Last updated: March 28, 2018. - Fortean Notes

Go to content

Main menu:

Last updated: March 28, 2018.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1877


1877:


1877 // Body of Mrs W.I. Peters / Frankfort, Ind. / See Dec 22, 1888. [B; 126. See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1877 // A.W. Underwood / Paw Paw / fire breath / See May 1, 1880. [B; 127. See: 1880 May 1, (B; 289), and, 1882 Dec 1, (B; 408).]


1877 // Fire / Baltimore / Trib, Mar 5-10-3, etc. // Montreal / Ap. 30-1-6, etc. // Pittsburg / Mar 19-1-5, etc. // St John, NB ' June 21, etc. // (St Louis / Ap 12). [B; 128. "Large Fire in Baltimore—Loss, $100,000." New York Tribune, March 5, 1877, p. 10 c. 3. "Fire and Loss of Life." New York Tribune, April 30, 1877, p. 1 c. 6. "The Fire Record." New York Tribune, March 19, 1877, p. 1 c. 5. "A City in Flames." New York Tribune, June 21, 1877, p. 1 c. 5. "Slaughter by Fire." New York Tribune, April 12, 1877, p. 1 c. 1-3 & p. 5 c. 3-4.]


1877 // H.H. / N. 11th St., Philadelphia / See Ap. 21, 1883. [B; 129. See: 1883 Ap. 21, (B; 495).]


1877 // Fasting girl of Market Harborough / See Jan. 4, 1878. [B; 130. See: 1878 Jan 4, (B; 178).]


1877 // Lebanon, Ohio / Burglar shot here, ab 1875. Bullets, March 6, 1880. [B; 131. See: 1880 March 6, (B; 278).]


1877 // Lights / wales / Proc. Eng. 19/98. [B; 132. Fryer, A.T. "Psychological aspects of the Welsh Revival." Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, 19 (1905-1907): 80-161, at 98 & 142-145. See: 1875 [Feb 28] / ab. March 1, (B; 42).]


1877 / ?? // All star showers unimportant / BA '77-100. [IV; 1985. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 100. “No very important occurrences of star-showers during the past year have been recorded.]


1877 // Frgs / At Leighton, Essex—after a very severe th. storm, tremendous shower of small frgs. "We could scarcely put our feet to the ground, and had to return home." / Mrs. Ellen S. Marvin, 1646 E. 15th St., Sheepshead Bay, N.Y. [IV; 1986.]


1877 // Famines / Nation 25-209. [IV; 1987. "The Indian Famine." Nation, 25 (October 4, 1877): 209-210.]


1877 // Have Sun, vol. 1 / Jan and June. [IV; 1988.]


1877 Jan 3 / See Jan 27. / (F). [IV; 1989. Fletcher, 104. This is the Warrenton meteorite. See: 1877 Jan 27, (IV; 2011).]


1877 Jan 4, to Feb 6 or 7 / Eruption, Japanese island of Ooshima. There were disastrous q's especially Jan 20 and Feb 4 and 5. / Nature 18-241. [IV; 1990. "Volcanic Phenomena and Earthquakes During 1877." Nature, 18 (June 27, 1878): 241. The Suwanosejima volcano.]


1877 Jan 5 / Great rains and floods / England. [IV; 1991.]


1877 Jan 3 / Mo. met / ab. sunrise / A.J. Sci 3/14/222 / no explosion heard. [IV; 1992. Smith, John Lawrence. "A Description of the Rochester, Warrenton, and Cynthiana Meteoric Stones...." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 14 (1877): 219-229, at 222-223. Regarding the Warrenton meteorite: "A fact to be noted in connection with the fall of this meteorite is that no explosion was heard, or any luminous phenomena produced, by its passage through the air after it was first noticed; this may be in part due to the fact that the fall happened at sunrise; but it was no doubt a meteorite well spent in its rapid motion through the atmosphere, and dropped quietly like an exhausted bird in its flight." These are the Rochester, Warrenton, and Cynthiana meteorites.]  


1877 Jan 3, 20, 23 / Det mets / U.S. / BA 77/98 / N.M. [IV; 1993. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 98. Two of these are the Warrenton, and Cynthiana meteorites.]


1877 Jan 6 / R-P. Jour, 6-4 / Revival at Newburyport, Mass. [B; 133. "Religious rivalry is at a white heat...." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 21 (no. 17; January 6, 1877): 6, (c. 4).]


1877 Jan 7 / early evening / Number of meteors, "with unusually slow motion." / Nature 15-244. [IV; 1994. "Our Astronomical Column." Nature, 15 (January 11, 1877): 243-244.]


1877 Jan 7 / night / Diamond Valley, Nevada / Editorial, NY Times, March 5-4-6—said reported detonations and fall of a great meteorite—because said to have contained large proportion of silver, the comments are meant humorously. [IV; 1995. “A Shower of Silver.” New York Times, March 5, 1877, p. 4 c. 6-7. An exaggerated newspaper yarn of a 2,000,000 ton meteorite containing silver and gold, (before Jules Verne's La Chasse au Météore), was ridiculed in an editorial.]


1877 Jan 7 / 10:30 p.m. / Met / BA 77-142. [IV; 1996. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 142.]


1877 Jan 7 / 10:30 p.m. / London / Birmingham / met / BA 77-116. [IV; 1997. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 116.]


1877 Jan / No q's / BA '11. [IV; 1998. Milne, 726.]


1877 Jan 7 / evening / London / A number of meteors from Ursa Major. "Much lightning on this evening." / Nature 15/244. [IV; 1999. "Our Astronomical Column." Nature, 15 (January 11, 1877): 243-244.]


1877 Jan 8 / Myriads of snow-fleas at York, Pa, or Podurae, covering the surface of the snow so as to discolor it over an area of 2 miles by half a mile. At about same time were reported from point ten miles north of Baltimore. Said that year before been seen in great numbers in Maryland. / Sc Amer Sup 3/1057. [IV; 2000.1, 2000.2. "Appearance of Snow Fleas." Scientific American Supplement, 3 (no. 67; April 14, 1877): 1057.]


1877 Jan 10 / [LT], 5-d / Vesuvius. [IV; 2001. "Mount Vesuvius." London Times, January 10, 1877, p. 5 c. 4.]


1877 Jan 13 / [LT], 11-c / Super in Norfolk. [B; 134. "Superstition in Norfolk." London Times, January 13, 1877, p. 11 c. 3.]


1877 Jan. 15 (?) / "Snakes" of Memphis. [B; 135.]


1877 Jan 15 / Snakes / Memphis, Tenn. / Liv / (D-90) / (36) / See eels at first mistaken for snakes, May 18, 1892. [IV; 2002. The note copies information from pages 90 to 91 of The Book of the Damned. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 5 (January 1877): 8. "Morning opened with light rain; 10:20 a.m. began to pour down in torrents, lasting fifteen minutes, wind S.W.; immediately after the reptiles were discovered crawling on the sidewalks, in the road, gutters and yards of Vance Street, between Lauderdale and Goslee streets, two blocks; careful inquiry was made to ascertain if anyone had seen them descend, but without success; neither were they to be found in the cisterns, on roofs, or any elevations above the ground; Vance street is comparatively new, has no pavements, gutters purely trenches; I heard of none being found elsewhere; when first seen they were a very dark brown, almost black; were very thick in some places, being tangled together like a mass of thread or yarn." "Thousands of Snakes in Memphis." New York Times, January 18, 1877, p. 5 c. 3. "A Snake Rain." Scientific American, n.s., 36 (February 10, 1877): 86. See: 1892 / ab. May 18, (VII; 487).]


1877 Jan. 15/ A snake / See Ap. 10, 1822. [IV; 2003. See: 1822 Ap. 10, (I; 942).]


1877 (Jan 16, ab) / Rel-Ph. J, Feb. 17-2-2 / Polt near Harrington, Del. / Details, but names not given. [B; 136. "Is It the Spirits?" Religio-Philosophical Journal, 21 (no. 23; February 17, 1877): 2, (c. 2-4).]


1877 Jan 17 / See new star, Nov 24, 1876. / E Mec. 24-598, W.F. Denning writes that in Jan one of the chief radiant points of meteors was in Cygnus. It was a new shower of meteors. Upon other days in Jan traces of it, but it was strongly marked Jan. 17. [IV; 2004. Denning, William Frederick. "A New Meteor Shower." English Mechanic, 24 (no. 623; March 2, 1877): 598. See: 1876 Nov. 24, (IV; 1953).]


1877 Jan 17 / See Nov. 24, 1876. / Denning says, E. Mec 24-598, was new. Could find no mention of it in Greg's, Schmidt's nor Tupman's Catalogs. [IV; 2005. Denning, William Frederick. "A New Meteor Shower." English Mechanic, 24 (no. 623; March 2, 1877): 598. Greg, 115, “Table V.” Schmidt, Julius. “Radiationspunkte und stündliche Häufigkeit der Meteore.“ Astronomische Nachrichten, 74 (1869): 49-64. Tupman, George Lyon. "Catalogue of Observed Radiant-Points and Comparison of the Positions with those of other Observers." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 33 (1873): 300-307. See: 1876 Nov. 24, (IV; 1953).]


1877 Jan 17 / See all the meteors between Nov. 24, 1876, and Jan. 17. / See Jan. 27. [IV; 2006. See: 1876 Nov 25-28, (IV; 1954); 1876 Nov. 29, (IV; 1962); 1876 Dec 11-12, (IV; 1966); 1876 Dec 13, (IV; 1968); 1876 Dec 13, (IV; 1969); 1876 Dec 21, (IV: 1975 to 1982); 1877 Jan 3, (IV: 1989 & 1992); 1877 Jan 3, 20, 23, (IV; 1993); 1877 Jan 7, (IV: 1994 to 1997); and, 1877 Jan 27, (IV; 2011).]


1877 Jan 18 / Trib, 8-5 / Explosion powder / Troy. [IV; 2007. "Explosion of Five Tons of Powder." New York Tribune, January 18, 1877, p. 8 c. 5.]


1877 Jan 20 / See Jan 4. / q. / Japan. [IV; 2008. See: 1877 Jan 4, to Feb 6 or 7, (IV; 1990).]  


1877 Jan 22 / N.Y. Times, 2-6 / Sun halos. [IV; 2009. “Halos Round the Sun.” New York Times, January 22, 1877, p. 2 c. 6.]


1877 Jan 23 / 4 p.m. / 9 miles from Cynthiana, Harrison Co., Ky / A.J. Sci 3/14/225. [IV; 2010. Smith, John Lawrence. "A Description of the Rochester, Warrenton, and Cynthiana Meteoric Stones...." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 14 (1877): 219-229, at 225. This is the Cynthiana meteorite.]


1877 Jan 27 / (F) / Third met to fall in a month / C. Rendus 85/678 / Serial / See back Dec. [IV; 2011. Fletcher, 104. This is the Cynthiana meteorite. Smith, Lawrence. "Description des pierres météoriques de Rochester, Warrenton et Cythiana, qui sont respectivement tombées les 31 décembre 1876, 3 janvier et 23 janvier, 1877, avec quelques remarques sur les chutes prècédentes de météorites dans le méme region." Comptes Rendus, 85 (1877): 678-681. See: 1876 Dec 21, (IV; 1978).]


1877 Jan 28 / Pater, Pembrokeshire / Fall of a ball of fire in a gale with th. and lightning. / Land and Water, Feb. 10, 1877. [IV; 2012. (Land and Water, February 10, 1877.)]


1877 Feb 4, 5 / See Jan. 4. / q. / Japan. [IV; 2013. See: 1877 Jan 4, (IV; 1990).]


1877 Feb 8 / 2:30 a.m. / Met ½ moon / Indiana / BA 77-154. [IV; 2014. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 154.]


[1877 Feb 10. Wrong date. See: 1877 Feb 17, (IV; 2015).]


1877 Feb 11 / q. Mexico / N.M. / A.J. Sci 3/14/158. [IV; 2016. "Earthquake of Jalisco, Mexico, and eruption of the Volcano Ceboruco." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 14 (1877): 158.]


1877 Feb. 14 / Mauna Loa began. / On 24th, a submarine eruption lasted 2 days in Bay of Kalukeakua. / Nature 18-241. [IV; 2017. "Volcanic Phenomena and Earthquakes During 1877." Nature, 18 (June 27, 1878): 241.]


1877 Feb [5] and [1877] Nov [13] / (Cut) / White spots on Venus / Knowledge, N.S., 6/221. [IV; 2018. (Knowledge, n.s., 6-221; not here; also, not n.s. 6-121., nor os 6-121 nor os 6-221) “The Planet Venus.” Nature, 46 (September 15, 1892): 468-471, (illustrations).]


1877 Feb 14, etc. / Great display, Mauna Loa / Am J. Sci 3/14/68. [IV; 2019. Coan, Titus. "Volcanic Eruptions on Hawaii." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 14 (1877): 68.]


1877 Feb 16 / Social Circle, Walton Co., Georgia / Detonation and shower of stones / M.W.R., Feb, '77. [IV; 2020. "Miscellaneous Phenomena." Monthly Weather Review, 5 (no. 2; February 1877): 8-9. "A shower of stones is reported to have fallen on the 16th in Social Circle, Walton county, Georgia, varying in size from a hen's egg to that of a man's two fists, irregular in shape, dark grayish color, interspersed with a bright, shiny substance resembling mica. The shower was brief, extended over about four acres of ground and followed an explosive sound." "A Shower of Rocks," Seattle Daily Intelligencer, March 29, 1877, p. 4 c. 1.]


[1877 Feb 17 /] 1877 Feb 10 / La Nature of / Clouds of sauterelles in Algeria. [IV; 2015. "Nuées de sauterelles en Algérie." La Nature, 1877 pt. 1 (no.194; February 17): 190.]


1877 Feb 18 / (Ref) / 2:20 p.m. / Portland, Me, q / A.J. Sci 3-15-21. [IV; 2021. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 21.]


1877 Feb 20 / (moon) / Eudoxe / In L'Astro 1885-212 (?), Trouvelot, of the Ob. of Meudon, writes that bet. 9:30 and 10:30 he saw in Eudoxe [Eudoxus] a new phe—a fine line of light extending across the crater—fine as a luminous wire all way across—more brilliant than moonlight in the sun. Looked but never seen again. [IV; 2022.1, 2022.2. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Murs Énigmatiques Observés à  la Surface de la Lune." Astronomie, 4 (1885): 212-216, (illustration).]


1877 Feb 20 / T[rouvelot] never saw the wall again, but on April 23, 1885, saw piles that looked like debris of a torn down wall. // (1885) / Ap. 23. [IV; 2023. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Murs Énigmatiques Observés à  la Surface de la Lune." Astronomie, 4 (1885): 212-216, at 213-214.]


1877 Feb. 23 / Gulf of Tunis / steamship Knight Templar—rumbling sound / sea lashed / ship struck by something—sank—raised—said been struck by a volcanic rock from sub. eruption / L.T., May 21-8-c. [IV; 2024. Coppin, William. "Submarine Volcanoes." London Times, May 21, 1877, p. 8 c. 3. "The noise lasted upwards of a minutes, and was accompanied by a seething mass of white foam which rose all round the steamer." A diver reported damage to the steamship's keep at two points with about ten and sixteen feet of the keel torn away as if  "from a rock crossing the steamer's track at right angles," rather than striking an object in its path.]


