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Last updated: April 8, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1883a

(January to June)


1883:


1883 / Body of Mrs. W.I. Peters, Frankfort, Ind / See Dec. 22, 1888. [B; 414. See: See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1883 / Tingwick, Mass. / Josephine Bedard / Fasting girl / See Ap 20, 1889. [B; 415. See: 1889 Ap. 20, (B; 1024).]


1883 / Killing by lightning up from ground, in Venezuela / Nature 31/458. [B; 416. Ernst, A. "Injuries caused by Lightning in Venezuela." Nature, 31 (March 19, 1885): 458-459.]


1883 / Period of "Krao" / a human monkey family / See Nature, 1883. [B; 417. Keane, Augustus Henry. "Krao, The Human Monkey." Nature, 27 (January 11, 1883): 245-246. "Krao." Nature, 27 (April 19, 1883): 579-580.]


1883 / Ghst lantern / Amsterdam / See Ap 29, 1897. [B; 418. See: 1897 Ap 29, (C; 346).]


1883 / 2 Questions / Oakland, Ind, and near Oakland, Cal / same kind of phe / Sept 2, 1886 / (mistake?). [B; 419. See: 1886 Sept 2, (VI; 771).]


1883 / Particulars of Alaskan Auroras / Ref 1881. [V; 1071. Refer to: 1881, (V; 425). Ray, Patrick Henry. Report of the International Polar Expedition to Point Barrow, Alaska. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1885, 361-441, at 410-441.]


1883 / Newspapers / Have London Daily News, to May 20. [V; 1072.]


1883 [Jan 1] / Dec 31 / Jan 27 / Harper's Weekly of Jan 27, 1883 / Shower of mud reported from California. [V; 1073. “Waifs and Strays.” Harper's Weekly, 27 (January 27, 1883): 55. “A shower of mud is reported from California. There being no political campaign in progress there, the occurrence is mentioned as a phenomenon.” “Injured by a FallShower of Mud.” Sacramento Daily Union, January 3, 1883, p. 1 c. 7. “A shower of mud fell in this section yesterday afternoon, covering everything with a light coating of gray sandy mud. As the atmosphere has been perfectly quiet for weeks, it is hard to determine where the sand came from.” The dispatch from Fresno, (on January 2), indicates the shower occurred on January 1, (Monday). “Miscellaneous Notes.” Los Angeles Herald, January 5, 1883, p. 4 c. 2. “A shower of mud fell in and near Fresno Monday afternoon, covering everything with a light coating of gray sandy mud. A sand storm at Bakersfield from Sunday night until Monday morning. The railroad track was obstructed and the air so thick that it was impossible to see more than thirty feet ahead.”]


1883 / D. News / To Sept. [V; 1074.]


1883 / All sunspots 1883-86 / L'Astro 7-126, etc. [V; 1075. “Taches solaires visibles à œil nu.” Astronomie, 7 (1888): 123-133.]


[1883 /] 1885 Jan / Pelham. N. Hampshire / metallic granules after thunder storm / Sc Am. [V; 2102. “Meteoric Dust.” Scientific American, n.s, 52 (February 7, 1885): 83. “Meteoric Dust.” Popular Science News, 17 (July 1883): 84. “A metallic substance in powder or small granules has been sent to the Science News laboratory for examination. It proves to be meteoric dust, largely composed of iron, nickel, and silica. Dr. Batchelder, of Pelham, N. H., who sent the specimen, states that he collected the dust on the walk in front of his house after a smart thunder shower. It is probable that large quantities of this material fall upon the earth, but remain unnoticed. Much of the iron found in soils is due to precipitation from the interstellar spaces, the particles becoming entangled in our atmosphere.”]


1883 Jan 1 / Explosion in a kitchen in Montrealthought stove in some way exploded. / Toronto Globe 2-2-1. [B; 420. “Montreal.” Toronto Globe, January 2, 1883, p. 2 c. 1.]


1883 Jan. 1 / Louise Hamlin in the dwelling of Mrs Ascher, Montreal, killed by the explosion of the kitchen stovecaused by the water in the pipes frozen the night before and the sudden heating of the stove. / Quebec Daily Mercury of 2nd. [B; 421.1, 421.2. "From Montreal This Evening."Quebec Mercury, January 2, 1883, p. 3 c. 4.]


