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Last updated: July 15, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1894


1894:


1894 / Mack family of Bellport, L.I., persecuted / See Feb 10, 1896. [C; 152. See: 1896 Feb 17, (C; 293).]


1894 / Pic have for year. [C; 153. New Orleans Picayune.]


1894 / ab. Jan 1 / (N) / Columbus, Ohio, after shower, earthworms found in street paved with asphalt. / Science 23/11. [VII; 932. Palmer, Charles B. "Do Earth Worms Rain Down?" Science, s. 1 v. 23 (January 5, 1894): 11.]


1894 Jan 9 / K-bug / D. Pic. of / Miss Josie Reichling. In the night a small blister appeared on her cheek near her mouth. The next day her face swollen. Swelling extended to her body and she died. She had no remembrance of anything having bitten her but it was thought that while helping to decorate a church for Christmas she had been bitten by a spider or some small insect. [C; 154.1, 154.2. “A Fatal Insect Bite.” New Orleans Picayune, January 9, 1894, p. 4 c. 5.]


1894 Jan. 11 / D. Pic. / Dover, N.J., wrought up by a wild man, Had been seen going around naked. [C; 155. “Another Wild Man.” New Orleans Picayune, January 11, 1894, p. 4 c. 4.]


1894 Jan 11 / P.L. / Wild man terrorizing people in vicinity of Dover, N.J. [C; 156. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 11, 1894.) “A Wild Man in Jersey.” New York Sun, January 5, 1893, p. 1 c. 6.]


1894 Jan 12 / ab 11:55 p.m. / Fort William / Glencoe, etc. / q. / like distant thunder / Geol Mag 1900-107. [VII; 933. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, n.s., decade 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107 & 112-114.]


1894 Jan 17 / Trib, 4-1 / Meteor at sea. [VII; 934. "A Big Meteor Seen At Sea." New York Tribune, January 17, 1894, p. 4 c. 1.]


1894 Jan 19 / 6:12 pm. / Newtonville, Mass. / meteor / Science 23-52. [VII; 935. Ames, C.H. "A Brilliant Meteor." Science, s. 1 v. 23 (January 26, 1894): 52.]


1894 Jan 20 / (Living) / Storm / Salamander 10 inches long from sky? / Science 23-66. [VII; 936. Osborn, William. “Do Earth Worms Rain Down?” Science, s. 1 v. 23 (February 2, 1894): 66. “On Jan.20 a wind unusually heavy for this section prevailed in Nashville. Rain fell abundantly in the latter part of the day. In the evening seven young men were standing under the awning of a certain store when they heard a sudden splashi, mud and water being thrown on one of the boys and upon the corner post of the awning. Their attention was directed to a living creature about five feet from the pavement, which they succeeded in capturing. The specimen was brought to me for identification and proved to be a full grown sword-shaped salamander (Amblsioma xiphias), measuring ten and three-fourths inches in length. Upon questioning the young men I obtained the following testimony: They did not see it falling; they did not see it in the air; they heard the splash; in falling it buried itself in the mud and water; they were fully persuaded that it had rained down.”]


1894 Jan 20 / night / Brilliant meteor / Mass and Conn. / P.L., 27th / NY Times, Feb 25-17-7. [VII; 937. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 27, 1894.) “A Brilliant Winter Meteor.” New York Times, February 25, 1894, p. 17 c. 7.]


1894 Jan 20 / night / Brilliant meteor from Vt to Pa / D. Pic, March 3. [VII; 938. “Personal and General Notes.” New Orleans Picayune, March 3, 1894, p. 4 c. 5-6.]


1894 Jan 21 / Most favorable of Eros, ac to Crommelin, in Observatory 21/373 / Next, Jan. 25, 1924 / 22/102 / Chandler revised calculations. Made it Jan 23, 1894. [VII; 939. Crommelin, Andrew Claude de la Cherois. “The New Planet DQ.” Observatory, 21 (1898): 370-375. “Minor Planet Notes.” Observatory, 22 (1899): 102. The planet DQ is now identified as the asteroid 433 Eros.]


1894 (Jan) / Whether some mistake about this or not, Newcomb, “Astronomy for Everybody, p 199, places nearest approach in 1892. [VII; 940. Newcomb, Simon. Astronomy for Everybody. New York: McClure, Phillips, 1903, 199. Newcomb gives 1892 as a near approach of Eros 433, which was undoubtedly a mistake.]


1894 Jan 22 / ab 10 p.m. / Arlington, near Exmoor / slight shock and sound like “underground thunder” / Geol Mag 1896-554. [VII; 941. Davison, Charles. “On the Exmoor Earthquake of January 23,1894....” Geological Magazine, s, 4 v. 3 (1896): 553-556, at 554.]


1894 Jan 23 / sound / Exmoor / 9 a.m. / At Molland, 2 rumbles—like distant thunder or firing of artillery in the interval between them "the only perceptible movement” / Dr Davison / Geol Mag., 1896-555. [VII; 942. Davison, Charles. “On the Exmoor Earthquake of January 23,1894....” Geological Magazine, s, 4 v. 3 (1896): 553-556 at 555.]


1894 Jan 23 / ab. 8:40 a.m. / Berrynharbour / shock and rumbling sound / Geol Mag 1896-554. [VII; 943. Davison, Charles. “On the Exmoor Earthquake of January 23,1894....” Geological Magazine, s, 4 v. 3 (1896): 553-556, at 554.]


1894 Jan. 23 / ab 9 a.m. / Exmoor / q / Geol Mag 1900-107. [VII; 944. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107-108.]


1894 Jan 23 / 9 a.m. / Times—Jan 29—distinct sound and vibrations. Supposed q. at N. Devon and as far as S. Moulton. [VII; 947. “An Earthquake in North Devon.” London Times, January 29, 1894, p. 4 c. 5.]


1894 Jan 23 / D. Pic. of / Ghost in a barn 2 miles from Fort Recovery, Ohio. [C; 157. “An Indiana Ghost.” New Orleans Picayune, January 23, 1894,p. 4 c. 4.]


1894 Jan. 25 / At 10 p.m., 25th, great meteor from Cheltenham, Stroud, Gloucestershire, Brixworth, Northamptonshire, Ross, Hereford. Reported from Stokesay Vicarage, Shropshire. Met not seen but sky illuminated for half a minute so objects nearly as visible as by daylight. [VII; 945.1, 945.2. Wood, James G. “The Meteoric Phenomena of January 25th.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 29 (February 1894): 8-11. Durations of the meteor's passage varied: at Chester, “barely a minute”; at Stokesay Vicarage, “certainly more than half a minute”; and, at Sarsden, “we seemed to be in daylight for a space of what I should judge to be about two whole minutes.” (Refs.??? for Northamptonshire and Gloucestershire.)]


1894 Jan 25 / 10 p.m. / Eng / great met det / Observatory 17-77. [VII; 946. Denning, William Frederick. “Large Detonating Fireball.” Observatory, 17 (1894): 77-78.]


1894 (Jan 25.) / 10 p.m.—Ac to one witness—she and other persons out walking—for 2 “whole minutes” seemed to be in daylight. [VII; 948. Wood, James G. “The Meteoric Phenomena of January 25th.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 29 (February 1894): 8-11, at 10.]


1894 Jan 25 / Ac to 3 observers in Liverpool, Llanthomas and Clifford, at 9:30 brilliant light in dark sky, “The sky seemed to open” and a rumbling sound—at 10 came great meteors, reported from many places. / Symons Met 29/8. [VII; 949. Wood, James G. “The Meteoric Phenomena of January 25th.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 29 (February 1894): 8-11, at 8-9. The observation at Liverpool was at 8:30 p.m., (not 9:30 p.m.).]


1894 Jan 25 / 1:07 p.m. / Glen Garry / q / Geol Mag 1900-107. [VII; 951. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107 & 114.]


1894 Jan. 25 / Black aurora—spokes of a  black wheel / Croydon / Knowledge, NS, 17/86. [VII; 952. Munro, John. “A Black Aurora.” Knowledge, o.s., 17 (n.s., 9; April 2, 1894): 86.]


1894 Jan 26 / Eagle, 1-4 / q's / U.S. / May 24-1-6 / July 18-1-7, 1-2 / 19-5-3 / Aug 10-7-7 / Dec. 14-12-3. [VII; 950. “Annapolis Has an Earthquake.” Brooklyn Eagle, January 26, 1894, p. 1 c. 4. “Earthquake Shocks in Missouri.” Brooklyn Eagle, May 26, 1894, p. 1 c. 6. “St. Louis Has a Small Shake.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 18, 1894, p. 1 c. 2. “Earthquake Shocks in Memphis.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 18, 1894, p. 1 c. 7. “An Earthquake Shock in Utah.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 19, 1894, p. 5 c. 3. “Memphis Has an Earthquake.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 10, 1894, p. 7 c. 7.  “Earthquakes in Burmah.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 14, 1894, p. 12 c. 3.]


1894 Feb 1 / det met / ab 10 p.m. / Seen at Mt Hamilton as if coming from Leo / in Nevada. Burst with concussions underneath. / Pubs-Pacific, 6-117. [VII; 953. “The Fire-Ball of February 1, 1894.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 6 (no. 35; March 1894): 117-122.]


1894 Feb. 1 / Meteor / night / Cal and Nevada / Meteor—whole heavens illuminated and shock like earthquake. / D. Pic, Feb, 13 / Said that morning of 9th, near Candelaria, 140 miles from Carson, a hole in the earth 100 feet across was found, fragments of stone lying around and branches of trees broken off by them. Ground so hot that not possible to examine closely. [VII; 954.1, 954.2. (New Orleans Daily Picayune, February 13, 1894.) “A Celestrial Visitor.” Los Angeles Herald, February 5, 1894, p. 1 c. 4. “Candelaria, Feb. 4.—The reports telegraphed from Carson that the meteor which swept over California and Nevada last Thursday night, had been founded imbedded in a gravel knoll near here, is incorrect.”]


1894 Feb 1 / night / Northern Cal and Nevada / great met. / B Eagle 5-1-6. [VII; 955. “Saw an Enormous Meteor.” Brooklyn Eagle, February 5, 1894, p. 1 c. 6.]


1894 Feb 1 / B. Eagle, 4-6 / Several earthquake shocks at Annapolis, Md., within a few weeks. [VII; 956. “Recent Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, February 1, 1894, p. 4 c. 6. See: 1894 Jan 26, (VII; 950).]


1894 Feb 6 / wtch / Daily Pic of / (See) May 28, '93. / At Salem, Ohio, trial at the Methodist Church, resulting in the expulsion of several members who asserted that Wm. Culp was a wizard and had bewitched them. [C; 158. “A Witch at Salem.” New Orleans Picayune, February 6, 1894, p. 4 c. 5. See: 1893 May 28, (C; 125).]


1894 Feb 6 / Worcester / about noon / meteor of radiance = to the sun / Nature 49-368 / Feb 8? [VII; 957. “Notes.” Nature, 49 (February 15, 1894): 367-372, at 368.]


1894 Feb. 7 / B. Eagle, 4-6 / q. shocks / Keeler, Cal., and Hawthorne, Nevada. [VII; 958. “Recent Events.” Brooklyn Eagle, February 7, 1894, p. 4 c. 6.]


[The following three notes were clipped together by Fort. C: 159-161.]


1894 Feb. 8 / Disap / [LT], Feb 20-10-a / Disap of Rev. W. Pedr Williams, popular Nonconformist Minister of Lower Clapton. Was to have lectured at Hertford, on Feb 12—large audience—no appearance—no explanation. / 21-10-c—information given to Scotland Yard that he disappeared upon the 8th. Lived at 197 Amherst-road, Hackney—age 30. [C; 159.1, 159.2. “Strange Disappearance.” London Times, Febraury 20, 1894, p. 10 c. 1. “The Strange Disappearance.” London Times, February 21, 1894, p. 10 c. 3.]


1894 Feb. 8 / [LT], March 1-7-a / 8-6-e / 16-10-e / More notes on disap. [C; 160. “The Rev. Pedr Williams.” London Times, March 1, 1894, p. 7 c. 1. “The Missing Minister.” London Times, March 8, 1894, p. 6 c. 5. “The Rev. Pedr Williams.” London Times, March 16, 1894, p. 10 c. 5.]


1894 Feb 20 / [LT], 10-a / 21-10-c / 22-3-f / 23-7-f / 28-9-f / Strange Disap. [C; 161. “Strange Disappearance.” London Times, Febraury 20, 1894, p. 10 c. 1. “The Strange Disappearance.” London Times, February 21, 1894, p. 10 c. 3. “The Strange Disappearance.” London Times, February 22, 1894, p. 3 c. 6. “The Strange Disappearance.” London Times, February 23, 1894, p. 7 c. 6. “The Strange Disappearance.” London Times, February 28, 1894, p. 9 c. 6.]