1877 Feb 24 / Rel-Ph. Jour, 2-5—from the Weldon (N.C.) News / Polt in home of elderly woman, Miss Penina Wallace, 5 or 6 miles from Enfield, N.C.—Raps—door flying open—bucket of water tilted over. No harm to Miss W., but a rock thrown at a visitor. [B; 137. "A Ghost." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 21 (no. 24; February 24, 1877): 2, (c. 5).]


1877 Feb 24 / 3 a.m. /Sandwich Islands / submarine eruption / L.T., March 22-9-f. [IV; 2025. "A Volcano in the Ocean." London Times, March 22, 1877, p. 9 c. 6. "From the Volcano!" Hawaiian Gazette, February 28, 1877, p. 3 c. 2-3. The Mauna Loa volcano.]


1877 Feb. 24 / 3 a.m. / Eruption / Hawaii / Nature 15-480. [IV; 2026. "Notes." Nature, 15 (March 29, 1877): 479-481, at 480. The Mauna Loa volcano.]


1877 Feb 26 / 6:20 p.m. / Ilford / Dr. C.M. Ingleby saw a meteor pass from right to left over the disc of the moon. / Nature 15-375. [IV; 2027. Ingleby, Clement Mansfield. "Meteor." Nature, 15 (March 1, 1877): 375. Ingleby was a scholar in metaphysics, mathematics, and literature, (not a doctor of medicine).]


1877 Feb. 27 / Eclipse of moon. [IV; 2028.]


1877 Feb. 27 / Yellow fall / Peckloh, Germany / (D-27). [IV; 2029. The note copies information from page 27 of The Book of the Damned. "Notes and Extracts." Monthly Weather Review, 5 (no 5; May 1877): 10-12, at 11. "The somewhat rare phenomenon of a fall of golden yellow snow occurred in the midst of a severe storm on the afternoon of the 27th of February at Peckeloh, in Germany. A specimen of the water melted from this snow, after being kept a few days, was microscopically examined by Weber, who describes it in Klein's Wochenschrift; he found that it contained principally four different kinds of germs or organisms, shaped respectively like arrows, coffee-beans, horns and dark flat discs." At Peckeloh, Germany, (not Peckloh). (Weber. Wochenschrift für Astronomie, Meteorologie und Geographie, n.s. v. 19 or 20 (1877): ???; not online).]


1877 Feb and Nov / + // White spots on Venus like those on Mars / Sc Am Sup 67/362. [IV; 2030. Gore, John Ellard. "Some Astronomical Curiosities. Celestial Paradoxes." Scientific American Supplement, 67 (no. 1744; June 5, 1909): 362-363. See: 1877 Feb [5] and [1877] Nov [13], (IV; 2018).]


1877 March 10 / Unequalled thunderstorms in Victoria, Australia / Panama D. Star, June 2. [IV; 2031. (Panama Daily Star, June 2, 1877.)]


1877 March 11 / 2 a.m. / Met / St. Etienne, France / met. / Nature 15/460. [IV; 2032. "Notes." Nature, 15 (March 22, 1877): 459-461, at 460-461.]


1877 March 11 / See Ap 23. / q in Argyleshire / Proc Roy Soc Edin. 9-404. [IV; 2033. Stevenson, David. "Notice of Recent Earthquake Shocks in Argyleshire in 1877." Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 9 (1875-1876): 403-405. See: 1877 Ap. 23, (IV; 2060).]


1877 March 12 / Trib 2-4 / Remarkable submarine volc. [IV; 2034. "A Remarkable Submarine Volcano." New York Tribune, March 12, 1877, p. 2 c. 4. See: 1877 Feb 24, (IV; 2025).]


1877 March 13 / Trib, 8-1 / Ap 7-2-3 / Myst disaps. [B; 138. "The Lost in Two Cities." New York Tribune, March 13, 1877, p. 8 c. 1-2. "The Lost in Two Cities." New York Tribune, April 7, 1877, p. 2 c. 3-4.]


1877 March 14 / [LT], 11-a / July 2-5-f // Colorado beetle. [IV; 2117. "Potato Beetle." London Times, March 14, 1877, p. 11 c. 1. "The Colorado Beetle." London Times, January 2, 1877, p. 5 c. 6.]


1877 March 16 / ab. 8 p.m. / Great meteor of Uitenhage, S. Africa, described in the Times, told of in La Sci Pour Tous, 21-29. [IV; 2035. "Meteors." London Times, May 21, 1877, p. 10 c. 3. (La Science Pour Tous, 21-29.)]


1877 March 16 / 8 p.m. / Cape of Good Hope / Great meteor / E to W / size of moon, but oblong / illuminated as bright as day—lasted a minute / LT, May 21-10-c. [IV; 2036. "Meteors." London Times, May 21, 1877, p. 10 c. 3.]


1877 March 16 / 8 p.m. / Cape of Good Hope / Great det met / BA 77-193 / La Nat 9-223. [IV; 2037. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 118-119 & 193. "Le 16 mars 1877, à Uitenhage...." La Nature, 1877 pt. 2 (no. 222; September 1): 223.]


1877 March 17 / Gunnersbury / ab 9:57 p.m. / Observatory 1/20 / Col. Tupman writes of a great meteor visible first at Frome, Tetbury, and Gunnersbury. [IV; 2038. Tupman, George Lyon. "The Meteor of March 17." Observatory, 1 (1877): 19-20.]


1877 March 17 / (Gunnersbury) / Cor says saw just ab. 8:55 p.m., a large red star in Serpens; had never seen it before—ten minutes later it increased and decreased 2 or 3 times like "a 'flashing' light on the coast, after which it suddenly disappeared." / He also saw the other met. / Also he saw the great meteor ab 10 p.m. / Nature 15-451. [IV; 2039.1, 2039.2. "Strange Star.—Meteor." Nature, 15 (March 22, 1877): 451.]


1877 March 17 / 9:57 p.m. / Ireland and Bristol Channel / met / BA 77-142. [IV; 2040. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 142-143.]


1877 March 20 / LT, 11-f / 22-10-c / 23-5-e // Met / Clifton. [IV; 2041. "The Weather." London Times, March 20, 1877, p. 11 c. 6. "The Weather." London Times, March 22, 1877, p. 10 c. 3. "The Weather." London Times, March 23, 1877, p. 5 c. 5.]


1877 March 21 / [LT], 11-b / Mars and the sun. [IV; 2042. Proctor, Richard Anthony. "The Planet Mars and the Sun." London Times, March 21, 1877, p. 11 c. 2.]


1877 March 22 / [LT]., 9-f / Volc. in ocean near Kealakeakua Bay. [IV; 2043. "A Volcano in the Ocean." London Times, March 22, 1877, p. 9 c. 6. The Mauna Loa volcano.]


1877 Mar. 22 / [LT], 1-6 / q / Jamaica. [IV; 2044. "The Mails." London Times, April 13, p. 11 c. 2. "One of the most severe shocks of earthquake ever experienced in the city of Kingston occurred about 1 o'clock on the morning of the 19th."]


1877 March 21 / E Mec 25/89 / C. Barret writes that at a time when surrounding craters were dark, Proclus shone out, so as to see "bright all over".—brilliantly lighted but not by the sun's rays. [IV; 2045. Barrett, C. "Reflection in the Moon." English Mechanic, 25 (April 6, 1877): 89.]


1877 March 21 / hail—thunder / C.R. 84-367. [IV; 2046. Ferrière, É. "Orage de grêle au cap d'Antibes, le 21 mars." Comptes Rendus, 84 (1877): 623.]


1877 March 23 / Two remarkable marks or depressions on limb of moon by Dr Copeland, in Nature 87/432 / "flats". [IV; 2047. Copeland, Ralph. "On two Flats on the Moon's Limb, observed March 23, 1877." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 37 (June 8, 1877): 432-433.]


1877 Mar 23 / See 21 March. / lights / Vence, France / D-282. [IV; 2048. The note copies information from page 282 of The Book of the Damned. "Éclairs en boule observés à Vence, en Provence." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 21 (1877): 45-46. See: (March 21???).]


1877 Ap. 4 / q and phe / At Ramée, on the Loire, 6 p.m., strong concussion, and during the night lights in the sky. / La Nature 8 (1877), p. 382 / This q more general in Italy. [IV; 2049. "Tremblement de terre du 4 avril 1877." La Nature, 1877 pt. 1 (no. 206; May 12): 382. "La secousse a été immédiatement suivie d'un coup de vent très-violent d'une durée de trois minutes environ; et pendant la nuit le ciel a brillé d'éclairs."]


1877 Ap. 4 / Along Loire region of the q., but at 2 p.m. thunder and hail. These were crystalline formed hail. / La Nat 8/355. [IV; 2050. Godefroy, Léon. "Grêlons Extraordinaire Tombées à la Chapelle-Saint-Mesmin (Loiret) et dans les Environs Pendant l'Orage du 4 Avril 1877." La Nature, 1877 pt. 2 (no. 205; May 5): 355-356, (illustrations).]


1877 Ap. 6 / [LT], 10-c / Storm frightful in N.E. Scotland. [IV; 2051. "The Weather." London Times, April 6, 1877, p. 10 c. 3.]


1877 Ap. 6 / 9:26 p.m. / Met explosion over Cork, Ireland / Observatory 1-52 / B As '77-155 / BA 77-155, 120. [IV; 2052. Lecky, Robert J. "Brilliant Meteor." Observatory, 1 (1877): 53-53. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 120-121 & 155-156.]


1877 Ap. 7 / night / Very destructive tornado / Pensacola, Fla / (F). [IV; 2053. Finley, 6.]


1877 Ap. 10 / [LT], 10-d / 12-11-a / 18-10-f // New Comet. [IV; 2054. "The Weather." London Times, April 10, 1877, p. 10 c. 4. Hind, John Russell. "Winnecke's Comet." London Times, April 12, 1877, p. 11 c. 1. "The Gale." London Times, April 18, 1877, p. 10 c. 5-6. Comet C/1877 G1.]


1877 Ap. 12 / Ghst at Buckfastleigh / M. Post, 22nd. [B; 139. (London Morning Post, April 22, 1877; no issue on April 22, 1877.)]


1877 Ap. 15 / Great spot appeared on sun. On 14th, solar surface spotless. / La Sci Pour Tous 21-132. [IV; 2055. (La Science Pour Tous, 21-132.)]


1877 Ap. 16 / The S.S. Poonah in a very severe sandstorm in the Suez Canal. Said that tons of sand fell on the decks. / L.T., May 2-11-f. [IV; 2056. "Sand Storm." London Times, May 2, 1877, p. 11 c. 6.]


1877 April 16 / (Cut) / Rocket-like ascend and descend met / Newcastle-on-Tyne, Ap 16, 1877—near zenith flashed—descended near easter horizon and again flashed—not a rocket—was seen at Cambridge and Manchester. / E Mec. 25/159, 182 // 10:05 p.m. / BA 77-156. [IV; 2057. Barkas, T.P. “A Brilliant Meteor.” English Mechanic, 25 (April 27, 1877): 159. “A Novel Ship....” English Mechanic, 25 (May 4, 1877): 182-183, at 182. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 120-121 & 156-157.]


1877 Ap. 16 / 10:50 p.m. / Met from Cassiop's Chair / Cambridge Nat. Hist Jour 1/65. [IV; 2058. (The Cambridge Natural History, 1-65; not online.) Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 120-121 & 156-157.]


1877 Ap 20 / Trib, 8-6 / Explosion mine / Saratoga. [IV; 2059. "The Iron Mine Blast." New York Tribune, April 20, 1877 p. 8 c. 6.]


1877 Ap. 23 / See March 11. [IV; 2060. See: 1877 March 11, (IV; 2033).]


1877 Ap. 23 / 11 a.m. / Auburn, N.H. / q / R—Feb 18. [IV; 2061. Refer to: 1877 Feb 18, (IV; 2021). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 23.]


1877 Ap. 24 / Cyclone / Texas. [IV; 2062. "The recent storm in Galveston was not a cyclone, hurricane or gale...." Dallas Daily Herald, (Texas), April 27, 1877, p. 2 c. 2.]


1877 April 26 / Day appointed for prayer by Gov of Minnestoa for relief from grasshoppers. [IV; 2063. "Religious Intelligence." New York Herald, April 15, 1877, p. 5 c. 1-4.]


1877 Ap. 28 / Rel-P. J, 6-1 / At Mount Joy, Pa., clergyman, Rev. Mr. Gerlach, stricken with paralysis, while preaching a funeral sermon. [B; 140. "Visitation of Providence." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 22 (no. 4; April 28, 1877): 6, (c. 1).]


[1877 Ap. 28]/ Ghst / Aldershot / 1877 / [LT], Ap. 28-10-c. [B; 141. "The Aldershot Ghost." London Times, April 28, 1877, p. 10 c. 3.]


1877 Ap. 29 / q / Mendoza / Standard (B. Ay.), May 15. [IV; 2064. (Buenos Aires Standard, May 15, 1877.)]


1877 May / England and Wales / Clouded yellow butterfly / "The most remarkable migration on record." / L.T., Aug 20-10-f, 1879 / rather rare butterfly. [IV; 2065. Wolley-Dod, Charles. "The Painted Lady Butterfly." London Times, August 20, 1879, p. 10 c. 6.]


1877 May 1-June 20 / Have N.Y. Herald. [IV; 2066.]


1877 May 2 / [LT], 9-d / 14-13-a / 15-11-f. [IV; 2067. (London Times, May 2, 1877, p. 9 c. 4. London Times, May 14, 1877, p. 13 c. 1. London Times, May 15, 1877, p. 11 c. 6.)]


1877 May 3 / ice / Texas / D-176. ** [IV; 2068. The note copies information from page 176 of The Book of the Damned. "Precipitation." Monthly Weather Review, 5 (no. 5; May 1877): 4-5, at 5. "Among the cases of large hail storms are the following: 3rd, terrific and destructive storm near Mason, Tex., hail as large as a man's hand, crushing crops and killing thousands of sheep...."]


1877 May 4 / (Augs) / "Flocks" of brilliant objects like 1st mag stars near the sun by Prof Schafarik of Prague. / Astro Reg. 23/208. [IV; 2069. Šafárik, A. "Telescopic Meteors." Astronomical Register, 23 (September 1885): 205-211, at 207-208.]