1883 Jan 1 / (Ref) / Maine and Nova Scotia / q / 2:58 a.m. / 8:28 / one on preceding day / Am J. Sci 3-27-358. [V; 1078. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 12.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 25 (1883): 353-360, at 360. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 13.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 27 (1884): 358-364, at 358.]


1883 Jan 1 / night Dec 31-Jan 1 / Rockland, Maine / q followed 2 hours later by "a tempest of thunder and lightning". / Toronto Globe 2-1-6. [V; 1079. “Shock of Earthquake.” Toronto Globe, January 2, 1883, p. 1 c. 6.]


1883 Jan. 1 / Dec. 31 / ab. 10 p.m. in St John, B.M. / Daily Telegraph of it is said. Says flashes in the sky, writer supposed were lightning. Comments that lighting in Dec. in N.B. is a rarity. [V; 1080. (London Daily Telegraph, ca. January 1883; not found.) “Dominion of Canada.” Scotsman, January 23, 1883, p. 6 c. 6-7. “At St. John, New Brunswick, the shock was very strong; a rumbling noise and two flashes of lightning, or brilliant meteors, attended it.”]


1883 Dec 31-Jan. 1 / Series / H = Halifax Citizen, Jan. 4 / H / 9:40 p.m.a brilliant meteor at Taunton, Mass. / 9:55 p.m.q., Eastport, Me / 9:45shock, Dover, N.. / H / ab 10, q., met / bet 10 and 11, q., met, Halifax / See E Concord. / 12Rockland phe / 2:58 a.m. / 8:28 / qs / Am. J. Sci 3/27/358. [V; 1081.1, 1081.2. (Halifax Citizen, January 4, 1883.) Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 13.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 27 (1884): 358-364, at 358.]


1883 Jan. 1 / At Halifax bet 10 and 11 p.m. the shock was slight. The sound was like that of distant artillery. / Halifax Citizen, Jan. 2 / 3-3-2 / That at sea q felt and a flash of light was seen. [V; 1082. (Halifax Citizen, January 2, 1883.) (Halifax Citizen, January 3, 1883, p. 3 c. 2.)]


1883 Jan 1 / Dec 31, night / q-phe / At St John, New Brunswick, rumbling sound with the q. Flashes of lightning or "the explosion of two brilliant meteors.” / Toronto Globe 3-2-4. [V; 1083. “The Earthquake.” Toronto Globe, January 3, 1883, p. 2 c. 4.]


1883 Jan 1 / Dec 31 at 10:07 p.m. and 10:43 at Halifax / Toronto Globe 3-2-4. [V; 1084. “Sunday's Earthquake.” Toronto Globe, January 3, 1883, p. 2 c. 4.]


1883 (Jan 1) / Series / Dec 31 / ac to Halifax Citizen, Jan. 4 / 9:40 p.m.a brilliant meteor at Taunton, Mass / 9:45, shock, Dover, N.H. / At 10:25 a meteor of remarkable size and brilliance at East Concord, N.H. Ball of fire that exploded like a rocket, though without noise. Rooms of houses brilliantly illuminated by it. [V; 1085.1, 1085.2. (Halifax Citizen, January 4, 1883.)]


1883 Jan 2, etc. / Floods / Europe / Symons Met 17-178, etc. [V; 1076. “The Recent Floods in Western Europe." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 17 (January 1883): 177-183.]


[1883 Jan 3. Wrong date. See: 1883 June 3, (V; 1077).]


1883 Jan. 3 / Ab. 7 p.m.Central Indiana / large meteor / Sid. Mes 2-8. [V; 1086. Kirkwood, Daniel. “A Large Meteor.” Sidereal Messenger, 2 (March 1883): 8-10.]


1883 Jan 3 / 6:45 p.m. / Great met / Ind, Ill, Wis / dark red light remaining several minutes from places started / Sun 5-1-2 / M.W.R. '07-391 / met train. [V; 1087. “Brilliant Meteor Seen in Chicago.” New York Sun, January 5, 1883, p. 1 c. 2. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (September 1907): 390-397, at 391, (Table 5).]


