. 6 c. 2.]


1899 Oct 28 / (obj) / Luzarches / M. A. Garrie that 4:50 p.m. a globe from sunset-colored clouds on horizon, it too rose-colored. Size of the moon. Moved, and he watched it 15 minutes. Saw it diminish to a point. / La Nat Sup., Nov. 11, p. 94. [VIII; 522. “Communications.” La Nature, 1899 pt. 2, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1381, supplement; November 11): 94.]


1899 Oct 28 / NY Times 29-7-3 / Dispatch from Santiago, Chile / Biela's Comet has been seen here with the naked eye. / N.Y. Times, Oct 31 / That Biela's not sighting—“that some persons in their anxiety mistook a cluster stars for the comet.” [VIII; 523. “Biela's Comet Reappears.” New York Times, October 29, 1899, p. 7 c. 3. “Discovery of Biela's Comet.” New York Times, October 30, 1899, p. 1 c. 6. “Biela's Comet Not Sighted.” New York Times, October 31, 1899,p. 6 c. 7. “In their anxiety some people mistook a cluster of stars for the comet.”]


1899 / autumn / One afternoon at Grange-over-Sands: black rain. / Halifax Naturalist 6-58. [VIII; 524. (Halifax Naturalist, 6-58; not online.)]


[1899 Oct 30. Wrong date. See: 1900 Oct 30, (VIII; 525).]


[1899 Oct 30. Wrong date. See: 1900 Oct 30, (VIII; 526).]


1899 Nov. 2 / 5:30 p.m. / Spot like a fiery mist on horizon—approaching rapidly—a meteor. Baldwin, Kansas / Pop. Astro 8-52. [VIII; 527. Hatch, Fred. “An Interesting Object.” Popular Astronomy, 8 (no. 1; January 1900): 52. This meteor “lasted fully one minute” and divided into “three distinct bodies which moved on the same path.”]


1899 Nov. 3 / Winona, Minn. / “Airship” reported. / See Sky Objects. / See Dec 5, 1897. [C; 433. See: 1897 Dec 5, (C; 367); 1897 Dec. 5 , (VIII; 143); and, (Sky Objects).]


1899 Nov. 3 / Airship / Minn. / See Dec. 5, 1897. [VIII; 528. See: 1897 Dec 5, (C; 367), and, 1897 Dec. 5 , (VIII; 143).]


1899 Nov 12-13 / “The Coming Meteors” / L.T. / Oct 28-16-c / Nov 6-13-f / 7-6-b / 10-6-f / 16-9-e / 14-6-f / 21-13-b / 22-10-d / 16-9-e / 17-9-f / 18-9-e / 21-10-f / See 25-12-c / 28-13-a / 27-11-e. [VIII; 529. “The Coming Meteors.” London Times, October 28, 1899, p. 16 c. 3-4. “Observing the Leonid Meteors.” London Times, November 6, 1899, p. 13 c. 6 & p. 14 c. 1. “The Coming Meteor Shower.” London Times, November 7, 1899, p. 6 c. 2. “The Coming Meteor Shower.” London Times, November 10, 1899, p. 6 c. 6. “The Leonid Meteors—A Forecast.” London Times, November 14, 1899, p. 6 c. 6. “The Leonid Meteors.” London Times, November 16, 1899, p. 9 c. 5. “The Leonid Meteors.” London Times, November 17, 1899, p. 9 c. 6. “The Leonid Meteors.” London Times, November 18, 1899, p. 9 c. 5. “Sir Robert Ball and the Leonids,” and, “The Leonids.” London Times, November 21, 1899, p. 10 c. 6. Bacon, John Mackenzie. “In Quest of the Leonids.” London Times, 21, 1899, c. 2-3. “The Leonids.” London Times, November 22, 1899, p. 10 c. 4. See: Bacon, John Mackenzie. “Meteoric Débris.” London Times, November 25, 1899, p. 12 c. 3. “A Shower of Meteors.” London Times, November 27, 1899, p. 11 c. 5. Neville, George. “A Meteorite.” London Times, November 28, 1899, p. 13 c. 1.]


1899 Nov 12 / 10:10 p.m. / London / Met / SSW to N.N.E. / Sc. Gos, NS, 6-218. [VIII; 530. Clark, Fred. Noal. "Brilliant Meteor." Science Gossip, n.s., 6 (no. 67; December 1899): 218.]