1877 May/ Klein // In Astro Reg 17/204, Neison over memoranda of his own. His first ob was May 19, 1877. See observations upon the region, listing 20 from July, 1870, to August, 1875, in which Hyginus N was not seen. [IV; 2070. Neison, Edmund. "Hyginus N." Astronomical Register, 17 (September 1879): 199-208, & (October 1879): 223-233, (November 1879): 251-259, and, 18 (September 1880): 199-206; at v. 17 pp.203-204. "If Hyginus N was as distinct as it is now, in 1780-1795, when Schröter observed, when Gruituisen observed in 1815-1826, when Lohrmann observed in 1824-1830, when Mädler observed, 1830-1839, and during the later periods when observed by Schmidt, Klein, and myself—then I cannot account in any manner whatever for its being overlooked." "A New Crater near Hyginus." Selenographical Journal, 1 (no. 2; May 2, 1878): 5-6. "From twelve years' experience in observing the neighbourhood of Hyginus, Dr. Klein is certain that the crater is new. Mr. Neison, who had this region under constant observation between 1871-1876, is also certain that during this period there did not exist on this part of the lunar surface any deep crater of the size and character described by Dr. Klein; for it is almost impossible that a deep black crater, of even half the dimensions of Klein's crater, could have escaped being seen when many new and much smaller objects have been discovered in its vicinity, and much more minute craterlets repeatedly observed."]


1877 May 2 / [LT], 11-f / Sandstorm / See sub. volcs. 21-8-c. [IV; 2071. "Sand Storm." London Times, May 2, 1877, p. 11 c. 6. See: (Submarine volcanoes???). See: 1877 Ap. 16, (IV; 2056). ]


1877 May 5 / "Appalling tempest" and torrents at Montevideo. / Standard, B. Ayres, 6th // of May 10th / Thousands of sheep drowned in the recent floods near Vecino. [IV; 2072. (Buenos Aires Standard, May 6, 1877, and, May 10, 1877.)]


1877 May 5 / See 15th. / At 5 a.m., Port Stanley, Ontario, a tidal wave 5 feet high rushed upon the northern shore of Lake Erie. Little wind; lake almost calm. / N.Y. Herald 16-3-5. [IV; 2073. "Was It an Earthquake?" New York Herald, May 16, 1877, p. 3 c. 5. See: 1877 May 15, (IV; 2103).]


1877 May 8 / 7:20 a.m. / Shock at New Plymouth, N.Z. / New Zealand Times, 9th. [IV; 2074. "Telegraphic News." New Zealand Times, (Wellington), May 9, 1877, p. 2 c. 6-7.]


1877 May 9 / A / various dates, Standard (BA) / Q—then a fire—then a tidal wave that put out the fire. Q's and volc eruptions reported from Sandwich Islands. Not till 17th full news. / at 8:52 p.m. [Scanned line missing, here] after town—"this town (or village) has disappeared." (Revolution in Peru at the time.) loods in Argentine. In Standard, 20th, someone describes, as best he can one town he visited, but nothing to describe except one wide smooth surface of water—no bridge, no steeples, no roofs No volcano mentioned in Standard. / May 30th, tells of delayed news of floods in some places 30 miles wide. [IV; 2075.1, 2075.2, 2075.3. (Buenos Aires Standard, May 20, 1877.)]


1877 May 9 / 8:30 p.m. / Severe q / Peru / At Antofagasta, a red glow was seen and supposed to have come from the volcano of San Pedro de Atacama. / Nature 16-174 / Sea waves 60 feet high. [IV; 2076. "Notes." Nature, 16 (June 28, 1877): 173-175, at 174. The Licancabur volcano.]


1877 May 9 / Q of Peru. Some days after the q, clouds of smoke from a volcano in desert of Atacama. / La Nature, p. 116 (1877). [IV; 2077. Tissandier, Gaston. "Le Tremblement de Terre et le Ras de Marée du Pérou, du Chili et des Îles Sandwich." La Nature, 1877 pt. 2 (no. 216; July 21): 116. The Licancabur volcano.]


1877 May 9 / From Antogagasta, a red glare was seen in direction of volcano of Llaga, which was active, was near frontier of Peru and Bolivia. / Geog May 4-208. [IV; 2078. "The Great Earthquake on the Coast of Peru." Geographical Magazine, 4 (1877): 206-209, at 208. The Isluga volcano.]


1877 May 9 / Great q / Chile / BA 11 / 14th and 17th. [IV; 2079. Milne, 726.]


1877 May 9 / Unknown volc / q in Peru / "At Antofagasta the atmosphere was illuminated by a red glare, supposed to have come from the volcano [of] San Pedro de Atacama, a few leagues in the interior." / L.T., June 27-4-3. [IV; 2080. "The Earthquake in Peru." London Times, June 27, 1877, p. 4 c. 2-3. The Licancabur volcano.]


1877 May 10 / Panama Daily Star and Herald, June 6, said that various opinions as to where the volcano was. "At first it was supposed that Ilaga on the southern boundary with Bolivia caused the caastrophe, but now it is attributed to that active volcano known as San Pedro de Atacama, ab 40 leagues inland from Mejillones de Bolivia. [IV; 2081.1, 2081.2. (Panama Daily Star and Herald, June 6, 1877.)]


1877 May 10 / "On Thursday evening, at 9:45, the Salado, at Sta. Fé, suddenly rose 20 inches, causing some vessels to part moorings. It was like an earthquake wave." Sta Fé—on Atlantic coast? Yes. = Santa Fe. / Standard (B. Ayres), 13th. [IV; 2082.1, 2082.2. (Buenos Aires Standard, May 13, 1877,)]


1877 May 10 / from 10:07 to 10:30 a.m. / Tidal wave / Gaviota, California / N.Y. Herald 11-7-4. [IV; 2083. "A Submarine Earthquake." New York Herald, May 11, 1877, p. 7 c. 4.]


1877 May 10 / Great tidal wave / Sandwich Islands / N.Y. Herald, June 1-5-5 / 4 a.m. [IV; 2084. "A Tidal Wave." New York Herald, June 1, 1877, p. 5 c. 5.]


1877 May 10 / See May 15. [IV; 2085. See: 1877 May 15, (IV; 2103).]


1877 [Nov 19] // Kroonstadt metite / Nature 88-565. [IV; 2086. "Our Astronomical Column." Nature, 88 (February 22, 1912): 565. See: 1877 Nov. 19, (IV; 2277). This is the Cronstad meteorite.]


1877 May 9 / 8:30 p.m. / A ship stopped by a shock 23 miles west of Antofagasta / N.Y. Times, June 12-2-4. [IV; 2087. “The Pacific Tidal Wave.” New York Times, June 12, 1877, p. 2 c. 3-4.]


1877 May 9 / 8:30 p.m. / First shock in Peru. / Brazil and River Plate Mail, July 7 / Sky overcast until night of 30-31st, with a few exceptions. / Among other details, "the lugubrious descent of a falling star through the smoke of the burning buildings which hovered over the centre of the city. // Issue of Aug 22, quoting the Valparaiso Times, that in the hills flashed electricity like flames. [IV; 2088.1, 2088.2. (Brazil and River Plate Mail, July 7, 1877.)]


1877 May 10 / 3:02 p.m. / Severe shock / Schoharie Co., NY / N.Y. Times 13-1-4. [IV; 2089. “The Effects of an Earthquake.” New York Times, May 13, 1877, p. 1 c. 4. ]


1877 May 10 / San Francisco / q waves began at 6:18 a.m. / L.T., May 31-11-f. [IV; 2090. "Earthquake Waves." London Times, May 31, 1877, p. 11 c. 6.]


1877 May 10 / Town in Peru destroyed by q / sharp q in San Francisco / in Middleburg, Schoharie Co, N.Y. / NY Times 13-1-4. [IV; 2091. “The Effects of an Earthquake.” New York Times, May 13, 1877, p. 1 c. 4.At San Francisco, the tidal waves of an earthquake were recorded on a tidal gauge, (which may have originated in the earthquakes in Peru).]


1877 May 11 / Newcastle, N.S.W.—waves began 5 a.m. / Syd Morn Herald, 12th. [IV; 2092. "Tidal Phenomena." Sydney Morning Herald, May 12, 1877, p. 5 c. 1.]


1877 May 11 / (other places 8 to 10 feet high) / Between 6 and 7 a.m., tidal wave 2 or 3 feet high, Wellington. Abnormal tide increase and at 5 p.m., 6 feet high. / N. Zealand Times of 12th. [IV; 2093. "The Tidal Wave." New Zealand Times, (Wellington), May 12, 1877, p. 2 c. 5-6.]


1877 May 11 / 8:10 p.m. / Very bright meteor, S to N, over Dunedin, N. Zealand. / N.Z. Times, 22nd. [IV; 2094. "There is at least one person who is not yet satisfied...." New Zealand Times, (Wellington), May 22, 1877, p. 2 c. 5. Harper, W.T.H.D. "The Tidal Wave." Dunedin Evening Star, May 16, 1877, p. 3 c. 2.]


1877 May 11 / Schnectady, Scholharie Co, NY / q / R—Feb 18. [IV; 2095. Refer to: 1877 Feb 18, (IV; 2021). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 24.]


1877 May 11 / Comrie / bet 2 and 3 a.m. / Sound like distant thunder or the discharge of cannon and q at Comrie / Nature 16-54. [IV; 2096. "Notes." Nature, 16 (May 17, 1877): 53-54, at 54. ]


1877 May 11 / New Zealand, E coast, and New S. Wales, sea rose bet 5 and 8 feet. / Nature 16-198. [IV; 2097. "Notes." Nature, 16 (July 5, 1877): 196-198, at 198. ]


1877 May 12 and 13 / Enormous swarms of locusts, Mepaddy, India / Madras Mail, June 29, 1901. [IV; 2098. (Madras Mail, June 29, 1901.)]


1877 May 13 / N.Y.T., 1-3 / 18-3-1 // Middleburg / Schoharie, N.Y. / q. [IV; 2099. “The Effects of an Earthquake.” New York Times, May 13, 1877, p. 1 c. 4. “The Schoharie County Earthquake.” New York Times, May 18, 1877, p. 3 c. 1.]


1877 May 14, etc. / Beast / Pall Mall Gazette, May 30-5 / "A mysterious beast is prowling about Hanover County, Virginia, and has caused general alarm. The animal has been seen on several farms, and, from the description [given] of it, is supposed to be a lioness escaped from one of the many menageries which have lately passed through the district. On the morning of the 14th inst. a large number of armed men tracked the animal for a number of miles through the country almost to the [vicinity of] Chickahominy River, where its track was lost. The marks left by the animal's feet are, it is stated, different from those ever before seen by any citizen of Hanover County. When standing still, the impressions made by the claws in the soil are over nine inches apart. It was reported by latest accounts to be moving in the direction of Richmond, and a large body of citizens, 'composed of cavalry and infantry' were in cautious but vigorous pursuit." [B; 142.1 to 142.5. "A mysterious beast is prowling...." Pall Mall Gazette, May 30, 1877, p. 5 c. 2. "A Lioness at Large." New York Herald, May 15, 1877, p. 7 c. 4.]


1877 May 14 / Lioness of Hanover Co / N.Y. Herald 15-7-3 // Herald-16-4-4—Lioness still at large. Parties from Richmond and other places had joined the first hunters. // Herald 18-5-4 / Said that though the deep tracks five inches by four had convinced experienced zoologists that a "lioness, or some such monstrous beast" was abroad, the animal had been killed—huge dog, dark yellowish, ab 6 feet "from nose to tail". Said owned by a Mr. Barbour and had strayed away a week before. [B; 143.1, 143.2, 143.3. "A Lioness at Large." New York Herald, May 15, 1877, p. 7 c. 4. "The Lioness Still at Large." New York Herald, May 16, 1877, p. 4 c. 4. "That Lion Scare." New York Herald, May 18, 1877, p. 5 c. 4. "The party lost no time, and soon they inserted the muzzles of their rifles in the opening between the boards, and at a given signal, after taking deadly aim a leaden volley was poured into the body of the animal and it expired almost instantly. When they were satisfied it was dead the body was inspected by the victorious slayers, and found to be that of a male animal of a dark yellowish color, measuring five feet ten inches from nose to tail and two feet eleven inches in height. It was an enormous carcass, the like of which had never before been seen in that section of country. But it was not until parties had arrived from Richmond that it was discovered to be a monster dog. a cross between a Newfoundland and Mount St. Bernard, which had recently been brought to tbe country by Mr. Benjamin Barbour. The animal had strayed off a week ago, and has since kept the country in a state of intense excitement."]


1877 May 14 / evening / NY Times 20-5-4 / Ac. Milwaukee (Wis) Sentinel—at Franklin, a roaring noise like approaching railroad train. Much speculation as to what could be—sky suddenly darkened by vast swarm of insects. Stragglers were larger than potato bug—having stronger resemblance to the June bug—dark brow with bright spots on ends of wings. / 20 minutes in passing / "Untold millions." [IV; 2100.1, 2100.2. “A Flight of Beetles.” New York Times, May 20, 1877, p. 5 c. 4. (Milwaukee Sentinel, May 15, 1877.)]


1877 May 14 / evening / Severe shock, Callao and Lima, Peru / N.Y. Times, June 12-2-4. [IV; 2101. “The Pacific Tidal Wave.” New York Times, June 12, 1877, p. 2 c. 3-4.]


[1877 May 14 /] 1877 May 17 / q. / Peru / BA '11. [IV; 2110. Milne, 726.]


1877 May 14, 18, June 12, Sept 27 / Peru / q. / Trib. [IV; 2102. "A Town Destroyed by an Earthquake." New York Tribune, May 14, 1877, p. 1 c. 6. "The Great Peruvian Earthquake." New York Tribune, May 18, 1877, p. 5 c. 3. "The Peruvian Calamity." New York Tribune, June 12, 1877, p. 8 c. 1. "Earthquakes in Peru." New York Tribune, September 27, 1877, p. 1 c. 6.]


1877 May 15 / Tidal wave in Lake Erie / NY Times May 21-2-4 // South Pacific, May 10 / Times, June 1-2-5 // Ac to June 1-5-3, it was enormous and disastrous at Sandwich Islands, May 10. [IV; 2103. “Tidal Waves in the Lakes.” New York Times, May 21, 1877, p. 2 c. 4. “The South Pacific Tidal Wave.” New York Times, June 1, 1877, p. 2 c. 5. “Whole Villages Washed.” New York Times, June 1, 1877, p. 5 c. 3.]


1877 May 15 and 29 / "Strange light spot N.W. of Picard,” by Frank Dennett / (no more) / E Mec 25/335. [IV; 2104. Dennett, Frank. “Notes on Our Satellite.” English Mechanic, 25 (June 15, 1877): 335.]


1877 May 15 / 1:30 a.m. / "Immense" meteor at Auckland / N.Z. Times, 17th. [IV; 2105. "Telegraphic News." New Zealand Times, (Wellington), May 17, 1877, p. 2 c. 6.]


1877 May 16 / 6 p.m. / N.Z. Times, 18th / At Westport, a very brilliant meteor vanished after a shower of sparks. [IV; 2106. "Telegraphic News." New Zealand Times, (Wellington), May 18, 1877, p. 2 c. 6.]


1877 May 16, etc. / NY Herald / Great forest fires / N. England / northern N.Y. [IV; 2107. "Flaming Forests." New York Herald, May 16, 1877, p. 4 c. 1-3. "Forest Fires." New York Herald, May 16, 1877, p. 6 c. 5. "Forest Fires." New York Herald, May 17, 1877, p. 7 c. 5. "Forest Fires." New York Herald, May 20, 1877, p. 11 c. 4.]