1894 Feb. 8 / 12:30 [p.m.] / Great daylight met / Eng and Ireland / Observatory 17-112 / Feb 6? [VII; 959. “A Remarkable Meteor.” Observatory, 17 (1894): 112. Denning, William Frederick. Meteoric Phenomena, February 7-22." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 82 (March 10, 1922): 307-309, at 307.]


1894 Feb. 15 / Inf. conjunction Venus. [VII; 960. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1894, 470.]


1894 Feb 15 / 5 a.m. / Met, Brooklyn. Said that after it disappeared, long, irregular, flashes of lightning played around the clouds for nearly ½ hour. / Eagle 15-1-6. [VII; 966. “Many Saw the Meteor.” Brooklyn Eagle, February 15, 1894, p. 1 c. 6.]


1894 Feb 15 / Eagle 15-10-2 / 1 a.m. / Brooklyn sky overcast. No thunder. Brilliant elec. display. At 5 a.m. again and the flashes last ½ hour. [VII; 967. “A Brilliant Electric Display.” Brooklyn Eagle, February 15, 1894, p. 10 c. 2.]


1894 Feb 17-March 1 / appeared 16th / Spot and clouds / Spot appeared. / At Barcelona. The sky which had been cloudless became cloudy. / Meridian on 22nd. / Had moved like a cloud on the sun as soon as spot appeared and was chiefly obscured 18th and 19th. On 20th could be observed. / (L Astro 13-133) / Paris—observed 22, 23, 25, 27th. Disap March 1. So great visible instantly to n.e. [VII; 961.1, 961.2. “La Grande Tache Solaire de Février 1894.” Astronomie, 13 (1894): 133-141.]


1894 Feb 19 / Great sunspot first seen. Maximum 20th. / Nature 49-419. [VII; 962. “Our Astronomical Column.” Nature, 49 (March 1, 1894): 419.]


1894 Feb 19 / Great spot appeared first, ac to Cosmos, N.S., 27-447. [VII; 963. “La grand tache du soleil.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 27 (March 10, 1894): 447.]


1894 Feb 19 / Shiff—living figures in moon. / Observatory 24/72. [VII; 964. “Notes.” Observatory, 24 (1901): 63-72, at 71-72.]


1894 Feb 19 / (R) / Sunspot in foggy atmosphere plainly seen with n.e. in England first on the 19th. / (Nature 49-419) / Nothing in Sci Amer except item on 24th. [VII; 968. “Our Astronomical Column.” Nature, 49 (March 1, 1894): 419. "Large Recent Sun Spots." Scientific American, n.s., 70 (March 31, 1894): 198.]


1894 Feb 19 / Large sunspot appear. / Nature 49-419. [VII; 969. “Our Astronomical Column.” Nature, 49 (March 1, 1894): 419.]


1894 Feb. 19 / night / Far Rockaway / That a met had ploughed the ground several feet. Not found. / Eagle 21-12-5. [VII; 970. “Far Rockaway's Meteor.” Brooklyn Eagle, February 21, 1894, p. 12 c. 5.]


1894 Feb 20, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26 / Mag. disturbance / big sunspot / Observatory 17/123 / (Cut) / Repeats phe of '92. [VII; 971. “Large Sun-Spot.” Observatory, 17 (1894): 123. See: (1892).]


1894 Feb 21 / early in evening / Great meteor / over Bolton, Lancashire / Nature 50-537 / (Cut). [VII; 965. Denning, William Frederick. “The Meteor and Meteor-Streak of August 26, 1894.” Nature, 50 (September 27, 1894): 537-538.]


1894 Feb. 21 / 7:18 p.m. / Det met / Colwyn Bay / Nature 49-419. [VII; 972. “Our Astronomical Column.” Nature, 49 (March 1, 1894): 419.]


1894 Feb 22, etc. / Great spot on sun / L'Astro 13-113. [VII; 973. “Nouvelle grande tache solaire visible à l'œil nu.” Astronomie, 13 (1894): 113-114.]


1894 / last of Feb / Sunspots / Sc Am 70/198. [VII; 974. "Large Recent Sun Spots." Scientific American, n.s., 70 (March 31, 1894): 198.]


1894 Feb 22 / Special aurora / North Amer / E Mec (Eng Soc) [note cut off] 9/290 / (Cut). [VII; 975. Veeder, Major Albert. "The Aurora of Feb. 22 in North America." English Mechanic, 59 (no. 1521; May 18, 1894): 290.]


1894 Feb. 27 / Night. A shaking at Benton Harbor, Mich. Supposed q, but, if so, was local. / D. Pic, March 3 / N.M. [VII; 976. “Personal and General Notes.” New Orleans Picayune, March 3, 1894, p. 4 c. 5-6.]


1894 Feb. 28 / Great Aurora / L'Astro 13-143. [VII; 977. “L'Aurore Boréale du 28 Février 1894.” Astronomie, 13 (1894): 142-145.]


1894 Feb 28 / 1:43 a.m. / near Singapore / Great bolide from Lynx / Les Sciences Populaires 9-266. [VII; 978. (Science Populaires, s. 2 v. 9 p. 266.)]


1894 March 8 / about noon / Annadale / q / Geol Mag 1900-107. [VII; 979. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107 & 114.]


1894 March 8 / evening / Great bolide / Paris / L'Astro 13-156. [VII; 980. Christophe, A. “Bolide remarquable.” Astronomie, 13 (1894): 156.]


1894 March 14 / 11 p.m. / Woodward, Iowa / a small earthquake “sounding like distant thunder” / Trib 16-1-2. [VII; 981. "Telegraphic Notes." New York Tribune, March 16, 1894, p. 1 c. 2.]


1894 March 16 / Santa Anna, Texas / Violent storm. “A funnel-shaped cloud and what resembled a ball of fire.” / MWR, March, p. 118. [VII; 982. “Wind.” Monthly Weather Review, 22 (no. 3; March 1894): 117-119, at 118.]


1894 March 17 / Funnel-shaped cloud in storm over Corsicana, Texas / M.W.R.—March. [VII; 983. “Wind.” Monthly Weather Review, 22 (no. 3; March 1894): 117-119, at 118-119.]


1894 March 18 / Funnel-shaped cloud and storm / Texas / M.W.R., March, p. 119. [VII; 984. “Wind.” Monthly Weather Review, 22 (no. 3; March 1894): 117-119. at 8.]


1894 March 18 / off Hatteras / reported, Trib-20-10-1, by officers of the steamer El Norte. Sea smooth and sun shining. On fog bank to west appearances of 28 schooners or parts of schooners. Not one primary of them was seen. / 6 to 8 a.m. [VII; 986. "A Story of Mirage At Sea." New York Tribune, March 20, 1894, p. 10 c. 1.]


1894 March 19 / Storm and funnel-shaped cloud over Leonard, Texas / same ref. [VII; 985. “Wind.” Monthly Weather Review, 22 (no. 3; March 1894): 117-118, at 119.]


1894 March 20 / Sunspots appear, east limb. / L'Astro 13-192. [VII; 987. “Les taches solaires.” Astronomie, 13 (1894): 191-192.]


1894 March 27 / (+) / met and b. snow / 8:15 p.m. / Iowa. Great met heard and seen. / Snow was falling, It was mixed with a black dust. Ed, MWR, March, 1894, says impossible to think dust fell in so many sq miles and that at that time a strong wind with clouds of dust in Ark, Okla,Missouri, Kansas, and parts of Iowa. / So coincidence. / B. [VII; 988.1, 988.2. “Notes by the Editor.” Monthly Weather Review, 22 (no. 3; March 1894): 126-128, at 128.]


1894 March 27 / met and dust / 8:15 p.m. / or 9:15  Eastern Time / Meteor of the largest size over eastern Iowa. At Iowa City dust fell. The meteor was heard to explode at Marengo. Here dust fell. Detonations heard several places. At a place 8 miles n.w. of Marengo “the ground was covered with a black dust [that was] mixed with the snow.” At Marengo the snow was melted and the sediment was a “fine sand of a brown ashy hue, apparently a mixture of silica and iron.” At Belle Plain the meteor was seen and the dust fell. But the writer in M.W.R., March, p. 128, argues that the dust had covered 25 sq miles. Could never come from any heard-of meteor. So he says that at the time clouds of dust prevailed over several neighboring states and parts of Iowa and the dust must have come so. [VII; 989.1, 989.2, 989.3. “Notes by the Editor.” Monthly Weather Review, 22 (no. 3; March 1894): 126-128, at 128.]


1894 March 27 / Hard to think could have come far together / diff velocities. [VII; 990.]


1894 March 27 / (2) / But he says that ac to the director of the Iowa State Weather Service, sediment of the snow was of fine sand of a brown ashy hue, apparently a mixture of silica and iron. / See April. [VII; 991. “Notes by the Editor.” Monthly Weather Review, 22 (no. 3; March 1894): 126-128, at 128. See: (April).]


1894 March 29 / Window-breaking / Daily Pic / In the home, at Lockport, N.Y., of Mrs Pattie Hall, a widow who was said to have power as a spiritualistic medium, every night for more than three weeks the windows had been breaking. “The police patrol the premises all night, but the breaking of the glass goes on regularly.” No missiles mentioned. [C: 162.1, 162.2. “They Break Her Windows.” New Orleans Picayune, March 29, 1894, p. 4 c. 5. “Window Panes Smashed.” Buffalo Evening News, March 10, 1894, p. 1 c. 4.]


1894 March 30 / Bayonne, N.J. / Aurora streamers moving from all directions toward a point on the meridian ab. 15 degs s of zenith. / Pop Astro 1-430. [VII; 992. Eadie, John H. “Aurora.” Popular Astronomy, 1 (no. 9; May 1894): 430.]


1894 March 30-31 / Aurora / Belgium / La Nat 1894/1/382 / Rays move slowly from east to west. [VII; 993. “Aurore Boréale.” La Nature, 1894 pt. 1 (no. 1093; May 12): 382.]


1894 March 31 / Anglesey / Aurora and peculiar noises on telephone. “Twangs” as if a stretched wire had been struck. / Nature 49-539. [VII; 994. "Notes." Nature, 49 (April 5, 1894): 538-542, at 539.]


1894 April 3 / [LT], 13-e / Aurora. [VII; 995. “Aurora Borealis at the Lakes.” London Times, April 3, 1894, p. 13 c. 5.]


1894 Ap. 7 and 11 / Clairvaux and Outre-Aube / Leaves / France / M / D-243. [VII; 996. The note copies information from page 243 of The Book of the Damned. "Pluie de feuilles mortes." Astronomie, 13 (1894): 194.]


1894 Ap. 9 / Something like a comet, by Edwin Holmes, in Draco / Pubs Astro Soc Pacific 9/33. [VII; 998. Monck, W.H.S. “Some Luminous Appearances i the Sky.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 9 (no. 54; February 1897): 33-36, at 34.]


1894 Ap. 10 / ab 12:30 a.m. / L Astro 13-194 / At Cleres (Seine-Inferieure), met from Serpent toward Antares. [VII; 999. Guilbert. “Bolide remarquable.” Astronomie, 13 (1894): 194.]


1894 Ap. 11 / B. Eagle, 1-3 / At Crasco, Iowa, 15-year-old daughter of Mr. J. Luckish seemingly died—buried. 2 or 3 days later grave opened. She had been buried alive. [C; 163. “A Young Girl Buried Alive.” Brooklyn Eagle, April 11, 1894, p. 1 c. 3.]


1894 Ap. 11 / Sound / 2:40 a.m. / q / See Oct 16, 1896. / 2 loud reports like those of cannon, in quick succession. [VII; 1001. See: 1896 Oct 16, (VII; 1603).]


1894 Ap 13 and 16 / in Hérault / Roguemaure / Aix / Pollen. / L'Astro 13-194. [VII; 1000. “Pluie de soufre.” Astronomie, 13 (1894): 194-195.]