1899 Nov. 12, etc. / An expedition sent by the Vienna Acad. of Sciences to observe the meteors in Delhi, India. / Nature 60-578. [VIII; 531. “Our Astronomical Column.” Nature, 60 (October 12, 1899): 577-578, at 578.]


1899 Nov 12 / In Nature, Oct 19, 1899, W.F. Denning writes that because of influence of Jupiter and Saturn, predicts greatest intensity Nov. 16, hours preceding twilight. [VIII; 532. Denning, William Frederick. “The Coming Shower of Leonids.” Nature,  60 (October 19, 1899): 592-593. The greatest intensity was expected “on the morning of November 16, in the twilight preceding sunrise.”]


1899 Nov 12 / Leonids / Flammarion began predicting them for 1896. / N.Y. Herald, Nov. 8-6-4. [VIII; 533. (New York Herald, November 8, 1899, p. 6 c. 4.)]


1899 Nov. 14-15 / night / Lima, Peru / No meteors, but a strong shock and rumbling sounds. / B. Eagle 15-1-2. [VIII; 534. "Earthquake Shock in Peru." Brooklyn Eagle, November 15, 1899, p. 1 c. 2.]


1899 Nov 14-15 / The meteors expected. In New London, was arranged for a factory whistle to give ten powerful blasts when the meteors appeared. / B. Eagle 14-4-2. [VIII; 535. "The Meteors." Brooklyn Eagle, November 14, 1899, p. 4 c. 2.]


1899 Nov 15-16 / night / 30 meteors counted at Chicago. / B. Eagle 16-1-4 / Several at Princeton in early morning. / 16-1-7. [VIII; 536. "Chicago's Observation." Brooklyn Eagle, November 16, 1899, p. 1 c. 4. "Meteors at Princeton." Brooklyn Eagle, November 16, 1899, p. 1 c. 7.]


1899 Nov. 15 / date of dispatch from Bombay / Cyclone destroyed thousands of dwellings of natives in the district of Negapatam. / B. Eagle 15-1-6. [VIII; 537. "Cyclone in India." Brooklyn Eagle, November 15, 1899, p. 1 c. 6.]


1899 Nov 15 / Mets considerable, Nov 15, 1903. Said been explained why not in 1899 and 1900, but no prediction be great 1903—no advance articles in mags. [VIII; 538. (Refs.???)]


1899 Nov. 15 / (Obj) / Dourite (Dordogne) / Enormous star. White, then red and sometimes blue. Looked and moved like a kite. / 7 p.m. / Where Venus? / La Nat Sup, Dec 16, p. 10. / Says had never seen anything like it. In south. / Dec 30, cor says without doubt was Fomalhaut. Venus set at 5:05 —asks for precise position. // In Sup., Jan 20, first cor says about 35 degrees above horizon in southwest but moved so that precise position not possible. [VIII; 539.1, 539.2. “Communications.” La Nature, 1900 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1386, supplement; December 16): 10. “Communications.” La Nature, 1900 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1388, supplement; December 30): 18. “Communications.” La Nature, 1900 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1391, supplement; January 20): 30. While Venus and Mars would have dipped below the horizon, Saturn would have been very low on the southwest horizon; Fomalhaut would have been only about 20° above the south-southeast horizon; but, Altair would have been about 45° above the southwest horizon, (brighter and closer to the general position given, than Fomalhaut), if this was a stellar object.]


1899 Nov. 15 . Report not yet verified. It is said, Sci Amer 81/338, or large meteorite fall near Webster City, Iowa. [VIII; 540. "The Meteor Display." Scientific American, n.s., 81 (November 25, 1899): 338.]


189 nov 16 / det met / Trib 18-9-5 / That George Smith, who lived in Fulton Co, Maryland, had been awakened early morning of 16th by loud hissing sound, flash of light, and a peal of seeming thunder. In morning had found a circular patch of ground ab 100 feet in diameter that looked as if been plowed in night. Smith thought met. had struck there. [VIII; 541.1, 541.2."Weird Tale of a Meteor." New York Tribune, November 18, 1899, p. 9 c. 5.]


1899 Nov. 19 / L. Times, Nov. 28, 1899 / Capt. Neville, of H.M.S. Dido, writes that on Nov 19, 1899, near island of Zante, in a heavy gale and thunderstorm, something like an exploding shell fell about 100 yards from the ship. [VIII; 542. Neville, George. “A Meteorite.” London Times, November 28, 1899, p. 13 c. 1.]