1877 May / Klein's dark spot on moon / Sc Am 38/36. [IV; 2108. "Is the Moon Inhabited?" Scientific American, n.s., 38 (July 20, 1878): 36. Birt, William Radcliffe. "Dr. Klein's New Crater near Hyginus." English Mechanic, 27 (no. 693; July 5, 1878): 407. (Klein, Hermann J. "U...." Wochenschrift für Astronomie, Meteorologie und Geographie, 20 (nos. 13 and 16; 1878): ....)]


1877 May 17 / [LT], 5-f / Coins near Cupar. [B; 144. "Ancient Coins." London Times, May 17, 1877, p. 5 c. 6.]


1877 May 17 / Hungen, Hesse, Germany / (F). [IV; 2109. Fletcher, 104. This is the Hungen meteorite.]


[1877 May 17. Wrong date. See: 1877 May 14, (IV; 2110).]


1877 May 19 / Trance / Rel-Ph-J, 4-2 / Ada Turk, aged 13, in a trance—Chicago. [B; 145. "Peculiar Entrancement." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 22 (no. 10; May 19, 1877): 4, (c. 2).]


1877 May / Williamsburg (Brooklyn) saloon keeper named Gunzer died. 18 months later his ghost appeared to new husband of his widow, who had been accused of murdering him. / N.Y. Times, 1879, March 18-8-3 / 23-8-2. [B; 146. “Gunzer Turned Up Again.” New York Times, March 18, 1879, p. 8 c. 3. “The Dierking Divorce.” New York Times, March 23, 1879, p. 8 c. 2.]


1877 May 19 / Hyginus N / Observation listed by Neison / Astro Reg 17/207 / "Large black crater." [IV; 2111. Neison, Edmund. "Hyginus N." Astronomical Register, 17 (September 1879): 199-208, & (October 1879): 223-233, (November 1879): 251-259, and, 18 (September 1880): 199-206; at v. 17 p. 207.]


1877 (May) / Klein's Crater / In Rutherford's photo of moon of March 6, 1865, a small light spot in point of Klein's Crater. / Times, Aug 31, 1878. [IV; 2112. “A New Crater in the Moon.” London Times, August 31, 1878, p. 4 c. 4-6.]


1877 // Klein's Crater. In Observatory, 3/328, Mr. Neison is quoted that he had observed the region with especial care in 1874-75 and had not seen this object. That Schmidt of Athens in all previous observations had not seen it, but upon looking, in 1877, had instantly seen it. [IV; 2113. "Meeting of the Royal Astronomical Society. Friday, 1879, January 10." Observatory, 3 (1879-1880): 325-338, at 327-328.]


1877 May 19 / Dr Klein's "Crater N of Hyginus / large black spot with a vaporous border, never been seen before / visible June 18—disap. 19th / weather bad and no obs till Nov. / dusky spot—Nov. 13 / disap—Nov. 14 / Seen Dec. 13 / often seen since / Lastly on March 8, 1879, completely vanished / But for later obs of Hyginus N, see Astro Reg., 17-251. [IV; 2114.1, 2114.2, 2114.3. Neison, Edmund. "Hyginus N." Astronomical Register, 17 (September 1879): 199-208, & (October 1879): 223-233, (November 1879): 251-259, and, 18 (September 1880): 199-206; at v. 17 pp. 207-208 & 255. Pabst's decipherment gives the date as "March 8, 1878"; but, Neison states that Hyginus N was "very distinctly visible" on March 8, 1879, but "was not visible" on March 29, 1879, when he next looked for it.]


1877 // Moon / west of Picard / See May 15, 1864. [IV; 2115. See: 1864 May 15, (III; 566).]


1877 May 21 / Toronto Globe of / Consternation in Long Island. Swarms of potato bugs in Farmingdale. [IV; 2116. “The Potato Bug on Long Island.” Toronto Globe, May 21, 1877, p. 1 c. 7. See: 1877 March 14, (IV; 2117).]


1877 May 21 / Dark Day and Det Met / 6 p.m. / Dark day at Fianarantsoa, Madagascar / 6 p.m., great met—"Fiery red encircled by blue; halo and tail comet-like". Burst and detonated. / BA 78-279. [IV; 2118. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the Year 1877-78." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1878, 258-377, at 278-279.]


1877 May 22 / Beetles? / Toronto Globe of—"A gentleman from Newington, Conn., mentions the occurrence of a flight of beetles in the early even twilight that must have included millions. They made a loud humming or booming sound, and were (he thinks) about ten minutes in passing. Some that were caught proved to be apparently beetles, but of a different appearance from the beetles that are most known hereabouts." Inasmuch as 17-year locusts were appearing in great numbers in New York State, it was thought that the insects of Newington were they and not beetles. [IV; 2119.1, 2119.2, 2119.3. “The Seventeen-Year Locusts.” Toronto Globe, May 22, 1877, p. 3 c. 4.]


1877 May 25 / London, Ontario / While the 7th Battalion Band was playing, someone threw a stone, injuring a bandsman. "The outrage has been several times repeated, but by whom is not known." / Toronto Globe, 29-1-8. [B; 147. “Latest from London.” Toronto Globe, May 29, 1877, p. 1 c. 8.]


1877 May 25 / Knoxville, Tenn / q / R—Feb. 18. [IV; 2121. Refer to: 1877 Feb 18, (IV; 2021). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 24.]


1877 May 26 / 3 p.m. / New Harmony, Ind / q / R—Feb. 18. [IV; 2120. Refer to: 1877 Feb 18, (IV; 2021). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at. 24.]


1877 May 28 / Stones / Toronto Globe of June 4, page 1-10, that for several weeks there had been a stone-throwing mania, among boys of Toronto in neighborhood of Chestnut Street south of Agnes St. Police had been complained to, but the stones continued to be thrown. [B; 148. “City News.” Toronto Globe, June 4, 1877, p. 1 c. 10.]


1877 May 28 / In N.Y., most brilliant aurora in several years / N.Y. Times 29-5-5. [IV 2122. “The Aurora Borealis.” New York Times, May 29, 1877, p. 5 c. 5.]


1877 May 28 / Aurora / Maine to Kansas and Dakota W / and N Car and Ky in the S / great aurora / M.W.R., May '77. [IV; 2123. "Atmospheric Electricity." Monthly Weather Review, 5 (no 5; May 1877): 7-8, at 7.]

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      


1877 June 1-17, etc. / Many deaths from lightning / La Nature 1877/2/121. [B; 149. Tissandier, Gaston. “Les Victimes de la Foudre en Mai, Juin et Juillet 1877.” La Nature, 1877 pt. 2 (no. 215; July 14): 118-122, at 119-122.]


1877 June 1 / [LT], 4-f / Sun in recess. [IV; 2124. "The Sun in Recess." London Times, June 1, 1877, p. 4 c. 6.]


[1877 June 4] 1877 June 5, 6 / NY Times 21-3-1 / Mt Carmel, Ill, destroyed by tornado. [IV; 2125. “Aid for the Suffering Asked.” New York Times, June 21, 1877, p. 3 c. 1.]


1877 June 6 / Elkhorn Valley, Nebraska / Waterspout burst, flooding everything 12 feet deep. / N.Y. Herald 7-7-3. [IV; 2126. "A Waterspout." New York Herald, June 7, 1877, p. 7 c. 3.]


1877 June 11 / Eruption reported in Southern California, 60 miles from Fort Yuma / Nature 18-241. [IV; 2127. "Volcanic Phenomena and Earthquakes During 1877." Nature, 18 (June 27, 1878): 241. See: 1877 June 13, (IV; 2132).]


1877 June 12 / 9:15 p.m. / Great met / Indiana / BA 77-193 / Am J. Sci 3/14/163. [IV; 2128. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 193. "Notice of the Meteor of June 12, 1877." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 14 (1877): 168.]


1877 June 12 / 8:27 p.m. / Great meteor / Ind / Mich / Ill / Iowa / NY Times 18-8-6. [IV; 2129. “The Meteor of June 12.” New York Times, June 18, 1877, p. 8 c. 6-7.]


1877 June 12 / Trib, 8-1 / q. / Peru. [IV; 2130. "The Peruvian Calamity." New York Tribune, June 12, 1877, p. 8 c. 1. See: 1877 May 9, (IV; 2079).]


1877 June / Cotopaxi, Equador / L.T., Aug 27-5-f, 1885. [IV; 2131. "Eruption of Cotopaxi." London Times, August 27, 1885, p. 5 c. 6. The Cotopaxi volcano was in eruption from January to September 2, 1877.]


1877 June 13 / Trib, 8-3 / Volcanic eruption / Cal. [IV; 2132. "Volcanic Eruption in California." New York Tribune, June 13, 1877, p. 8 c. 3. "A dispatch from Los Angeles states that a volcanic eruption occurred in the mountains opposite Flowing Well Station, on the Southern Pacific Railroad, about 60 miles from Yuma, at 9 a.m. yesterday [June 11]. It was preceded by a violent vibration of the earth, about half an hour after which a dense volume of smoke and huge black and broken bowlders were observed to issue from the mountains." "Volcanic Eruption." New York Herald, June 13, 1877, p. 7 c. 5-6. "The Southern California Volcano." Daily Alta California, June 15, 1877, p.1 c. 1. "A despatch received by Mr. John Corning, Assistant General Superintendant of the Southern Pacific Railroad, last evening, states that the volcanic disturbances in the mountains, eight miles from Mammoth Tank Station, continue. The volcano was smoking, steaming and ejecting rocks in large numbers. There was a continual noise like the rolling of thunder." "A Volcano in the Colorado Desert." Daily Alta California, June 16, 1877, p. 2 c. 1. "There is no mention of any flame, lava, or mud coming from the volcano, nor is it said that there was any earthquake shock, so the eruption is probably a one-horse affair out of which no serious excitement can be made. Small as it may be, however, it deserves more attention than it has yet received. No person has yet visited it or given a description of |its appearance as visible from the railroad. In fact, there is room for suspicion that it, belongs to a class of phenomena previously observed in that region—we mean the mud volcanoes. These are really swamps or muddy pools through which hot steam rises from subterranean sources, and it is said that sometimes black smoke accompanies the steam. These mud volcanoes, however, are in the plain, whereas the outbreak of the 11th inst., is placed on a mountain side." The volcanoes of the Salton Buttes of California are thought to have last erupted about 1800 years ago; but, evidence of volcanic activity was noted in the Colorado Desert, along the railroad between San Diego and Yuma. James, Joseph Francis. "The Colorado Desert." Popular Science Monthly, 20 (January 1882): 384-390, at  386. A mud-spring gave the name Volcano to a section-house station near the Flowing-Well Station. "The spring is situated in a depression about twenty-five feet deep, and the same in diameter. In the bottom is a small lake, or mass of liquid mud. This rises in great bubbles as large as a hat, breaking and sputtering like boiling lard. All over the surface of the water are little bubbles, caused by carbonic-acid gas. Both mud and water have a strong smell of sulphuretted hydrogen, and the spring is evidently the result of volcanic force, which has, at some former period, been very active."]


1877 June 14 / Lights on moon by Prof. Henry Harrison / Sid. Mess., 3/150 / on dark limb—"the light resembles the reflection of a moving mirror x x x. [IV; 2133. "By the kindness of Prof. John Heywood...." Sidereal Messenger, 3 (June 1884): 150. "By kindness of Prof. John Heywood, Otterbein University, Westerville, 0., we are able to give our readers some interesting observations made by Prof. Henry Harrison In 1877, June 14, 8 P.M. They are as follows: 'While engaged at drawings of the Moon’s terminator, now 84 hours of age, I notice variations of brilliancy along the dark limb, or earth-shine so-called, which present curious characteristics; the light resembles the refiexion of a moving mirror, held in a strong light against the shadow side of a dark hall; streamers of light of a faint greenish-blue, seen to move along the limb, resembling somewhat the moving streamers often seen during a display of our terrestrial Aurora Borealis. (Perhaps optical illusion.) June 16th, 1877.—'Think I discover the same moving light on Moon’s dark limb, as on the 14th inst., but much fainter.' It seems to me that these observations are a strong confirmation not only of my observations, but of my explanation; as the same occurred to Mr. Harrison." See: 1883 Nov. 4 / and Nov and Dec, (V; 1703), and, 1884 Sept. 16, (V; 2025).]


1877 June 14 / Clermont Ferrand / Bolide / C.R. 84-1462. [IV; 2134. Gruey. "Observation d'un bolide, à Clermont-Ferrand, le 14 juin 1877." Comptes Rendus, 84 (1877): 1462-1463.]


1877 June 14 / 8:40 p.m. / Bolide / Clermont Ferrand / C.R. 84-1462. [IV; 2135. Gruey. "Observation d'un bolide, à Clermont-Ferrand, le 14 juin 1877." Comptes Rendus, 84 (1877): 1462-1463.]


1877 June 14 / (Fr) / 8:52 p.m. / Met seen, Clermont-Ferrand / Det at Bordeaux / BA 78-264. [IV; 2136. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the Year 1877-78." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1878, 258-377, at 264-265.]


1877 June 14 / (F[r]) / Hail / Clermont-Ferrand / La Nat '77/2/277. [IV; 2137. "Orage à Grèle du 14 Juin 1877, Observé à Clermont-Ferrand." La Nature, 1877 pt. 2 (no. 226; September 29): 277-278, (illustrations).]


1877 June 15 / Sun free from spots / Sc Am 37/10. [IV; 2138. "Astronomical Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 37 (July 7, 1877): 9-10.]


1877 June 15 / Toronto Globe of, 1-8 / "From all sides comes intelligence of the approach of the potato bug.” [IV; 2139. “Latest from Quebec.” Toronto Globe, June 15, 1877, p. 1 c. 8.]


1877 June 15 / Submarine eruption near Peruvian coast / Nature 18-241. [IV; 2140. "Volcanic Phenomena and Earthquakes During 1877." Nature, 18 (June 27, 1878): 241. An enormous column of water arose at Pisagua not far from shore and strong eddies formed. Fuchs, Carl Wilhelm Casimir. "Die vulcanischen Ereignisse des Jahres 1877." Mineralogische und Petrographische Mitteilungen, 1 (March 1878): 106-136, at 112.]


1877 June 15 / m[oon] / White spot west of Picard. / W.R. Birt writes that he saw it as a ring. / E Mec 25/609. [IV; 2141. Birt, William Radcliffe. “Lunar Matters.” English Mechanic, 25 (no. 649; August 31, 1877): 609. Lunar Section.” Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 19 (1909): 375-380, at 376. "Capt. W. Noble, in 1877, June 15, found the White Spot west of Picard, appearing as a ring, as though it was an excessively large shallow crater; Moon's age, 4.24 days."]


1877 June 16 / Toronto Globe, 3-2 / Potato bugs in swarms like bees. [IV; 2142. “Of the potato bug the Harriston Tribune says....” Toronto Globe, June 16, 1877, p. 3 c. 2.]


1877 June 16 / See 14th. / Prof. H. thought saw again, but faintly. [IV; 2143. See: 1877 June 14, (IV; 2133).]


1877 June 17 / moon / 10 h / "I fancied I could detect a minute point of light shining out of the darkness that filled Bessel. / Frank C. Dennett / E Mec 25/432. [IV; 2144. Dennett, Frank C. “Notes on Our Satellite.” English Mechanic, 25 (July 13, 1877): 432-433.]