[1894 Ap 16-17] / 1894 Ap 14 / Trib, 5-4 / several days before / As reported by officers of the s.s. Kansas City. They were 25 miles from Currituck light and 62 from Cape Charles light. At nine at night, dim outline of a shore in the sky and the 2 lights shone brightly. Steamer went on and all the coast lighted up with lighthouses ordinarily invisible—all said been identified. Till 3 a.m. [VII; 1002.1, 1002.2. "A Mirage Seen At Night." New York Tribune, April 19, 1894, p. 5 c. 4. "Cloud-Mirrored Lights." New York Sun, April 19, 1894, p. 1 c. 4. "The Kansas City left Savannah on Sunday. At twilight on Monday the officers on the bridge saw, one hundred or more feet up in the foggy air, about eight miles from the North Carolina coast, a duplication of the low-lying shore, with houses and stunted trees here and there. When darkness had set in the officers of the ship saw shoreward the phantasm of the edge of the land, looking like a streak of painted scenery in the background of a show, surmounted and dotted with light. The real scenery and lights were hidden behind the vapor mask below. Only their simulacra were visible from the deck, of the Kansas City. Thereafter, until morning, the shore was invisible, but its reflection in the clouds was seen until almost dawn on Tuesday." "It was away down twenty-five miles abeam of Currituck light about sixty-two miles south of Cape Charles that the skipper of the Kansas City saw high on the horizon an unfamiliar beacon, gleaming like a terresrial Mars. Second Officer Philllps calculated, after examining his chart, that the distant light was not a new planet, but the reflection of the Cape Charles light projected on the cloud. Before this beacon was seen the image of the Currituck light twenty-five miles abeam of the Kansas City was noted. The skipper and his officers kept their glasses glued to the distant light, and, as the steamship draw nearer to it, they were convinced that it beamed from Cape Charles. A procession of cloud-mirrored light danced by the steamship she came up the coast. Nothing real in the way of light or objects ashore was seen until the Kansas City was in the neighborhood of the Delaware capes."]


1894 Ap. 19/ Fisher. Polk Co., Minnesota / (F). [VII; 997. Fletcher, 106. This is the Fisher meteorite.]


1894 Ap. 20-29 / Five shocks / Venezuela / L.T., May 11-5-4. [VII; 1003. “The Earthquakes in Venezuela.” London Times, May 11, 1894, p. 5 c. 4.]


1894 Ap. 20, 27 / Great q's / Greece / Nature 54/116 / 50/607 / N.M. [VII; 1004. (Nature, 54-116; not found here; not v. 51, 52.) Davison, Charles. “M. Papavasililiore on the Greek Earthquakes of April, 1894.” Nature, 50 (October 18, 1894): 607.]


1894 (Ap-May) / Q's in Greece / La Nat 1894/2/1. [VII; 1005. Tissandier, Gaston. “Tremblements de Terre en Grèce Avril et Mai 1894.” La Nature, 1894 pt. 2 (no. 1096; June 2): 1-2.]


1894 Ap. 22, 23, 26, 28, May 2, 8 / Trib of [Ap. 22] / Great q / Greece / La Nat, 1894. [VII; 1006. "The Earthquake in Greece." New York Tribune, April 22, 1894, p. 2 c. 2.  Tissandier, Gaston. “Tremblements de Terre en Grèce Avril et Mai 1894.” La Nature, 1894 pt. 2 (no. 1096; June 2): 1-2.  “Tremblements de Terre en Grèce.” La Nature, 1894 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1092, supplement; May 5): 92. (April 20, 23, 24, 27, 28, May 1, 5: in La Nature articles.)]


[1894 Ap. 27. Wrong date. See: 1873 April 27, (VII; 1007).]


1894 Ap. 27 / Greece and Java / qs / BA 11 / 28, Venezuela / Sims / See Feb 18, 1889. [VII; 1008. Milne, 737-738. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1894 Ap. 28 / dispatch dated / Disastrous hurricane / Madagascar / M. Post, May 12. [VII; 1009. “Disastrous Hurricane in Madagascar.” London Morning Post, May 12, 1894, p. 5 c. 4.]


1894 May 2 / q / See Oct 16, 1896. / Dr. Davison says on surface must have been slighter than on Ap. 11, but underground miners left their work—fearing an explosion. [VII; 1010. See: 1896 Oct 16, (VII; 1603).]


1894 May 2 / South Wales / q / Nature 50-33 / (Times)—3-11-e. [VII; 1011. “Notes.” Nature, 50 (May 10, 1894): 33-36, at 33. “Earthquake Shock in South Wales.” London Times, May 3, 1894, p. 11 c. 5.]


1894 May 5 / (Dublin) / Cor writes saw mass of white light shoot from east to west and disap—repeated 3 times—reappeared. Five minutes later a mass of concentric [rings] flashed and disappeared. / E Mec (Eng Soc) 59/267. [VII; 1013. O'Neill, A. “A Curious Phenomenon.” English Mechanic, 59 (no. 1520; May 11, 1894): 267-268. “...I saw an elongated mass of white light shooting from west to east, and continuing its course for a second, and then turned due north, when it disappeared. I observed repetition of this phenomenon three times. About five minutes later it again appeared in a north-easterly direction; but it assumed a different form—namely, a mass of concentric rings. This time it appeared to be nearer our earth than the others, and after flashing across the heavens in the same direction, it disappeared entirely. In an hour afterwards a white light appeared in a northerly portion of the heavens. Will some correspondents kindly explain the above?” No replies to this query.]


1894 May 9 / Bori, Betul District, Cent. Provs., India / (F). [VII; 1014. Fletcher, 106. This is the Bori meteorite.]


1894 May 9 / Aerolite / also in 1895 / E Mec 79/393. [VII; 1015. Monck, William Henry Stanley. "AerolitesPerpetual Motion.” English Mechanic, 79 (no. 2045; June 3, 1904): 383-384. See: 1895 May 9, (VII; 1287). This is the Bori meteorite.]


1894 May 10, 18, 27 / Trib of / q / Venezuela. [VII; 1012. "In and Out of Congress." New York Tribune, May 10, 1894, p. 2 c. 5-6. "Thousands of Lives Lost." New York Tribune, May 18, 1894, p. 1 c. 2. "The Earthquake in Venezuela." New York Tribune, May 27, 1894, p. 2 c. 2.]


1894 May 10-11 / 2 a.m., 11th / Hogs and geese / PeoriaPittsburg207 miles / Trib, June 9. * [VII; 1016. “A Powerful Western Wind.” New York Tribune, June 9, 1894, p. 12 c. 2. “Elwood, Ind., May 20.'The Peoria, (Ill.), Transcript' of Friday, May 11, contained the following: 'Last night during the heavy storm, two hogs and a fat goose, belonging to Sam Wainscott, were blown from his barnyard, and they have not been heard from.'" “However remarkable the statement may seem these very pigs, together with the goose, are now inhabiting the barnyard of T.J. Hancock near this city, where they were dropped by the storm which swept over here at that time.  It was about 2 o'clock in the morning when Hancock was aroused from his sleep by the storm. He went out into the barnyard to look after his stock, and his attention was attracted to the clouds, in which he saw, during a lightning flash, the pigs and goose. Suddenly they dropped to the ground in his yard, and next morning they were as lively as usual, having suffered only slightly during their perilous trip of 207 miles through the air. The article in the Peoria paper was shown to Mr. Hancock, who wrote to Mr. Wainscott asking for a description of the missing pigs and goose. The description tallies perfectly with that of the animals in Mr. Hancock's possession. He has written to Wainscott to come and get his stock, which he is convinced belongs to him.” “Flying Trip of Pigs and a Goose.” Chicago Tribune, May 20, 1894, p. 10 c. 4. “Last week....” Elwood Daily Press, (Indiana), May 25, 1894, p. 4 c. 3. “Last week The Times printed a short article regarding two pigs and a goose, which were alleged to have been carried from Peoria, Ill., to Tipton in a storm and deposited on the farm of T. J. Hancock. The matter was intended as a joke on Mr. Hancock but the Elwood correspondent of the Chicago Tribune didn't know any better. He took the article bodily from The Times and sent it to his Chicago paper and it was printed as a special from Elwood. This was a brilliant performance on the part of the Elwood young man, but Mr. Hancock should bring suit against the Chicago paper for saying that he lived in Elwood.Tipton Times.”]


1894 May 11 / turtle and alab. / Miss., US / D-86. [VII; 1017. The note copies information from page 86 of The Book of the Damned. "Remarkable Hail." Monthly Weather Review, 22 (no. 5; May 1894): 215. “During a severe hailstorm at Vicksburg on the afternoon of Friday, May 11, a remarkably large hailstone was found to have a solid nucleus, consisting of a piece of alabaster from one-half to three-quarters of an inch. During the same storm at Bovina, 8 miles east of Vicksburg, a gopher turtle, 6 by 8 inches, and entirely encased in ice, fell with the hail.” “That Hail-Stone's Nucleus.” Vicksburg Daily Commercial Herald, May 26, 1894, p. 4 c. 2. Major Dunwoody of the Weather Bureau wrote: “Referring to your letter of the 18th instant I beg to return herewith, the substance reported to have been found in the centre of a hail stone, with the statement that it is evidently a piece of alabaster, roughly carved for ornamental purposes, then broken and lost. If the person who found it is not entirely mistaken, it must have beeu carried up in some tornado cloud and made the nucleus ol the hail stone.”]


1894 May 13 / 2:50 p.m. / Slight shock / Malta / M. Post, 14th. [VII; 1018. “Shock of Earthquake at Malta.” London Morning Post, May 14, 1894, p. 5 c. 1.]


1894 May 14 / afternoon / Annandale / q / Geol Mag 1900-107. [VII; 1019. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107 & 114.]


1894 May 17 / Hailstones size of billard balls / Cleveland, Ohio / Nature 50-173 / Weighed up to 6 ounces—some of very irregular form. Not conglomerates. [VII; 1020. Herrick, Francis Hobart. “Hailstones at Cleveland, Ohio.” Nature, 50 (June 21, 1894): 173.]


1894 May 18 / Trib, 1-2 / q. [VII; 1021. "Thousands of Lives Lost." New York Tribune, May 18, 1894, p. 1 c. 2.]


1894 May / April or May / Pollen / Algeria / La Nat Sup., May 5. [VII; 1022. “Pluie de soufre en Algérie.” La Nature, 1894 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1092, supplement; May 5): 92.]


[1894 May 11] / 1894 May 23 / Fiery phe / D. Pic of / Several days before, at Flora, Ind., a heavy black cloud and a sheet of flame, coming from the west. It was seen descending toward the town and the people were panic-stricken. There was an explosion that shook the ground for miles around, shattering windows. Leaves were burned from trees. Explosion followed by calm and a clear sky. [VII: 1023.1, 1023.2. “A Strange Electrical Phenomenon.” New Orleans Picayune, May 23, 1894, p. 4 c. 5. “State Telegrams.” Crawfordsville Daily Journal, (Indiana), May 15, 1894, p. 1 c. 7.  “The village Flora, near here, was visited by a curious electrical phenomenon Friday morning. A black cloud accompanied by a sheet of fire approached from the west. As it came over the town it settled to the earth, causing a wild panic among the frightened villagers. Its descent to the ground was followed by a terrific explosion that shook the earth for miles and shattered the windows to fragments all over the town. The leaves were burned from the trees, but no buildings were fired. The broken glass was invariably sucked outward instead of falling inside the house. There was no thunder reports. The explosion was instantly followed by a dead calm and a clear sky.”]


1894 May 25 / N.Y.T., 1-4 / q. / Missouri, Illinois. [VII; 1024. “Earthquakes in Two States.” New York Times, May 25, 1894, p. 1 c. 4.]


1894 May 25, July 19 / 55 days apart / See May 16, '96. / q / St. Louis / Trib. [VII; 1025. See: 1896 May 16, (VII; 1512). (New York Tribune, 1894 or 1896???)]


1894 May 26 / Paterson, N.J. / Wld man captured / P.L., 29th. [C; 164. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 29, 1894.) “Capture of The Wild Man.” Passaic Daily News, May 28, 1894, p. 8 c. 1.]


1894 May 26 / Birmingham / detonating meteor / Mems. BAA 4/17. [VII; 1026. “Detonating Meteor of May 26.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 4 (1896): 17.]


1894 May 27 / Spots—west limb / Group of sun spots seen by W.E. Sperra to form near sun's western limb. / Nothing seen 7 a.m. but disturbance began at 9. / Pop Astro 2-143 / Sperra—Randolph, Ohio. [VII; 1027. Sperra, William E. “Sun-spots.” Popular Astronomy, 2 (no. 3; November 1894): 143.]


1894 May 29 / Severe shocks / Pigianello, Italy / M. Post, 30th. [VII; 1028. “Earthquake Shocks in Italy.” London Morning Post, May 30, 1894, p. 5 c. 4.]


1894 May 29 / Trib, 1-1 / Philadelphia cloudburst. [VII; 1029. "Flooded by a Cloudburst."  New York Tribune, May 29, 1894, p. 1 c. 1.]