1899 Nov. 19 / Met in storm / Coast Greece / D-97. [VIII; 543. The note copies information from page 97 of The Book of the Damned. "Notes." Nature, 61 (November 30, 1899): 110-4, at 111. Neville, George. “A Meteorite.” London Times, November 28, 1899, p. 13 c. 1.]


1899 Nov 20 / night / CR 130-1292 / Coronilla, Bolivia / metite / Sc. Amer 83-23. [VIII; 544. "Science Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 83 (July 14, 1900): 23.]


[1899 November] / (Nov-Dec bound together) / Read L.T. / 1899 / met debris / Nov. 25-12-c / meteite / Nov. 28-13-a. [VIII; 545. Bacon, John Mackenzie. “Meteoric Débris.” London Times, November 25, 1899, p. 12 c. 3. Neville, George. “A Meteorite.” London Times, November 28, 1899, p. 13 c. 1.]


1899 Nov “23”/ Fell “recently” relatively to Nov 23—a red dust at Menindie, N S. Wales. / Chem News 88-41 / Composed chiefly of grains of quartz with a film of iron oxide mixed with sooty matter. / See far back in year. [VIII; 546. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 88 (July, 10, 17. 24, and 31, 1903): 16-18, 32-34, 41-45, 55-58, at 41. See: 1899 June 17, (VIII; 443), and, 1899 Oct 5, (VIII; 520).]


1899 Nov 25 / Daily Chronicle of / Androms in Austria / Nature 61-152. [VIII; 547. (London Daily Chronicle, November 25, 1899.) Denning, William Frederick. “Supposed Daylight Leonids.” Nature, 61 (December 14, 1899): 152.]


1899 Nov. 25 / (Mets) / D. Chronicle of / “Our Vienna correspondent telegraphing last night says:—Successful observations of the Bielids last night.” Said that from beginning of evening until moonrise 67 meteors, mostly from Andromeda, were counted. Obs by astronomers of Vienna Observatory. [VIII; 548.1, 548.2. (London Daily Chronicle, November 25, 1899.)]


[1899 Nov 24 /] 1899 Nov 27 (?) / Andromedids / at Princeton / Nov 25-1-4, B Eagle / not looked up. [VIII; 549. "Fine Shower of Meteors." Brooklyn Eagle, November 25, 1899, p. 1 c. 4.]


1899 Nov 28-29 / night / Tidal wave Tacoma, Wash. Piers carried away and 2 steamships sunk. / Trans N. Zealand Institute 1899-197. [VIII; 550. Phillips, Coleman. “On the Volcanoes of the Pacific." Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 32 (1899):188-212, at 197. “The following is the account of the Tacoma disaster: 'More complete details relative to the Tacoma disaster are given in a Reuter's telegram dated Tacoma, Washington, 29th November. A mysterious accident which resulted in great damage to property occurred here last night. At 11 o'clock a loud roaring was heard, like that preceding the advance of a tidal wave, and 600 ft. of the docks suddenly disappeared into the bay. Two steamers were disabled and sunk. The ground in the vicinity subsided to the extent of 6 in. to 1 ft., causing a panic and stampede among the crowd which had collected in the vicinity. The cattlepens of the Northern Pacific Railway, and the company's offices, besides a freight-house 1,400 ft. in length, collapsed, the last mentioned catching fire. Various theories are advanced as to the cause of the disaster. The steamboat men maintain that it was due to a tidal wave 25 ft. in height, while others assert that, owing to a submarine land-slide, a great fissure or hole was formed beneath the bay, causing the docks to be swallowed up. Two lives were lost.'”]


1899 Dec and Nov / Chic Trib not well done. [C; 434.]


1899 / ab Dec 1 / Great drought Lower Mississippi River broken. / See Aug. [VIII; 551. See: 1899 Aug to Dec, (VIII; 480).]