1877 June 17 / Jodzie, Kovno, Russia / (F). [IV; 2145. Fletcher, 104. This is the Jodzie meteorite.]


1877 June 18 / 7:30 p.m. / Rise and fall of water in Lake Michigan / R—Feb 18. [IV; 2146. Refer to: 1877 Feb 18, (IV; 2021). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 24.]


1877 June 18 / See May 19. / "N appeared like a large black spot with a nebulous border. It seemed to contain a darker nucleus." [IV; 2147. Neison, Edmund. "Hyginus N." Astronomical Register, 17 (September 1879): 199-208, & (October 1879): 223-233, (November 1879): 251-259, and, 18 (September 1880): 199-206; at v. 17 p. 207. See: 1877 May 19, (IV; 2114).]


1877 June 19 / See May 19. / N could not be detected. Smaller markings or craters, in the region could be—In plain of N, a large dull gray spot. [IV; 2148. Neison, Edmund. "Hyginus N." Astronomical Register, 17 (September 1879): 199-208, & (October 1879): 223-233, (November 1879): 251-259, and, 18 (September 1880): 199-206; at v. 17 p. 207. See: 1877 May 19, (IV; 2114).]


1877 / middle of June [June 18] // frgs / ac Petersburg (Va) Index Appeal / NY Times 25-8-6 / Little frogs appeared on streets of P. [IV; 2149. “A Shower of Frogs.” New York Times, June 25, 1877, p. 8 c. 6-7.  (Petersburg Index and Appeal, June 22, 1877; @ Newspaperarchive.com.) "Petersburg." Richmond Daily Dispatch, (Virginia), June 20, 1877, p. 3 c. 1. "When people remarked to each other, at 4 o'clock yesterday morning, that it was raining cats and dogs, they had no idea that it was raining frogs also; but it was. Either the frogs came along with the storm, or else came out of the earth in some parts of the city in multitudes greater than ever were seen in this corner of the earth." "The lower streets and the depot-yards of the Atlantic. Mississippi and Ohio and the Richmond and Petersburg railroads were so dense with these creatures. that it was almost impossible to walk without, treading on them. Thev were not larger than fire-cent pieces, and kept up a constant hopping, as if they were trying to get back home. Most of them must have died. If they had been full grown, and had met that fate, the air would have been poisoned by such a contribution, and malaria would have resulted. It is believed that the high wind which prevailed during the storm swept this plague of frogs from a neighboring swamp. Great interest was excited by their appearance."]


1877 June 19 / Meteoric stone said fallen at Bowling Green, Ky. Weighed ab pound and half. Resembled a fragment of grindstone but much harder and heavier. / Sci Amer 37-51. [IV; 2150. "It is stated that a meteoric stone fell...." Scientific American, n.s., 37 (July 28, 1877): 51. (This object does not appear in later catalogs of  meteorites.)]


1877 June 19 / N.Y. Times, July 1-6-7 / Meteoric stone, resembling a piece of grindstone, weighing about a pound, fell on farm of John M. Claypool, near Bowling Green, Ky. [IV; 2151. “General Notes.” New York Times, July 1, 1877, p. 6 c. 7.]


1877 June 19 / Op. Jup. [IV; 2152.]


1877 June 22 / Rome / Sand, mud, pollen / Sc Am 37/53. [IV; 2153. "A Sandstorm in Rome."  Scientific American, n.s., 37 (July 28, 1877): 53.]  


1877 June 23 / Red / Italy / D-41 / 16. [IV; 2154. The note copies information from page 41 of The Book of the Damned. "Notes." Nature, 16 (July 5, 1877): 196-198, at 197-198. "Italy." London Times, June 26, 1877, p. 5 c. 5.]


1877 June 23 / Naples and Rome / dry haze / sun "like a sickly moon". Fine dust fell. / L.T., July 3-9-e. [IV; 2155. "A Dust Shower." London Times, July 3, 1877, p. 9 c. 5.]


[1877 June 22-23 /] 1876 June 22-23 / Italy / Sedimenti sabbiosi in rain / Italian pub, but see Nature 16/197. [IV; 1861. Lais, Giuseppe. "Sedimente Sabbiosi delle Acque de Pioggia." Atti dell'Accademia Pontificia de'Nuovi Lincei, 29 (1875-1876): 246-252. "A Dust Shower." London Times, July 3, 1877, p. 9 c. 5. "Notes." Nature, 16 (July 5, 1877): 196-198, at 197-198. The article by Lais refers to a sixth fall of sand, in 1875, on June 24 and 25, at Rome, (which was combined with his observations, of another fall at Rome, on June 22 and 23, in 1877, by Fassig, as "22-23 Juni 1876"). Fassig, Oliver Lanard, ed. Bibliography of Meteorology. Part II: Moisture. Washington: Signal Office, 1889, 388. See: 1875 June 24-25, (IV; 1861).]


1877 June 24 / 8:45 a.m. / q / Belg / C. et T 8/38. [IV; 2156. Lancaster, Albert Benoît Marie. "Les Tremblements de terre en Belgique." Ciel et Terre, 8 (March 16, 1887): 25-43, at 39.]


1877 June 24 / Sims / q's / Germany and Philippines / BA '11 / Sims / See Feb 18, 1889. [IV; 2157. Milne, 726. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1877 June 24 / Ice / Colorado. ** [IV; 2158. “Winds.” Monthly Weather Review, 5 (no. 6; June, 1877): 6-8, at 7. "Pieces of ice fell `so large that they could not be grasped in one hand.'”]


1877 June 25 / Polt / Martin's Ferry, Ohio / N.Y. Times, July 1, 1877 / July 1-7-5. [B; 150. “An Ohio Ghost Story.” New York Times, July 1, 1877, p. 7 c. 5-6.]


1877 June 25 / M. Ferry / See Feb., 1890. [B; 151. See: 1890 Feb. 8, (B: 1083 & 1084).]


1877 June 25 / Began phe, home of William McComas, a wealthy farmer, 5 miles from Martins Ferry, on road to Cadiz, Ohio. / (N.Y. Times, July 1-7-5) / Jars of preserves started falling in a pantry. Stove moved across room. A piano, weighing 800 pounds, moved. Other large object moved. Feather bed carried from upstairs room down the stairs. Loaves of bread torn into pieces and scattered. [B; 151.1, 151.2. “An Ohio Ghost Story.” New York Times, July 1, 1877, p. 7 c. 5-6.]


1877 June 25-28 / Cotopaxi / Nature 18-241. [IV; 2159. "Volcanic Phenomena and Earthquakes During 1877." Nature, 18 (June 27, 1878): 241. The Cotopaxi volcano.]


1877 June 26 / volc deluge / morning / Eruption / Cotopaxi, Ecuador / Sci Amer, Aug 4, p. 68 / Followed by a frightful flood down 3 rivers. Flood of mud and water carried away many cattle and human beings. [IV; 2160. "Eruption of a South American Volcano." Scientific American, n..s.,  37 (August 4, 1877): 68. The Cotopaxi volcano.]


1877 June 26 / Eruption and a deluge of water and mud from Cotopaxi, Ecuador / Nature 16-335. [IV; 2161. "Notes." Nature, 16 (August 16, 1877): 334-336, at 335. The Cotopaxi volcano.]


1877 June 26 / 9:30 a.m., et seq / Ecuador / Violent detonations and vast falls of ashes supposed from a volcano. Supposed Cotopaxi. / N.Y. Times, July 16-1-5 / See Books on Cotopaxi and Ecuador. Any one on the met at time? / See Jan 14, '86. [IV; 2162. “Eruption of a Volcano.” New York Times, July 16, 1877, p. 1 c. 5. See: 1886 Jan 14, (VI; 356).]


1877 June 29 / Meteor / vol. 12 / Ref, Jan. 1, 1866. [IV; 2163. Refer to: 1866 (Jan), (III; 793). "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 12 (1877): 293-299, at 298-299.]


1877 // summer /// A Camberwell Beauty butterfly caught in Dorset. In following years only two others caught in Dorset, up to Aug 23, 1921. / The Entomologist, Oct., 1921. [IV; 2164. “Vanessa Antiopa in Dorset.” Entomologist, 51 (October, 1921): 243-244.]


1877 // summer /// Editor of the Entomologist 1877-236 says had received more than one hundred letters upon the subject of Colias Edusa. [IV; 2165. Carrington, John T. “Colias Edusa; A Second Brood.” Entomologist, 10 (September 1877): 236.]


1877 July 1 / Waverly, Minn / Jolly, Ind / Richmond, Ky / Sullivan, NH / Tornadoes / (F). [IV; 2166. Finley, 6.]


1877 July 2/ 4:30 p.m. / Tornado / Elkhart, Ind. / Left a sulphurous odor / (F). [IV; 2167. Finley, 6-7.]


1877 July 3 / Typhoon / Shanghai. [IV; 2168. (Refs??? Possibly July 13.)]


1877 July 4 / [LT], 5-d / (B.D.) / (3-9-e) / Rome / See June 23. [IV; 2169. The note copies information from page 41 of The Book of the Damned. "The Shower of Sand." London Times, July 4, 1877, p. 5 c. 4. "A Dust Shower." London Times, July 3, 1877, p. 9 c. 5. See: 1877 June 23, (IV; 2154).]


1877 July 5 / Clinkers / Kilburn / D-106. [IV; 2170. The note copies information from page 106 of The Book of the Damned. ("Fall of a Thunderbolt in Kilburn." Kilburn Times, (London), July 7, 1877, p. 5 c. 3; not online.) Symons, George James. "The Non-existence of Thunderbolts." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 14 (1888): 208-212, at 209-210.]


1877 July 5 / Hay whirled up out of sight / Banbury / Symons Met Mag 12/88. [IV; 2171. Morrell, Edward C. "A Whirlwind." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 12 (July 1877): 88. "At 1.50 p.m. I observed some men, who were haymaking in a meadow a short distance below the house, looking up in the air. On my looking up also, I saw some hay whirling round and round in the air. Some of the hay kept falling, turning round and round as it fell, but a considerable portion flew off at a great height, high above the trees, to the N.E., and I lost sight of it. The hay was evidently whirled up from the field in which the men were at work. The wind was S.W., and light at the time, the clouds being rather stormy."]


1877 July 6 / [LT], 5-d / Supposed new volc in Finland. [IV; 2172. "Miscellaneous Continental News." London Times, July 6, 1877, p. 5 c. 4. "Notes." Nature, 16 (May 17, 1877): 53-54, at 54. "Finnish papers report that vast masses of smoke are issuing from a mountain adjoining the river Tana, and that the snow in the vicinity has been melted away. The region has hitherto been free from evidences of volcanic activity. The theory has often been advanced that the gradual elevation of the shores of the Gulf of Bothnia is due to volcanic forces, and it is possible that these are finally seeking a vent."]


1877 July 10 / Waterspout / Lake Pontchartrain, La / NY Times 15-2-7. [IV; 2173. “Water-Spouts in Louisiana.” New York Times, July 15, 1877, p. 2 c. 7.]


1877 July 11 / [LT], 10-e / Tiger hunt in the Midlands. [B; 153. "A Tiger Hunt in the Midlands." London Times, July 11, 1877, p. 10 c. 5. A tigress escaped from a train and was shot near the Long Buckby Locks.]


1877 July 11 / Lurancy Vennum / See Religio-Phil Jour., June 8, 1878, p. 6, copying from the Watseka (Ill.) Republican, May 23, 1878 / Had told the Roffs, with whom she was living, that Lurancy Vennum would return—so at time predicted, L.V. "returned". Took up the life of L.V. [B; 154. "A Local Wonder." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 24 (no. 14; June 8, 1878): 6, (c. 2).]


1877 July 11 / Girl in alarming convulsions—sometimes head and feet met. / Religio-P-J, Aug 3, 1878 / Her parents were going to have her sent to an insane asylum. / Mr. Asa B. Roff and his wife, neighbors, investigated. Girl at first took char of a German woman, and then young man named Willie Canning—then, in the presence of Mr. Roff, said she was in communication with spirit of his daughter Mary. Mary many times before died had fits, or convulsions—she bled herself to relieve pain—cut self severely once—one time for 5 days "a raving maniac". Both Mary Roff and L. Vennum, neighbors, houses ab 40 rods apart, were convulsionaries. Told of her that she could see when blindflded. She died July 5, 1865. / Roffs took Lurancy to live with them—convinced them that was in the char of their daughter—telling them incidents of the past, such as crossing the Red River when they moved to Texas, such as "I remember Mrs. Reeder's girls, who were in our company." / In descriptions, good looks of Lurancy mentioned repeatedly. / Roffs and Vennums not well known to one another. [B; 155.1 to 155.5. Stevens, Elhanan Winchester "The Watseka Wonder." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 24 (no. 22; August 3, 1878): 1, (c. 1-5), & p. 8, (c. 1-3).]


1877 July 11 / The Watseka Wonder / Religio-Phil Jour, Ap 26, 1879, p. 2 / Mary Lurrancy Vennum, aged 14, of Watseka, Ill., taken suddenly "insane". Found to be obsessed by a spirit, which gave the name of Willie Channing, and then by another, who gave the name of Mary Roff. / May 3, p. 2—taken to the home of Mr Roff, whose daughter had died when Lurrancy 2 years old—Lurrrancy knew every particular in Mary's life and then changed to former self, crying to go home, not recognizing Mr and Mrs Roff. /// BO. [B; 156.1, 156.2, 156.3. "The Watseka Wonder." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 26 (no. 8; April 26, 1879): 2, (c. 4); "The Watseka Wonder." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 26 (no. 9; May 3, 1879): 2, (c. 4). These are copies of advertisements for Stevenson's pamphlet. See: 1877 July 11, (B; 158).]


1877 July 11 / A letter from Roff in Relio-P. J, Sept 7-8-2, 1878 / YRA ++. [B; 157. "The Watseka Wonder." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 25 (no. 1; September 7, 1878): 8, (c. 2-3).]


1877 July 11 / Lurrancy Vennum / Watseka Wonder / Full story in Religio-Phil Jour, July 27, Aug 3, 1878. [B; 158. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, July 27, 1878; not found here.) Stevens, Elhanan Winchester "The Watseka Wonder." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 24 (no. 22; August 3, 1878): 1, (c. 1-5), & p. 8, (c. 1-3). Stevens, Elhanan Winchester. The Watseka Wonder. Chicago: Religio-Philosophical Publishing House, 1887. Stevens provides a detailed account of Mary Lurancy Vennum's initial illness and spiritual possession by Mary Roff. Roff had died, (either at home, in Watseka, or at a hospital), on July 5, 1865; yet, for a period of a few months, Lurancy Vennum went to live with the Roff family, while apparently fully possessed by the spirit of Mary Roff, (who, with reluctance, gave up this situation); later, on a predicted dated, Lurancy resumed her normal personality and returned to her own family. Lurancy Vennum married and had her own family, (once, later, allowing Asa Roff to speak with Mary Roff). Lurancy was born on April 16, 1864; her family moved into Watseka, in October, 1865, (after Mary's death); thus, this phenomenon was not a case of reincarnation nor of which the two girls would have known one another, during Mary's lifetime. Lurancy married, lived on a farm in Kansas, and died in Los Angeles, on August 30, 1952.]