1883 Jan 4 / [LT], 7-f / Explosion / fireworks / near Castellamare. [B; 422. “Southern Italy.” London Times, January 4, 1883, p. 7 c. 6.]


1883 Jan 5 / [LT], 4-e / Explosion / Lea Bridge Road. [B; 423. "Fires." London Times, January 5, 1883, p. 4 c. 5.]


1883 Jan. 5 / night / Slight q. / Belleville, Canada / Toronto Globe 8-3-2. [V; 1088. “Belleville.” Toronto Globe, January 8, 1883, p. 3 c. 2.]


1883 Jan 5 / Floods / Germany and Austria / Daily News, Feb. 6. [V; 1089. “The letter which we publish this morning from our Vienna correspondent....” London Daily News, January 9, 1883, p. 4 c. 7 & p. 5 c. 1. “Disastrous Floods in the United States.” London Daily News, February 6, 1883, p. 5 c. 6.]


1883 Jan 5 / Another kitchen range explodes, Montreal. / Toronto Globe 6-3-2. [B; 431. “Montreal.” Toronto Globe, January 6, 1883, p. 3 c. 2.]


1883 Jan 6 / Water-back of a kitchen range explodes in a house, Church Street, Halifax. / Halifax Citizen 6-3-1. [B; 432. (Halifax Citizen, January 6, 1883, p. 3 c. 1.)]


1883 Jan 6 / bet 2 and 3 a.m. / q / n. Ohio / Ref., Jan 1. [V; 1090. Refer to: 1883 Jan 1, (V; 1078). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 13.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 27 (1884): 358-364, at 358.]


1883 Jan 8 / Epidemic / Montreal Gazette of / Several thousand persons in Binghampton, N.Y., stricken with unknown disease. Nausea, lassitude, pains. [B; 433. “A New Epidemic.” Montreal Gazette, January 8, 1883, p. 8 c. 3. “A remarkable epidemic disease is prevailing here. There is said to be 2,000 cases, but none so far are fatal. Fifteen persons in one manufactory were stricken down in a single day. Travellers and visitors in the city have been attacked almost as soon as they arrived. The first symptoms are nausea and lassitude, followed by exhaustion, headache and pains in the back. It has been attributed to the impurity of the city water, but this theory does not seem correct, as persons who live outside of the city have been attacked.”]


1883 Jan 8 / Daily News of / Catastrophic floods along the Rhone worst in 100 years. / But seems came from sudden thaw. [V; 1091. “The Floods on the Continent.” London Daily News, January 8, 1883, p. 6 c. 5.]


1883 Jan 10 / Comet of Sept still visible to n.e. in Brazil / Knowledge 3/122. [V; 1092. “The Great CometMagnetic Storm.” Knowledge, o.s, 3 (February 23, 1883): 122. Comet C/1882 R1.]


1883 Jan 11 / [LT], 6-f / Explosion / Dunfermline. [B; 424. "Explosion in a Church." London Times, January 11, 1883, p. 6 c. 6.]


1883 Jan 11 / Severe q's., Murcia, Spain / L.T. 15-6-a / and on 16thLT, 17th / LT, Feb 7 / These shocks small damage reported up to Feb 6th. / Back to Octab. 12th. [V; 1093. “Earthquakes in Spain.” London Times, January 15, 1883, p. 6 c. 1. “Earthquakes in Spain.” London Times, January 17, 1883, p. 5 c. 6. “Spain.” London Times, February 7, 1883, p. 5 c. 5. See: 1882 Oct 13, (V; 984).]


1883 Jan 11 / bet 1 and 2 a.m. / along Miss and Ohio / Mo., Tenn, Ill. / [earthquakes] / Ref, Jan 1 / See Oct 14-15, 1882. / 1:25 a.m., Cairo, Ill / N.Y. Times 12-8-4 / See M.W.R., Jan. [V; 1094. Refer to: 1883 Jan 1, (V; 1078). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 13.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 27 (1884): 358-364, at 358-359. “Cairo, Ill., Jan. 11.” New York Times, January 12, 1883, p. 8 c. 4. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 11 (no. 1; January 1883): 21-23, at 22. See: 1882 Oct 14-15, (V; 986).]