1899 Dec. 2 / Ship Eclipse, Pacific Ocean, badly damaged by great fall of water from a clear sky—said been from a waterspout. / Chic Tribune 30-1-3. [VIII; 552. “Waterspout From Clear Sky.” Chicago Tribune, December 30, 1899, p. 2 c. 1. “Disaster to the Eclipse.” Hawaiian Star, (Honolulu), December 22, 1899, p. 1 c. 2. “She was struck by a squall or water spout on December 2nd, and in five seconds her mast had gone, thirteen sails were split and one seaman, who was aloft, was carried way so far from the ship that he was never seen again.” “The disaster to the Eclipse came from a clear sky and iIn the midst of a calm, which Captain Peterson describes as being like Honolulu harbor. The vessel was going along under full sail, but it was noticed that the mizzen royal sail had been split by a slight squall. John Nicholson was sent aloft to bind it. He started to haul down the top gallant stay sail, while the captain, mate and most of the crew went below to eat breakfast. Suddenly there was a crash on deck and the ship trembled and lurched. When the men rushed from below poor Nicholson was out of sight and the main mast was a wreck hanging over the vessel. No trace of the sailor was to be seen.” “The squall carried away the starboard main top gallant and royal back stay, the main top mast and main top gallant and royal, with yards and sails, the mizzen royal mast and yard, and fore royal yard. The main top mast was broken below the main cap, the main top gallant was smashed into two pieces and the main top gallant yard into three. All the sails, fore and aft, were split. Six of them were a complete loss. In thirty seconds after the disaster the ship was riding easily on a smooth sea and the men were trying to get a glimpse of their lost companion in the water.” “Captain Peterson thinks that a waterspout must have done the damage. The breaking of iron bars showed a storm of most remarkable power. Iron bars four or five inches thick were twisted like thin wire, and thick pieces of iron were cut in two as if they had been soft wood.”]


1899 Dec 8 / B Eagle, 11-3 / At Smithville, L.I., for more than a week, ghost, as if wrapped in a sheet, seen at sides of a road. [C; 435. "Smithville's Ghost Hunt." Brooklyn Eagle, December 8, 1899, p. 11 c. 3.]


1899 Dec 8 / Disap.—James Stacey, Junior—of Northease, Lewis. Not seen again up to Jan 18, 1901—D. Mail of—. [C; 436. (London Daily Mail, ca. 1899-1901.)]


1899 Dec 10 / B. Eagle, 18-4 / In Butte, Montana, a divine healer spoke insultingly of the Pope. A man in the audience, Malachi Dwyer, started to thrash him. The healer called on God to protect him, and Dwyer dropped dead. Verdict of Coroner's Jury was that Dwyer had dropped dead. Healer's name not given. Said he was the editor of an anti-Catholic paper, “The Living Truth”. [C; 437.1, 437.2. "The Making of a Myth." Brooklyn Eagle, December 10, 1899, p. 18 c. 4. "Was He Struck Dead?" Anaconda Standard, December 8, 1899, p. 8 c. 1-3. On December 7, 1899, the divine healer and religious pamphleteer, J.S. Charlebois, (a former Catholic), offended Malachia Dwyer, (a former friend and staunch Catholic), at the public library, with his claim that the anti-christ number of "666" was marked on the pope's forehead. Dwyer called Charlesbois a liar and had raised his hand to strike him; but, the librarian intervened in the disturbance and asked Dwyer to leave. "Dwyer started to walk out, and as he reached the door, fell prone on the steps." Charlebois believed that it was a matter of divine protection, but the coroner suggested Dwyer, (68-years-old), had suffered a heart attack due to the excitement.]


1899 Dec 16 / (moon) / During eclipse of the moon, Prof Pickering saw white spot around Linne apparently increase in diameter by 1/6 of a mileprobably a light effect. / Pop Astro 8/59. [VIII; 553. Pickering, William Henry. “Lunar Changes during the Eclipse of December 16, 1899.” Popular Astronomy, 8 (no. 2; February 1900): 57-59, at 59.]


1899 (Dec 24) / Eva Roach of Montreal asleep again. Upon Christmas Eve in 1898 she fell asleep and stayed so 38 days. / Chic Trib., Jan 5, 1900, p. 3. [C; 438.1. “Eva Roach Asleep Again.” Chicago Tribune, January 5, 1900, p. 1 c. 4.]


1899 Dec 25 / 4:25 a.m. / Severe q / Hemet / southern California / Nature 61-595. [VIII; 554. “Notes.” Nature, 61 (April 19, 1900): 592-596, at 595.]


1899 Dec. 30 / Bristol / Augs. [VIII; 555. (Refs.???)]


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

1899 Dec 31 / Tiflis / Caucasia / big q / [BA] '11. [VIII; 556. A class III earthquake. Milne, 740.]

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