1877 July 11 / Character of Asa B. Roff / Religio-P J, 1878, Aug 31-4-4. [B; 159. "Asa B. Roff." Religio-Philsophical Journal, 24 (no. 26; August 31, 1878): 4, (c. 4).]


1877 July 14 / ab 5 a.m. / Waterspouts on Lake Michigan / NY Times 18-3-1. [IV; 2174. “Water-Spouts on Lake Michigan.” New York Times, August 18, 1877, p. 3 c. 1.]


1877 July 14 / afternoon / Tenn. / q and rumbling sounds / Sc Am 37-72 // 6:40 p.m. / NY Times 15-2-5 / 6:40 p.m. / R—Feb. 18. [IV; 2175. "Earthquake in Tennessee." Scientific American, n.s., 37 (August 4, 1877): 72.“Earthquake at Memphis.” New York Times, July 15, 1877, p. 2 c. 5. Refer to: 1877 Feb 18, (IV; 2021). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 24.]


1877 (July 18) / ([C]ut) / bet 10:15—10:45 p.m. / Two unknown luminous bodies near Jupiter's second satellite, [by] a cor who signs himself  "Young Astro". / E Mec 25/522, 535. [IV; 2176. “Stars near Jupiter.” English Mechanic, 25 (no. 645; August 3, 1877): 522. “A Much-Need Select Committee....” English Mechanic, 25 (no. 646; August 10, 1877): 534-535, at 535. Europa was the “second satellite”; and, while there were faint, unnamed stars nearby, their separation by the distance, (as described), would not suggest a “double star,” (the subject of the inquiry).]


1877 July 19 / See May 18. / Said that N was seen by Schmidt. [IV; 2177. See: 1877, (IV; 2113).]


1877 July 21 / Rel. Ph. J, 1-5, from Pittsburgh Commercial—home of William McComas, in a community of Quakers, near Cadiz, Ohio—began on a Monday—July 16 or 9? Objects on shelves, such as cans of fruit, falling to floor and not stay on shelf when put back. She called in neighbors. All saw a stove move from one side of the room to another. A piano, weight about 800 pounds, moved out from its position. Feather bed carried from one room to another. Sewing machine thrown across a room. Tubs of butter raised and threw out the butter. Drawers moved out of bureaus—hams came down from hooks—loaves of bread torn in fragments and scattered about. / Phe stopped at night—began next day. [B; 160.1, 160.2, 160.3. “An Ohio Ghost Story.” Religio-Philosophical Journal, 22 (no. 19; July 21, 1877): 1, (c. 5). See: 1877 June 25, (B; 151). The phenomena began in June.]


1877 July 27 / Mars and Saturn / 1st conjunction / Sc Am 37/178. [IV; 2178. "The Triple Conjunction of Mars and Jupiter." Scientific American, n.s., 37 (September 22, 1877): 178.]


1877 // summer /// (Cut) / Butterflies not seen again till Sept, 1892. / Symons Met (L) 27/144 / See May. / (Addington). [IV; 2179. Mathison, John. "Butterflies." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 27 (October 1892): 144.]


1877 Aug 1 / [LT], 10-a / 2-4-d / 6-4-f / 29-9-f / 7-8-f / 9-3-b / 10-7-f / 13-10-d / 14-3-d // July 2-5-f / 7-7-d / 12-5-f / 13-5-c / 25-11-a / 30-5-e // Sept 3-6-b / 5-6-f / 17-5-f // (Oct 15-5-c ) // Also see Index. /// Colorado beetle invasion / Eng., Germany, etc. [IV; 2180.1, 2180.2. “The Colorado Beetle.” London Times, July 2, 1877, p. 5 c. 6. “The Colorado Beetle.” London Times, July 7, 1877, p. 7 c. 4. “The Colorado Beetle.” London Times, July 12, 1877, p. 5 c. 6. “Miscellaneous Continental News.” London Times, July 13, 1877, p. 5 c. 2-3. “The Colorado Beetle in Germany.” London Times, July 25, 1877, p. 11 c. 1. “The Report of the Select Committee....” London Times, July 30, 1877, p. 5 c. 4-5. “The Colorado Beetle Scare.” London Times, August 1, 1877, p. 10 c. 1. “The Colorado Beetle.” London Times, August 2, 1877, p. 4 c. 4. “The Colorado Beetle Scare.” London Times, August 6, 1877, p. 4 c. 6. “The Colorado Beetle.” London Times, August 7, 1877, p. 8 c. 6. “Irish Agriculture.” London Times, August 9, 1877, p. 3 c. 5-6. “The Colorado Beetle.” London Times, August 10, 1877, p. 7 c. 6. “The Colorado Beetle.” London Times, August 13, 1877, p. 10 c. 4. “Germany.” London Times, August 14, 1877, p. 3 c. 4-5. “The Colorado Beetle.” London Times, August 29, 1877, p. 9 c. 6. “Miscellaneous Continental News.” London Times, September 3, 1877, p. 6 c. 2-3. Knight, H.C. “Evolution.” London Times, September 3, 1877, p. 6 c. 6. “The Colorado Beetle.” London Times, September 17, 1877, p. 5 c. 6. “Miscellaneous Continental News.” London Times, October 15, 1877, p. 5 c. 3.]


1877 Aug 9-11 / Brussels / numbers of Perseids rather small / Nature 17-212. [IV; 2181. "Notes." Nature, 17 (January 10, 1878): 210-213, at 212.]


1877 Aug 10 / (Cut) / Guildford, Surrey / whirl / Symons Met. 12/122. [IV; 2182. "Whirlwind near Guildford, Surrey." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 12 (September 1877): 122-124. "The Weather." London Times, August 11, 1876, p. 10 c. 6.]


1877 Aug / 285 Perseids in 5 hours / Nature 90-93. [IV; 2183. "The Perseid Shower of Meteors." Nature, 90 (September 19, 1912): 93.]


1877 Aug 10 / Perseids / At Rossinière, 7000 feet above sea level, Perseids were incessant. / Symons' Met 12-121. [IV; 2184. Ward, Michael Foster. "August Meteors." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 12 (September 1877): 121-122.]


1877 Aug 10 / Florence, N.J. / q / R—Feb 18.[IV; 2185. Refer to: 1877 Feb 18, (IV; 2021). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 24.]


1877 Aug 17 / 11 a.m. / N.Y. Times 23-5-2 / Greenfield, Michigan / heavy, explosive sound. [IV; 2186. “Earthquake in Michigan.” New York Times, August 23, 1877, p. 5 c. 2. The sky was “perfectly clear,” and, when no account of an accident or explosion was received, “they came to the conclusion that it was an earthquake....”]


1877 Aug 17 / ab 11 a.m. / Detroit, Mich / q and sound / R—Feb 18.[IV; 2187. Refer to: 1877 Feb 18, (IV; 2021). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 24.]


1877 Aug 21 / near Lake Pavin / Strangely characterized hail / La Nat 9/253. [IV; 2188. Barrau, Émile de. "Sur une Trombe de Grêle près du Lac Pavin." La Nature, 1877 pt. 2 (no. 224; September 15): 253-254.]


1877 Aug 23 / N.Y. T., 5-2 / q / Michigan. [IV; 2189. “Earthquake in Michigan.” New York Times, August 23, 1877, p. 5 c. 2.]


1877 Aug 22 / Patches, some a mile long—blood red water /L.I. Sound / NY Times 26-10-4. [IV; 2190. “Blood-Red Water in the Sound.” New York Times, August 26, 1877, p. 10 c. 4.]


1877 Aug 3 / Total eclipse moon / La Nat. 1877/2/index / Cut. [IV; 2191. Flammarion, Camille. "L'Éclipse Totale de Lune du 23 Aout 1877." La Nature, 1877 pt. 2 (no. 220; August 18): 178-179. "Éclipse de lune du 23 aout." La Nature, 1877 pt. 2 (no. 222; September 1): 222."Éclipse de lune." La Nature, 1877 pt. 2 (no. 222; September 1): 223.]


1877 Aug 23 / [LT, 9-d / 24-9-f / 25-10-e / 28-8-d / 30-9-f / Sept 7-8-e // Ec. Moon. [IV; 2192. Eclipse of the Moon. "The Eclipse." London Times, August 23, 1877, p. 9 c. 4. "The Eclipse." London Times, August 24, 1877, p. 9 c. 6. "The Eclipse." London Times, August 25, 1877, p. 10 c. 5-6. Pritchard, Charles. "The Eclipse." London Times, August 28, 1877, p. 8 c. 4. "The Eclipse." London Times, August 30, 1877, p. 9 c. 6.]


1877 Aug 26 / 2nd conjunction / Mars and Saturn / Cut. [IV; 2193.]


1877 Aug 26 / Third satellite of Mars reported / See "Mars". / N.Y. Times, Aug 30, 1877 / (Cut). [IV; 2194. “Another Satellite.” New York Times, August 31, 1877, p. 4 c. 6-7. “Another Satellite of Mars.” New York Herald, August 30, 1877, p. 7 c. 6. Sheehan, William. The Planet Mars. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1996, 62. The third satellite was supposedly discovered by Henry Draper, along with Edward Singleton Holden; and, Holden soon added his own discovery of a fourth moon.]


1877 Aug 27-29 / Great th. storm / Iowa / Iowa Weather Rep. 649-656 / See Fassig 2-174. [IV; 2195. Hinrichs, Gustavus. “The Great Thunder Storm of August 27 to 29, 1877, and Heavy Rains in Iowa.” Annual Report of the Iowa State Agricultural Society, 1877, 649-656. “In fact, we had a great thunder storm in Iowa, terrific in its electrical displays along the Middle Des Moines, causing the destructive floods near the capital, thus bringing about the greatest railroad disaster known in the history of the State.” Fassig, 174.]


1877 Aug 29 / Small stone size of a bean that fell at Cologne. / Pop Sci 15-566. [IV; 2196. "Bodily Injuries from Falling Meteors." Popular Science Monthly, 15 (August 1879): 566-567. "The reader will perhaps remember how, according to the 'Cologne Zeitung,' on August 29th of year before last, at half-past nine in the morning, a certain married couple living in the house No. 32 Neumarkt, in that city, were startled by a small stone falling through the open window into their room. 'The wife ran and picked it up—a black-gray, prismatic stone of the size of a small bean; but, as it was red-hot and burned the tips of her fingers, she quickly dropped it again. Some minutes later the husband again took it up and found it to be still so hot that he could hardly hold it in his hand.' This stone, which was immediately taken to the editor's office, was by all recognized as a meteorite." (Not in Fletcher's nor Prior's catalogs.)]


1877 Aug 31 / Plato / by A. Stanley Williams / A light shining in Plato which was in the shade. / L'Astro. 1/302. [IV; 2197. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Observation Curieuse Faite sur la Lune." Astronomie, 1 (1882): 302.]


1877 Sept 1 / ab 11 a.m. / Maryland / q / R—Feb 18.[IV; 2198. Refer to: 1877 Feb 18, (IV; 2021). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 25.]


1877 Sept / Have Sun for Sept. [IV; 2199.]


1877 Sept 1 / Serial bolide / Eng. 71/78 / Observatory 2/271. [IV; 2200. Denning, William Frederick. "Meteor Notes for December." Observatory, 2 (1878): 270-271. See: 1871 Sept 1, (IV; 499).]


1877 Sept. 5 / Op. Mars / (A1). [IV; 2201.]


1877 Sept 6 / [LT], 9-e / Mars. /// Mag[note cut off] inde[note cut off]. [IV; 2202. "The Planet Mars." London Times, September 6, 1877, p. 9 c. 5.]


1877 Sept 7 / NYT, 2-7 / q / Maryland. [IV; 2203. "Earthquake Shock in Maryland." New York Times, September 7, 1877, p. 2 c. 7.]


1877 Sept. 7 / Bloomington, Indiana / lights that appeared and vanished at intervals of 3 or four seconds in same place in sky. Then no more—few minutes later, a fifth. Same place. / Rept B Assoc 1878-325 / Sc Am 37-193. [IV; 2204. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the Year 1877-78." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1878, 258-377, at 325-326. Kirkwood, Daniel. "Stationary Meteors." Scientific American, n.s., 37 (September 29, 1877): 193.]


1877 Sept 8 and 9 / (Sound) / Sound like humming of machinery heard these two nights in New Haven, but a disagreeable, sharp sound—Said that had been sounds before but were traced to "the action of the air by the fall of water over Ousatonic dam, 10 or 12 miles away." / NY Times 11-3-1 / See Danbury, 1888. [IV; 2205.1, 2205.2. "New Haven's Mystery." New York Times, September 11, 1877, p. 3 c. 1. See: 1888 Jan 14, (B; 845).]


1877 Sept 8-9 / See Hastings, Jan, 1926. [IV; 2206. See: (1926 Jan, Hastings.)]


1877 Sept 10 / 10 a.m. / Center / Burlington, N.J. / slight shock and sound like distant thunder or the passing of a railroad train / N.Y. Times, Oct 5-3-4. [IV; 2207. "Jersey's Earthquake." New York Times, October 5, 1877, p. 3 c. 4.]


1877 Sept 10 / Shock at Bristol, Pa., described as "terrific". / N.Y. Times 12-4-7. [IV; 2208. "General Notes." New York Times, September 12, 1877, p. 4 c. 6-7.]


1877 Sept 10 / q—met / 10 a.m. / Mercer, Ocean, and Monmouth Cos., N.J. / explosive sound and shock / Sun 12-1-5 / "At the time of the shock the sky was perfectly clear, but everybody seems to have first heard the rumbling sound in the air and have instinctively gazed upward." [IV; 2209.1, 2209.2. "New Jersey's Earthquake." New York Sun, September 12, 1877, p. 1 c. 5.]


1877 Sept 11, 12 / 11th, 7:45 p.m., Boën (Loire), meteor of extraordinary brilliance, leaving a brilliant train—slight sound was heard. 12th, at 6:52 p.m., a concussion felt and a deep, rolling sound heard. / C.R., 85-577. [IV; 2210. Duram, V. "Sur un bolide aperçu à Boën (Loire), le 11 septembre, et sur une secousse de tremblement de terre constatée le 12 septembre." Comptes Rendus, 85 (1877): 577-578.]


1877 Sept 10 / (Fr) / [LT], 6-a / (q) / Bagneres-de-Bigorre. [IV; 2211. "Miscellaneous Continental News." London Times, September 10, 1877, p. 6 c. 1.]


1877 (Sept 11) / 7:45 p.m. / Ext. brilliant meteor / on 12th, 6:52 p.m., a quake at Boën (Loire) / L'A. Sci 21-56. [IV; 2212. "Bolide et tremblement de terre à Boën (Loire)." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 21 (1877): 56.]


1877 Sept / lights / Wales / D-282. [IV; 2213. The note copies information from page 282 of The Book of the Damned. "Mysterious Lights." London Times, October 5, 1877, p. 10 c. 2.]