1894 May 31 / P.L. of / Wld man living in a cave in Washington Co., Ky. [C; 165. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 31, 1894.)]


1894 May 31 / Trib, 1-5 / Cloudburst / Colorado City. [VII; 1030. "Swept by a Cloudburst." New York Tribune, May 31, 1894, p. 1 c. 5.]


1894 June 3 / Oregon / flat piece of ice / D-180. [VII; 1031. The note copies information from pages 180 and 181 of The Book of the Damned. “Notes by the Editor.” Monthly Weather Review, 22 (no. 7; July 1894): 292-293, at 293. “One correspondent states that the formation was more in the nature of sheets of ice than simple hailstones. The sheets of ice averaged 3 to 4 inches square and from three-fourths of an inch to 1½ inches in thickness. They had a smooth surface and in falling gave the impression of a vast field or sheet of ice suspended in the atmospher and suddenly broken into fragments about the size of the palm of the hand.”]


1894 June 6 / Fr / Trombe / Calvados / La Nat 1894/2/141. [VII; 1032. Tissandier, Gaston. “Trombe dans le Calvados. 6 Juin 1894.” La Nature, 1894 pt. 2 (no. 1104; July 28): 141-142.]


1894 June 6 / Debris, ice, frgs, fish / D. Pic of, copying from Atlanta Constitution / Letter from one of the members of the staff of the National Museum of Costa Rica. Fall of slabs of ice 6 to 8 inches thick. One piece weighed 23 pounds, most of the other fragments larger than bricks. In them such substances as a ball of earth, wads of rotten leaves, sand, fish and frog spawn, 2 live frogs, one dead frog, a mass of kelp, or seaweed, pebbles, a sea shell, some queer black seeds, the size of buckshot. [VII: 1036.1, 1036.2, 1036.3. “Tremendous Hail Stones.” New Orleans Picayune, June 6, 1894, p. 4 c. 5. “Curious Facts.” Atlanta Constitution, May 7, 1894, p. 4 c. 6-7. “Curious Hailstones.” Washington Evening Star, (D.C.), June 13, 1894, p. 6 c. 3. “A gentleman connected with the Museo Nacional (National Museum), at San Jose, Costa Rica, in a private letter, tells a graphic story of the wonderful hailstorm which recently visited the southwest coast of that Central American republic. His letter, in part, is as follows: 'The cloud came almost directly from the west, and was blacker than the proverbial 'Egyptian darkness.' We are now well used to tropical storms, with their accompaniments of real thunder and lightning, something grander than the folks in old Missouri have ever seen or heard, but in this case it seemed a thousand squalls, hurricanes and cyclones combined in one. All of a sudden there was a terrible roaring and splashing in the bay near the camp. I have since thought that the only thing it could be compared with would be a shower of bricks and cobblestones falling into the ocean. We had hardly time to take shelter in an immense hollow guave when that portion of the cloud which was dumping its immense load of ice into the salty water veered to the northeast and crossed to the treeless tract of mountains lying over toward Hanfeta. It was not a hailstorm in the grand, true sense of the word—it was simply an awful precipitation of thousands of tons of ice from the clouds. Some of these lumps were not larger than one's fists, but the majority of them were larger than full-sized building bricks, and one which buried itself in the sand near our camp kettle on the beach was a jagged, three-cornered mass of ice weighing twentv-three pounds an hour and a half after the storm cloud had passed. As one of the boys afterward remarked: 'It seemed as if the cloud had been frozen solid to a depth of about six or eight inches and then suddenly knocked to pieces and thrown to the earth.' But few of the ice chunks bore the least resemblance to ordinary hailstones; all were of jagged and irregular form, the majority of the pieces containing some foreign substance, such as a ball of earth, wads of rotten leaves, sand, fish and frog spawn, &c. The head of a dead sunfish was found in one piece, and a half dozen or a dozen of the ice slabs gathered up and put into our water jar yielded two live and one dead frog, a mass of kelp, or seaweed, three small pebbles, a seashell and some queer black seeds about the size of buckshot.'"]


1894 June 6 / Mud on trees. This is indexed in B. Eagle index whether under India, or not. [C; 166. “India's Mysterious Tree Marking.” Brooklyn Eagle, May 29, 1894, p. 1 c. 6.]


[The following six notes were clipped together by Fort, C: 167-172.]


1894 June 6 / Mud on trees / (Morn. Post of), 5-4 / “The microscopic tests which have been made of the mud found daubed on the trees in North Behar prove, in the opinion of the Government, that in 90 per cent. of the cases the smearing is due to cattle and pig rubbing against the trees. The rest of the smearing of mangoes is declared to be mainly the work of mendicants who desired to create a scare.” “A positive contradiction is given to a report which has been current here that 20 Sadhus have been captured at Nainital in the act of daubing trees. The latest cases of tree-smearing have occurred in Ghazipur and Cachar.” [C: 167.1, 167.2, 167.3. “The Tree Daubing in India.” London Morning Post, June 6, 1894, p. 5 c. 4.]


[The following two notes [indecipherable ] together within the clip. C: 168-169.]


1894 Ap 17 / L. Times of / All mango trees in several districts of Northern Behar found smeared with mud and hairs. Meaning had baffled all inquiry. Thought to have bearing upon a cow-protection movement. Ignorant peasantry thought a sacred temple had disappeared and mud from a large tank caused by its subsidence. / LT, Ap. 30—the strange markings spreading eastward and westward. [C; 168.1, 168.2. “India.” London Times, April 17, 1894, p. 5 c. 1. “India.” London Times, April 30, 1894, p. 5 c. 1.]


1894 May 5 / “Spectator” of / Smearing of mango trees throughout Behar and provinces east and west. Plaster mixed with hairs. Thought be spreading of exciting to insurrection—because before mutiny of 1857 there was a distribution of little unleavened cakes throughout Behar. / Times (London), May 11-5-a—thought no polticial meaning but to attract pilgrims to a sacred temple in Nepaul. / Times, May 30—had appeared as far west as Allahabad. / June 6—pigs and cattle rubbing against trees and mendicants who wished to create a scare. These were the sadhus. [C; 169.1, 169.2, 169.3. (London Spectator, May 5, 1894.) “India.” London Times, May 11, 1894, p. 5 c. 1. “India.” London Times, May 30, 1894, p. 5 c. 3. “India.” London Times, June 6, 1894, p. 5 c. 4.]


1894 May 9 / Englishman of / Said that ac to some, pig bristles / others, human hair / other—a vegetable fibre. [C; 170. (Englishman, May 9, 1894.)]


1894 Ap-June / Tree-smearing / India / See time of q—June 30, 1897. [C; 171. See: 1897 June 30, (VIII; 46.2).]


1894 [Ap-June] / Tree-daubing. / In Daily Mail, April 20, 1909, Sir Edward Henry, on Indian Police Service, quoted that been proved been only rubbings against trees by pigs and buffaloes and so the excitement had subsided. [C; 172. (London Daily Mail, April 20, 1909.)]


1894 June 7 / 5:15 [P.M.] / Violent eruptive prominence on sun, at Alta, Iowa / Pop Astro 2-45. [VII; 1033. Hadden, David Edward. “Eruptive Solar Prominence (June 7, 1894).” Popular Astronomy, 2 (no. 1; September 1894): 45.]


1894 June 8 / Lights of Mars / L Astro 1894/321. [VII; 1034. Flammarion, Camille. "La Planète Mars." Astronomie, 13 (1894): 321-329, at 321.]


1894 June 11 / Granada and Almeria, Spain / shocks / M. Post, 13th. [VII; 1035. “Earthquake in Spain.” London Morning Post, June 13, 1894, p. 5 c. 5.]


1894 June 15 / Trib, 6-6 / Sea Story. [C; 173. "Personal." New York Tribune, June 15, 1894, p. 6 c. 6.]


1894 June 16 / White spot on Saturn's ring / L'Astro 13-273. [VII; 1037. Antoniadi, Eugène Michel. "Tache blanche sur l'anneau de Saturne." Astronomie, 13 (1894): 273.]


1894 June 18 / 3 a.m. / Explosion / house wrecked / unknown origin / Brussels. [C; 174. (Refs.???)]


1894 June 19 / 1 a.m. / Oran, Algeria / severe q / Nature 50-202. [VII; 1038. “Notes.” Nature, 50 (June 28, 1894): 202-206, at 202.]


1894 June 19 / Algeria and Java / qs / BA '11 / Sims / See Feb 18, 1889. [VII; 1039. Milne, 738. Two class I earthquakes. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1894 June [19] / Brilliant star-like points reported by Lowell—flash lights like signals—but from a marking supposed to be a snow cap of Mars. / Nature 50/396. [VII; 1045. “Our Astronomical Column.” Nature, 50 (August 16, 1894): 395-396.]


1894 June 19 / “Flashlights” on Mars / Nature 50/396x. [VII; 1047. “Our Astronomical Column.” Nature, 50 (August 16, 1894): 395-396.]


1894 June 20 / Big Jap q. [VII; 1040. A class I earthquake. Milne, 738.]


1894 June 20 / Trib, 1-5 / Cloudbursts. [VII; 1048. "Furious Summer Storms." New York Tribune, June 20, 1894, p. 1 c. 5.]


1894 June 21 / Severe q. / Japan / M. Post, 22nd. [VII; 1041. “Earthquake in Japan.” London Morning Post, June 22, 1894. p. 5 c. 3.]


1894 June 21 / Reigate / whirl / Symons Met (L) 29/90. [VII; 1042. "Short Notes." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 29 (July 1894): 90-91.]


1894 June 21 / Crystals of salt / Pocatello, Idaho / (N) / US Bureau of Soils, Bull. 68/113. [VII; 1043. (U.S. Bureau of Soils, Bulletin 68-113.)]


[1894 June] / Chaos / The 2 whirls / Sym Met 29/96 / Cor writes that, June 21, 1894, at Reigate, upon a brilliant day, trees around a field he was in showing no sign of wind—“Without warning, an extraordinary whirlwind broke on the field within a few yards of where I stood, catching up the hay with violence." The hay went up to a great height and some passing rooks were caught up and carried into the sky until no longer visible. / p. 136 / Another cor writes that upon the same day, on the racing grounds of the Athletic Club, at Fulham, and, “showed a refined taste in selecting music books of the band, and carrying their leaves to an inconceivable height.” [VII; 1044.1, 1044.2, 1044.3, 1044.4.  "Short Notes." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 29 (July 1894): 90-91. Lecky, Robert J. "Whirlwinds." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 29 (October 1894): 136.]


1894 June 21 / Fulham / Selective whirl / Symons Met (L) 29/136. [VII; 1046. Lecky, Robert J. "Whirlwinds." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 29 (October 1894): 136.]


[1894 June 21] / 1894 June 22 / Mirage / Pub Ledger, 26th / “People in the vicinity of Columbus, Indiana, witnessed a mirage of some distant city believed to have been St. Louis on Friday night. The phe. was visible for half an hour. The streets of the city could easily be seen, as could the church spires and the river. [VII; 1049.1, 1049.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, June 26, 1894.)  “Mirage in the Sky.” Indianapolis Journal, June 23, 1894, p. 5 c. 2. “Columbus, Ind., June 22.—Just at sunset in this locality yesterday there was one of the most beautiful scenes ever witnessed by the citizens of this section. The sky at an angle of about 45 degrees presented a picture or mirage of a beautiful city, with its church spires, wide streets, shade trees and large buildings. By the city flowed a large river, the water of which shone like silver. The clouds which surrounded this scene were tinted with the colors of the rainbow, while the general background was of a deep yellow. It is not known that the sky ever presented such a scene before in this locality, and there can be no doubt that it was a true picture of some distant city, and it is believed to have been St. Louis.”]


1894 June 23 / Trib., 1-2 / q. [VII; 1050. (New York Tribune, June 23, 1894, p. 1 c. 2; not found here.)]


1894 June 25 / (Sounds) / In Ciel et Terre, 16/485, M. Van der Broeck, in a paper upon mysterious sounds like discharges of artillery, but untraceable to terrestrial artillery—gives a table of series of sounds, and intervals, heard by him at Louvain. Possibility of a code in intervals of one series that he gives. / 3 M / 4 M / ¾ M / 3¾ M / ¾ M. [VII; 1051.1, 1051.2. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v. 16 pp. 484-485.]


1894 June 27 / 5:30 p.m. / south of Sydney / Det met seen / Jour Roy Soc N.S. Wales 28-256. [VII; 1052. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. "The Meteor of June 27th, 1894." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 28 (1894): 256-258.]