1883 Jan 11 / L.T., 11-c / Aurora in Shetlands. [V; 1095. “Aurora Borealis in the Shetlands.” London Times, January 11, 1883, p. 11 c. 3.]


[1883 Jan 11 /] 1883 Feb 11 / [LT], 11-c / Aurora / Shetlands. [V; 1129. “Aurora Borealis in the Shetlands.” London Times, January 11, 1883, p. 11 c. 3.]


1883 Jan. 13 / [LT], 6-a / Explosion / fog signals. [B; 425. "The Late Fatal Explosion at Greenwich." London Times, January 13, 1883, p. 6 c. 1.]


1883 Jan 13 / Great floods in Hungary / D. News, 15th. [V; 1096. “The Floods in Hungary.” London Daily News, January 15, 1883, p. 6 c. 3.]


1883 Jan 14 / Trib, 4-1 / Ghost. [B; 434.1. “Mr. Heaphy's Ghost.” New York Tribune, January 14, 1883, p. 4 c. 1-5. “Four Stories.” All the Year Round, 5 (September 14, 1861): 589-600, at 589-593. “Mr. H.'s Own Narrative.” All the Year Round, 6 (October 5, 1861): 36-43. Heaphy, Eliza Bradstreet. A Wonderful Ghost Story Being Mr. H.'s Own Narrative. London: Griffith & Farran, 1882. Mr. Heaphy's Ghost. Chicago: Religio-Philosophical Journal, 1883. Guy, William Augustus. “The Narrative of Mr. H., the Portrait-painter, Analysed and Critically Examined.” Journal of Mental Science, n.s., 31 (July 1885): 151-174. Thomas Frank Heaphy, (1813-1873), identified himself to Charles Dickens as the painter in one of the “Four Stories” and furnished his own version of his three encounters with a young woman, (on a railway journey, as a guest at dinner, and at his London studio), and with her family, (who hoped to obtain a portrait of her); and, only by having encountered the woman on these occasions, (unaware of her identity, apparently a living person, but unseen by others), Heaphy produced two sketches and a portrait of the deceased daughter. Guy asked: “May there not also be some old inhabitant or inhabitants of the Close at Lichfield who can say whether, somewhere about the year 1858 (27 years ago) there was living in the Cathedral Close a gentleman of the name of Lute, who had, at or about that time, a daughter aged 22 deceased and a daughter aged about 15 living, and who was for a while, after the decease of his daughter, in a state of derangement from which he recovered?” No “Lute” was found in the 1851 and 1861 census records nor in the death and burial records, (from 1855 to 1860), for Staffordshire; but, the name “Lute” was probably a fictitious name to conceal the family's real identity, (as other names and places were concealed in Heaphy's story, including Heaphy's own name until after his own death).]


1883 Jan 14 / ab. noon / 17 / bet 5 and 6 a.m. / Slight shocks at Panama / L.T. 13-11-e. [V; 1097. “Earthquake Shocks.” London Times, February 13, 1883, p. 11 c. 5.]


1883 Jan 15 / L.T., 6-e / Sea quake. [V; 1098. “A Seaquake.” London Times, January 15, 1883, p. 6 c. 5.]


1883 Jan 15 / Large n. eye Sunspot / L.T. 17-7-e. [V; 1099. Hodges, Sydney. “Sun Spots.” London Times, January 17, 1883, p. 7 c. 5.]


1883 / ab Jan 15 / Valley of Faverges, Savoy, Switzerland / loud detonations and landslip down side of a mountain / Daily News 18-5-5. [V; 1100. “Landslip in Savoy.” London Daily News, January 18, 1883, p. 5 c. 5. The Valley of Faverges, (Haute-Savoie), is located in France, near the Swiss border.]


1883 Jan 16 / 11 shocks at Archena (Murcia), Spain, bet 3 and 6 a.m. / Daily News 17-6-1. [V; 1101. “Earthquakes in Spain.” London Daily News, January 17, 1883, p. 6 c. 1.]


1883 Jan 16 / 22 shocks Murcia. / D. News 18-6-5 / on 17th some. [V; 1102. “The Earthquakes in Spain.” London Daily News, January 18, 1883, p. 6 c. 5.]