1877 Sept 11 / See Sept 11, 75 and 76. / 8 p.m. / France and Switz / met / BA 78-280. [IV; 2214. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the Year 1877-78." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1878, 258-377, at 280-281. See: 1875 Sept 11, (IV; 1740).]


1877 Sept 11 / Pinzgau, Switzerland / by the meteorologist, F Zurcher. / Ab. 3:30 p.m.—sun had sunk behind a mountain. Suddenly pine trees shone with a light as brilliant as sunlight reflected from polished silver. / La Nat 1878/1/122 / Zeit Met 12/410. [IV; 2215. Zurcher, Frédéric. "Phénomène Optique Observé à Pinzgau." La Nature, 1878 pt. 1 (no. 242; January 19): 122-123. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 12 (1877): 408-416, at 410-411.]


1877 Sept 12 / in Eng by Newell / and Sept. 26, in France, by Lameu / Mars surrounded by a halo / Les Mondes, 45-145. [IV; 2216. “Chronique d'astronomie.” Cosmos, v. 45 (1878): 145-147. “Notes.” Nature, 16 (September 20, 1877): 445-448, at 446. “Mr. R.S. Newall, F.R.S., telegraphing to the Times, from the Observatory, Gateshead, last Thursday night, 'states that on August 23, during the total eclipse of the moon, he observed that Mars is surrounded by a whitish envelope, the diameter being about twenty times that of the planet. He saw it again on September 7, and again last night distinctly. It has a well-defined edge, and is densest nearest to Mars. Small stars were seen though it. It is easily visible, Mr. Newall states, in the 61½-inch finder.” Newall's large telescope, (with its 6½-inch finder), was plagued by its location in the midst of a turbulent atmosphere. Denning, William Frederick. Telescopic Work for Starlight Evenings. London: Taylor and Francis, 1891, 25. “The large Cooke refractor of 24.8-inches aperture, which has been mounted for about twenty years at Gateshead, has a singularly barren record. Its atmospheric surroundings appear to have rendered it impotent. The owner of this fine and costly instrument wrote the author in 1885: 'Atmosphere has an immense deal to do with definition. I have only had one fine night since 1870! I then saw what I have never seen since.'"]


1877 Sept. 13 / Observation by Borrelly upon unknown object near Mars—supposed by a faint star / Nature 16/477. [IV; 2217. "Our Astronomical Column." Nature, 16 (October 4, 1877): 477-478. "An observation on September 13, by M. Borrelly at Marseilles, presumed to apply to the satellite , must refer to a faint star, the satellite at the time being in the opposite quadrant." "Découverte d'une nouvelle comète, par M. Coggia, et observation de l'un des satellites de Mars, par M. Borrelly." Comptes Rendus, 85 (1877): 570. Phobos and Deimos would have been on the opposite side of Mars to that indicated by Borrelly.]


1877 Sept 14 / BO / evening / Medium and Daybreak, Sept 21, p. 603 / Cor, Wm. Gill, writes that at Brighton, he had been visited by Mr. Herne, the well-known medium. Something fell on floor with a tremendous crash. By a great fall of pebbles that covered floor and furniture, but broke nothing. They were picked up, weighed and counted. 480 weighed 3 lbs. 5 ounces. It was in a good light. [B; 161.1, 161.2. Gill, William. "A Shower of Pebbles." Medium and Daybreak, 8 (no. 390; September 21, 1877):  603.]


1877 Sept. 18 / The Brooklyn sky obj / See Book. [B; 162. The note copies information from page 142 of Lo! Smith, William H. "Was It an Angel?" New York Sun, September 21, 1877, p. 2 c. 6.]


1877 Sept 18 / N.Y. Herald, 10-4. Ghst / Jersey City. [B; 163. “A Jersey Ghost.” New York Herald, September 18, 1877, p. 10 c. 4.]


1877 Sept-Oct / Wales / Lights / 151 / at Towyn (Merionethshire) near mouth of the Dysynni. [B; 164. The note copies information from page 282 of The Book of the Damned. "Mysterious Lights." London Times, October 5, 1877, p. 10 c. 2.]


1877 Sept / Op Mars / Lights Wales. [IV; 2218. The perihelic opposition of Mars occurred on September 5, 1877. See: (Lights Wales.).]

  

1877 Sept 21 / Conjunction / Mars, Saturn and moon / C.R. 85/609, 768. [IV; 2219. "M. L. Hugo adresse une Note relative à un alignement...." Comptes Rendus, 85 (1877): 609. "M. J. Vinot fair remarquer qu'il a signalé...." Comptes Rendus, 85 (1877): 768.]


1877 Sept 23 / Hurricane / Dutch West Indies / loss of property $2,000,000 / N..Y. Times, Oct 30-1-4. [IV; 2220. “The West Indian Hurricane.” New York Times, October 30, 1877, p. 1 c. 4.]


1877 Sept. 21 / Bloomington, Indiana / Indiana University / brilliant met 1/5 moon size / broke into 3 / Observatory 1/250. [IV; 2221. Kirkwood, Daniel. "Meteors." Observatory, 1 (1877): 250.]


1877 Sept 27 / q / Peru / Trib. [IV; 2222. "Earthquakes in Peru." New York Tribune, September 27, 1877, p. 1 c. 6.]


1877 Sept 28 / ab. 7:30 p.m. / Germany / Met appeared size of full moon. / BA 78-280. [IV; 2223. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the Year 1877-78." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1878, 258-377, at 280-281.]


1877 Oct-Nov / White spots on Mars / La Nat 1878/1/79. [IV; 2224. Duval, E. "Récentes Observations de la Planète Mars." La Nature, 1878 pt. 1 (no. 239; December 29): 79-80, (illustrations).]


1877 Oct-Dec / Have General Notes, N.Y. Times. [IV; 2225.]


[1877 Oct 5] / LT / Oct 5, 1877 / dets and loc paper. / (lights). [IV; 2226. "Mysterious Lights." London Times, October 5, 1877, p. 10 c. 2.]


1877 Oct 6 / [LT], 6-b / New Comet. [IV; 2227. "A New Comet." London Times, October 6, 1877, p. 6 c. 2. Comet C/1877 T1.]


1877 Oct 8 / —Switzerland / 12—Oregon / 13—Turkey // q's / BA '11 / Sims. / See Feb. 18, 1889. [IV; 2228. Milne, 726. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1877 Oct 8 / q and bells / = polt? / L.T. 10-8-b / 5:20 a.m. / q / Geneva. / Ac to one person, aroused by the ringing of bells in his house. [IV; 2229. "Earthquake Shock at Geneva." London Times, October 10, 1877, p. 8 c. 2.]


1877 Oct 10 / [LT], 5-d / 10-8-b / 17-4-d // q / Berne, etc. [IV; 2230. "Miscellaneous Continental News." London Times, October 10, 1877, p. 5 c. 4. "Earthquake Shock at Geneva." London Times, October 10, 1877, p. 8 c. 2. "The Earthquake." London Times, October 17, 1877, p. 4 c. 4.]


[1877 Oct 8. Wrong date. See: 1877 Oct 14, (IV; 2231).]


[1877 Oct 8. Wrong date. See: 1877 Oct 14, (IV; 2232).]


1877 Oct 8 / 8 p.m. / Severe shock / Nor Car / NY Times, Nov. 9-2-7. [IV; 2233. "Earthquake in North Carolina." New York Times, November 9, 1877, p. 2 c. 7.]


1877 Oct 9 / 12:12 a.m. / Charleville, Ardennes, France / Antwerp / very bright fireball / BA 79-108. [IV; 2234. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report of Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1878-79." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1879, 76-131, at 108-109. Thibout. “Bolide du 8-9 Octobre 1877." Bulletin Hebdomadaire de l'Association Scientifique de France, 21 (no. 521; October 28, 1877): 63.]


1877 Oct 9 / 2 a.m. / Alarming shock / Lima, Peru . N.Y. Times, Nov. 4-2-4. [IV; 2235. "Central and South America." New York Times, November 4, 1877, p. 2 c. 4.]


1877 Oct 12 / Portland, Oregon / q. / I / BA '11. [IV; 2236. Milne, 726.]


1877 Oct 11 / 6:45 p.m. / Hartford, Conn. / great met / NY Times, Nov. 8-2-3. [IV; 2237. "A Big Meteor." New York Times, November 8, 1877, p. 2 c. 3.]


1877 Oct 12 / Fiery things carried in a gale / Jour Met Soc 1878/166. [IV; 2238. “Curious Phenomenon During the Gale.” London Daily News, October 18, 1877, p. 6 c. 4. "Proceedings at the Meetings of the Society." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 4 (1878): 160-167, at 166-167.]


1877 Oct. 13 / (Cut) / Aerolite at Soko-Banja, Servia / (another on 20) / B Assoc 1878/368. [IV; 2239. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the Year 1877-78." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1878, 258-377, at 368-370.]


1877 Oct 13 / q / Turkey (Island of Marmora) / BA '11. [IV; 2240. Milne, 726.]


1877 Oct 13 / Soko-Banja (Sazbanovac), Alexinatz, Servia / According to (F). [IV; 2241. Fletcher, 105. This is the Soko-Banja meteorite.]


1877 Oct. 13 / (daylight) / Great meteor—long streaming train / bet 11 and 12 a.m. / NY Times 18-4-6. [IV; 2242. "General Notes." New York Times, October 18, 1877, p. 4 c. 6. "The Philadelphia Telegraph says that the light from it was so great as to cause its shape, size, and motion to be entirely clear, even in the broad glare of day."]


1877 Oct 14 / Myst Murder / Matilda Hacker / The Euston Square Mystery / Lloyds W. News, Oct 17, 1907. [B; 165. (Lloyds Weekly News, October 17, 1907; not online.) Williams, Montagu. Leaves of a Life. New York: Houghton, Mifflin, 1890, v. 2, 139-148.]


1877 Oct. 14 / M. Hacker / Her mummified remains found in a coal cellar, which had been used every day for the twenty months it been there. [B; 166. Williams, Montagu. Leaves of a Life. New York: Houghton, Mifflin, 1890, v. 2, 140-142. Matilda Hacker went missing in the week following October 10, 1877, and was believed to have been murdered on October 14, when she was alone in the house with Hannah Dobbs. The remains of her body was found in a coal cellar of the house on May 9, 1879.]


1877 Oct 14 / Bolide, 6:30 p.m., in France / Paris, Havre, Clermont-Ferrand. / Nature 16-556. [IV; 2243. "Notes." Nature, 16 (October 25, 1877): 555-559, at 556.]


[1877 Oct 14 /] 1877 Oct 8 / Mets / France / little in B.A. '78 / See Bull Assoc Sci. de France 21/224. [IV; 2231. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the Year 1877-78." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1878, 258-377, at 282-283. “Bolides du 14 Octobre 1877." Bulletin Hebdomadaire de l'Association Scientifique de France, 21 (no. 531; January 6, 1878): 224.]


[1877 Oct 14 /] 1877 Oct 8 / (+) / Mets in France / BA 78-282. [IV; 2232. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the Year 1877-78." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1878, 258-377, at 282-283.]


1877 Oct 14 / (Cut) / Met in gale / Eng / (D-97). [IV; 2244. The note copies information from page 97 of The Book of the Damned. "Curious Phenomenon during the Late Gale." Nature, 16, (October 25, 1877): 551. "Curious Phenomenon during the Late Gale." Nature, 17 (November 1, 1877): 10-11.]


1877 Oct 14 / Ball of fire in a gale, at 6:50 p.m., at Lower Tooling—20 minutes later another fell at Brixton. / Nature 16/551. [IV; 2245. "Curious Phenomenon during the Late Gale." Nature, 16, (October 25, 1877): 551.]


1877 Oct 14 / Mets / France / BA 79-110. [IV; 2246. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report of Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1878-79." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1879, 76-131, at 110-111.]


1877 Oct 15 / [LT], 5-a / Colorado beetle near Dusseldorf. [IV; 2247. "Miscellaneous Continental News." London Times, October 15, 1877, p. 5 c. 1.]


1877 Oct. 12 / q report / Panama, Oregon and Washington Territory and not Cal. / Editorial writer, NY Times 26-4-7, alludes to the fact that California had agreed to hush up news of qs not to discourage investors. [IV; 2248. "In California...." New York Times, October 26, 1877, p. 4 c. 7.]


1877 Oct 13, etc. / Orionids great. [IV; 2249. “The Meteoric Shower of October.” Nature, 100 (November 8, 1917): 194.]


1877 Oct 13 / Soko Banja / ac to Flammarion / L'Astro 2-129. [IV; 2250. Flammarion, Camille. "D'ou Viennent les Pierres Qui Tombent du Ciel?" Astronomie, 2 (1883): 129-141.]


1877 Oct 19 / Met trail like an "S" / Worcestershire / L.T., Oct 23, 1877 / Nature 17-10. [IV; 2251. “The Weather.” London Times, October 23, 1877, p. 11 c. 5-6. Denning, William Frederick. "Meteor of October 19, 6.15 P.M." Nature, 17 (November 1, 1877): 10, (illustration).]


1877 / ab. middle of Oct // Ac to Chicago Tribune of the 7th of Nov, in a garden at Monticello, Jones Co., Iowa, fell a meteorite. It was covered with an ash-covered fungus-growth like gray mold, like a vegetable growth, but looking crystalline under a microscope. / N.Y. Times, Nov. 17-4-7. [IV; 2252.1, 2252.2. "A Curious Meteorite." New York Times, November 17, 1877, p. 4 c. 7. "Curious Meteorite." Chicago Tribune, November 7, 1877, p. 11 c. 6.]


1877 Oct 20. / Land and Water of / Fresh cocoanuts and tropical leaves and grass in sea near island of Mull. [IV; 2253. (Land and Water, October 20, 1877.)]


1877 Oct 23 / [LT], 6-f / Windfall (?). [B; 167. "A Windfall." London Times, October 23, 1877, p. 6 c. 6. The "windfall" was valuables discovered in a secret drawer, (not any meteorological phenomenon).]


1877 Oct 23 / [LT], 11-e / 24-11-c // Meteors. [IV; 2254. "The Weather." London Times, October 23, 1877, p. 11 c. 5-6. "The Weather." London Times, October 24, 1877, p. 11 c. 3.]


1877 Oct 26 / bet 5 and 6 p.m. / 43° N and 128 W. / Vessel felt a severe shock. / N.Y. Times, Nov 12-2-1. [IV; 2255. "An Earthquake and an Indian Fight." New York Times, November 12, 1877, p. 2 c. 1.]


1877 Oct 28 / Sunspots / L'Astro 3/128. [IV; 2256. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Ombres Observées sur le Soleil." Astronomie, 3 (1884): 127-130, at 128.]


1877 Oct 28-Nov 1 / 31 meteors from Aries. / by Denning / Nature 76-574. [IV; 2257. Denning, William Frederick. "October Meteors." Nature, 76 (October 3, 1907): 574.]

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           1877 1887 Nov 1 / 5:45 p.m. / Large and brilliant meteor reported in New York and Poughkeepsie / N.Y. Times 3-4-6. /// 1902. [IV; 2258. "General Notes." New York Times, November 3, 1877, p. 4 c. 6.]