1894 June 28 / Luminous projections / Mars / L'Astro 1894/321. [VII; 1053. Flammarion, Camille. "La Planète Mars." Astronomie, 13 (1894): 321-329, at 321.]


1894 / [July 6] / summer / Frogs / Scotland / NQ 8/6/104. [VII; 1054. Wallace, R. Hedger. "A Shower of Frogs." Notes and Queries, s. 8 v. 6 (August 11, 1894): 104-105. “A Shower of Frogs.” Glasgow Herald, July 7, 1894, p. 10 c. 3.]


[1894 July 2-17. Wrong date. See: 1892 July 2-17, (VII; 1055).]


1894 July 5 / Nature of, p. 225 / Almost total absence of butterfly life at Gravesend. [VII; 1056. “Absence of Butterflies.” Nature, 50 (July 5, 1894): 225.]


1894 July 10 / q / Constantinople / Nat. Sci 8/27 / BA, '11. [VII; 1057. (Nat. Sci., 8-27.) A class III earthquake. Milne, 738.]


1894 July 12 / ab. 11 p.m. / Comrie / q / Geol Mag 1900-107. [VII; 1058. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107 & 114.]


1894 July 12 / Comrie / See 1895, July 12. [VII; 1059. See: 1895 July 12  (VII: 1329 & 1330).]


1894 July 13 / q's Turkey continue. / 14th—19th / M. Post, next day dates. [VII; 1060. “The Earthquake in Turkey.” London Morning Post, July 12, 1894, p. 3 c. 1. “The Earthquake in Turkey.” London Morning Post, July 13, 1894, p. 3 c. 1. “The Earthquakes in Turkey.” London Morning Post, July 18, 1894, p. 5 c. 3. “The Earthquakes.” London Morning Post, July 19, 1894, p. 5 c. 2. “The Earthquakes in Turkey.” London Morning Post, July 20, 1894, p. 5 c. 2.]


1894 (July 13) / q and cloud / (Cut) / Pine Ridge, Cal, 50 miles east of San Francisco / Smithson Miscell Cols, 37/appendix, 227 / At 8:50 p.m. / There was a great electric display in cloudless sky and a sharp shock, and a remarkable phe, reported from the Sierra Nevada Mountains, east of Fresno”—“a wonderful display of electricity on the edges of the cloud”. Then occurred a quake violent enough to shake houses and trees. Seems same time as other but is dated the 14th in the List. [VII; 1061.1, 1061.2, 1061.3. Holden, Edward Singleton. "A Catalogue of Earthquakes on the Pacific Coast 1769 to 1897." Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, v. 37 art. 5 (1898): 1-253, at 227-228. “About sunset last evening a red cloud, apparently fifty miles in length, gradually settled over the range, and as soon as night came on persons in this city observed a wonderful display of electricity on the edges of the cloud.” “To-day news from that region says that when the electrical display was at its height an earthquake, violent enough to rattle house and shake trees, was felt (VI). It continued several seconds. After it had subsided the cloud rapidly passed away and the atmosphere became clear.” “So far as can be learned the earthquake was felt at no place else than immediately under the cloud. It was not felt on the plains 20 miles distant.” “Cloud and Earthquake.” San Francisco Chronicle, July 15, 1894, p. 14 c. 5. “Lightning and Earthquake.” San Francisco Call, July 15, 1894, p. 2 c. 2. “Fresno, July 14.—News comes by telephone from Pine Ridge lumber district, sixty miles northeast of this city, to the effect that a sharp shock of earthquake lasting a few seconds was felt there at 8:50 last night.” “The shock was accompanied by the greatest electric display ever witnessed by inhabitants here. The strange feature is that no clouds were noticed by the citizens.”]


1894 July 17 / dispatch from N.Y. / Severe q's Mexico recently. / M Post, 18th. [VII; 1062. “Earthquake in Mexico.” London Morning Post, July 18, 1894, p. 5 c. 3.]


1894 July 18 / Shock / Ogden, Utah / BA 1911-43. [VII; 1063. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 43.]


1894 July 18 / Cairo, Ill / Ky and Mo / shock / M. Post, 20th. [VII; 1064. “The Earthquakes.” London Morning Post, July 19, 1894, p. 5 c. 2.]


1894 July 18 / Memphis, Tenn—6:30 a.m. / St. Louis—7:10 a.m. / shocks / Trib 19-2-6. [VII; 1065. "They Think It Was An Earthquake." New York Tribune, July 19, 1894, p. 2 c. 6.]


1894 July 19 / 4:30 a.m. / Monaco / slight shock / M. Post, 20th. [VII; 1066. “The Earthquakes.” London Morning Post, July 19, 1894, p. 5 c. 2.]


1894 July 19 / Ch 34 / La Nat, 1894/2/286 / Boiai, Greece / Bolide in full daylight fell, stood and exploded—stationary 5 minutes [note cut off] then moved off. [VII; 1067. Maltezos, C. “Bolides et Aérolithes Tombés en Grèce en 1894.” La Nature, 1894 pt. 2 (no. 1113; September 29): 286. “Après cinq minutes de suspension, à midi 12m, un bruit épouvantable a été entendu, et le bolide s'est dirigé vers le plus haut sommet du mont Crithen, en continuant sa marche, it est tombé dans la mer avec un nouveau bruit.” “Boiai” is now identified as Voies, Greece; and, “mont Crithen” is now identified as the mountain peak, Krithina, (Κριθίνα), above Agios Nikolaos, Laconia, Greece.]


[1894 July 19, Aug 21, 23, 24 /] 1894 Aug 19, 21, 23, 24 / See June 8. [VII; 1110. See: 1894 June 8. (VII; 1034). Flammarion, Camille. "La Planète Mars." Astronomie, 13 (1894): 321-329, at 321.]


1894 July 20 / Short, sharp, mag disturbances / no large sunspots. / Observatory 17/313. / [note cut off]44 / [note cut off]tory. [VII; 1068. “Magnetic Storm.” Observatory, 17 (1894): 313.]


1894 July 20 / Great magnetic perturbations began suddenly in France ab 6:15 a.m. / L'Astro 13-351. [VII; 1069. Moureaux, Théodule. "Grande pertrubation magnétique." Astronomie, 13 (1894): 351.]


1894 July 21 / Aurora / Tasmania / Nature 50/482. [VII; 1070. “Notes.” Nature, 50 (September 13, 1894): 480-484, at 482.]


1894 July 26 / q. / Servia (Varna) / II q. / BA '11. [VII; 1071. A class II earthquake. Milne, 738.]


1894 July 26 / 0h. 35m. / q / Greece (Douka) / Elis / BA '11. [VII; 1072. A class I earthquake. Milne, 738.]


1894 July 27 / 7:30 p.m. / Stockton, Fresno, San Rafael, Lodi, Cal / det met / Eagle 28-1-2. [VII; 1073. “Illuminated by a Meteor.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 28, 1894, p. 1 c. 2.]


1894 July 27 / Det met / 7:36 p.m. / Mt Hamilton, Cal / Pop. Astro.—2-142 / Pubs Astro Soc Pacific 6-268. [VII; 1074. “Great Meteor of July 27, 1894.” Popular Astronomy, 2 (no. 3; November 1894): 142. Barnard, Edward Emerson. “Great Meteor of July 27, 1894.” Astronomical Journal, 14 (1894): 122. Holden, Edward Singleton. “The Meteor of July 27, 1894, 7h 30m P.S.T.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 6 (no. 38; December 1894): 268-270.]


1894 July 27 / Pasadena, Cal, and Lick Observatory / met explosion and train or cloud for 20 minutes / Nature 50/399 / [note cut off]ce [note cut off]ily 13. / 66/513 / 434. [VII; 1075. Wesson, Edward. “A Remarkable Meteor.” Nature, 50 (August 23, 1894): 399-400. Holden, Edward Singleton. “The Meteor of July 27, 1894.” Contributions from the Lick Observatory, no. 5 (1895): 1-30. (???, 66-513, 434???)]


1894 July 27 / Savtschenskoje (Kherson), Russia / (F). [VII; 1076. Fletcher, 106. This is the Savtschenskoje meteorite.]


1894 July 28 / B. Eagle, 1-4 / Strange epidemic, like blood poisoning, causing deaths at Minerva, 10 miles south of Alliance, Ohio. [C; 175. “A Strange Epidemic in Ohio.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 28, 1894, p. 1 c. 4.]


1894 July 28 / Luminous projection / Mars / dark part / (Nature) / Sc Am 71/132. [VII; 1077. “A Strange Light on Mars.” Nature, 50 (August 2, 1894): 319. “A Strange Light on Mars.” Scientific American, n.s., 71 (September 1, 1894): 132.]


1894 July 28 / Light on dark part of Mars / Nature 50/319. [VII; 1078. “A Strange Light on Mars.” Nature, 50 (August 2, 1894): 319.]


1894 July 29 / Great storm / Bath region. [VII; 1079. (Refs.???)]


1894 July 29 / 9:30 p.m. / Lick Observatory / Great met “many times as bright as Venus.” In Cepheus through north end of  Cassiopeia, burst in Camelopardalis. / Pubs Pacific 6/295. [VII; 1080. Perrine, Charles Dillon. “Bright Meteor of July 29, 1894.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 6 (no. 38; December 1894): 295.]


1894 July 30 / At West Chester, mirage in northern sky. / P.L., Aug 4 / “A town, mountains and river were perfectly reproduced.” [VII; 1081. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 4, 1894.)]


1894 July 29 / See June 8. [VII; 1082. See: 1894 June 8, (VII; 1034).]


1894 / ab last July / Ghst / Chicago. [C; 176. (Refs.???)]


1894 Aug. / Herbert Spencer, student at University of Lawrence, Kansas, disappeared. (N.Y. Herald, 1896, 6-24-9-3) / Aug, 1896, returned and took up studies, where left off, but he recognized neither professors at University nor members of his family, On night of March 6, 1896, policeman found him in Philadelphia, asking who and where he was. He was well-dressed. Sent to Philadelphia City Hospital. Here he remained and in July was recognized by a visitor. [C; 177.1, 177.2. (New York Herald, June 24, 1896, p. 9 c. 3; not found here.)  "Erased His Mind." Wichita Eagle, October 4, 1896, p. 9 c.1-2 & p. 12 c. 2. See: 1896 Aug, (C; 303).]


1894 Aug 1 (B. Eagle), 3-7 / “Mysterious death lurks in a big vineyard near Collis [near Fresno, Cal.]. Everybody has left the place and the authorities are preparing to begin a searching investigation of the premises.” 2 persons dead and another dying of malady, supposed to be paralysis of the heart. [C; 178.1, 178.2. “Mysterious Fatality About a Vineyard.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 1, 1894, p. 3 c. 7.]


1894 Aug 2 / E Lancashire / Sudden alarming darkness—great downpour and damage to crops. / 3-7-3, Daily Chronicle. [VII; 1083. (London Daily Chronicle, August 3, 1894, p. 7 c. 3.)]


1894 Aug 3 / B Eagle, 10-3 / Plague of black spiders in Crawford Co., Ind. [C; 179. “A Plague of Black Spiders.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 3, 1894, p. 10 c. 3. "The Indiana State News." Indianapolis News, August 1, 1894, p. 6 c. 5-8.]


1894 Aug 3 / Long Beach / Little girl named Ryder disap. Thought could not have drowned. / NY Trib 9-1-2 / See Trib 7 and 8. [C; 180. "Was She Kidnapped?" New York Tribune, August 9, 1894, p. 1 c. 2. "The Child Probably Drowned." New York Tribune, August 7, 1894, p. 7 c. 2. Edward Osborne Ryder built the White House Hotel, (a seasonal beach resort), on Water Island, New York, in 1890.]


1894 Aug 3 / Trib, 4-3 / Myst. [C; 181. "His Body Found in a Swamp." New York Tribune, August 3, 1894, p. 4 c. 3.]


1894 Aug 3 / Prayer and rain / (B. Eagle, Aug 5-7-5) / People at Aquebogue, L.I., assembled and prayed for rain. Had been little or no rain since June 1. ½ hour after the prayer, torrents fell. [C; 182. “They Prayed For Rain.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 5, 1894, p. 7 c. 5.]


1894 Aug 6 and 19 / Perrotin and Williams / proj. Mars / Observatory 17/296. [VII; 1084. “The Bright Projections on Mars.” Observatory, 17 (1894): 295-296. Henri Joseph Anastase Perrotin's observation was on August 6, and Arthur Stanley William's observation was on August 19.]


1894 Aug 6-7-11 / From 5 a.m. on 6th, gunfire at Shoeburyness. / Standard 7-3-6 / 1st day and also 7th (8:30) and concludes on 11th. [VII; 1085. “The Provinces.” London Standard, August 7, 1894, p. 3 c. 6. “The Shoeburyness Meeting.” London Standard, August 8, 1894, p. 3 c. 2. “The Shoeburyness Meeting.” London Standard, August 13, 1894, p. 3 c. 4.]


1894 Aug 7 / Hypnotism / N.Y. Trib., 1-5 / Man appeared in Vineland, N.J. Introduced self, saying he was Dr. Miller, of the Well's Eye Hospital of Philadelphia. Swindled people, who said that he frequently shook hands, squeezing their hands, after which they had a sensation of sickness. Sold an old man named Efts eyeglasses, pretending would be good for cataracts on eyes, for $44. [C; 183.1, 183.2, 183.3. "His Handshake Made Them Sick." New York Tribune, August 7, 1894, p. 1 c. 5.]


1894 Aug 7 / nude / B. Eagle, 10-3 / Man wearing only shoes, arrested sitting middle of Broadway, at 12th St. [C; 184. “A Living Picture Found on Broadway.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 7, 1894, p. 10 c. 3.]


1894 Aug 7 / Drought in Kansas / N.Y. Trib 8-1-5. [VII; 1086. "The Drouth in Western Kansas." New York Tribune, August 8, 1894, p. 1 c. 5.]


1894 Aug / Explosions bombs? / Eng. and Italy. [VII; 1087. (Refs.???)]


[The following notes were clipped together by Fort. VII: 1089 to 1100.]


1894 Aug. 9 / Somerset County Mail of, 5-1 / That “During a recent shower at Bath there fell many thousands of jelly fish, and the pavements and roads were spattered with them. They were about the size of a shilling.” [VII; 1089. (Somerset County Mail and West of England Express, (Crewkerne), August 9, 1894, p. 5 c. 1.) "A Shower of Frogs." Notes and Queries, s. 8 v. 6 (September 8, 1894): 189-191, at 190. “A Shower of Jelly Fish.” Somerset Western Gazette, August 10, 1894, p. 2 c. 6. See: 1894 Aug 10, (VII; 1093).]


1894 Aug 1-16 / Bath Herald / Nothing. [VII; 1090.]


1894 Aug 1-18 / Daily Chronicle / Nothing. [VII; 1091.]


1894 Aug 10 / Frgs / repeat / July 20 and 27, 1901. [VII; 1092. See: 1901 July 20, (VIII; 855), and, 1901 July 27, (VIII; 858).]


1894 Aug 10 / snails and jellyfish / Bath Daily Chronicle, Aug 13 / “A correspondent informs us that during the thunderstorm which visited this district on Friday afternoon (10th), there was quite a shower of snails at Pilton, near Shepton Mallet; the molluscs were so numerous that they could be taken in shovelfuls. We have also heard of shower of jellyfish not far from Bath, but the exact locality of tbe phenomenon our informant does not mention.” [VII; 1093.1, 1093.2. (Bath Daily Chronicle, August 13, 1894.) “Current Topics.” Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette, August 16, 1894, p. 7 c. 1.]


1894 Aug 10 / Diss Express of / Successive frogs or toads in Thatto Heath, near Wigan. “That they had come down with the rain there is said to be no doubt whatever.” “Successive falls.” [VII; 1094. “A Shower of Frogs.” Diss Express, August 10, 1894, p. 3 c. 4. "The Remarkable Phenomenon at Thatto Heath." Wigan Observer and District Advertiser, July 20, 1894, p. 5 c. 4. A large number of frogs were discovered on the road and an adjoining field, after a rain shower, on July 16, 1894. "The most puzzling question was, why did hundreds, probably thousands, appear after a sharp shower, none having been seen before the shower?" “A Shower of Frogs at Thatto Heath.” Liverpool Echo, July 16, 1894, p. 4 c. 4. “The creatures were all of the same size, the body being about half an inch long.”]


1894 Aug (early) / Jellyfish / Bath / (D-48). [VII; 1095. The note copies information from page 48 of The Book of the Damned. "A Shower of Frogs." Notes and Queries, s. 8 v. 6 (September 8, 1894): 189-191, at 190.]


1894 Aug 10 / M. Post / Nothing. [VII; 1096.]


1894 Aug. 10 / Wigan Examiner / Nothing. [VII; 1097.]


1894 Aug (early) / frogs / Wigan / D-48. [VII; 1098.The note copies information from page 48 of The Book of the Damned. "A Shower of Frogs." Notes and Queries, s. 8 v. 6 (September 8, 1894): 189-191, at 191.]


1894 Aug 10 / Living / frog in mid ocean / March 21, 1897. [VII; 1099. See: 1897 March 21, (VII; 1705).]


1894 Aug 10 / Succession of falls / See July-Aug, 1892 and 1886. / See July, 1901. [VII; 1100. See: (July-Aug, 1892); (1886); 1901 July 20, (VIII; 855); and, 1901 July 27, (VIII; 858).]


1894 Aug 10 / Elec. house / P.L. of / Inhabitants of a house in Bend St., Baltimore, believed it to be bewitched. “Bright flashes and jets of fire burst from different parts of the house. Said that all the pipes in the house were charged with electricity. The phe. mornings and evenings; never in the afternoon. Said that 2 lines of electric cars ran by the house, whether connection or not. / See Jan 9, 1891. [C; 185.1, 185.2. (Philadelpha Public Ledger, August 10, 1894.) See: 1891 Jan 9, (B; 1124).]


1894 Aug 10-23 / Group of colossal sunspots appears on 10 / L'Astro 13-349 / Central on 16th. [VII;1088. Antoniadi, Eugène Michel. "La grand tache solaire d'août 1894." Astronomie, 13 (1894): 349-350.]


1894 Aug 10 / 12:30 a.m. / Memphis, Tenn. / 3 distinct shocks / Trib 11-1-2. [VII; 1101. "Telegraphic Notes." New York Tribune, August 11, 1894, p. 1 c. 2.]


1894 Aug 10 / 2:30 p.m. / London / intense darkness and heaviest th. storm of the season / D. News, 11th. [VII; 1102. “Thunderstorms and Loss of Life.” London Daily News, August 11, 1894, p. 3 c. 7.]


1894 Aug 10 / “Remarkable phe” at Garboldisham—whirlwind carried a wagon load of barley to Thelnetham, three miles away. Here some of the straws matted together fell. / Diss Express, Aug 17-5-4. [VII; 1106. “Whirlwind in Norfolk.” Diss Express, August 17, 1894, p. 5 c. 4. “The current carried away what is estimated to be about a waggon load of barley from a field in the occupation of Mr. Peacock.” No wagon was carried away by the whirlwind, (just the barley).]


1894 Aug 10 / 4 p.m. / Great th storm / Bath. [VII; 1112. (Refs.???)]


1894 Aug 10 / Series of objects, etc., June 20th-Sept, Tarbes, as if favorable current / 1887. [VII; 1113. (Refs.???)]


1894 Aug 11 / B. Eagle, 1-5 / Ghost at Mapleton, L.I. On railroad tracks near a point where a girl, Margaret Barning, had shot herself, a few days before. Engineer stopped the train. It glided away. / 29-5-4 / In meantime not been seen again, but news of much interest in Mapleton. Then that the ghost been caught. Somebody had rigged up a figure in a sheet. [C; 186.1, 186.2. “Mapleton Slights Its Ghost.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 11, 1894, p. 1 c. 5-6. “The Mapleton Ghost Laid.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 29, 1894, p. 5 c. 4.]


1894 Aug 11 / Ghst / The suicide is told of in Eagle 6-1-7 / 7-10-3 / 8-17. [C; 187. “An Unrecognized Suicide.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 6, 1894, p. 1 c. 7. “More Mysterious Than Ever.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 7, 1894, p. 10 c. 3. “Recognized at the Morgue.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 8, 1894, p. 1 c. 7.]


1894 Aug 11 / (Mapleton) / Newspaper descriptions gruesome—bloodstains still on the grass at place where the body was found. [C; 188. “The Ghost Bobs Up Again.” Brooklyn Eagle, August 13, 1894, p. 10 c. 5-6.]


1894 Aug 12 / D. Pic of / Bear and hyena scare near Terre Haute, Ind. Bear thought to be one that escaped from someone in Robinson, Ill., and hyena supposed from a circus. [C; 189. “Terrorized by Wild Animals.” New Orleans Picayune, August 12, 1894, p. 16 c. 2. “General State News.” Indianapolis News, August 8, 1894, p. 2 c. 1-2. “General State News.” Indiana State Sentinel, September 19, 1894, p. 8 c. 1-4.]


1894 Aug 12 / Eagle, Sept [note cut off] / / by Louis Gathmann, of Chicago—a vivid green spot in a valley on the moon / Valley of Sinus Boris / Said this was seen by seven other persons through telescope. [VII; 1105. “That Green Spot on the Moon.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 28, 1894, p. 2 c. 1.]


1894 Aug 15 / Explosion near Holyhead / Standard 16-3-5. [VII; 1103. “The Provinces.” London Standard, August 16, 1894, p. 3 c. 5.]


1894 Aug 16 / white patches on Mars / Nature 51/41. [VII; 1104. “Observations of Mars.” Nature, 51 (November 8, 1894): 40-42, at 41.]


1894 Aug 17 / Frgs / Indiana. [C; 190. “Indiana Enjoys a Shower of Frogs.” Crawfordsville Daily Journal, (Indiana), August 13, 1894, p. 4 c. 5. “Muncie, Ind., Aug. 13.—A curious phenomenon occurred in the northern portion of the county Saturday afternoon. Shortly after 1 o'clock a shower of live frogs began falling. The shower of living creatures continued for five minutes and covered a 10-acre field on the farm of Ezra Willburn. The frogs fell only on Mr. Willburn's farm and at the time they fell the sky was cloudless. The cause of the shower is somewhat a mystery, although It is said that the frogs could have been drawn from a distant pond by a strong whirlwind and carried through the air to a point over Mr. Willburn's field.” The date of this shower was August 11, 1894. (Another reference in Indianapolis News, August 18, 1894, p. 11 c. 5, to shower of frogs in England. “Residents of Thatto Heath, St. Helens, England, are concerned over what was apparently a shower of frogs or toads. After a sharp shower the roads between Thatto Heath Library and the reservoir was literally black with frogs.”]


1894 Aug 17 / Sk Ho / full-grown frgs / D. Pic / Some days before, at Muncie, Ind., for 5 minutes thousands of full-grown frogs fell from sky. [VII; 1107. “It Rained Frogs.” New Orleans Picayune, August 17, 1894, p. 4 c. 5. “Indiana Enjoys a Shower of Frogs.” Crawfordsville Daily Journal, (Indiana), August 13, 1894, p. 4 c. 5.]


1894 Aug. 18 / Very “brilliant little projection” at terminator of Mars. In sketch looks like a little searchlight oblique to the line of the terminator. / A. Stanley Williams, Mem. B.A.A., 4/119. [VII; 1108. “Section for the Observation of Mars.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 4 (1896): 107-137, at 119.]


1894 Aug 19 / Lick Observatory, Cal / a bright aurora / Ab 9 h, Pac St. Time, a bright meteor fell almost vertically from Polaris to the horizon. [note cut off] second later another but to the west of the first. / Pubs-Pacific 6/294. [VII; 1109. “Observations of the August Meteors of 1894.” Publications of the Astronomical Association of the Pacific, 6 (no. 38; December 1894): 294.]


[1894 Aug 19, 21, 23, 24. Wrong dates. See: 1894 July 19, Aug 21, 23, 24, (VII; 1110).]


1894 and 98 / Aug 11 / Remarkable meteors seen at Rome / Astro. Nachrichten / Muller / nos. 3529-44 / 3545-60. [VII; 1111. Muller, Adolf. “Aussergewöhnliche Meteirirscheinungen.” Astronomische Nachrichten, 148 (1899): 33-34. Muller, Adolf. “Aussergewöhnliche Meteirirscheinungen.” Astronomische Nachrichten, 148 (1899): 375-376.]


1894 Aug 20, ab. / Ghst / 3rd Ave, N.Y. City / Ghost period—. [C; 191. (Refs.???)]


1894 Aug 24 / P.L. of / At Coffeyville, Miss, “the other night”, immense meteor that burst with a detonation that shook the earth far around. [VII; 1114. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 24, 1894.) “An Immense Meteor.” Los Angeles Herald, August 17, 1894, p. 2 c. 1. “Coffeyville, Miss., Aug. 16.—An immense meteor burst immediately over Coffeyville at 12 o'clock last night with a report that shook the earth around and frightened the people almost out of their wits. Those who witnessed the phenomenon state that it resembled a ball of fire passing through the sky, and when it reached a point directly over the town exploded with a deafening report. Fragments were picked up in the streets today. They present the appearance of volcanic rocks after an eruption. The negroes are greatly excited over the occurrence, and they look upon it as a direct warning from heaven that the judgment day is close at hand.” The location is Coffeeville, Mississippi, (not Coffeyville, as reported in some newspapers).]


1894 Aug 26 / Met and streak / page in Nature 50-537. [VII; 1115. Denning, William Frederick. “The Meteor and Meteor-Streak of August 26, 1894.” Nature, 50 (September 27, 1894): 537-538.]


1894 Aug 26 / Ommaney / Nature 135, vol 50 / D-274. [VII; 1116. The note copies information from page 274 of The Book of the Damned. Ommanney, Erasmus. "Extraordinary Phenomenon." Nature, 50 (September 27, 1894): 524.]


1894 Aug 26 / Maidenhead / Cor saw, bet. 10:30 and 11 p.m., 4 steady rays of light in two pairs in sky. / E Mec 60-111. [VII; 1117. Harnett, Francis. Russell. “Aurora (?)” English Mechanic, 60 (no. 1539; September 21, 1894): 111.]


1894 Sept 1 / Enormous flight of butterfly Hypatus bachmani reported from area almost 100 miles square in Texas—Insect Life, 7-357. [VII; 1121. “A Remarkable Migration of Butterflies.” Insect Life, 7 (March 1895): 357-358.]


1894 Sept 2 / 7:47 p.m. / Corsica dets / “corse” / bolide / L'Astro 13-433. [VII; 1118. "Le bolide du 2 septembre 1894." Astronomie, 13 (1894): 433-435.]


1894 Sept 2 / D. Pic, Sept. 8 / Dark day at Bellows Falls, Vt. No clouds. Sun visible but not strong enough to cast a shadow. So dark artificial light everywhere. Thought might from forest fires in Mich and Wis. [VII; 1119. “A Dark Day.” New Orleans Picayune, September 8, 1894, p. 4 c. 4.]


1894 Sept 2 / New Eng. / Dark Day / Sc Am 112-229. [VII; 1122. Talman, Charles Fitzhugh. "Dark Days and Forest Fires." Scientific American, n.s., 112 (March 6, 1915): 229.]


1894 Sept. / Great eruption of Benbow, in the New Hebrides / Le Naturaliste 1906-182. [VII; 1120. Joly, Raoul Paul. “Volcans des Nouvelles-Hébrides.” Le Naturaliste, s. 2 v. 20 (1906): 180-182, at 182. The Ambrym volcano erupted from October 15, 1894, to February 10, 1895.]


1894 Sept. 6 / See Aug. 18. / “A minute bright projection visible 40 minutes. [VII; 1123. See: 1894 Aug. 18, (VII; 1108).]


1894 Sept 8 / night / Cloudburst / Bethlehem, Pa / N.Y. Trib 10-7-3. [VII; 1124. "A Cloudburst at Bethlehem." New York Tribune, September 10, 1894, p. 7 c. 3.]


1894 Sept 11 / clbrst / Bethlehem, Pa / Chicago Citizen, 15th. [VII; 1125. (Chicago Citizen, September 15, 1894.)]


1894 Sept 11 / Fireball fell from a black cloud, tearing up a Chicago street. / Chic Citizen, 15th. [VII; 1126. (Chicago Citizen, September 15, 1894.)]


1894 Sept 12 / Juvisy Observatory / two narrow lines in sky, from sun / Knowledge 18/205. [VII; 1127. Antoniadi, Eugène Michel . “Optical Phenomenon.” Knowledge, o.s., 18 (n.s., 10; September 2, 1895): 205, (illustration).]


1894 Sept 14 / Volc. Colima, Mexico, active / B. Eagle 14-1-2. [VII; 1128. “Volcano Eruption Threatened.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 14, 1894, p. 1 c. 2. The Colima volcano was in eruption from December 4, 1893, to 1902.]


1894 Sept 18 / 10:10 a.m. / Glen Garry / q / Geol Mag 1900-107. [VII; 1129. Davison, Charles. “On Some Minor British Earthquakes of the Years 1893-1899.” Geological Magazine, s. 4 v. 7 (1900): 106-115, 164-177, at 107 & 114.]


1894 Sept 20, to June 8, 1896 / J—permanent / Two “garnet-red spots” on Jupiter “apparently unchanged, or at least almost immovable” observed by Brenner. / Observatory 20-248. [VII; 1130. Brenner, Leo. “A Peculiar Spot on Jupiter.” Observatory, 20 (1897): 248-249.]


1894 Sept 21 / Cyclone / Iowa / Minn. / Wis / Nature 50-528. [VII; 1131. “Notes.” Nature, 50 (September 27, 1894): 527-530, at 528.]


1894 Sept 22, 23, 24 / Swarm / Village of Guilford, Conn, butterflies (Callidryas eubulle) for three days over the town southwest in a swift unwavering line / Entomological News, 10-71. [VII; 1132. Field, William L.W. “Callidryas Eubule in Migration.” Entomological News, 10 (March 1899): 71-73.]


1894 Sept 24 / Hurricane / Cuba / N.Y. Trib 25-1-4. [VII; 1133. "It Is Blowing Great Guns." New York Tribune, September 25, 1894, p. 1 c. 4.]


1894 Sept 25 / Cyclone / Japan / Nature 50/528. [VII; 1134. “Notes.” Nature, 50 (September 27, 1894): 527-530, at 528.]


1894 Sept 30 / Objects seen through telescope, at Shere, Guildford. Enormous number. If birds, were invisible to n. eye. / Nature 52/415. [VII; 1135. Bray, Reginald Arthur. “A Remarkable Flight of Birds.” Nature, 52 (August 29, 1895): 415.]


1894 Sept 30 / Shere, Guildford, Eng—far away birds / Nature 52-415. [VII; 1136. Bray, Reginald Arthur. “A Remarkable Flight of Birds.” Nature, 52 (August 29, 1895): 415.]


1894 Oct. / Severe q. / Japan / L.T., Nov. 29-6-b. [VII; 1137. “Disastrous Earthquake in Japan.” London Times, November 29, 1894, p. 6 c. 2.]


1894 Oct 1-14 / Colossal sunspots in a group / L'Astro, 13-436 / Meridian, 7th. [VII; 1138. Antoniadi, Eugène Michel. "Group colossal de taches solaire d'octobre 1894." Astronomie, 13 (1894): 436.]


1894 Oct 3 / [LT], 3-c / q. / Dortmund / Eng? [VII; 1139. “Germany.” London Times, October 3, 1894, p. 3 c. 3. Dortmund, Germany.]


1894 / Op. Mars / bright projection / Astro Jour 16/208. [VII; 1141. Hussey, William John. "Projection on the Terminator of Mars." Astronomical Journal, 16 (1896): 208.]


1894 Oct 13 / 6 p.m. / (N) / 229 Havemeyer St., Brooklyn / Myst explosion in a house / B Eagle 14-24-2 / See Nov. 23 [C; 192. “Mysterious Explosion.” Brooklyn Eagle, October 14, 1894, p. 24 c. 2. See: 1894 Nov 23, (C; 201).]


1894 Oct 15 / Violent volc eruption at Ambrym, an island of the New Hebrides group / Nature 51-61. [VII; 1140. “Notes.” Nature, 51 (November 15, 1894): 61-64, at 61. The Ambrym volcano.]


1894 Oct. 20 / Op Mars / (Al). [VII; 1142. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1894, 471.]


1894 Oct 20 / Op. Mars / Oct 16 / Newcomb, Pop Astro, p. 326. [VII; 1143. Opposition of Mars. Newcomb, Simon. Popular Astronomy. New York: Harper, 1894, 326. Newcomb provided the wrong date for the opposition of Mars.]


1894 Oct 27 / Province of San Juan, Argentine, great q. Said that more than 2,000 perished. / Nature 51-18. [VII; 1144. “Notes.” Nature, 51 (November 1, 1894): 18-21, at 18.]


1894 Oct 29 / B. Eagle, 1-5 / A hair-snipping Jack—Huntington, L.I. [C; 193. “Cut Off Miss Bennett's Hair.” Brooklyn Eagle, October 29, 1894, p. 1 c. 5.]


1894 / Nov. 5 / J / Small though conspicuous dark spot on N. edge of great N equatorial belt of Jupiter by Denning, who kept track of the obj until May 9, 1895, when very faint. / Observatory 19-326. [VII; 1145. Denning, William Frederick. “The Spots in Jupiter's N. Hemisphere.” Observatory, 19 (1896): 326-328.]


1894 Nov. 7 / late at night / Patterson, N.J. / Trib. 9-12-3 / det met / 3 vivid flashes / Lurid glare and an immense ball of fire moving eastward and heavy rumbling report that rattled windows. [VII; 1146. "Was It a Bursting Meteor?" New York Tribune, November 9, 1894, p. 12 c. 3.]


1894 Nov. 9 / early morning. / Benton Harbor, Mich / q and deep rumbling like thunder / Trib 11-3-3. [VII; 1147. "Earthquake Shock in Michigan." New York Tribune, November 11, 1894, p. 3 c. 3.]


1894 Nov 10 / Trans Merc. [VII; 1148. Transit of Mercury. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1894, 471.]


1894 Nov 11 / 11:40 p.m. / Yamaska, Quebec / severe q / low rumbling sound / seemed from e to w / Trib 13-2-3. [VII; 1149. "Earthquake and Volcanic Outbreaks." New York Tribune, November 13, 1894, p. 2 c. 3-4. The Colima volcano.]


1894 Nov. 12 / One of the most violent tempests recorded in France / La Nat Sup., Dec 4, 1897. [VII; 1150. “Informations.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1279, supplement; December 4): 1..]


1894 Nov 12 / Violent tempest / France. [VII; 1151. (Refs.???)]


(1894) Nov 13-14 / night / Mag storm and no remarkable sunspots / Observatory 17/406. [VII; 1152. “On the 13th November a notable magnetic disurbance....” Observatory, 17 (1894): 406.]


1894 Nov 13 / Trib, 2-3 / Colima / volc. [VII; 1153. "Earthquake and Volcanic Outbreaks." New York Tribune, November 13, 1894, p. 2 c. 3-4. The Colima volcano.]


[The following three notes were folded together by Fort. C: 194-196.]


1894 Nov. 14 / Wld Animal / (See Nov. 10.) / P.L. of—“Harrisburg, Ohio, a village ab 10 miles from Columbus, is in a state of terror, the people hardly daring to go out of their houses for fear of some terrible wild beast, which is said to be lurking in the vicinity.” Said never been seen but its “terrible roars” at night been heard, and calves and other domestic animals been devoured. A hunt was organized, but—“As soon as the dogs caught a scent of the trail, they ran back and crouched at the feet of the hunters, refusing to move.” Said that this circumstance increased the terror of the people. [C; 194.1, 194.2, 194.3. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, November 14, 1894.) See: 1894 Nov 10, (C; 195).]


1894 Nov 10 / Lion running wild near Washington Court House, Ohio. / Eagle 11-1-4. [C; 195. “Lion Hunting in Ohio.” Brooklyn Eagle, November 11, 1894, p. 1 c. 4.]


1894 Nov 8 / D. Pic / Harrisburg, Ohio, a village ab 10 miles from Columbus, terrorized by “terrible roars after dark”. No animal seen but domestic animals had been devoured. [C; 196. (New Orleans Daily Picayune, November 8, 1894; issue missing at Newspapers.com.) “Terrified.” Cincinnati Enquirer, November 4, 1894, p. 9 c. 9.]


1894 Nov. 15 / B. Eagle, 1-4 / Denver strangler / 17-10-5. [C; 197. “The Denver Strangler.” Brooklyn Eagle, November 15, 1894, p. 1 c. 4. “The Denver Strangler.” Brooklyn Eagle, November 17, 1894, p. 10 c. 5.]


1894 Nov. 16 / It / q and phe / Calabria / See 1805. [VII; 1154.  Refer to: 1805 July 26, (I; 146). Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 398-399.]


1894 Nov 16 / Violent shocks / Calabria / Nature 51-82. [VII; 1155. “Notes.” Nature, 51 (November 22, 1894): 82-85, at 82.]


1894 Nov. 18 / severe shocks / Calabria / L.T., 20th, etc. / 10 p,m,, and 7 a.m. of 19th / 400 lives lost / See Nov. 27. / again morning of 21st. [VII; 1156. “The Earthquake in Italy and Sicily.” London Times, November 20, 1894, p. 5 c. 4. See: 1894 Nov. 27, (VII: 1167 & 1170); and, 1894 Nov. 28, (VII; 1157). (Ref. to 400 lives lost???)]