1883 Jan 16 / Also see Jan. 11. / 5 p.m. / Slight shock and rushing sound / Monmouth, Wales / L.T. 17-9-e. [V; 1103. “Earthquake in Wales.” London Times, January 17, 1883, p. 9 c. 5.]


1883 Jan 16 / 5 p.m.Clifton / 9:09 a.m., Hastings / qs / Nature 27-293 / Psychos [note cut off]. [V; 1104. “Earthquakes.” Nature, 27 (January 25, 1883): 293.]


1883 Jan 17 / Scar. D. Post / First news of the phe, home of Mr and Mrs. James Edmond, 2 St. Hilda's-terrace, Prospect roadknocks, usually in the evening, from half a dozen to 40 or 50. Began ab 1st of Jan. In D. Post, advertisement signed by Chief Constable Pattison that Mr Edmond would pay 5 pounds reward for information leading to detection of causes, of the "great percussive noises. Day after day this advertisement in the Post, but only a few brief paragraphs in the Post upon the phe. Phe mentioned and no more of the water pipe. / Post of 19thsaid that been another inexplicable incident. The body of a new-born infant had been sent to a firm of dyers at Perth, by train, and had been traced to Scarborough. [B; 434.2 to 434.5. (Scarborough Daily Post, January 17, 1883; not at BNA.) (Scarborough Daily Post, January 19, 1883; not at BNA.) “Playing the Ghost.” York Herald, January 18, 1883, p. 3 c. 4. ]


1883 Jan 17 / Rappings at Scarborough, so loud disturbed a whole neighborhood and thought be firing of dynamiteac to the advertisement. [B; 434.10. (Ref???)]


1883 (Jan) / March 16 / Scarborough Weekly Post ofsaid that the "mystery" of the supposed phenomena at the home of Mr. Edmond, Prospect road, Scarborough, had been solved, and that the culprit was the servant girl who had confessed to Chief Constable Pattison. "The means which the girl adopted to carry out the hoax are not explained, but they were no doubt of a commonplace character. It was raps and furniture moving. [B; 434.6, 434.7. (Scarborough Weekly Post, March 16, 1883; not at BNA.)]


1883 Jan 17 / Toronto Globe of / British ship Pride of the Ocean from Hamburg to N.Y. off Harwich blown upsaid been by dynamite. [V; 1105. “The Harwich Wreck.” Toronto Globe, January 17, 1883p. 2 c. 1.]


1883 Jan 19 / Muiden, near Amsterdam / ab. 7:30 a.m. / tremendous detonation / explosion of a gunpowder factory / D. News, 20th / Almost every house in town unroofed. Cause unknown. / See March 17. [V; 1106. “Terrible Explosion at a Gunpowder Mill.” London Daily News, January 20, 1883, p. 5 c. 5. See: 1883 March 17, (V; 1198).]


1883 Jan. 20 / (with Sun distant) / Scarborough D. Post ofthat been an amusing solution of the supposed manifestations at Mr. Edmond's house in Bow street. A practical plumber had gone to the house and had found a water pipe partly obstructed, the resisted pressure in the pipe causing noisy oscillations. [B; 434.8, 434.9. (Scarborough Daily Post, January 20, 1883; not at BNA.)]


1883 Jan 20 / Trib, 1-2 / Amsterdam / powder explosion. [B; 435. “Killed by Terrific Explosions.” New York Tribune, January 20, 1883, p. 1 c. 2.]


1883 Jan. 20 / Fenian? / Explosion, in Glasgow, of a gasometer, 100 feet diameter and 60 high. / D News 22-6-7 / "The cause is mysterious." 3 hours lateranother terrific explosion in a railroad company's shed. Next day some young men found on a viaduct a tin box filled with explosive powder. [B; 436.1, 436.2. “Severe Explosion at Glasgow.” London Daily News, January 22, 1883, p. 6 c. 7.]


1883 Jan 20 / L.T., 9-f / Lightning / Paris. [B; 437. "A Curious Effect of Lightning." London Times, January 20, 1883, p. 9 c. 6.]


1883 Jan 20 / Disap / Anapolis / Nova Scotia / Montreal Gazette 22-1-4. [B; 438. “Nova Scotia.” Montreal Gazette, January 22, 1883, p. 1 c. 4.]