1877 Nov. 2 / 8:10 a.m. / 11:20 a.m. / q—Bullpits, Bourton, Dorset / Nature 17/38. [IV; 2259. "Notes." Nature, 17 (November 8, 1877): 37-38, at 38. “The Weather.” London Times, November 5, 1877, p. 10 c. 5.]


1877 Nov 3 / (Mars) / Cambridge, Mass. / Meteors that came from a point near Mars / ab 7, ab 10, ab 11 p.m. / 11, few minutes after / Am. J. Sc. 3-15-158. /// 14 / 39 / 116 / 212 / 333 / 55 // 11 / 108. [IV; 2260. "Meteors observed in Cambridge, Mass., November 3, 1877." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 158.]


1877 Nov 3 / Conjunction / Mars and Saturn / La Nature 1877/2/339. [IV; 2261. Tissandier, Gaston. "Conjonction de Mars et de Saturne." La Nature, 1877 pt. 2 (no. 230; October 27): 339.]


1877 Nov 4 / 1:50 a.m. / q. / Montreal / N.Y. Times 7-3-3 / At Saratoga, a gale. It stopped. Then the q. Again the wind. / At Troy, after the atmosphere became close and there was a sulphurous odor. [IV; 2262. "Earthquake Incidents." New York Times, November 7, 1877, p. 3 c. 3. "One curious fact in connection with the earthquake was the peculiar action of the wind. A few moments previous it had been blowing, almost a gale. Suddenly it ceased, and for several minutes the silence was painful, the quiet being similar to that that usually precedes a hurricane or cyclone. Then came the shock, and in a few moments the wind again returned, but it did not attain the velocity with which it had traveled previous to the action of the earth."]


1877 Nov. 4 / afternoon / Slight q / New York / New Brunswick / Quebec / Nature 17-38 / On the 15th, one in Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, Dakota. Talk of a volcano in Nebraska. / See p. 110. [IV; 2263. "Notes." Nature, 17 (November 8, 1877): 37-38, at 38. "Notes." Nature, 17 (December 6, 1877): 108-110, at 110. "Un nouveau volcan aux États-Unis." La Nature, 1878 pt. 1 (no. 243; January 26): 143. "Ses vapeurs étaient visibles à 12 ou 13 milles (19 ou 21 kilomètres) de distance." (Chicago Evening Journal, ca. November 15, 1877; on microfilm.)]


1877 Nov. 4 / NY, etc. / NY Times—5-1-5 // Canada / q. / Canadian Naturalist, N.S., 8/342. [IV; 2264. Dawson, John William. “The Earthquake of November 4, 1877.” Canadian Naturalist, n.s., 8 (1878): 342-345.]


1877 Nov 4 / q / Canada / NY—New Eng. / See index, Am J. Sci 3-15 / and page 25. [IV; 2265. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes. No. 7." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 21-27, at 25-26. "The Earthquake of November 4, 1877." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 321-324, at 322.]


1877 Nov. 4 / Sunspots / L'Astro 3/128. [IV; 2266. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Ombres Observées sur le Soleil." Astronomie, 3 (1884): 127-130, at 128-130.]


1877 Nov. 4 / Mars and Saturn separated by 1/3 apparent diameter of moon / L.T., June 30, 1879. [IV; 2267. "Close Approach of Two Planets." London Times, June 30, 1879, 9 c. 1-2. "The Triple Conjunction of Mars and Jupiter." Scientific American, n.s., 37 (September 22, 1877): 178.]


1877 Nov 11 / 6:30 p.m. / Racine College, Wisconsin / met / Sci Am 37-342. [IV; 2268. Hindley, Robert C. "A Brilliant Meteor." Scientific American, n.s, 37 (December 1, 1877): 342.]


[1877 Nov 11 /] 1877 Nov. 19 / Cronstad, Orange River Colony, S. Af. / (F). [IV; 2277. Fletcher, 105.  Rudge, W.A. Douglas. "Preliminary Note on the Meteorites in the Bloemfontein Museum." Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa, 2 (1912): 211-221. Rudge gave the date of the fall as November 11, (not November 19). Prior, George Thurland. "The Meteoric Stones of Launton, Warbreccan, Cronstad, Daniel's Kuil, Khairpur, and Soko-Banja." Mineralogical Magazine, 18 (November 1916): 1-25, at 10-13. This is the Cronstad meteorite.]


1877 Nov. 12 / NY Times, 4-7 / Ac to Burlington Free Press, met stone found on Mt. Pisgah, Sutton, Vt. [IV; 2269. "General Notes." New York Times, November 12, 1877, p. 4 c. 7. "Meteoric Stone." Burlington Weekly Free Press, (Vermont), November 16, 1877, p. 4 c. 1.]


1877 Nov. 13, to Feb 7, 1878 / on Venus / "Two remarkable white spots, strongly reminding me of those seen on Mars" on Venus by Trouvelot. / Observatory 3/417 / near poles. [IV; 2270. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold.  "White Spots on Venus." Observatory, 3 (1879-1880): 416-417.]


1877 Nov 13 / N seen at first glance, but Nov 14 "not a trace of N could be detected though definition was very good. / See May 18. [IV; 2271. See: 1877 May 19, (IV; 2114).]


1877 Nov. 14 / Severe q, Canada, and northern N.Y., 1:55 a.m. Disagreeable sulphurous odor in all parts of Montreal. / In Albany, supposed explosion (Times, 6th). (Times, 5, 6, 7th). / Slight sulphurous odor at Troy (Times, 7th). [IV; 2272. “Severe Shock of Earthquake.” New York Times, November 5, 1877, p. 1 c. 5. “The Sunday Morning Earthquake.” New York Times, November 6, 1877, p. 2 c. 6. "Earthquake Incidents." New York Times, November 7, 1877, p. 3 c. 3.]


1877 Nov. 15/ ab. noon / Nebraska / Kansas / Dakota / Iowa / shocks / N.Y. Times 16-1-5. [IV; 2273. "Earthquake Shocks in the West." New York Times, November 16, 1877, p. 1 c. 5.]


1877 Nov 16 / 9:14 p.m. / York / met / BA 78-284. [IV; 2274. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the Year 1877-78." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1878, 258-377, at 284-285.]


1877 Nov. 16 / 2:20 a.m. / Shock / Knoxville, Tenn / NY Times 19-4-7. [IV; 2275. "The Earthquake in Knoxville." New York Times, November 19, 1877, p. 4 c. 7.]


1877 Nov 18 / Cathedine, Brecknockshire / a luminous body moving so slowly that at first thought to be the "evening star" setting / LT, Nov 27-7-f. [IV; 2276. "The Weather." London Times, November 27, 1877, p. 7 c. 5-6.]


[1877 Nov. 19. Wrong date. See: 1877 Nov 11, (IV; 2277).]


1877 Nov. 20 / (+) / (See Next.) / Trib, 8-2 / q / South. [IV; 2278. "The Earthquakes." New York Tribune, November 20, 1877, p. 8 c. 2.]


1877 Nov. 20 / 4:40 p.m. / Daylight met. train visible 15 minutes / long obj tapering to point / Raleigh, N.C. / N.Y. Times 23-4-7. [IV; 2279. "General Notes." New York Times, November 23, 1877, p. 4 c. 7.]


1877 Nov 20 / (Nor Car) / afternoon / Det met Nor Car and Virginia / "long enduring cloud streak." / BA 78-259, 266 / See Nov. 19. [IV; 2280. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the Year 1877-78." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1878, 258-377, at 259 & 266-267. “The Meteor...Again.” Richmond Daily Dispatch, (Virginia), December 13, 1877, p. 4 c. 1. See: (Nov 19).]


1877 Nov. 20 / Det met / Virginia / Sc Am 38/137. [IV; 2281. "The Virginia Meteor." Scientific American, n.s., 38 (March 2, 1878): 137.]


1877 Nov. 23 / great streak / 8:24 p.m. / Great det met / Isle of Man / N. Wales / Chesire / BA 78-266 / Another, not det, one hour before, p. 269. [IV; 2282. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the Year 1877-78." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1878, 258-377, at 266-270. “A slight alteration of the radiant (diminishing its longitude) brings the orbit nearly into coincidence with that of the comet of 1702.”]


1877 Nov. 23 / (Succession / See Jan. 14.) / see Nature. / Det. met / Lancashire/ Cheshire / N. Wales ? Observatory 1/282, 316 / See Nature. / 8:30 p.m. / Eng and Wales / LT 29-7-5. [IV; 2283. "The Meteor." Nature, 17 (November 29, 1877): 94-95. "The Meteor." Nature, 17 (December 6, 1877): 113-114. Petty, T.S. "The Meteor of November 23." Nature, 17 (January 3, 1878): 183. Tupman, George Lyon. "The Great Detonating Meteor of November 23, 1877." Nature, 17 (January 24, 1878): 246-247.   Tupman, George Lyon. "The Meteors of November 23." Observatory, 1 (1877): 282-283. Tupman, George Lyon. "The Meteors of 1877, Nov 23." Observatory, 1 (1877): 316-322, 351-355. "The Weather." London Times, November 27, 1877, p. 7 c. 5-6. See: 1878 Jan 14, (IV; 2311).]


1877 Nov. 23 / 8:30 p.m. / Yorkshire / det met / At Strassburg, ab 6 p.m., a violently det met. / Nature 17-114. [IV; 2284. "Meteoric Phenomena." York Herald, November 26, 1877, p. 8 c. 1. "The Meteor." Nature, 17 (December 6, 1877): 113-114.]


1877 Nov. 26 / q. / Peru / B.A. '11. [IV; 2285. Milne, 726.]


1877 Nov. 27 / Bhagur, Bombay, India / (F). [IV; 2286. Fletcher, 105. This is the Bhagur meteorite.]


1877 Nov 27 / [LT], 7-f / 29-7-e // Meteors. [IV; 2287. "The Weather." London Times, November 27, 1877, p. 7 c. 5-6. "The Weather." London Times, November 29, 1877, p. 7 c. 5-6.]


1877 Nov. 27 / Bolide / La Nat 1879/2/158. [IV; 2288. Guillemin, Amédée. "Le Bolide du 27 Novembre 1877." La Nature, 1879 pt. 2 (no. 323; August 9): 158-160.]


1877 Nov. 30 / [LT], 4-f / Rare birds. [B; 168. Morris, F.O. "Rare Birds." London Times, November 30, 1877, p. 4 c. 6.]


1877 Dec [16] / In home of Edward Foster, a spiritualist, a ghost said been seen. / Medium and Daybreak 9-7. [B; 169. Foster, Edward. "A Ghost at Preston." Medium and Daybreak, 9 (no. 405; January 4, 1878): 7. "A Ghost at Preston." Manchester Evening News, December 18, 1877, p. 2 c. 4. "A Ghost." Preston Chronicle, December 22, 1877, p. 4 c. 6. A mob formed in the street outside of Foster's residence hoping to see a ghost in an upper window, but saw "nothing beyond the flapping of one of the blinds."]


1877 Dec 1 / (+) / Leopard that been roaming around a month, killed in Marion, Ohio. / N.Y. Times, Dec 4-4-7 / See May 23. / See last of May. / 2 killed, ac to Dayton Journal / NY Times 5-4-6. [B; 170. See: 1877 May 14, etc., (B; 142); 1877 May 14, (B; 143); and, (nil for "May 23" and "last of May.").]


1877 Dec. 1 / 5:45 p.m. / Poughkeepsie ./ NY City / large brilliant meteor. / NY Times, Nov 3-4-6. [IV; 2289. "General Notes." New York Times, November 3, 1877, p. 4 c. 6.]


1877 Dec 18 / morning / Ottawa Valley, Ontario / q. / Nature 17-212. [IV; 2290. "Notes." Nature, 17 (January 10, 1878): 210-213, at 212.]


1877 Dec 18 / [LT], 10-d / Sun and earth. [IV; 2291. Proctor, Richard Anthony. "The Sun and the Earth." London Times, December 18, 1877, p. 10 c. 4.]


1877 Dec 24 / [LT], 6-f / Coincidences. [B; 171. "Coincidences." London Times, December 24, 1877, p. 6 c. 6.]


1877 Dec 26 / (NY Times), 1-6 / Ac to Aiken (S.C.) Journal, upon his farm, about 6 miles north of the Savannah River, Dr. J.L. Smith, of Silverton Township, noticed something fall to the ground near him. It was an alligator, about 12 inches long. A few seconds later another fell or "made its appearance". He looked around and found six others within a space of 200 yards." So not said seen to fall from sky. [IV; 2292.1, 2292.2. "A Shower of Alligators." New York Times, December 26, 1877, p. 1 c. 6. (Aiken Journal, S.C., 1877; microfilm @ University of South Carolina.)]


1877 Dec 26 / 8 a.m. / 2 meteorites fell near the village of Höhr, in the Prussian province of Hessen Nassau. / Nature 17-232. [IV; 2293. "Notes." Nature, 17 (January 17, 1878): 231-234, at 232-233. (No further references to these meteorites found.)]


1877 Dec. 28 / Hail, size of tomatoes / Brisbane / Nature 17-455. [IV; 2294. "Notes." Nature, 17 (April 4, 1878): 454-456, at 455. "Tremendous Hail Storm." Brisbane Courier, December 29, 1877, p. 5 c. 5-7. "The hailstones rapidly augmented in number and in size, till a perfect fusilade of lumps of ice varying in size from a hazel nut up to a hen's egg was discharged from the clouds and driven with prodigious force before the furious blast." "A Great Storm." Brisbane Telegraph, December 29, 1877, p. 2 c. 7 & p. 3 c. 1-2. "Roofs, whether of slate, shingle, or iron, were penetrated by the two-inch hailstones with which they were cannonaded; glass, of course, quickly disappeared in shattered fragments, wherever exposed; shop-shutters, which were in some cases hastily put up, were considerably knocked about; trees were denuded of their foliage and boughs; and generally the town presented the appearance of having been bombarded and sacked."]


1877 Dec 28 / Styria, Neumark, and Judenburg, Austria / I / q. / BA '11. [IV; 2295. Milne, 727.]


1877 Dec. 31 / Thunderstorm at Lima, Peru. / None been heard of since 1803. / L'Astro 5-434. [IV; 2296. (Astronomie, 5-434; not found in this volume.) Palma, Ricardo. Tradiciones Peruanas. Quinta serie. Barcelona: Montaner y Simón, 1894, v. 3, 226-227. In “Truenos en Lima,” Palma indicated that, before December 31, 1877, Lima had only experienced thunder during tempests in 1552, 1720, 1747, and 1803.]  

                                                                                        

1877 Dec 31 / 5:30 / between Ainsworth and Bury (Eng) / Met / Sc. A. Sup 5-1867. [IV; 2297. "Manchester Liteary and Philosophical Society." Scientific American Supplement, 5 (no. 117: March 30, 1878): 1867. "Ordinary Meeting, January 8th, 1878." Proceedings of the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society, 17 (1877-1878):  67-74, at 67.]

 
Copyright 2015. All rights reserved.
Back to content | Back to main menu