1894 Nov 19-Dec 19 / Fires, Flushing, L.I.—See Jan 5, 6. / See B. Eagle Index, 1895. [C; 198. See: 1895 Jan 5, (C; 227), and, 1895 Jan 6, (C; 226).]


1894 Nov. 21 / B. Eagle, 12-5 / Sadie Anderson, pretty girl aged 17, 3 days in a trance, 357-18th Street, Brooklyn. [C; 199. “Lay Three Days in a Trance.” Brooklyn Eagle, November 21, 1894, p. 12 c. 5.]


1894 Nov. 22 / B. Eagle, 1-2 / Ghost—figure in white—reported in 28th Ward, Brooklyn. One person, a girl, reported having been pinched by the ghost. [C; 200. “Brooklyn's New Ghost.” Brooklyn Eagle, November 22, 1894, p. 1 c. 2.]


1894 Nov 23 / See Oct 13. / Trib, 5-4 / Ghost / Brooklyn. [C; 201. "A Ghost Who Prays to the Moon." New York Tribune, November 23, 1894, p. 5 c. 4. See: 1894 Oct 13, (C; 192).]


1894 Nov 23 / Aurora—placed / At Tyron, Dumfriesshire / At 7:30 p.m. a luminous mist west of Jupiter / Then the mist passed over Jupiter. Then a belt between Jup. and the Pleiades. / By 8 p.m. had reached Mars. / Nature 51/107, 246, 390. [VII; 1157. Shaw, J. “An Aurora on November 23.” Nature, 51 (November 29, 1894): 107. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. “An Aurora on November 23.” Nature, 51 (January 10, 1895): 246-247. “An Aurora on November 23.” Nature, 51 (February 21, 1895): 390.]


1894 Nov. 23 / 4 a.m. / Parkersburg, W Va. / q. and deep rumbling / Trib 24-1-3. [VII; 1158. "Mild Earthquake Shocks." New York Tribune, November 24, 1894, p. 1 c. 3.]


1894 Nov. 23 / bet 8 and 9 a.m. / In towns near New London, Conn. / pronounced vibrations and sound as of distant thunder / Trib 24-1-3. [VII; 1160. "Mild Earthquake Shocks." New York Tribune, November 24, 1894, p. 1 c. 3.]


1894 Nov. 23 / Details of aurora in Nature, Jan 10, very similar to that of March 13, 1895. [VII; 1161. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. “Aurora of November 23, 1894.” Nature, 51 (January 10, 1895): 246-247. See: 1895 March 13, (VII; 1246).]


1894 Nov 24 / Meteor / Sydney, N.S.W. / Observatory 18/91. [VII; 1162. Gale, Walter Frederick. “A Magnificent Meteor.” Observatory, 18 (1895): 91-92.]


1894 Nov. 24 / Smoke and steam from Mt. Rainier, Wash. / Herald 13-3-1. [VII; 1163. (New York Herald, December 13, 1894, p. 3 c. 1; not found here.)]


1894 Nov. 25 and 26 / Mars / Bright spot like a cloud on Mars. By A E Douglass at Lowell Observatory. / Astrophysical Jour 1/127 / it dissipated and reformed like a met train. 26th had moved / qs. [VII; 1164. Douglass, Andrew Ellicott. "A Cloud-like Spot on the Terminator of Mars." Astrophysical Journal, 1 (1895): 127-130.]


1894 Nov 25, 26 / Spot / Mars / (103) / D-187. [VII; 1165. The note copies information from page 187 of The Book of the Damned. Douglass, Andrew Ellicott. "A Cloud-like Spot on the Terminator of Mars." Astrophysical Journal, 1 (1895): 127-130.]


1894 Nov. 25 / (+) / Ice falling luminously and exploding / Eagle, Dec 6-1-6 / Steamer Urbano, from Rotterdam to Baltimore, in a gale. “...A loud report was heard in the air and an immense ball of fire appeared overhead. Suddenly two explosions louder than the first were heard. After the first of these explosions the ball became a mass of forked streamers of light. [At the second small particles spread over the ship and shot in all directions.] Large lumps of ice fell on the deck. Several of the men ran to pick them up, but it is said they seemed to disappear and left the men astounded.” [VII; 1166.1, 1166.2. “The Meteor Exploded.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 6, 1894, p. 1 c. 6.]


1894 Nov. 27 / It / Brescia, etc. / q / BA '11. [VII; 1167. A class I earthquake. Milne, 738.]


[1894 Nov 27. Wrong date. See: 1893 Nov 27, (VII; 1168).]


1894 Nov. 27 / met first / 11 p.m. / Council Bluffs, Iowa / Whole heavens lighted up by a luminous body. Exploded near earth and fragments scattered over several acres of ground in the town. Said that the strangest pu[note cut off] of the phe was that about 2 minutes later there was a terrific shock like a q. / Trib 29-4-5 / N.Y. Times 29-16-2. [VII; 1169.1, 1169.2. "Fall of a Meteor in Iowa." New York Tribune, November 29, 1894, p. 4 c. 5. “Big Meteor in Council Bluffs.” New York Times, November 29, 1894, p. 16 c. 2. “A large meteor fell, striking the earth in the southwestern part of the city, about 11 o'clock last night. It appeared to be about the size of a balloon, and lighted up the whole city for about half a minute. Just before it struck the earth it exploded, and its fragments were scattered over several acres of ground.” “The most strange phenomenon connected with it is that about two minutes after the meteor fell there was a terrific shock, scarcely less severe than an earthquake, which shook nearly every building in the city and awakened nearly all of the slumbering inhabitants. Buildings in the north part of the town, fully one mile away from where the meteor fell, were violently shaken.”]


1894 Nov. 27 / See Nov. 18. / L.T., 28th / In north of Italy, severe qs at Brescia, 6:15 a.m. / BA '11 / rated at I = small. [VII; 1170. A class I earthquake. Milne, 738. “Earthquakes in Southern Europe.” London Times, November 28, 1894, p. 5 c. 6.]


1894 Nov 27 / det met / 11 p.m. / Council Bluffs, Iowa / Trib 29-4-5. / Luminous obj the size of a balloon “lighting up the whole city as light as day" for about ½ a minute. “Terrific shock, scarcely less severe than an earthquake.” It was supposed that stones had fallen. [VII; 1171. "Fall of a Meteor in Iowa." New York Tribune, November 29, 1894, p. 4 c. 5.]


1894 Nov. 28 / Trib of 19, 22, 24, 26, 27, Dec 28 / Great q / Italy and Sicily. [VII; 1157. "Many Killed By the Earthquakes." New York Tribune, November 19, 1894, p. 1 c. 2. "Devastated by Earthquakes." New York Tribune, November 22, 1894, p. 5 c. 1. "Earthquakes Continue in Italy." New York Herald Tribune, November 24, 1894, p. 1 c. 1. "Destructive Earthquakes in Sicily." New York Tribune, November 26, 1894, p. 1 c. 2. "Earthquake Shocks Continue." New York Tribune, November 27, 1894, p. 8 c. 3. "Earthquakes in Italy and Sicily." New York Tribune, December 28, 1894, p. 1 c. 2.]


1894 Nov. 28 / [LT], 11-c / 29-11-e / Venus—passage behind the sun. [VII; 1172. “Passage of Venus Behind the Sun.” London Times, November 28, 1894, p. 11 c. 3. “Passage of Venus Behind the Sun.” London Times, November 29, 1894, p. 11 c. 5. The first article suggested that, before its conjunction with the Sun, Venus might appear as a dark spot upon the solar corona. “observation of the reappearance in England is quite hopeless, the conditions being too unfavourable.” The apparent magnitude of Venus, when on the far side of the Sun, (near its superior conjunction), would be about -3.82; thus, Venus would be extremely difficult to observe with the naked eye during daylight hours, (when the blue sky would render invisible anything with an apparent magnitude less than -4), especially next to the Sun, (with its apparent magnitude of -26.74). The latter article points out that Venus would be behind the solar corona, and, would only appear as a “dark body” when in transit across the Sun's disc, (since its visibility is due to reflected sunlight). The author of the first article could have mistaken the November conjunction as being an “inferior conjunction,” (rather than a superior conjunction, when Venus passes behind the Sun), as did Prof. McNeill. McNeill, Malcolm. “Planetary Phenomena for November and December, 1894.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 6 (no. 37; August 15, 1894): 193-198, at 193. “Venus is a morning star quite close to the Sun. It rises less than an hour before on November 1. It rapidly approaches the Sun, and comes to inferior conjunction on the morning of November 30.” “Malcolm, McNeill, 1855-1923.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 37 (no. 215; February 1925): 21-22. “Readers of the Publications will remember Professor McNeill gratefully as the contributor of the Planetary Phenomena which have appeared in every regular number from August, 1894, to December, 1924.... It was most unusual to find an error of any kind in his manuscripts.”]


1894 Nov. 28 / Another terrific eruption of Colima, Mexico / B. Eagle 30-12-1. [VII; 1173. “Volcano Eruptions in Mexico.” Brooklyn Eagle, November 30, 1894, p. 12 c. 1. The Colima volcano.]


1894 / early in Dec / Volc eruption on Amoryn Island, on the New Hebrides / N.Y. World, 1895, Jan 16. [VII; 1174. (New York World, January 16, 1895; not @ Newspapers.com.)]


1894 Dec 13 / Polts begin at Durweston, near Blandford. / Proc. SPR 12-90. [C; 202.1. Podmore, Frank. "Poltergeists." Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, 12 (1897): 45-115, at 90-95.]


1894 Dec 13 / begin / Home of Mrs. Best, her daughter and 2 little girls boarding with her, in village of Durweston, 3 miles from Blandford. / (Proc. Soc. 12-90) (R. ac. 3834) / Scratching sounds. Then stones thrown violently. Account by a neighbor, Mr Newman, of beads striking a window pane and breaking it. Then at intervals little shells came through a doorway, slowly. Object like the hasp of a glove dropped. [C; 202.2. Podmore, Frank. "Poltergeists." Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, 12 (1897): 45-115, at 90-95.]


1894 Dec 13 / Children boarders / See back, far, to Cideville case. [C; 203. See: 1850-51, (A; 282), and, 1851, (A; 283).]


1894 Dec 13 and 14 / q / II / India, Burmah / BA '11. [VII; 1175. A class II earthquake. Milne, 738.]


1894 Dec. 17 / 3:30 a.m. / Schoharie Co, N.Y. / q and sound like thunder / Trib 18-2-3. [VII; 1176. "The Earth Trembled." New York Tribune, December 18, 1894, p. 2 c. 3.]


1894 Dec 22 / Dust / im Innern von England / Met Zeit 12/71. [VII; 1179. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 12 (1895): 62-80, at 71. "The Gale of Saturday, December 22nd." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 29 (January 1895): 177-179. The reports were of salt and sea spray mixed with rains, (not a fall of dust).]


1894 Dec 23 / Aurora / J B.A.A. 5/152. [VII; 1177. Pope, James T. "Solar Section." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 5 (1892-1893): 152.]


1894 Dec / Smoke from Mt Renier (Tacoma), Wash / Eagle, Dec 26-1-3. [VII; 1178. “Mount Tacoma Is Spouting Steam.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 26, 1894, p. 1 c. 3. The Mount Rainier volcano, (also known as Mount Tacoma), erupted from November 21 to December 24, 1894.]


1894 Dec 25 / morning / Trib 26-7-2 / Port Huron, Mich / Canadian bank of St Clair river reflected in sky—ab 13 miles of it. St Clair City clearly outlined in the sky—smoke seen from smoke-stacks. Lasted ab. an hour. [VII; 1180. "A Mirage at Port Huron, Mich." New York Tribune, December 26, 1894, p. 7 c. 2.]


1894 Dec 27 / B. Eagle, 1-5 / Near Elwood, Ind., David Jones, farmer, 93 days without sleep. [C; 204. “Without Sleep for Ninety-three Days.” Brooklyn Eagle, December 27, 1894, p. 1 c. 5. “The Sleepless man.” Greenfield Republican, (Indiana), December 24, 1895, p. 2 c. 3. “Two years ago he went 93 days and last year he went 131 days without sleep, and apparently did not suffer very much discomfort.”]


1894-95 / winter / at Lough Neagh / Cor, Nature 53/198, writes heard booming of “mystical guns” every five or six minutes and later “two fearful boomings”. [VII; 1181. “Remarkable Sounds.” Nature, 53 (January 2, 1896): 197-198.]

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