1883 Jan 21 / 1:40 p.m. / San Salvador / Shock / LT, March 14-6-f. [V; 1107. “Earthquakes on the Pacific Coast.” London Times, March 14, 1883, p. 6 c. 6.]


1883 Jan 21 / Explosion at the Giant Powder Co's works near Oakland, Cal. Bet 40 and 50 Chinamen killed. / D News 23-5-6. [V; 1108. “Explosion in California.” London Daily News, January 23, 1883, p. 5 c. 6.]


1883 Jan 21 / Trib, 9-2 / Met / Indiana. [V; 1109. “An Indiana Meteor.” New York Tribune, January 21, 1883, p. 9 c. 2.]


1883 Jan 22 / [LT], 6-c / The Picardio / Abandoned Vessel. [B; 439. "Terrible Disaster at Sea." London Times, January 22, 1883, p. 6 c. 3. The Picardio was sinking, and its crew was saved by another ship.]


1883 (Jan 23) / Spon Comb / 3 persons in Chattanooga burned standing in front of fire. / 9, 10, and 11 o'clock / NY Times, 1883, Jan 23-2-3. [B; 440. “Burned to Death.” New York Times, January 23, 1883, p. 2 c. 3.]


1883 / ab Jan. 23 / Pittsburgh / man disaps fromfinds self in Chicago / no money and objs in pockets gone / (and hair and beard cut / World—Feb. 8-1-4) / Looks as if had disguised himself—then thought better of it. [B; 441. (New York World, February 8, 1883, p. 1 c. 4.)]


1883 Jan 23 / [LT], 3-e / 24-5-e / 25-5-e / 27-5-f / Feb 10-12-d / March 3-10-d / 13-10-b / 17-13-b / 22-3-d / 8-6-f / Overdue or Missing Vessels. [B; 442. “Terrible Collision in the Mersey.” London Times, January 8, 1883, p. 6 c. 5-6. “An Overdue Steamer.” London Times, January 23, 1883, p. 3 c. 5. “An Overdue Steamer.” London Times, January 24, 1883, p. 5 c. 5. “Overdue.” London Times, January 25, 1883, p. 5 c. 5. “The Overdue Steamer Quebec.” London Times, January 27, 1883, p. 5 c. 6. “Overdue.” London Times, February 10, 1883, p. 12 c. 4. “A Missing Yacht.” London Times, March 3, 1883, p. 10 c. 4. “Latest Shipping Intelligence.” London Times, March 8, 1883, p. 12 c. 1. “The City of Chester.” London Times, March 13, 1883, p. 10 c. 2. “Safety of an Overdue Steamer.” London Times, March 17, 1883, p. 13 c. 2. “Missing Vessels.” London Times, March 22, 1883, p. 3 c. 4.]


1883 Jan 23 / [LT], 5-e / 24-5-d / Explosion / Powder / near Oakland, Cal. [B; 426. "The United States." London Times, January 23, 1883, p. 5 c. 5. "The United States." London Times, January 24, 1883, p. 5 c. 4.]


1883 Jan 23 / [LT], 12-a / Explosion / Eccleston Square. [B; 427. "Gas Explosion." London Times, January 23, 1883, p. 12 c. 1.]


1883 Jan 23 / Obj said be new comet seen near JupiterPuebla Obs., MexicoDenning says was a well-known nebula. / Observatory 12/286. [V; 1110. Denning, William Frederick. “Notes on Comets and Comet-seeking.” Observatory, 12 (1889): 285-286. “A new comet was said to have been discovered close to this planet on Jan. 23, 1883, at the Puebla Observatory, Mexico, but this proved to be the well-known 'Crab' nebula near ζ Tauri.”]


1883 Jan. 24 / [LT, 5-d / Comet near Jupiter. [V; 1111. “A New Comet.” London Times, January 24, 1883, p. 5 c. 4. “The Great Comet, 1882.New Comet, 1883 (?)” English Mechanic, 36 (no. 933; February 9, 1883): 521. Denning wrote: “Have any of your readers succeeded in picking up the comet described at the Pueblo Observatory, Mexico, on about Jan. 23, and said to be situated near Jupiter? The only 'comet' (?) I can find in the neighbourhood of this planet is the celebrated 'crab' Nebula ( = Messier l and No. 1157 of Sir John Herschcl's general catalogue, 1864). An English observer is also said to have seen the comet on Jan. 27, about 1½° S.E. of Jupiter. It was then somewhat faint, and about 4' diameter. This corresponds to the nebula referred to, and I should have considered the whole matter as one of mistaken identity, were it not that the original telegram emanated from an observatory, where, most assuredly, some means would be adopted to avoid the chances of such an error. The nebula referred to is such a well-known object, and the means of identifying it so easy from its position, about 1° n.p. Zeta Tauri, that it is difficult to understand how it can have been mistaken for a comet. Moreover, the means of distinguishing a comet from a nebula are so well known, that one can hardly believe them to have been entirely overlooked on this occasion. Still, there is an ominous silence from Dun Echt which gives strength to the inference that a mistake has been made in regard to this alleged comet by the Mexican observers. Perhaps, however, one of your readers is in a position to explain the matter?”]


1883 Jan 24 / early morning / q in Wilkesbarre, Pa, by collapse of old coal mines under city / World 25-2-3. [V; 1112. (New York World, January 25, 1883, p. 2 c. 3.)]


1883 Jan. 25 / [LT], 9-f / Super in Somersetshire. [B; 443. "Superstition in Somersetshire." London Times, January 25, 1883, p. 9 c. 6.]


1883 Jan 26 / Liverpool / explosion in gunpowder factory / Toronto Globe 27-2-6. [B; 444. “Fatal Gunpowder Explosion.” Toronto Globe, January 27, 1883, p. 2 c. 6.]


1883 Jan. 26 / Linares, Spain. / SpainExplosion in gunpowder factory. / Toronto Globe 27-2-6. [B; 445. “Fatal Gunpowder Explosion.” Toronto Globe, January 27, 1883, p. 2 c. 6.]


1883 Jan 26 / evening / Explosion of a gunpowder factory in the province of Jaen, Andalusia. / LT, Jan. 29-6-1. [B; 446. "Spain." London Times, January 29, 1883, p. 6 c. 1.]


1883 Jan 26 / 11:45 p.m. / Shock / Lima / LT, March 14-6-f. [V; 1113. “Earthquakes on the Pacific Coast.” London Times, March 14, 1883, p. 6 c. 6.]


1883 Jan 27 / [LT[, 10-d / Explosion / Powder Mill / Ormskirk. [B; 428. "Fatal Explosion." London Times, January 27, 1883, p. 10 c. 4.]


1883 (Jan 28) / 2:45 p.m. / Saint Caprias-Quinsac, Gironde, France / (F) / C.R. 97-1022. [V; 1114. Fletcher, 105. Lespiault, G., and, Forquignon, L. “Sur une météorite ferrifère, tombée le 28 janvier 1833 à Saint-Caprais-de-Quinsac (Gironde).” Comptes Rendus, 97 (1883): 1022. This is the Saint Caprais-de-Quinsac meteorite.]


1883 Jan 29 / By E.L. Layard, of British Consulate, Noumeaa brilliant point in sky s.e. of Orion. It increased and died away without moving from position. / Nature 27-531. [V; 1115. Layard, Edgar Leopold. “Meteor; the Transit; the Comet.” Nature, 27 (April 5, 1883): 531.]


1883 Feb 1 / In a factory in Bombay / (The Englishman) (Calcutta), Feb. 6 / In a high wind a large quantity of dust blown into the top floor room. Cry raised that place was falling. Panic. In struggle down narrow staircase, 23 lives lost. [V; 1116. (Englishman, February 6, 1883.)]


1883 Feb. 1 / 7:34 p.m. / Strong shock / Iquique / other places on Pacific coast / L.T., March 14-6-f. [V; 1117. “Earthquakes on the Pacific Coast.” London Times, March 14, 1883, p. 6 c. 6.]


1883 Feb 1 / evening / Iserlohn (Rhenish Prussia) / glistening black meteorite. Size of a goose's egg / Nature 27-423. [V; 1118. “Notes.” Nature, 27 (March 1, 1883): 422-424, at 423. Brezina, Aristides. Die Meteoritensammlung des K. K. Mineralogischen Hofkabinetes in Wien am 1. