Last updated: April 8, 2021. - Fortean Notes

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Last updated: April 8, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1836 to 1838


1836:


1836 Jan 3 / Very violent q in Philippines. Several volcs were active. / BA 54. [I; 2074. Mallet, 258.]


1836 Jan. 5 / Philippines / I. [I; 2075. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1836 Jan 12 / 6:30 p.m. / Large meteor at Cherbourg. Detonations heard at Coutances., / BA 60. [I; 2076. Greg, 76-77.]


1836 Jan 12 / Detonating wheel-like meteor / See Feb 12. / Cherbourg, France. [I; 2077. See: 1836 Feb 12, (I; 2085).]


1836 Jan. 24 / India / Chandernagore / Sook-Sagur / also Kabul / I / q / BA 11. [I; 2078. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


[1836 Jan 28 /] 1836 Nov / Jour of Asiatic Soc of Bengal of [Nov] / See May 19, 1806vessel at 1° 35 S and 20° 45 W of Greenwich (23° SW of Paris) heard loud sound and felt shock. In a succeeding voyage, met at  0° 35' S and 15° 50' W of  Greenwich, sea violently agitated and volcanic cinders of ashes floating. [I; 2142.1, 2142.2. See: 1806 May 19, (I; 182). "Proceedings of the Asiatic Society." Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 5 (1836): 753-759, at 758. Daussy, Pierre. "Note sur l'existence probable d'un volcan sous-marin situé par environ 0°20' de latitude sud, et 22° de longitude ouest." Comptes Rendus, 6 (April 16, 1838): 512-516, at 515-516. Mallet, 258. Mallet, Robert. "Fourth Report upon the Facts and Theory of Earthquake Phenomena." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1858, 1-136, at 22. Volcano Number 385030 of the Global Volcanism Program.]


1836 Jan 28 / 9 p.m. / See May 19, 1806. / vessel at 0º 40' S and 22° 30' W / violent shock to a vessel. [I; 2079. See: 1806 May 19, (I; 182). The ship was the Philantrope de Bordeaux. Mallet, Robert. "Fourth Report upon the Facts and Theory of Earthquake Phenomena." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1858, 1-136, at 22.]


1836 Jan 31 / Stone fell near men who had been shooting. / near Corrèze, France / PhipsonMeteors, p. 47 / CR 58/226. [I; 2080. Daubrée, Gabriel-Auguste. "Note sur deux aérolithes, l'un tombé à Vouillé (Vienne), le 13 mai 1831, et offert au Muséum d'Histoire naturelle par la ville de Poitiers; l'autre tombé à Mascombes, départment de la Correze, le 31 Janvier 1836, et dont la chute était restée sans publicité." Comptes Rendus, 58 (1864): 226-230, at 229-230. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. Meteors, Aerolites, and Falling Stars. London: L. Reeve, 1867, 47-48. The Mascombes meteorite.]


1836 Jan 31 / (Fr) / Mascombes, France / stone and 2 dets / BA 67/416. [I; 2081. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 416.]


1836 Jan 31 / 1 p.m. / Metite / Mascombes. / Particulars / "Preceded by Detonations" / La Sci Pour Tous 9-93. [I; 2082. Daubrée, Gabriel-Auguste. "Note sur deux aérolithes." La Science Pour Tous, 9 (no. 12; February 18, 1864): 93. See: 1836 Jan 31, (I; 2080). The Mascombes meteorite.]


1836 Feb 8 / (It) / Rivoli, Piedmont / det met / BA '60 / 7 a.m. [I; 2083. Greg, 76.]


1836 Feb. 9 / (Hun) / 5 p.m. / Hungary / q and sounds and atmospheric disturbances / BA 54. [I; 2084. Mallet, 259.]


1836 Feb 12 (?) / Cherbourg / 6:27 a.m. / Det met and strong sulphurous odor / C.R. 2-154. [I; 2085. "Sur un bolide observé près de Cherbourg." Comptes Rendus, 2 (1836): 153-154.]


1836 Feb 18 / moon / Ac to Gruithuisen, in western crater of Messier, where there are two remarkable straight lines of light, dark band between them covered with luminous points. / Sc Am Sup7-2696. [I; 2086. Flammarion, Camille. "Is the Moon Inhabited?" Scientific American Supplement, 7 (nos. 169 and 170; March 29, and, April 5, 1879): 2696, 2711-2712, at 2696. "On the 18th of February, 1826, a strange fact made itself manifest in the luminous train; the dark band which traversed its center was intermingled with luminous points, 'and I believe,' writes he, 'that I observed that they did not remain always in the same position.' At times a veil or mist appeared to extend over these objects, while that under other circumstance, where they ought to have been less visible on account of the effect of the solar light, they were more so."]


1836 Feb 23 / Feb. 26 / Shocks / Parma, Italy / BA 54. [I; 2087. Mallet, 259.]


1836 Feb 24 / (It)(qmet) / Great q / Rossano and Croscia, Calabria, in ruins. Rise and fall of sea. / A meteor seen / Ponton, Earthquakes, p. 108. [I; 2088. Ponton, Mungo. Earthquakes and Volcanoes. London: T. Nelson, 1868, 67-68. Revised ed. London: T. Nelson, 1870, 62.]


[1836, about April /] 1826 March / Fall of dust ab 600 miles w. of Cape Verde / Nautical Magazine 6-291. [I; 1240. Burnett, John. "Phenomena at Sea." Nautical Magazine, 6 (1837): 291-292. "I observed the same phenomenon last year in nearly the same situation, but not to the same extent, and nearly two months later."]


1836 Ap. 2 / Pribyloff Islands, Alaska / Destructive q / BA 1911-42. [I; 2090. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1836 April [4], Easter Monday / Shropshire / (8 o'clock) / q / like an explosion / LT, Ap. 14-5-e. [I; 2089. "A smart shock...." London Times, April 14, 1836, p. 5 c. 5.]


1836 Ap. 22 / Sulphur / Prussia / Phipson, Earth's Atmospherep. 42. [I; 2091. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. Researches On the Past and Present History of the Earth's Atmosphere: Including the Latest Discoveries and Their Practical Applications. London: C. Griffin, 1901, 41-42. Dulk, Friedrich Philipp. "Nachricht über Schwefelregen." Archiv der Pharmazie, 69 (1839): 80-86.]


1836 Ap. 22 / Aurora at Sea / C.R. 3/519. [I; 2092. "Observations faites pendant une traversée de Dieppe à Terre-Neuve." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 519-520.]


1836 April 24 / (It) / (Cut) / "A terribly destructive earthquake" / Calabria / In the sky were phe that looked like "great beams on fire". / BA 54/259. [I; 2093. Mallet, 259.]


1836 Ap. 24 / Cosenza, Italy / III. [I; 2094. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1836 Ap 24-25 / (It) / Calabria / phe and q / See 1805. [I; 2095. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 354-355. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1836 Ap. 24 / night / At moment of great q in Calabria, a meteor appeared along the shore of Calopezzali. C.R., 17-621. [I; 2096. Perrey, Alexis. "Nouvelles recherches sur les tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, de 1801 à juin 1843." Comptes Rendus, 17 (1843): 608-625 at 621.]


1836 Ap. 24 / Calabria and Naples / shock and meteor / The next day Vesuvius sent out thick smoke. / BA 54. [I; 2097. Mallet, 259.]


1836 Ap. 24 / Rossano, Calabria / large fireball / "like a wooden beam on fire" / BA 60. [I; 2098. Greg, 76.]


1836 April / Great dry fog in South Australia / Chem News 88-43 'The phenomenon excited a good deal of apprehension in the minds of the settlers." [I; 2099. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 88 (July, 10, 17. 24, and 31, 1903): 16-18, 32-34, 41-45, 55-58; at 43-44.]


1836 Ap. 24 / (It) / Rassano, etc. (Cosenza) / great q / [BA] '11. [I; 2100. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1836 May 3-4 / Calabria, Italy / I. [I; 2101. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1836 May 8 / Toronto / A / A.J.S. 32/393+. [I; 2102. Bonnycastle, Richard Henry. "Auroral Appearance." American Journal of Science, 32 (1837): 393-395, (with an illustration).]


1836 May 10 / Pollen in valley of the Aspe (Basse-Pyrénées) / C.R. 2-516. [I; 2103. "M. Hufty de la Jonquière ecrit...." Comptes Rendus, 2 (1836): 516.]


1836 May 13 / (Fr) / 5 a.m. / Angers, Nantes, etc. west of F. / sounds and q / BA 54. [I; 2104. Mallet, 260.]


1836 May 15 / Konigsberg / (N) / lights on moon during eclipse of sun / Loomis, Treatise on Astronomy, p. 174. [I; 2105. Loomis, Elias. A Treatise on Astronomy. New York: Harper, 1866, 174-175. "During the eclipse of May 15, 1836, about 25 seconds before the middle of the eclipse, Professor Bessel, with the Königsberg heliometer, observed a faint point of light near the edge of the moon's limb. The point became brighter, and other similar points appeared beside it, which soon united, and in this manner rendered visible the whole of the moon's border between the extremities of the sun's cusps."]


1836 May 15 / Ac to Poey / C.R. 56/88 / Havana / luminous things moving away from sun to considerable distance and then retracing. Others moved with no commoness of direction. Some size of 7th mag. star. Others scarcely detectable. [I; 2106.1, 2106.2. Poey, Andrés. "Sur le passage d'une quantité considerable de globules lumineux observés à la Havane durant l'éclipse solaire du 15 mai 1836." Comptes Rendus, 56 (1863): 88-90.]


1836 May 15 / Augs. / Havana / eclipse of sun / (N) / C.R. 56/88 / D-210. [I; 2107. The note copies information from page 210 of The Book of the Damned. Poey, Andrés. "Sur le passage d'une quantité considerable de globules lumineux observés à la Havane durant l'éclipse solaire du 15 mai 1836." Comptes Rendus, 56 (1863): 88-90. Léotard, Jacques. "Meme sujet." Astronomie, 5 (1886): 391-392.]


1836 June 3 / Red Hook, N.Y. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [I; 2108. Finley, 3.]


1836 June 10 / Sury (Loire) / Fireball / S. to N. / BA 60. [I; 2109. Greg, 76.]


1836 June 12 / Venetia, Italy / II. [I; 2110. A class II earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1836 June 23 / [London Times], 6-f / Sun Spots. [I; 2111. "Spots on the Sun." London Times, June 23, 1836, p. 6 c. 6. "Never have so many of these spots been observed as during the present year between  February and the end of May. Up to the 22d of April M. Menard had counted 10, and up to the 19th of May[,] 13...."]


1836 June 28 / 8-9 a.m. / Heavy fall of snow in Sydney, N.S.W. Unprecedented. / Symons' 12-170. [I; 2112. "Reviews." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 12 (November 1877): 166-170 , at 170, c.v. "Climate of New South Wales." Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. Climate of New South Wales: Descriptive, Historical, and Tabular. Sydney: Charles Potter, 1877, 22.]


1836 July 8 / New England / Dark Day / Sc Am 112-229. [I; 2113. Talman, Charles Fitzhugh. "Dark Days and Forest Fires." Scientific American, n.s., 112 (March 6, 1915): 229.]


1836 July 8 / Basilicata, Italy / I. [I; 2114. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1836 July 15 / evening / Providence R.I.sound like thunder and q. / Niles Register, July 30, 1836. [I; 2115. "Earthquake." Niles' Weekly Register, 50 (July 30, 1836): 364.]


1836 July 20 / [London Times], 5-d / Ext occurrence. [A; 119. "Extraordinary Occurrence." London Times, July 20, 1836, p. 5 c. 4.  An unexplained and violent attack upon Pierre Napoleon and Antoine Lucien, (two of the sons of Lucien Bonaparte, the Prince of Canino), by the Carabineers of Pope Gregory XVI resulted in Pierre Napoleon's arrest amd Antoine Lucien's escape.]


1836 July 20 / [L.T.], 6-f / Strange discovery. [A; 120. "Strange Discovery." London Times, July 20, 1836, p. 6 c. 6. The discovery of seventeen miniature coffins and figurines, at Arthur's Seat, is reported.]


1836 July 25 / Inf conjunction / Venus-Sun / (Al). [I; 2116. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1836, 475.]


[1836 July 29] / 1836 July(?) 28 / Norwich, Conn / obj like a mosaic of stones in tar. / See under Objs. [I; 2117. See: Objs / Coins, etc. / 1836, (SF-IV: 236 & 237).]


1836 Aug / A / dets / Am J. Sci 32/220. [I; 2118. Twining, Alexander C. "Observations upon certain Auroral and Optical Phenomena." American Journal of Science, 32 (1837): 217-229, at 220-224.]


1836 Aug 8 / successional / Smyrna. / B.A. '54 / midnightqs / At 10 p.m., a met had been seen. [I; 2119. Mallet, 261.]


1836 Aug / Pribyloff Islands, Alaska / III. [I; 2120. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1836 Aug / Perseids / A. J. Sci 37-335. [I; 2121. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Report on the Shooting Stars of August 9th and 10th, 1839, with other facts relating to the frequent occurrence of a meteoric display in August." American Journal of Science, 37 (1839): 325-338. at 336.]


1836 Aug 11 / Aurora / B Assoc 1836/32. [I; 2122. Traill, Thomas Stewart. "On the Aurora Borealis of 11th August, 1836." " Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1836, Notices and Abstracts, 32-33.]


1836 Aug 15 / Albi, France / frogs / C. Rendus 3/435. [I; 2123. "M. Cantié...." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 435. "M. Cantié, imprimeur à Albi, écrit que le 15 août dernier, il a vu tomber, pendant une pluie d'orages, de petits batraciens."]


1836 Aug 20 / Large met / detonating / Illinois / 4 p.m. / in sunshine / BA 60. [I; 2124. Greg, 76.]


1836 Aug 20 / Meteors in Illinois in daytime / A. J. Sci 33/402 / BA '60-76. [I; 2125. Gaylord, R. "Brilliant Meteor seen in the day time." American Journal of Science, 33 (1837-1838): 402. Greg, 76.]


1836 Aug 30 / Oaxaca / q. / See June 5, 1897. / BA '11. [I; 2126. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705. See: 1897 June 5, (VII; 1786).]


1836 Sept 7 / Spon Comb / Paris / L.T., Ap 10-3-f, 1837. [A; 121. "Spontaneous Combustion." London Times, April 10, 1837, p. 3. c. 6. Joly. "Remarkable Case of Spontaneous Combustion." London Medical Gazette, 20 (April 8, 1837): 63-64. Joly. "Combustion Humaine dite Spontanée." Journal des Connaissances Médico-Chirurgicales, 4 no. 4 (October, 1836): 149-150.]


1836 Sept. 14 / (Fr) / (See Aug, '35.) / Aubres, Drôme, France / Metite / (F). [I; 2127. Fletcher, 100. This is the Aubres meteorite. See: 1835 Aug 30, (I; 2030).]


1836 Sept 18 / Florence / 10 a.m. / Fireball / "A doubtful substance found?" / BA 60. [I; 2128. Greg, 76.]


1836 Sept 24 / near Macclesfield, Eng / Swarm of minute insects est. upon 50 sq miles / Analyst 5/234. [I; 2129. "Swarm of Minute Insects In and Around Macclesfield." The Analyst: A Quarterly Journal of Science, Literature, Natural History, and the Fine Arts, 5 (1836): 234-237.]


1836 Sept 25 / (N) / Red glare in sky, London, and firemen out / Mechanics Mag 36/355 / These in Annual Report upon London Fires. [I; 2130. Baddeley, William. "London Fires in 1836." Mechanics' Magazine, 26 (February 11, 1837); 354-365, at 355.]


1836 Oct 11 / Volc / Goentoer, Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [I; 2131. Backer, 881. The Guntur volcano.]


1836 Oct 18 / Breslau / large fireball / BA 60. [I; 2132. Greg, 76.]


1836 Oct. 18 / Great aurora or sky glow and 2 Vulcs or sunspots / See Feb., 1837. / CR 3/585. [I; 2133. "Sur l'aurore boréale du 18 octobre 1835, observée à Forli." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 585. "Sur l'aurore boréale du 18 octobre 1836." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 585-586. These articles only relate to auroral phenomena; yet, Pastroff reported observing two "asteroids" on October 18. See: 1837 Feb 16, (I; 2172).]


1836 Oct. 18 / (N) / "Fire in sky" and hundr[eds] of firemen and soldiers in many cities in England, France and Germany. / Mechanics Mag 26/355 / See Sept. 25. [I; 2134. Baddeley, William. "London Fires in 1836." Mechanics' Magazine, 26 (February 11, 1837); 354-365, at 355. No quote for "Fire in sky."]


1836 Oct 18 / Cherbourg / Aurora / C.R. 3/518, 536, 585. [I; 2135. "Aurore boréale du 18 octobre 1836." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 518-519. "Observation de l'aurore boréale à Turin et à Chambéry." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 536. "Sur l'aurore boréale du 18 octobre 1836." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 585-586.]


1836 Oct. / A. / France / 34/286 A. J. Sci. [I; 2136. Barnard, Frederick Augustus Porter. "On the Aurora Borealis of November 14, 1837." American Journal of Science, 34 (1838): 267-290, at 286.]


1836 Oct. 18 / Auroral / ab 8 p.m. / London / great red glare in sky / fire engines called out / LT, Oct 20-3-c. At Strasburg, Rennes, etc., ab 8:30 / Times, 24th / Two columns of fire rose in opposite directions. [I; 2137. "The Northern Lights." London Times, October 20, 1836, p. 3 c. 3. "Shortly after 8 o'clock, on Tuesday evening, the metropolis and its suburbs, for miles around, was thrown into a state of the greatest excitement by the northern hemisphere suddenly assuming a most awful fiery appearance, whih seemed to indicate the existence of some dreadful conflagration in the northern portion of the metropolis." "The Great Aurora Borealis." London Times, October 24, 1836 p. 4 c. 6. "A splendid aurora borealis appeared last evening about half past 8 o'clock, in Rennes, and spread for a moment some alarm in the city. The brightness from the clouds was such that it resembled a large fire breaking through the roof of an edifice." "Strasburg, Oct. 19th.Last evening, between 8 and 9 o'clock, a rather extraordinary phenomenon caused a general uproar in our city. A dazzling light suddenly spread over a large extent of the sk, which soon appeared totally on fire."]


1836 Oct. 23 / 7 p.m. / 11 p.m. / Fireballs over Greenfield, Mass, exploding with q. effects. / Niles Weekly Register, Nov. 5. [I; 2041. "Domestic Chronicle" Niles' Weekly Register, 51 (November 5, 1836): 160. "Meteor. On Sunday, 23d, a large meteor, or fire ball, was observed to pass over Greenfield, Mass at 7 and 11 o'clock at night; it exploded both times, causing houses to quiver as if affected by an earthquake."]


1836 ab. last of Oc / [q] / Paisley / Kilpatrick / Erskine / Inchinan / ab. 10:50 p.m. / L.T., Oct 31-6-e. [I; 2138. "Earthquake at Old Kilpatrick and Paisley." London Times, October 31, 1836, p. 6 c. 5. Mallet, 262. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 121. Mallet and Milne note an earthquake at Blytheswood, on October 24, at 10 A.M.]


1836 Nov 1 / [London Times], 2-e / q / Rawcliffe Bridge / (not found). [I; 2139. "Earthquake." London Times, November 1, 1836, p. 2 c. 5. "About midnight, on the 15th ult., a slight shock of an earthquake was felt at Rawcliffe-bridge, and at the farmhouses continguous to the Dutch river, attended with a rumbling noise somewhat like the rattle of a heavy carriage, which lasted a few seconds, and greatly alarmed many of the inhabitants.Doncaster Gazette."]


1836 Nov. 1 / Vulc / 2 black bodies diff. sized by Pastoroff / C.R. 49/811. [I; 2140. "Lettre de M. Herrick...." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 810-812, at 811. LeVerrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. "Examen des observations qu'on a présentées, à diverses époques, comme pouvant appartenir aux passages d'une planète intra-mercurielle devant le disque du Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 83 (September 18, 1876): 583-589, 621-624, 647-650, 719-723, at 621-622. See: 1837 Feb 16, (I; 2172).]


1836 autumn / Many auroras / Shetlands / C.R. 3/781. [I; 2141. Edmonston, Thomas. "Aurores boréales." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 781.]


[1836 Nov. Wrong date. See: 1836 Jan 28, (I; 2142).]


1836 Nov. 11 / See Dec. 11. / Macao, Brazil / (F). [I; 2143. Fletcher, 100. This is the Macao meteorite. Fletcher gives the date of its fall as November 11, 1836. See: 1836 Dec 11, (I; 2155).]


1836 Nov 12 / Leonids / ac to Olmsted / A. J. Sci. 31-388. [I; 2144. Olmsted, Denison. "On the Meteor Shower of November, 1836." American Journal of Science, 31 (1837): 386-391, at 390.]


1836 Nov 12-13 / Near Tours, mets like a rain of fire reported. Near Culloy, in the valley of the Rhone, seen through a fog so rapidly people thought auroral flashes or lightning. Athenaeum 1837-12. [I; 2145. "Falling Stars." Athenæum, 1837 (no. 480; January 7): 12-13.]


1836 Nov. 12-13 / In northern Russia, unusual no. of meteors (lat. 60), town of Bogouslowsk. / C.R. 4-524 / bet 3 and 4 a.m. of 13th, from Leo. [I; 2146. "Étoiles filantes." Comptes Rendus, 4 (1837): 524.]


1836 Nov 12-13 / N.Y. / Evening, few meteors, but flashes like lightning and aurora. / 2 a.m., began mets. from Leo. / Niles Weekly Register, Nov 19, 1836. [I; 2147. "Meteors of the 12th and 13th Instant." Niles' Weekly Register, 51 (November 19, 1836): 179. "During the evening but few meteors were obseved, but from 8 o'clock until near dawn, successive flashes were observed in the east, suposed by some to be lightning. At 9 o'clock, a very beautiful auroral light was seen of a pinkish hue."]


1836 Nov. 20 / (It) / Italy / q and red light / See 1805. [I; 2148. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 355-356. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1836 Nov. 20 / q. / II / Salerno and Basilicata, Italy / BA '11. [I; 2149. A class II earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1836 Nov 22 / Silesia / "atmospheric explosion / BA 60. [I; 2150. Greg, 76.]


1836 Dec. 3etc. / 2 p.m. / Began eruption in Guadaloupe. / C.R., 4-294. [I; 2151. Lherminier. "Note sur l'éruption du volcan de la Guadeloupe." Comptes Rendus, 4 (1837): 294-295. La Soufrière volcano.]


1836 Dec 11 / Parma / from 7:45 p.m. till midnight / Ab. 50 mets = stars first mag, 12 = Jupiter. Then ab 15 smaller ones till daybreak. Most from e to w. / L.T., 1837, Jan 4-6-2. [I; 2152. "In the night...." London Times, January 4, 1837, p. 6 c. 2. See: 1836 Dec 11, (I; 2154).]


1836 Dec / Eruption / Guadaloupe / See Feb. / Athenaeum 1837-444. [I; 2153. "Volcano in Guadaloupe." Athenæum, 1837 (no. 503; June 17): 444. See: 1837 Feb, (I; 2169).]


1836 Dec 11 / At Parma, from 7:45 to midnight, no less than 50 meteors equally in brilliance stars of 1st mag, 12 of them as bright as Jupiter. From midnight till 6:30 great number of smaller ones, 15 size of stars of second mag. Most of them from e. to w. / See Dec 11, 1833. / L.T., 1837, Jan 4-6-b. [I; 2154.1, 2154.2. "In the night...." London Times, January 4, 1837, p. 6 c. 2. "In the night of the 11th Dec a great number of shooting stars were eseen at Parma; they are described as more numerous than those observed on November 13. From a quarter before 8 till midnight there were no less than 50, equalling in brilliancy stars of the first order, 12 of which were as bright as Jupiter. From midnight till half-past 6 in the morning 15, resembling stars of the second magnitude, were observed, with a number of smaller size. The direction of the greater portion was from east to west. A nearly similar phenomenon was observed at Parma during the night of the 11th of December, 1833." This meteor shower may be an early observation of the Geminid meteor showers. While the asteroid 3200 Phaethon, (discovered in 1983, is thought to be the parent body of these meteors, coinciding with the orbital elements of the Geminids), the observed dust tail being shed by 3200 Phaethon may not adequately account for these displays. Jewitt, David; Li, Jing; and, Agarwal, Jessica. "The Dust Tail of Asteroid (3200) Phaethon." Astrophysical Journal Letters, 771 no. 2 (July 10, 2013): L36. "Most particles in the optical tail follow gravitationally unbound orbits and thus do not contribute to the Geminid meteoroid stream." See: 1833 Dec 11, (I; 1854).]


1836 Dec 11 / See Nov. 11. / Macao, Brazil / fall great number of stones / C.R. 5-211. [I; 2155. Berthou, F. "Chute de pierres observéee au Brésil." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 211. Greg, 76. See: 1836 Nov. 11, (I; 2143).]


1837:


1837 Jan 1 / q / Palestine / Congregational Magazine 20-405. [I; 2156. (Congregational Magazine, 20 (1837): 405).]


1837 Jan 1 / Great q / Syria / BA '11. [I; 2157. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1837 [Jan 5] / Vesoul and Toulouse / 1:15 a.m. / loud det. met / BA 60. [I; 2158. Greg, 76-77.]


1837 Jan 1 and to Feb / Great quake on 1st Syria / Athenaeum 1837/416. [I; 2159. "Great Earthquake in Syria." Athenæum, 1837 (no. 502; June 10): 416-417.]


1837 Jan. 1 / q. in Syria / Safat and Tabereah / Athenaeum 1837-416 / Fire shot from ground. Many hot springs burst out. Throughout month of June. [I; 2204. "Great Earthquake in Syria." Athenæum, 1837 (no. 502; June 10): 416-417. "The principal shock of the earthquake appears to have been felt on the 1st of January; but successive shocks continued throughout the month," in January, (not June).]


1837 Jan 1 / 4:35 p.m. / Beyrout, Syria / q. / The Atmosphere was hot and charged with electricity. / Arc. Sci 1838-254 / 39 villages destroyed. [I; 2160. "Earthquake in Syria." Arcana of Science and Art, 11 (1838): 254-255. "During the day of the earthquake the atmosphere was close and charged with electricity. Fahrenheit's thermometer stood at 66°, but five minutes after the earthquake it rose to 70°."]


1837 Jan 1 / Great q. / town of Saffet / 4 or 5,000 killed / L.T., Ap. 12. [I; 2161. "Earthquake at Syria" London Times, April 12, 1837, p. 7 c. 4. "Late Earthquake in Palestine." London Times, March 1, 1837, p. 7 c. 6. The city of Safed is now part of Israel.]


1837 Jan 1 / Severe shock / Beyrout / 14 houses thrown down / L.T., Feb 7/5/f. [I; 2162. "A severe shock...." London Times, February 7, 1837, p. 5 c. 6. "A severe shock of an earthquake was experienced at Beyrout on the 1st of January; it lasted about 30 seconds."]


1837 Jan. 5 / 1 a.m. / near Vichy, etc. / Met size of moon followed by several luminous pointsone minute / C.R. 4-94. [I; 2163. "Météore lumineux de la nuit du 4 au 5 janvier 1837." Comptes Rendus, 4 (1837): 94-95.]


1837 Jan 5 / 1:15 a.m. / Toulouse, etc. / det met / BA 60-76 / Germany, too. [I; 2164. Greg, 76. The observation from Niederbronn-les-Bains, in Alsace, would have been in France, next to the German border.]


[1837 Jan 5 /] 1837 Jan 15 / Mikolowa, Hungary / 5 p.m. / stonefall, ac to Poggendorf / BA 60. [I; 2165. Greg, 76. Boguslawski, Georg von. "Zehnter Nachtrag zu Chladni's Verzeichnisse der Feuermeteore und herabgefallenen Massen (Wien 1819)." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, Ergänzungsband, 4 (1854): 1-155, 353-456; at 356. Papp, Gábor, & Bartha, Lajos. "On the fireball observed at Mihályfa, Hungary, on 5 January, 1837, mistaken as the Mikolawa meteorite.” Annales Historico-Naturales Musei Nationalis Hungarici,  99 (2007): 207-210. The object observed at Mihályfa was a fireball from which a glowing body was seen to fall, and the red hot "stone" and wrong date were newspaper errors.]


1837 Jan 26 / bet 1 and 2 a.m. / Chalon-sur-Saône and at Bourg (Ain) / aurora very brilliant / supposed from a fire. / Night, 25-26, aurora at Geneva, maximum at 12:45. / [L.T.], Feb 7-6-d / 8-6-f. [I; 2166. "On the night...." London Times, February 8, 1837, p. 6 c. 6. "On the night of the 26th ult., between the hours of 1 and 2 o'clock, a very brilliant aurora borealis was observed at Chalon-sur-Saône which lasted for more than half an hour. This celestial phenomenon was also observed at Bourg (Ain); it lasted more than 10 minutes, and was at first supposed to be a fire towards the north of the town. A similar phenomenon was also observed at Geneva, on the night of the 25th, and was visible till past 2 o'clock in the morning of the 26th. At its most brilliant period, about three-quarters past 12 o'clock, the space above the Jura was interspersed with bright red streaks, and the entire firmament was interspersed with fleecy clouds. The wind was south-west.French paper." The same article also appears in the London Times, February 7, 1837, p. 6 c. 4. This Bourg is Bourg-en-Bresse, (Ain).


1837 Jan 29 / Vizille, Isère / violent explosive sound followed by q. / BA 54. [I; 2167. Mallet, 265.]


1837 Feb 5 / Op Mars / (Al). [I; 2168. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1837, 468.]


1837 Feb / Eruption / Guadaloupe / Athenaeum 1837-444 / See Dec. [I; 2169. "Volcano in Guadaloupe." Athenæum, 1837 (no. 503; June 17): 444. See: 1836 Dec, (I; 2153). The Soufriere Guadeloupe volcano was in eruption until February 12, 1837.]


[1837 Feb 8 /] 1837 Feb. 15 / Over Comrie region fell a black powder. / Edin New Phil Jour 31-293. [I; 2171. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (April-October 1841) 259-309, at 293. "On Wednesday last (8th February) Locherne, in Perthshire, was observed to be covered by a black scum...." "Remarkable Fact." Aberdeen Press and Journal, March 1, 1837, p. 4 c. 1. "On Wednesday last, Locherne, in Perthshire, was observed to be covered by a black scum which spread in a thin film over its surface. On Thursday morning, this had removed from the central parts and collected near the sides, where part of it was deposited on the sands in the form of black paste, which, when taken up in the hands, was not easily washed off again, and rendered the water (usually remarkably pure) totally unfit for use. About the same time, at the farm of Miggar, eight or nine miles from Locherne, some clothes that had been left out all night to bleach were next morning covered with black dew of a similar kind. Was this phenomenon observed in other parts of the country, and can it have any connexion with the present noxious state of the atmosphere?"]


1837 Feb 13 and 14 / Red dustfall / ab. 600 miles w. of Cape Verde / Nautical Magazine, 6-291. [I; 2170. Burnett, John. "Phenomena at Sea." Nautical Magazine, 6 (1837): 291-292. Burnett gave his ship's positions as 4° 20' N., 23° 20' W., (on February 11), and, 8° N., 27° 20'W., (on February 15), being unable to distinguish the horizon and obtain his position in the hazy weather. "The nearest land during these four days, was the western coast of Africa, distant about 600 miles."]


[1837 Feb. 15. Wrong date. See: 1837 Feb 8, (I; 2171).]


1837 Feb 15 (?) / Phantom / In Times of 25th, copying from the Western Luminary, that on Wednesday night (Feb. 15?) some persons saw lights in the streets of Exmouth and heard tramping horses bet 11 and 12 p.m.going to windows saw a funeral processionseveral mutes on horseback, three mourning coaches followed by chariotsprocession ending with more mutes on horseback. Said that several persons ran from houses and saw it turn a corner, and took a short cut, expecting to overtake it, seeing the lights glittering in the road, but upon reaching the road could not see it, and searched in vain. / Then inquiries at the toll gate, but somewhere between last sighted and the toll gate the procession had disappeared. Said that no person likely to be buried with such pomp had died in the neighborhood.

[A; 122.1 to 122.4. "A Marvellous Circumstance." London Times, February 25, 1837, p. 2 c. 5. "A Love for the Marvellous." Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, March 4, 1837, p. 5 c. 4. (@ BNA. No copy of Flindell's Western Luminary, February ??, 1837).]


1837 Feb 16 / 2 Vulcans by Pastorff / An Sci Dis 1860/410. [I; 2172. "New Planets." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1860, 409-411, at 410. "Astronomie." Bibliothèque Universelle des Sciences, Belles-Lettres, et Arts, Sciences et Arts, 58 (1835): 434-435. Pastorff said that he had seen two "asteroids" crossing the Sun's disc, in 1834. Wartmann, Louis-François. "Lettre de M. Wartmann a M. Le Prof. De La Rive, sur Quelques Observations de M. Pastorff." Bibliothèque Universelle de Genéve, n.s., 8 (April 1837): 409-411. Pastorff reported observing these asteroids on October 18 and November 1, in 1836, and on February 16, in 1837. Wartmann, Louis François. "Sur l'éclipse de lune du 20 avril dernier, sur la lumière zodiacale et sur de nouveaux astéroïdes." Correspondance Mathématique et Physique de l'Observatoire de Bruxelles, 9 (1837): 141-144.]


1837 Feb 18 / Aurorafrom the sun / Wycombe / 10:30 p.m. / "Two streams" of a bright vermillion color: ["...]the one arising in the north-east, passing over Arcturus and Ursa Major; and the other originating in the south-west, leaving Orion to the southward, passing over Aldebaran and Capella, and meeting in the Zenith," forming a luminous arch of no great breadth. The western limb was by much the brightest and shot forth rays. [I; 2173.1, 2173.2. Tatem, James George. "General Observations Made on the Weather at Hgh Wycombe, Bucks., Lat. 51° 37' 44" North; Long. 34' 45" West, During the Year 1837." Transactions of the Meteorological Society, 1 (1839): 98-103, at 98-99.]


1837 Feb 18 / Aurora / Proc. Roy. Irish Acad. 1/38. [I; 2174. "Mr. Lloyd read a note on the Aurora Borealis of the 18th inst....."Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, 1 (February 27, 1837): 38-39.]


1837 Feb 18 / Dorset / 7 to 11 p.m. / Aurora / LT, Feb 25-2-f. [I; 2175. "On Saturday evening...." London Times, February 25, 1837, p. 2 c. 6. "On Saturday evening last the phenomenon of the Aurora Borealis presented a very magnificent spectacle. Soon after 7 o'clock the sky to the north-west was lighted up with a sheet of brilliant crimson light, the coruscations of which, towards the zenith, were extensive and most rapid. Shortly after 8 o'clock the irregular motion of the phenomenon became less perceptible, and the crimson light was based on an arch of pale light. The appearance did not subside until about 11 o'clock.Dorset Chronicle."]


1837 Feb. 18 / Aurora / France / Switzerland / Livonia / CR 4/589. 263. 337. [I; 2176. "Aurore boréale du 18 février 1837." Comptes Rendus, 4 (1837): 263. "Aurore boréale du 18 février 1837." Comptes Rendus, 4 (1837): 337. "Aurores boréales." Comptes Rendus, 4 (1837): 589.]


1837 Feb. 18 / Aurora / London and France / Am J. Sci 32/396. [I; 2177. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Aurora Borealis of February 18, 1837." American Journal of Science, 32 (1837): 396.]


1837 Feb 18 / From 8 to 10 p.m., broad crimson streak in sky, e to w., close to Mars. / L.T. 25-6-a. [I; 2178. "A singular appearance was observed in the heavens...." London Times, February 25, 1837, p. 6 c. 1.]


1837 Feb 22 / Orkneys / Ship illuminated with St. Elmos fire and shore nearby and then thunder and hail. / Jour Frank Inst. 2-20/362. [I; 2179. Traill, William. "St. Elmo's Fire seen in Orkney." Journal of the Franklin Institute, s. 2 v. 20 (1837): 362.]


1837 Feb. 25 / q. / Belg. / Ciel et T 8/38. [I; 2180. Lancaster, Albert Benoît Marie. "Les Tremblements de terre en Belgique." Ciel et Terre, 8 (March 16, 1887): 25-43, at 38.]


1837 Feb 25 / Doncaster / 10 p.m. / Aurora in east / 10:30, another, opposite column in west, on Orion / L.T., March 1-2-e. [I; 2181. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, March 1, 1837, p. 2 c. 5.]


1837 March / at Cape of Good hopeby Sir John Herschel / Sunspots, "extraordinary both in point of number and magnitude, and in every point of view extremely remarkable." / Arcana of Science 1838-279. [I; 2182. "Remarkable Spots on the Sun in March, 1837." Arcana of Science and Art, 11 (1838): 279. "Remarkable Spots on the Sun in March, 1837." Magazine of Popular Science, 4 (1837): 155.]


1837 March 3 / At Zara, Dalmatia, q. preceded by a dull noise. [I; 2183. Mallet, 266.]


1837 March 14 / Austria / I. [I; 2184. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1837 March 18 / Greece / II. [I; 2185. A class II earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1837 March 28 / island of Curzola, Dalmatia / At 6:15 p.m., a luminous meteor and train of fireat 8:30 a.m., a (q). / B Assoc '54/267 / (See March 3.) [I; 2186. Mallet, 267. See: 1837 March 3, (I; 2183).]


1837 March 31 / Ap. 1 / See Ap. 12 / Meteors / New Haven / A. J. Sci 11/184 / Wrong date / See 1826. [I; 2187. Twining, Alexander C. "Observations on two late Meteors seen at New-Haven." American Journal of Science, 11 (1826) 184-189. See: 1826 March 31, (I; 1243), and, 1837 Ap. 12, (I; 2194).]


1837 April / Unknown worms of Devonshire. [A; 123. See: 1837 April 10, (I; 2196).]


1837 April / A / France / Am. J. Sci. 34/285. [I; 2188. Barnard, Frederick Augustus Porter. "On the Aurora Borealis of November 14, 1837." American Journal of Science, 34 (1838): 267-290, at 285. See: 1837 April 6, (I; 2191).]


1837 April-May / Caserta, Italy / I. [I; 2189. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1837 April 6 / Angers / Aurora / C.R. 4/589. [I; 2191. "Aurore boréale." Comptes Rendus, 4 (1837): 589.]


[1837 April 10 /] 1837 Ap. 24 / Times of / "Altogether unknown to agriculturalists of the neighborhood." / worms / Devonshire / D-92. [I; 2196. The note copies information from page 92 of The Book of the Damned. "An extraordinary  phenomenon...." London Times, April 24, 1837, p. 6 c. 3. "An extraordinary phenomenon occurred last week in the parish of Bram[p]ford Speke, Devonshire. During a snowstorm a large number of black worms, each about three-quarters of an inch long, fell in the village and the neighbouring fields. They are different from the turnip worm, and altogether unknown to the agriculturalists of the neighbourhood.Plymouth Journal." "Brampford Speke." London Morning Post, April 20, 1837, p. 8 c. 3. The Morning Post cites the Exeter Western Luminary as its source and helps to indicate the phenomenon occurred, Monday morning, on April 10.]


1837 Ap 11 / Tuscany, Italy / II. [I; 2192. A class II earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1837 Ap. 11 / Tuscany, etc., Italy / q. / II / BA '11. [I; 2193. A class II earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1837 Ap. 12 / q. / Hartford / Am J. Sci 32/399 / See Ap. 1. / See Aug, 1840. [I; 2194. "Earthquake." American Journal of Science, 32 (1837) 399. See: 1840 Aug 9, (II; 204).]


1837 Ap. 15 / Austria / Stonefall reported. Greg thinks maybe confounded with Jan 15. / BA 60. [I; 2190. Greg, 76-77. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 327.  "On the 15th April 1837, one which weighed above 6 ounces, was found in Austria." Thomson does not indicate the source of his information. See: 1837 Jan 5, (I; 2165).]


1837 Ap 20 / (F) / Setting sun above the horizonmoon rose in total eclipse (refraction). / Thomson, Intro to Meteorology, p. 82. [I; 2195. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 82.]


[1837 Ap. 24. Wrong date. See: 1837 April 10, (I; 2196).]


1837 Ap. 24 / Wrms / nothing in Plymouth papers. [I; 2197.]


1837 Ap. 28 / 10 p.m. / Shores of the Baltic, in the province of Koeslin, Prussia. A hill 100 feet high sank, leaving a chasm, with a sound like thunder. / LT, May 17-7-e. [I; 2198. "On the 28th...." London Times, May 17, 1837, p. 7 c. 5. "On the 28th ult., at 10 o'clock in the evening, an extraordinary phenomenon took place on the shores of the Baltic, in the province of Koeslin, in Prussia. A hill of more than 100 feet in height, and covered with furze, suddenly sank with a noise resembling thunder. The abyss which had been thus opened must be at least 200 paces in length. The circumstance produced a movement of the ground in the neighbourhood, by which the adjoining hills were raised from 20 to 30 feet. The cause of this phenomenon has not yet been discovered." Koszalin is now in Poland.]


1837 spring / Haunted house 3 miles west of Lafayette, Indiana / Rel-Ph. J, May 4, 1872, p. 15. [A; 124. Stackhouse, I.M. "Story of a Haunted House." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 12 (no. 7; May 4, 1872): 5, (c. 1-3).]


1837 May 5 / (Slag) / Am. J. Sci., 32/395 / Ac to Boston Daily Advertiser. slag, or stones that looked like scoria from a furnace, fell at Bridgewater, Mass / B Assoc, '60 / Said been warm when found. / Am J. Sci., 50/322 / Prof. Shepard says nothing but slag and had been on the ground in the first place. [I; 2199.1, 2199.2. Greg, 76-77. "Meteorite." American Journal of Science, 32 (1837): 395. Shepard, Charles Upham. "Corrigenda to Vol. XXXII." American Journal of Science, 50 (1846): 322.]


1837 May 5 / bet 3 and 4 p.m. / East Bridgewater, Mass / ac to A. J. Sci. 32/395. quoting the Boston Daily Advertiser, June 10. / A metite. / resembled lava, or the scoria of a furnace. [I; 2200. "Meteorite." American Journal of Science, 32 (1837): 395. (Boston Daily Advertiser, June 10, 1837).]


1837 May 16 / [London Times], 7-c / Another wonder. [I; 2201. "Another Wonder." London Times, May 16, 1837, p. 7 c. 3.  In Airdrie, Scotland, a female dog found over 60 deserted lambs, adopted and suckled them, over a period of 14 months after she had her own litter of pups.]


1837 May 17 / [London Times], 7-e / Ext. phe. [I; 2202. "On the 28th...." London Times, May 17, 1837, p. 7 c. 5. This is the publication date of the phenomenon. See: "1837 Ap. 28," (I; 2198).]


1837 May 17 / Algeria / Mirage of troops? / La Sci Pour Tous 2-206, col 2-+. [I; 2203. "Cas de mirage observé en 1837 sur le lac salé de Dréhan dans la province d'Oran." La Science Pour Tous, 2 (no. 26; June 4, 1857): 206-207. Bonnafont. "Cas de mirage observés en 1837 sur le lac salé de Dréhan, dans la province d'Oran." Comptes Rendus, 44 (1857): 915-917.]


1837 June 21 / ab. 11 a.m. / Bleibourg,etc. / Illyria / q preceded by a sound like thunder / BA 54. [I; 2205. Mallet, 268.]


[1837 June 27 /] 1837 July 4 / Canterbury / From ruins of a fortress a stream of red light was seen. Residents were alarmed, but it was found light came from swarms of small insects. Said that at same place been a similar phe. ab 30 years before. / L.T.. July 7-7-d / See Sept 6-4-d. [A; 125.1, 125.2. "A singular phenomenon...." London Times, July 7, 1837, p. 7 c. 4. "A singular phenomenon...." Kentish Gazette, July 4, 1837, p. 3 c. 3. "A singular phenomenon was witnessed on Tuesday evening in this city. The residents within and near the precincts of the Old Castle, at the southern entrance of the city, were alarmed in the night time by a stream of red light, apparently issuing from the old ruins, as if a fire was raging below. As little of this fortress now remains but the outer walls, which inclose a coal-yard and a part of the gas works, it was at first feared that by some means the inflammable material had become ignited. On repairing to the spot it was discovered that the light emanated from an innumerable swarm of small insects, which had collected on the walls and about the old ruins. The moon was not visible; and with the exception of the spot in which they had located, all was darkness. With the morning sun the little creatures disappeared. About thirty years ago a similar phenomenon was witnessed on these walls." (London Times,  September 6, 1837, p. 4 c. 4; not found here.)]


[1837 June 27 /] 1837 July 4 / Insects may have been attracted by the light. [I; 2206.]


1837 July 7 / At Colchester a countryman supposed to have come from the neighborhood of Thorpe engaged a room at the Mitre public house. Morning of the 8th he did not appear. Landlord found the door locked and key gone. Forced the door open. Floor, bed curtains covered with bloodlodger gone. Because a penknife covered with blood thought he had committed suicide. Police inquirynothing heard of him. / (L.T. 12-5-b). [A; 126.1, 126.2. "Mysterious Case." London Times, July 12, 1837, p. 5 c. 2.]


1837 July 12 / De Vico saw a very small and perfectly round spot, without a trace of penumbra, traverse a good part of the sun's disk in 6 hours. / Observatory 2/424. [I; 2207. "Search for Vulcan." Observatory, 2 (1878): 424. "Decuppis, a friend of De Vico's supplies the date of this observation in the 'Album' for 1838, July 7, where he states that on July 12, 1837, De Vico saw a very small and perfectly round spot, without trace of penumbra, traverse a good part of the Sun's dusk in the short space of 6 hours."]


1837 July 14 / Yonozu, Japan / Metite / (F). [I; 2208. Fletcher, 100. This is the Yonozu meteorite.]


1837 July 21 / Unknown ? Fishes / Niles Register, Aug 5, 1837, that ac to the naturalist Dr. Wood, fishes had fallen in th. storm into the streets of Louisville. He considered them doubtfully a species of Exocetus, but was doubtful because the pectoral fins were peculiar. Holding one up to a light, he found it devoid of veins or arteries. / (Beware "Exocetus"). [I; 2009.1, 2009.2. "A Fish Storm." Niles' Weekly Register, 52 (August 5, 1837): 356. "Dr. Wood, a naturalist, relates the astonishing fact, that after a thunderstorm at Louisville, on the 21st ultimo, he saw the puddles of water collected in the streets and the commons, swarming with a species of psicatory tribe, varying in weight from 10 to 3 dwts. which not without doubt he ranks with the genus Exocetus, although the pectoral fins are not united with the sides quite near enough to the spinal membrane to be the true Elvolans. He further observes that by placing them in a glass jar of water between himself and the light of a taper, he found the body to be transparent and void of veins or arteries. Only two parts of the body contained blood vessels visible to the naked eye. The air vessels covered the whole interior of the sides and back. Whether they ascended in the clouds as spawn and there attained their present size, or whether they were drawn up in that perfection, he does not decide." The "Exocetus" is the genus of  flying fishes, and "Piscis Volans," which translates as flying fish, is a constellation in the southern sky; thus, (whether or not these flying fish were hatched in the clouds or came from the stars), their tale is written in the vein of a newspaper hoax. A pennyweight, (dwt.), is about 1.55 grams. The Caledonian, (St. Johnsbury, Vermont), August 8, 1837, (p. 4 c. 5), includes the remainder of this yarn: "...he does not decide; but reasoning from the fact that young frogs have been known to cover the ground after a heavy rain, he thinks it not improbable that the ethereal world might have rained these fishes. Let the philosophers of nature determine."]


1837 July 21 / Fishes / streets of Louisville. [A; 127.]


1837 July 24 / Redruth / Shower in one street onlysmall yellow fliesfell thickbit or stung severely. / L.T., July 31, 1837, 7/d / See Cardiff, May, 1907, or 1905. [I; 2210. "A Shower of Flies." London Times, July 31, 1837, p. 7 c. 4. "On Monday evening a singular circumstance took place at Redruth. About 7 o'clock the main street of that town was visited by a shower of small yellow flies, which fell so thick as to cause great annoyance to persons walking there at the time; they bit or stung severely the faces and hands of those on whom they alighted. It is rather singular that the flies confined their movements to the High-street alone.Plymouth Journal."]


1837 July 24 / (F) / (F.O.) / Gross-Divina. Hungary / Metite / BA '60. Nagy-Divina, ac to F. [I; 2211. Fletcher, 100. Greg, 76. This is the Nagy-Diwina meteorite.]


1837 Aug/ (Fr.) / Esnaude, Charente / Metite / BA '60 / (F). [I; 2212. Fletcher, 100. Greg, 76. This is the Esnandes meteorite.]


1837 Aug 2 / St. Thomas, W Indies / I. [I; 2213. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1837 Aug. 2 / St. Thomas, W. Indies / Destructive q. / BA 1911-55. [I; 2214. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 55.]


1837 Aug 2 / q and hurricane / island of St Thomas / BA 54 says account seems very doubtful. [I; 2215. Mallet, 268.]


[1837 Aug. 2 /] 1837 Dec 2 / Hurricane at Tortola, B.W.I. / 36 ships wrecked in the harbor / L.T., 1867, Dec 3-10-f / Houses carried away. [I; 2272. Symons, George James. "The Tortola Hurricane." London Times, December 3, 1867, p. 10 c. 6. "In the midst of the hurricane shocks of earthquake were felt, and to complete this awful visitation a fire broke out in the back stores of Messrs. Stubbs and Co." Reid, William. An Attempt to Develop the Law of Storms.... 1st ed. London: John Weale, 1838, 55. 3rd edition. London: John Weale, 1850, 59.]


1837 Aug 2 / night / q / Sydney, N.S.W. / BA 54. [I; 2216. Mallet, 268.]


1837 Aug 3 / morning / Severe shocks / Zante / BA 54. [I; 2217. Mallet, 268.]


1837 Aug 5 / New Haven, Conn. / Met / BA 60-76. [I; 2218. Greg, 76.]


1837 Aug 9 / Geneva / At 9 p.m.clouds on horizonnone zenithwater felllarge drops "tiède" to such a degree as to drive people to shelter. Fell for several minutes and stoppedbut fell again several times during an hour. / C.R. 5/549 ac to Wartmann. [I; 2219.1, 2219.2. "Extrait d'une lettre de M. Wartmann...." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837) 549. Wartmann reports that the rain first fell about one or two minutes. "Rain from a clear sky." American Journal of Science, 36 (1839): 178.]


1837 Aug 9 / The q's here at Acapulco were from W. to E. till 12th of Novemberafter that, stronger from E. to W. In Dec., again, W. to E. [I; 2220 (Ref.???).]


1837 Aug 9 / See Sept. 4. / Shocks here (Mexico) went on. / BA 54 / Sept 18, violent / severe, 21st, 22nd. [I; 2221. Mallet, 268-272. The following Mexican earthquakes were on October 18, 19, 21, and 22, 1837, (not "Sept 18"). See: 1837 Sept 4, (I; 2232).]


1837 Aug 9 / q-phe / Morelia (Michoacan), Mexico4:15 p.m., shocks15 minutes later, great tempest and electric discharges so great that the air seemed on fire, and falling stars in the evening. / Refearly Nov, 1839. [I; 2222.1, 2222.2. Mallet, 268-269. Galeotti, H. "Sur les tremblements de terre et les étoiles filantes." Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, 8 pt. 2 (1841): 437-441, at 438.]


1837 Aug 9-10 / The Perseids noted in Switzerland and by Wartmann; noted as coming from Ceph., Cass, and Pers. / C.R., 5-552 / p. 183, M. Arago announced extraord no. of meteorsas directed toward Taurus. / p. 347 / See that some noticed them in U.S., too. / See A. J. Sci. [I; 2223.1, 2223.2.  "Étoiles filantes du mois d'août." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 347-348. "Extrait d'une lettre de M. Wartmann...." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 552-553. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Additional Observations on the Shooting Stars of August 9th and 10th, 1837." American Journal of Science, 34 (1838): 180-182.]


1837 Aug / Mets / A. J. Sci 33-index / 34-180. [I; 2224. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Further proof of an annual Meteoric Shower in August, with remarks on Shooting Stars in general." American Journal of Science, 33 (1837-1838): 354-364. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Additional Observations on the Shooting Stars of August 9th and 10th, 1837." American Journal of Science, 34 (1838): 180-182.]


1837 Aug 9, 10 / Perseids / A. J. Sci 34-180. [I; 2225. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Additional Observations on the Shooting Stars of August 9th and 10th, 1837." American Journal of Science, 34 (1838): 180-182.]


[1837 Aug 10. Wrong date. See: 1838 Aug 10, (I; 2226).]


[1838 Aug 10 /] 1837 Aug 10 / 60 mets an hour counted at Vienna. / Athenaeum 1838-900. [I; 2226. Littrow, Joseph Johann von. "Falling Stars in August and November." Athenæum, 1838 (no. 581; December 15): 900. "Chronique" L'Institut, 6 (no. 261; December 27, 1838): 432.]


1837 Aug 10 / Volc / Merapi, Java / N.M./ C.R. 70-878. [I; 2227. Backer, 881. The Merapi volcano.]


1837 Aug 10-11 / between 1:15 and 12:15 / M. Arago and 2 other observers counted 107 meteors. / L.T., Nov. 2-1-d. [I; 2228. "Shooting Stars." London Times, November 2, 1837, p. 1 c. 4. "In the night of the 10th to the 11th of August last, M. Arago's eldest son and a friend counted, in the garden of the observatory, 107 of these bodies between 11¼ and 12¼ hours. Also from 12 hours 37 minutes to 3 hours 26 minutes the beginning of twilight of the same night MM. Bouvard and Laugur observed 184. The motions of the greatest number were directed towards Taurus, as they ought from the motion of the earth.Railway Magazine."]


1837 Aug. 26 / [L.T.], 3-d / Astro. rarity / 25-3-d / 23-6-a / other notes. [I; 2229. "Astronomical Rarity." London Times, August 26, 1837, p. 4 c. 4. The peculiar rising and setting times of the Harvest Moon. "A curious phenomenon...." London Times, August 25, 1837, p. 3 c. 4. A fireball at Hornsey, on August 3rd. "A singular appearance was observed in the heavens...." London Times, February 25, 1837, p. 6 c. 1. Fort copied citations for article in Palmer's Index to the Times Newspaper, which appeared under the headings for “Astronomical” and “Phenomenon.” See: 1837 Feb 18, (I; 2178).]


1837 Aug 29 / Upper Silesia / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 2230. Greg, 76.]


1837 Aug 30 / Cork, Ireland / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 2231. Greg, 76.]


1837 Sept 4 / See Aug. 9. / Mexicoafter a stormclouds around volc Jorullo, and at night many meteors. / BA 54. [I; 2232. Mallet, 269. Galeotti, H. "Sur les tremblements de terre et les étoiles filantes." Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, 8 pt. 2 (1841): 437-441, at 438. The Jorullo volcano has not erupted between 1774 and 1943. See: 1837 Aug 9, (I; 2222).]


1837 Sept 6 / Barbadoes / I. [I; 2233. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1837 Sept 21 / 7:48 p.m. / at Paris / great met from near the Eagle / C.R., 5-555. [I; 2234. Mauvais. "Grand météore observé à Paris le 21 septembre 1837." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 555. "...un bolide éblouissant, qui produisait une lumière telle, que les corps projetaient une ombre distincte." Greg, 76. Lowe, 136. Cast a shadow. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 305. "Meteor." Athenæum, 1837 (no. 528; December 9): 900.]


1837 Sept 22 / (+) / Big q and phe in air / Van Dieman's Land / B Assoc 54/269. [I; 2235. Mallet, 269-270. Mallet's source of information was Alexis Perrey, who obtained his information from Antonio Colla; but, Colla's identification of "Maya" and "Lasaya" were not known locations in Van Dieman's Land, (Tasmania), nor in New Holland, (Australia). Perrey, Alexis. "Memoire sur les Tremblements de Terre dans le Bassin du Rhin." Mémoires couronnés et mémoires des savants étrangers, 19 (1845-1846): 1-113, at 94. Colla, Antonio. "Terremoti sentiti in diversi punti del globo nell'anno 1837" Biblioteca Italiana, o sia Giornale di Letteratura, Scienze ed Arti, 92 (1838): 264-270, at 267-270. "Earthquakes in New South Wales." Sydney Magazine of Science and Art, 2 (1859): 93-94. "Where are these places situated?" A "truthful account" was suggested, wherein a "slight shock" was felt in Sydney, and a "considerable earthquake" struck Adelaide, (both on August 2, 1837). "An extraordinary redness in the sky" was noticed the preceding day. See: 1837 Aug 2, (I; 2216). "On Wednesday night...." Sydney Herald, August 7, 1837, p. 9 c. 2. "Earthquake." South Australian Gazette and Colonial Register, July 29, 1837, p. 3 c. 3. Also, on July 23, Adelaide was struck by an earthquake. An earthquake for September 21 or 22 was not found in the Tasmanian and Australian newspapers, in 1837.]


1837 Sept, end of / Volc eruption near Acheen, East Indies / BA 54. [I; 2236. Mallet, 270. The Bur ni Telong volcano.]


1837 Oct 1 / loud rumblings at Agram / Oct 6, detonation like discharge of artillery and earth trembled / Oct 7, 2 reports on 6th / at intervals day and night. / great damage reported / Athenaeum 1837-852. [I; 2237. "Earthquake in Croatia." Athenæum, 1837 (no. 525; November 18): 852. Agram is the German name for Zagreb, Croatia.]


1837 Oct. 6 / Devastating gale / New Orleans / L.T., Nov. 21-6-b. [I; 2238. "Destructive Hurricane at New Orleans." London Times, November 21, 1837, p. 6 c. 2.]


1837 Oct 11 / (sky fire) / 8 p.m. / 18 7 p.m. / Nov. 511:30 / Nov 125 to 10 p.m. / Nov 1410 p.m. / red light in sky / no arch as observed at Cambridge / LT, Nov 22-6-b. [I; 2239. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, November 22, 1837, p. 6 c. 2.]


1837 Oct 11 / 7:30 p.m. / Dept of Calvados, France / violent shock and loud explosions heard / BA '54. [I; 2240. Mallet, 270.]


1837 Oct 12 / [LT], 5-c / Wild man / Indiana. [A; 128. "A regular 'Caspar Hauser'...." London Times, October 12, 1837, p. 5 c. 3. "A regular 'Caspar Hauser' has been found in the back woods of Indiana. He is about 15 years of age, is quite wild, knows no human language, and although domiciliated in the family of a Mr. Clarke, with every comfort around hm, he daily endeavours to escape to the forest. He devours small birds, nuts, and raw deer's flesh; and the only indication of humanity he has yet given besides wearing the form of man, and developing a savage kind of reason, is the falling violently in love with a servant girl in the family. A more perfect Orson, or wild man of the woods, has never been seen either in this or any other country."]


1837 Oct 18 / See '36. / Aurora / Paris / C.R. 5-639. [I; 2241. "Aurore boréale le 18 octobre 1837." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 639.]


1837 Oct. 20 / Stowe, Ohio, 3 a.m. / Tornado / [V]ery few tornadoes [e]arly mornings. / Finley's Rept. [I; 2242. Fort observed that Finley's tornadoes seldom occurred in the early mornings; only twelve of these six hundred occurred between midnight and seven o'clock. Finley, 3, 13-14.]


1837 Oct. 20 / q and sound / Devon / See May 3, '09. [I; 2243. Parfitt, Edward. "On Earthquakes in Devonshire." Report and Transactions of the Devonshire Association, 16 (1884): 641-661, at 651. See: 1809 May 3, (I; 265).]


1837 Oct. 20 / At Camelford, rumbling sound and vibrations. Thought was thunder, but the atmosphere was too serene. / L.T. 30-6-c. [I; 2244. "Earthquake." London Times, October 30, 1837, p. 6 c. 3.]


1837 Oct 31 / 12:58 a.m. / Murcia, Spain / q / atmosphere suffocatingly hot / BA 54. [I; 2245. Mallet, 272.]


1837 Nov 1 / Milan / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 2246. Greg, 76.]


1837 Nov 7 / Chile / III / [Severe quake / BA 1911]. [I; 2247. Milne, 705.]


1837 Nov. 7 / evening and night / A. J. Sci. 37-358 / high waves / Sandwich Isles / 20 feet high one place / 6:30 p.m. / q, Chile, I think. [I; 2248. Rooke, Thomas Charles Byde. "Notice of remarkable Agitations of the Sea at the Sandwich Islands, on the 7th November, 1837." American Journal of Science, 37 (1839): 358-361. The tsunami at Hilo Bay rose twenty feet above the high water mark. Fort suggests that the tsunami originated with the earthquake in Chile, on the same date. Milne, 705. "Sandwich Islands." Literary Gazette, (January 26, 1839): 59-60. "Singular Tidal Phenomenon." The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, 32 (November, 1837): 221-222. This last article mentions some of the tsunami's effects at Honolulu, but nothing regarding the destruction at Hilo Bay and elsewhere.]


1837 Nov 7 and 8 / Samoa / shocks / C.R. 10-836. [I; 2249. Dumoulin. "Coincidence de date de quelques mouvemens extraordinaires de la mer...." Comptes Rendus, 10 (1840): 835-837.]


1837 Nov 10 / Met moved like [illustration]. / L.T., Nov 18/7/a. [I; 2250. "Meteors." London Times, November 18, 1837, p. 7 c. 1. It exhibited a remarkable feature when near the star Vega. Its path had previously been almost rectilinear, or very slightly curved; but, at the moment referred to, it bent into an undulating figure, not dissimilar to the letter S placed on its side, and afterwards continued as nearly as the eye could judge, the line of its former course. Similar phenomena having been once or twice remarked, we are disposed to think them not uncommon; and the question arises. what is the cause? Variation of external resistance, owing to very partial inequalities in the density of the atmosphere, might explain them, but it is it not known how inequalities of adequate significance could arise. May not the zig-zag-ath be due to the development of irregular force within the meteor itself, ie some such action as determines the course of a squib, for instance? We throw out the hint, without venturing to theorize upon it."]


1837 Nov 12 / Time of great aurora, severe shock, Lucerne / BA 54. [I; 2251. Mallet, 272.]


1837 Nov 12 / Sky fireEngland / supposed conflagration somewhere / L.T., Nov 18, etc. [I; 2252. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, November 18, 1837, p. 7 c. 1. "The firemen of the various stations on the London Fire Establishment have, during the last four nights, been repeatedly called up by alarms of fires, which, on inquiry, were found to be caused by occasional corruscations of deep red light, which arising at the northern or north-eastern parts of the horizon, flashed up to the zenith, and after a brief continuance suddenly disappeared."]


1837 Nov 12-13 / Paris, etc. / Aurora / C.R. 5/726, 704, 761. [I; 2253. "Aurore boréale." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 704. "Aurore boréales du 12 novembre dernier." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 726. "Aurore boréale." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 761.]


1837 Nov. 12 / (aurora and q) / (Cut) / Severe shock at Lucerne"during the night of the 12th and 13th a beautifu[l] Aurora borealis was observed at different places in Europe." / B Assoc 1854-272. [I; 2254. Mallet, 272.]


1837 Nov. 13 / The Leonids in N.Y. / L.T., Dec 9-6-e / On morning ofnone until 1:05 a.m. / 226 counted. [I; 2255. "Meteoric Shower of November, 1837." London Times, December 9, 1837, p. 6 c. 5.]


1837 Nov 12-13 / Aurora / C.R. 5/704, 726, 761. [I; 2256. "Aurore boréale." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 704. "Aurore boréales du 12 novembre dernier." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 726. "Aurore boréale." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 761.]


1837 Nov. 13 / 8 groups of sunspots visible to smallest of telescopes / N.Y. / LT, Dec 9-6-e. [I; 2257. "Meteoric Shower of November, 1837." London Times, December 9, 1837 p. 6 c. 5. "The spots on the sun (which some have supposed to have a connexion with the zodiacal light) are very remarkable at present and peculiarly deserving the attention of astronomers. Yesterday (the 13th) eight distinct groups were visible on the sun's disk, even to the smallest telescopes. These, with larger powers, could be resolved into more than 60 distinct spots."]


[1837 Nov 13-14. Wrong date. See: 1838 Nov 13-14, (I; 2258).]


1837 Nov / Leonids active. / See Perseids. [I; 2259. See: (Perseids).]


1837 Nov. 12 / ab. 6 p.m. / Luminous red arch / sky cloudless / About 8 p.m., a great meteor appeared, succeeded by others, up to 10 p.m., when clouds covered sky. / L.T. 14-7-d. [I; 2260. "Singular Celestial Phenomena." London Times, November 14, 1837, p. 7 c. 4. Robert, L. "Etoile filantes de la nuit du 12 au 13 novembre." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 121-122. The brief reference in the London Times to the French Academy of Science concerns observations made in 1832 at Mauritius. See: 1832 Nov. 12, (I; 1728).]


1837 Nov. 12 / 5:30 p.m. / 2 belts crimson light / Manchester / L.T. 17-3-c. [I; 2261. "There was a very splendid appearance...." London Times, November 17, 1837, p. 3. c. 3.]


1837 Nov. 12-13 / night / Great auroral glare in sky at Paris, but only one meteor seen / L.T. 17-3-c. [I; 2262. "The Aurora Borealis on Sunday night...." London Times, November 17, 1837, p. 3. c. 3. "The Aurora Borealis on Sunday night, which was so very splendid, was carefully observed at the Paris Observatory; the same night was devoted to the observation of falling stars, and by a singular chance only one was seen."]


1837 Nov. 12-13 / In issue of 18th and beforeother accounts of this aurora and no mention of meteors. [I; 2263. "Atmospherical Phenomenon," and, "Aurora Borealis." London Times, November 18, 1837, p. 7 c. 1. "There was a very splendid appearance of the Aurora Borealis...," "The Aurora Borealis was most distinctly visible...," and, "Northern Lights." London Times, November 17, 1837, p. 3 c. 3.  (1837 Nov. 12 - 13 / In issue of 18th and before).]


1837 Nov. 14 / Aurora / A.J. Sci 34-267. [I; 2264. Barnard, Frederick Augustus Porter. "On the Aurora Borealis of November 14, 1837." American Journal of Science, 34 (1838): 267-290.]


1837 Nov 16 / [London Times], 2-e / Dec 9-6-f / Rara Avis. [I; 2265. "Rara Avis." London Times, November 16, 1837, p. 2 c. 5. A rooster, near Langholm, Scotland, had changed its plumage from red feathers, in 1835, to snow white feathers, in 1836, and, adding black feathers, in 1837, when it was killed by a weasel. "Rara Avis." London Times, December 9, 1837, p. 6 c. 6. "Rara Avis." Caledonian Mercury, December 4, 1837, p. 3 c. 6. "A few years ago a northern diver, or ember goose, having been shot on Talkin Tarn, in Cumberland, the circumstance was noticed as an extraordinary occurrence, that bird being rarely seen so far south. A fine specimen of the same bird, measuring from the tip of the beak to the end of the tail, two feet ten and a half inches, and from the tip to tip of the wings four feet four inches, was taken alive by a boy, on the 16th ult., in the public street of Penrith. The cause of its not taking flight from its pursuer cannot be accounted for, as its wings, on being examined, were found to be perfectly sound."]


1837 Nov 18 to 23 / qs in Mexico / every time first at 10 p.m. and again at midnight / Ref early Nov, 1839. [I; 2266. Galeotti, H. "Sur les tremblements de terre et les étoiles filantes." Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, 8 pt. 2 (1841): 437-441, at 439. See: 1839 / early in Nov, (II; 128).]


1837 Nov. / Aurora / London / Am J. Sci 34/283. [I; 2267. Barnard, Frederick Augustus Porter. "On the Auroraa Borealis of November 14, 1837." American Journal of Science, 34 (1838): 267-290, at 283.]


1837 Nov 22 / Mexico / great q / [BA] '11. [I; 2268. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1837 Nov. 25 / Near bank of Bahama, Capt of vessel saw an enormous fire on horizon for 4 hours. Thought been a submarine volc. On Jan 3, another Captain there found the sea disturbed and milky. / Nov. 30, q, Martinique / Athenaeum 1838/349. [I; 2269. "Submarine Volcano." Athenæum, 1838 (no. 550; May 12): 349.]


1837 Nov. 25 / Banks of Bahamas, for 4 hours, great fire, as reported by Capt. of a ship, on the horizon, as if from submarine volc. Later, water here seen discolored. / C.R. 6-302. [I; 2270. "Documents relatifs à une éruption sous-marine qui paraît avoir eu lieu sur le banc de Bahama." Comptes Rendus, 6 (1838): 302.]


1837 about Nov 24 / about 11 p.m. / Rutland / q / See Dec 15. [I; 2271. See: 1837 Dec 8, (I; 2275).]


[1837 Dec 2. Wrong date. See: 1837 Aug. 2, (I; 2272).]


[1837 Dec 8 /] 1837 Dec 15 / LT, Dec 18-3-f / ab 11 p.m. / Rutland / 3 violent shocks. People supposed been an explosion of gunpowder. Had been on[e] 3 weeks before. [I; 2274. "An Earthquake in Rutland." London Times, December 18, 1837, p. 3 c. 6.]


[1837 Dec 8 /] 1837 Dec 15 / 11 p.m. / 3 shocks in Rutland. Violent enough to shake houses. Had been one there 3 weeks before. / L.T., Dec. 18-3-f. [I; 2275. "An Earthquake in Rutland." London Times, December 18, 1837, p. 3 c. 6. "An Earthquake in Rutland." Lincolnshire Chronicle, December 15, 1837, p. 3 c. 3.]


1837 Dec. 14 / 7:40 p.m. / great met / Conn. / A. J. Sci 37-130 or 27-130(?). [I; 2273. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Account of a Meteor seen in Connecticut, December 14, 1837; with some considerations on the Meteorite which exploded near Weston, Dec. 14, 1807." American Journal of Science, 37 (1839): 130-135. Greg, 76.]


[1837 Dec 15. Wrong date. See: 1837 Dec 8, (I; 2274).]


[1837 Dec 15. Wrong date. See: 1837 Dec 8, (I; 2275).]


1837 Dec 16 / (See Nov 11, 1836.) / Atheaeum of / some time before / many stones / Macao, Brazil. [I; 2276. "Falling Stones." Athenæum, 1837 (no. 529; December 16): 915. See: 1836 Nov. 11, (I; 2143), and, 1836 Dec. 11, (I; 2155). This is the Macao meteorite.]


1837 Dec 16 / Outburst of Carinae / Sir J. Herschel / Clerke, Hist Astro, appendix. [I; 2277. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 4th ed., (1902), 48-49, 447. Eta Carinae, (previously known as Eta Argus), includes two massive stars, which, originally recorded as a 4th magnitude star, began its 18-year-long "Great Eruption" and became brighter than Rigel, with an apparent magnitude of -1.0 in 1845. The Homunculus Nebula was produced by this Great Eruption. Smith, Nathan, and, Frew, David J. "A revised historical light curve of Eta Carinae and the timing of close periastron encounters." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 415 (2011): 2009-2019.]


[1837 Dec 16 /] 1838 Nov 16 / 7 p.m. / at Condé-sur-Noireau, France / Met train seen, not met. / C.R. 7-979. [I; 2356. "Meteore lumineux, le 16 novembre 1838." Comptes Rendus, 7 (1838): 979. "...le 16 décembre dernier, à 7 heures du soir..." Greg, 76.]


[1837 Dec 26. Wrong date. See: 1737 Dec 26, (I; 2278).]


[1837 Dec 26. Wrong date. See: 1737 Dec 26, (I; 2279), and, 1892 Aug. 13, (I; 2279).]


1837 Dec. 30 / Trebnitz / N to S / daylight / fireball / BA 60. [I; 2280. Greg, 76.]


1838:


1838 about / India / [illustration] / D-274 / See '39. [I; 2281. The note copies information from page 274 of The Book of the Damned. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 44. In a letter by G. Pettitt, a meteoric object was observed by two young men, who drew his attention to it, about 7:30 P.M., at Palamcottah, (now, Palayamkottai), India, "in the year 1838." "They beheld on looking up a brilliant object in the heavens, shining more brightly than the moon, and instantly came and called me to see it. By the time I had reached the outside of my house, its brilliance had considerably faded, but even then it was a glorious object. Its position was directly north, its elevation about forty-five degrees, perhaps a little higher; its form I well remember, because of its resemblance to a letter in the Tamul alphabet, and its whole surface, though different in shape, little less than that of the moon. Its shape and relative size to the moon may be represented thus. What appear to me to be its great peculiarities were these; it was perfectly stationary, never moving for a moment from the place where it was first seen; and it remained visible twnety minutes from the time I first saw it, becoming more and more dull and indistinct, till it melted away and was seen no more. I should add that it was a starlight night, without a single cloud," (and no moon). The illustration resembles the vowel "e" in the Tamil syllabic script.]


1838 Jan. 2 / Breslau / N.E. to S.W. / fireball / BA 60. [I; 2282. Greg, 76.]


1838 Jan. 2 / morning / Extraordinary display of mets at Mornez, near Geneva / Proc. Amer. Phil Soc 13-501. [I; 2283. Kirkwood, Daniel. "On the Meteors of January 2nd." Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 13 (1873): 501-502.]


1838 Jan 5 / 7:15 and 7:30 a.m. / Belley (Ain) / shocks and loud sounds / BA 54. [I; 2284. Mallet, 273.]


1838 Jan 7 / Kaee, Oude, Hindoostan / Oldham's date / Fletcher's = Jan 29. [I; 2285. Fletcher, 100. Fletcher gives the date of the fall as January 29, 1838. (Oldham's date???) This is the Kaee meteorite.]


1838 Jan 8-14 / (It) / Umbria / flames from the earth and q / See 1805. [I; 2286. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 356. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1838 Jan 8 / Spoleto / q / said that flames seen issuing from earth / BA '54. [I; 2287. Mallet, 273.]


1838 Jan 21 / Tynehead / q / rent in earth extending 1/2 mile / L.T., 1838, Jan 24-7-f. [I; 2288. "Sunday morning a shock of an earthquake...." London Times, January 24, 1838, p. 7 c. 6. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 121.]


1838 Jan 23 / Great q, Transylvania, Turkey, Russia. Said that at Orsova, Hungary, flames were seen issuing from earth. / BA 54. [I; 2289. Mallet, 274-275.]


1838 Jan 23 / incip. volc. / Transylvania / q and flames from earth. / C.R. 6/244 / BA '11 / Russia / BA 54/274 / J. des Deb / Feb 13, 16, 26, 27. [I; 2290. "M. l'amiral Roussin, dans une lettre écrite...." Comptes Rendus, 6 (1838): 244. "On écrit d'Odessa, le 26 janvier." Journal des Debats, February 13, 1838, p. 2 c. 4. "L'Observateur authrichien publie une lettre de Cronstadt...." Journal des Debats, February 16, 1838, p. 2 c. 1-2. "On écrit de Pétersbourg, le 10 février." Journal des Debats, February 26, 1838, p. 2 c. 4. "On écrit d'Odessa, le 9 février." Journal des Debats, February 27, 1838, p. 2 c. 1. Mallet, 274-275. Milne, 705.]


1838 Jan 23 / S.W. Russia / III / Hungary, Balkans. [I; 2291. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1838 Jan 28 / Venus greatest brilliancy / Al. [I; 2292. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1838, 72.]


1838 Jan 29 / See Jan. 7. / Kaee, Oude, India / Metite / (F). [I; 2293. Fletcher, 100. Fletcher gives the date of the fall as January 29, 1838. See: 1838 Jan 7, (I; 2285). This is the Kaee meteorite.]


1838 Feb. 2 / near Sassarie / Land violently lifted and torn / Athenaeum 1838-396. [I; 2294. "Disturbance of the Soil." Athenæum, 1838 (no. 553; June 2): 396.]


1838 Feb 14 / Dijon, France / 4:30 and 6:30 p.m. / slight shocks but violent explosions / BA 54. [I; 2295. Mallet, 276.]


1838 Feb 14 / Umbria, Italy / I. [I; 2296. A class I earthquake. Milne, 706.]


1838 Feb. 26 / Volc / Ternate / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [I; 2297. Backer, 881. The Gamalama volcano.]


1838 Feb 28-March 1 / night / Lisbon / shocksthunder and lightning, rain, hail, wind / C.R. 17-619. [I; 2298. Perrey, Alexis. "Nouvelles recherches sur les tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, de 1801 à juin 1843." Comptes Rendus, 17 (September 25, 1843): 608-625, at 619).]


1838 March 4 / 19 h / Venus Inf. conjunction Sun / (Al). [I; 2299. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1838, 472.]


1838 March 17 / London / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 2300. Greg, 76-77.]


1838 March 17 / Rumbling sound / 1 p.m. / Shrewsbury / q / LT, 19-4-f / 21-7-f. [I; 2301. "The shock of an earthquake...." London Times, March 19, 1838, p. 4 c. 6. "The shock of an earthquake was distinctly felt at Shrewsbury and in its immediate neighbourhood at 1 o'clock on Saturday night.Salopian Journal." "Earthquake at Shrewsbury." London Times, March 21, 1838, p. 7 c. 6. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 121. A class I earthquake. Milne, 706.]


1838 March 17 / 4 p.m. / Barton and Grimsby [and] other places on coast / sudden intense darkness and electric flashes and then suddenly light again / L.T. 26-3-d. [I; 2302. "On Saturday, the 17th inst...." London Times, March 26, 1838, p. 3. c. 4.]


1838 March 17 / 4 p.m. / near Barton (South Killingholme), Grimsby / heavy cloudsdarkness / thunder and lightning and soon passed away / L.T., March 26-3-d. [I; 2303. "On Saturday, the 17th inst...." London Times, March 26, 1838, p. 3. c. 4.]


[1838 March 30. Wrong date. See: 1828 March 30, (I; 2304).]


1838 Ap. 8 / Whirlwind near Calcutta / A. J. Sci 36-71. [I; 2305. Floyd, J. "Account of the Hurricane or Whirlwind of the 8th of April, 1838." American Journal of Science, 36 (1839): 71-75. "...at Dum Dum the hailstones were uncommonly large, one weighing, (as is said,) three and a half pounds."]


1838 Ap. 18 / Metite / (Ref) / Akbarpur (Saharanpur), India / Mems Geolog. Survey of India/43/part 2 / (F) / N.W. Provs. [I; 2306. Brown, John Coggin. "A Descriptive Catalogue of the Meteorites Comprised in the Collection of the Geological Survey of India, Calcutta (On August 1st, 1914)." Memoirs of the Geological Survey of India, 43 (1916): part 2, 149-287, at 161. Fletcher, 100. Greg, 76. This is the Akbarpur meteorite.]


1838 Ap. 20 to 4 a.m., 21st / Knoxville, Tenn. / 154 meteors seen / few in other places / A. J. Sci. 34/398. [I; 2307. "Meteor Shower in April." American Journal of Science, 34 (1838): 398.]


1838 Maggio [May] 12-13 / Substance / Fassig 2/375. [I; 2308. Fassig, Oliver Lanard, ed. Bibliography of Meteorology. Part II: Moisture. Washington: Signal Office, 1889, 375. Costa, Oronzio Gabriele. "Straordinaria copia dell' Oribates alatus caduta colle piogge de' 12 e 13 Maggio del 1838."  Corrispondenza Zoologica, 1 (1839): 19-23. Costa identifies the Oribatida mites that fell with this rain.]


1838 May 18 / Michigan / NY / Canada / met / BA 60-76. [I; 2309. Greg, 76.]


1838 May 22 / Isère, France / I. [I; 2310. A class I earthquake. Milne, 706.]


1838 May 26 / near Halle, Prussia / Severe shocks / "A dull sound was heard, which, according to some persons, was subterranean." / BA 54. [I; 2311. Mallet, 277. Not "severe shocks"; Mallet writes: "Some subterranean commotions supposed to have been felt," (Mallet's emphasis).]


1838 May 31 / by Prof. Wartmann / At 7 p.m.sky cloudless in zenith and none near. Rain, lukewarm and in large drops, fell. / Timbs', 1839-262. [I; 2312. "Rain Without Clouds." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1839, 262. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. "Sur quelques phénomènes météorologiques observés sur le littoral de la Flandre occidentale." Comptes Rendus, 44 (1857): 784-787, at 786.]


1838 June 6 / Chandakapur, Berar, India / Metite / (F). [I; 2313. Fletcher, 100. Greg, 76. This is the Chandakapur meteorite.]


1838 June 7 / 11 p.m. / Sound / Meleda / BA 54 / But see June 7, 1839. [I; 2314. Mallet, 277. See: 1839 June 7, (II; 50).]


1838 June 11 and 12 / Iceland / III. [I; 2315. A class III earthquake. Milne, 706.]


1838 June 18 / at Arras / Great number of little frogs / L'Institut 6-212. [I; 2316. "Aux faits nombreux de pluies de Batraciens...." L'Institut, 6 (June 28, 1838): 212.]


1838 June 23 / Pessaro9:45 p.m. / Venice10:18 p.m. / qs / At Pesaro, many large meteors seen first. / At Venice, torrents of hail and rain. / BA 54. [I; 2317. Mallet, 277.]


1838 June 23 / (It) / Pesaro / "Many shooting [or falling] stars," rather brilliant and of large size, and q. / BA '54/277 / C.R. 7/89 / 8/344. [I; 2318. Mallet, 277. "Tremblements de terre." Comptes Rendus, 7 (1838): 89. "Effet d'un tremblement de terre sur le niveau de l'eau dans les puits." Comptes Rendus, 8 (1839): 344.]


1838 June 23 / Pessaro (Marches), Italy / I. [I; 2319. A class I earthquake. Milne, 706.]


1838 June 23 / qmets / Rept B.A., '73-385 / at Pesaro, Italy / 9 p.m. / Many meteors coming from the east. They were bright and large and in such great numbers that they looked like fireworks. A few minutes later a violent q. [I; 2320. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1872-73." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1873, 349-403, at 385.]


1838 June 23 / A few minutes before violent q at Pesaro, Italy, at 9 p.m., as recorded in the works of Count Joseph Mamiani, many large meteors from the east toward south. The numbers attracted attention of the people of Pesaro. / BA 73-385. [I; 2321. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1872-73." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1873, 349-403, at 385.]


1838 June 23 / Qmets / Pesaro, Italy / 9 p.m. / A few minutes after the [mets] a "very violent" q. Many meteors were seenfrom east to south. / BA 73-385. [I; 2322. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1872-73." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1873, 349-403, at 385.]


1838 June 23 and into 1839 / qs of St Jean de Maurienne, Savoy, Italy / BA 1911. [I; 2323. A class I earthquake. Milne, 706.]


1838 June 25 / at Toulouse / "The atmosphere had become opaque but without any appearance of a storm." Then streaks of fire from horizon toward zenith at regular intervals for ab minute and a half. /

[LT], July 3-6-e. [I; 2324.1, 2324.2. "A remarkable celestial phenomenon...." London Times, July 3, 1838, p. 6 c. 5.]


1838 June 26 / Aurora / Macao, Brazil / C.R. 7-87. [I; 2325. Callery. "Aurore Boréale observée à Macao." Comptes Rendus, 7 (1838): 87-88. This location was Macau, in China, (not in Brazil). As the phenomenon was reported at the Séance of July 9, 1838, the date of "June 26," (reported in the index, but not in the article, "Hier du soir"), is doubtful; as, communications between China and France were not very rapid in 1838.]


1838 June 28 / Whirl near Elgin / L.T., July 19-7-d. [I; 2326. "Extraordinary Whirlwind." London Times, July 19, 1838, p. 7 c. 4.]


[1838 July 4. Wrong date. See: 1838 August 8, (I; 2328).]


[1838 July 4 /] 1838 July 11 / at noon / A whirl near Middleton / At 2:45 near Lincoln / L.T. 14-6-f. [I; 2329. "Effects of a Whirlwind," and, "Extraordinary Whirlwind." London Times, July 14, 1838 p. 6 c. 6. "Extraordinary Whirlwind." Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, July 7, 1838, p. 3 c. 5. "Great Storm and Flood." Manchester Guardian, July 7, 1838, p. 3 c. 6-7. These latter accounts of the whirlwind at Middleton indicate its date as July 4, (not July 11).]


1838 July 6 / Liverpool / 11:30 p.m. / a flash of lightningthen a ball of fire, stationary 2 minutes, emitting sparks, then falling / LT 13-6-d. [I; 2327. "We are informed by Inspector Hemer...." London Times, July 13, 1838, p. 6 c. 4.]


[1838 July 11. Wrong date. See: 1838 July 4, (I; 2329).]


1838 July 22 / Montlivault, Loir-et-Cher, France / Metite / (F) / C.R. 76-314. [I; 2330. Fletcher, 100. This is the Montlivault meteorite. Daubrée, Gabriel-Auguste. "Note sur des météorites représentant deux chutes inédites qui ont eu lieu en France, l'une à Montlivault (Loir-et-Cher), le 22 juillet 1838, l'autre a Beuste (Basses-Pyrénées) en mai 1859." Comptes Rendus, 76 (1873): 314-316.]


1838 July 25 / afternoon / Rushford, N.Y. / Tornado / also Belfast, N.Y. / Finley's Rept. [I; 2331. Finley, 3.]


1838 July 30 / Frgs / Cor to the Sun saw in Gower St., London, after th. storm, dozens of young frogs, largest not exceeding 1/2 inch, hopping on the pavements. / Mirror 32/112 / D-80. [I; 2332. The note copies information from page 80 of The Book of the Damned. Hale, C.P. "A Shower of Frogs." Notes and Queries, s. 8 v. 7 (June 1, 1895): 437. "Shower of Frogs." The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, 32 (August 11, 1838): 112. "A correspondent of the Sun, who dates from 7 Sackville-street, states, that as he was walking up Tower-street on Monday afternoon, July 30, 1838, he saw some dozens of young frogs hopping on the foot and carriage pavements; which he conjectures had been precipitated to the earth in a heavy shower that had fallen about an hour before, as they were scattered to a considerable distance. He describes the largest of the frogs as not exceeding half an inch in length, while some were extremely minute, but all exceedingly lively." "Shower of Frogs." Lincolnshire Chronicle, August 1, 1838, p. 4 c. 3. "Shower of Frogs in Gower-Street." London Globe, August 1, 1838, p. 3 c. 2-3. "A correspondent of an evening paper says, 'I hasten to communicate a remarkable phenomenon:—As I was walking up Gower-street, about two o'clock this day (Monday), my attention was attracted to some persons on the opposite side of the street engaged in examining some object on the ground. I instantly perceived that it was a small frog, and, on looking about, observed some dozens of these reptiles hopping about on the pavement, while others were skipping from pool to pool (remaining after the rain) in the centre of the road. I inquired of the persons who had first observed the fact if they knew how they came there, and their answer was, that they were at a loss to account for it. By my desire the manservant of No. 11, collected about a dozen of these little animals, for the purpose of submitting them to the inspection of naturalists. On inquiring of him if he had ever before remarked a similar occurrence, his answer was in the negative. It then occurred to me that such a large quantity (found, on further search, to be scattered, not only in the centre and on the flagging of the street, but down the areas of the houses 10, 11, and 12) may have been precipitated to the earth in the heavy shower that had fallen but an hour before. The matter deserves investigation. The fry of fish have been observed, I believe not unfrequently, to have fallen in thunder storms; but I am not aware that the young of frogs have been before noticed. The largest of these little creatures did not exceed half an inch, and some were extremely minute, all quite lively."]


1838 July 30 / Frgs / London. [A; 129.]


1838 Aug 1, etc. / Vesuvius / An Reg '38-121 / at least to 11th, with day or so off. [I; 2333. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 80 (1838): pt. 2, 1-171, at 121-122, cv. "Naples." The Vesuvius volcano.]


1838 August / whole month / Etna in eruption / [LT], Oct 3-5-c. [I; 2334. "Mount Etna...." London Times, October 3, 1838, p. 5 c. 3. The Etna volcano.]


1838 Aug 2 / near Neufchatel, Switzerland / Flight of birds size of pigeons, ac to someor smoke, ac to others. Said been gnats. / LT 18-6-b. [I; 2335. "A remarkable phenomenon was of the evening of the 2d inst. at Boudry...." London Times, August 18, 1838, p. 6 c. 2.]


1838 Aug 2-3 / night / Etna and Vesuvius in eruption / not say when start / BA 54. [I; 2336. Mallet, 278. The Etna and Vesuvius volcanoes.]


[1838 August 4 /] 1838 July 4 / Dec 15 / 1839June 16 / July 13 / Mexican qs. and meteors / BA '54 / (noted). [I; 2328. Mallet, 278, 280, 285-286.]


1838 Aug 9, 10 / Obs many places in U.S. upon or looking for Perseids / A. J. Sci 35/167. [I; 2337. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Report on the Shooting Stars of the 9th and 10th of August, 1838." American Journal of Science, 35 (1838-1839): 167-174.]


[1838 Aug 10 /] 1837 Aug 10 / 60 mets an hour counted at Vienna. / Athenaeum 1838-900. [I; 2226. Littrow, Joseph Johann von. "Falling Stars in August and November." Athenæum, 1838 (no. 581; December 15): 900. "Chronique" L'Institut, 6 (no. 261; December 27, 1838): 432.]


1838 Aug. 10 / Flash in the sky so brilliant that the eye could not bear it, Aug 10, 1838. Left a train like that of a meteornot. / Prof. Wartmann / B.A. 1846/11. [I; 2338. Wartmann, Louis François. "On some Meteorological Phenomena." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1846, Notices and Abstracts, 11-12.]


1838 Aug 30 / 4 p.m. / Providence, R.I. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [I; 2339. Finley, 3.]


1838 Sept 7 / Oxford / 8:40 a.m. / q and rumbling sound / "At the time the atmosphere was much disturbed, indicating storms and thunder, though none were heard in the neighborhood." / L.T., Sept 19-3-c / at Adderbury, ac to Index. [I; 2340. "Shock of an Earthquake." London Times, September 19, 1838, p. 3. c. 3.]


1838 Sept 16 / 10 p.m. / waves of light from a dark belt of clouds / Lincoln / LT 22-7-e. [I; 2341. "Celestial Phenomena." London Times, September 22, 1838, p. 7 c. 5.]


1838 Sept 16 / (aug) / 7:30 p.m. / St. Alban's / band of light that moved slowly / LT, Sept 17-7-d. [I; 2342. "Extraordinary Phenomenon." London Times, September 19, 1838, p. 3 c. 3. "Extraordinary Phenomenon." The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, 32 (September 29, 1838): 221.]


1838 Sept 16 / Arcturus beam / 7 p.m. / Auroral arch and especial ray from Arcturus to Lyra / L.T., Sept 22-7-e. [I; 2343. "Celestial Phenomena." London Times, September 22, 1838, p. 7 c. 5.]


1838 Sept 18 / Ec. Sun / New Haven / A. J. Sci 35-403. [I; 2344. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations made at Yale College on the Eclipse of the Sun of September 18, 1838." American Journal of Science, 35 (1838-1839): 174-178.]


1838 Sept 24 / (Fr) / 1:45 a.m. / Cauterets / near Bagneres? / slight q and rumbling sound / LT, Oct 9-5-b. [I; 2345. "A letter from Bagneres...." London Times, October 9, 1838, p. 5 c. 2.]


1838 Sept 27 / 31:41 N / 44:30 W / Sound like thunder, and a ship violently quakedon Oct 9, 27:37 N, 31:7 W., 2 p.m., 3 small shocks, same vessel. / Athenaeum 1839-141. [I; 2346. "Submarine Volcano." Athenæum, 1839 (no. 590; February 16): 141.]


1838 Sept 27 / 31° 40' N. Lat., and 44° 30' W. Long / 3 strong shocks to a ship, and sound like thunder / on Oct 9, but clear weather / But no disturbance of the sea. 27° 37' N, and 31° 7' W Long / again 3 concussions / small ones / C.R. 8-32. [I; 2347. Blouet. "Note sur des secousses en pleine mer." Comptes Rendus, 8 (1839): 32.]


1838 Sept 29-30 / night / Etna increased violence. / BA 54. [I; 2348. Mallet, 279. The Etna volcano.]


1838 Oct 13 / Metite hot and smoking / yet was of combustible material / A. J. Sci 40-199 / Oct 12 is the date here. [I; 2349. "African Meteorite of Cold Bokkeveld." American Journal of Science, 40 (1840-1841): 199-201. "In the paper of Dec. 11th, is a detailed statement signed Thos. Maclear, at the Royal Observatory, Dec. 7, 1839, a principal object of which is to correct the date of the fall of the stones, making it the 13th instead of the 12th of October, 1838." "My master sent me to look what it was that had fallen; when I found a stone quite warm, so much so that I could not hold it in my hands." This is the Cold Bokkeveld meteorite.]


1838 Oct. 13 / Cold Bokkeveld, Cape Colony. / Metite / (F). [I; 2350. Fletcher, 100. Greg, 76. This is the Cold Bokkeveld meteorite.]


1838 Oct 18 / morning / Fr / Berias (Ardèche) / met after met from point in Hercules / C.R. 8-344. [I; 2351. "Extrait d'une lettre de M. Jule de Malbos...." Comptes Rendus, 8 (1839): 344.]


1838 Oct 22 / "Singular and mysterious fire" in a huge hollow tree / Sheffield / [LT]. Nov. 5-3-f. [A; 130. "On the morning of the 22d of October...." London Times, November 5, 1838, p. 3 c. 6.]


1838 Nov 12 / Ac to cor in Timesnothing could have exceeded the grandeur of the heavens in this display at London. Too rapid to count. / Nature 71-93. [I; 2352. Denning, William Frederick. "The November Meteors of 1904." Nature, 71 (November 24, 1904): 93. Woods, Robert Carr. "The Meteoric Shower." London Times, November 20, 1838, p. 6 c. 2.]


1838 Nov. 12-13 / Philadelphia (?) / Night clear bet 1:45 and 2 a.m. and one meteor seen. / 14 - 15. clear until 2:30 a.m., but not even an ordinary average number of meteors seen. / Proc Amer Phil Soc. 1-60 / Also few seen at Princeton, Univ. of Virginia, and Kenyon College, Ohio. / p. 69. [I; 2353.1, 2353.2. "Stated Meeting, November 16." Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 1 (1838-1840): 56-60, at 60. "Stated Meeting, January 4." Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, 1 (1838-1840): 67-69, at 69.]


[1838 Nov 13-14 /] 1837 Nov. 13-14 / from 11:30 p.m. of 13th, till daybreak 14th / at Vienna / 1002 meteors counted / Athenaeum 1838-900. [I; 2258. Littrow, Joseph Johann von. "Falling Stars in August and November." Athenæum, 1838 (no. 581; December 15): 900. "Chronique" L'Institut, 6 (no. 261; December 27, 1838): 432.]


1838 Nov / Mets  / A. J. Sci 35/Index / 36-355. [I; 2354. Lovering, J. "Meteoric Observations made at Cambridge, Mass." American Journal of Science, 35 (1838-1839): 323-328. Olmsted, Denison. "On the Meteoric Shower of November, 1838." American Journal of Science, 35 (1838-1839): 368-370. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Additional Account of the Shooting Stars of December 6 and 7, 1838." American Journal of Science, 36 (1839): 355-358, at 355.]


1838 Nov. 13 / 7 p.m. / Meteor size of moon at Cherbourg / C.R., 7-902. [I; 2355. "Grand météore lumineux dans la nuit du 13 novembre 1838." Comptes Rendus, 7 (1838): 902-903. Greg, 76.]


[1838 Nov 16. Wrong date. See: 1837 Dec 16, (I; 2356).]


[1838 Nov. 24. Wrong date. See: 1833 Nov 24, (I; 2357).]


1838 Dec 5-10 / Banchory / Aberdeenshire / Polt stones / Jour Soc 9-27. [A; 131. “Correspondence.” Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 9 (February 1899): 22-32, at 27-28. Owen, Robert Dale. Footfalls on the Boundary of Another World. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1860, 255-259. Mackay, Charles. Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions. London: R. Bentley, 1841, v. 2, 400-405.]


1838 Dec. 6 / 8:55 to 9:15 p.m. / from zenith / 42 mets at Toulon / C.R. 8-255. [I; 2358. Flaugergues, Paul. "Note relative à une observation d'étoiles filantes, faite à Toulon, le 6 décembre 1838." Comptes Rendus, 8 (1830): 255.]


1838 Dec. 7 / U.S. / various places / meteors, ab. 150 a, hour / A. J. Sci 35-365. [I; 2359. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Report on the Shooting Stars of December 7, 1838, with remarks on Shooting Stars in general." American Journal of Science, 35 (1838-1839): 361-370, at 365.]


[1838 Dec 7 /] 1838 Dec 15 / Mexico / qmets / BA 54. [I; 2365. Mallet, 280.]


1838 Dec 7 / bet 6 and 7 p.m. / by T. W. Webb, in Herefordshire / Great number of meteors. In half an hour, 40 were counted. / Nature 7-203 / See Proc Met Soc 1838-39, p. 9. [I; 2360. Webb, Thomas William. "Star Shower in 1838." Nature, 7 (January 16, 1873): 203. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 185. (Proceedings of the Meteorological Society, during the session 1838-1839 [and 1839-40], p. 9. Possibly only copies @ Oxford & Glasgow.)]


1838 Dec. 7 / bet 6 and 7 p.m. / by T. W. Webb / Great number of mets. An auroral light at the time. / Nature, Jan 16, 1873. [I; 2361. Webb, Thomas William. "Star Shower in 1838." Nature, 7 (January 16, 1873): 203.]


1838 Dec. 7 / South Herefordshire / A great number of mets. 40 counted in ab 1/2 hour. / BA '52-185. [I; 2362. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 185.]


1838 Dec. 10 / 2 mets in France / C.R. 7-1081. [I; 2363. "M. Vincent écrit relativement à deux étoiles filantes qu'il observées le 10 de ce mois...." Comptes Rendus, 7 (1838): 1081.]


1838 Dec 12 / Mets / A. J. Sci 35-361 / 36-355 / 43-398 / 36-355 / 42-398 / 41-403. [I; 2364. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Report on the Shooting Stars of December 7, 1838, with remarks on Shooting Stars in general." American Journal of Science, 35 (1838-1839): 361-370. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Additional Account of the Shooting Stars of December 6 and 7, 1838." American Journal of Science, 36 (1839): 355-358. "Shooting Stars of December 7, 1838." American Journal of Science, 41 (1841): 403. "Shooting Stars of Dec. 7, 1838." American Journal of Science, 42 (1841-1842): 398-399.]


[1838 Dec 15. Wrong date. See: 1838 Dec 7, (I; 2365).]


1838 Dec 16 / Dunsink Observatory, Ireland / Last 4 hours of daylight, clouds arranged in arches converging to the N.E. and S.E. points of horizon. / Athenaeum, 1839-141. [I; 2366. "Meteorological Phenomena." Athenæum, 1839 (no. 590; February 16): 141.]


1838 Dec 16 / Singular ap. of clouds / Proc Irish Acad 1-249. [I; 2367. Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, 1 (1836-39): 249. "The President gave an account of a singular appearance of the clouds, observed on the 16th December, 1838, at the Observatory of Trinity College, Dunsink. They appeared, for at least the last four hours of day light, to be arranged in arches which converged very exactly to the N.E. and S.W. points of the horizon; while the breaks or joints in these arches were directed, though with less exactness, to two other horizontal points, which seemed to be always opposite to each other, but ranged from N.W. and S.E. to N. and S. Conjectures were offered with respect to the cause of this appearance."]


1838 Dec 23 / night / La Rochelle / shock and sound like cannon fire / BA 54. [I; 2368. Mallet, 281.]


1838 Dec 23 / 4 p.m. / Shock at Woodhouse Eaves ab time of q in Naples / Gents Mag, Feb, 1839, p. 198. [I; 2365. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, n.s., 11 (February 1839): 198-200, at 198. "It is remarkable that an earthquake was felt at Naples about the same time. It is well known to geologists that an anticlinal line of strata is in the Charnwood Forest."]


[End of Series I. Beginning of Series II.]

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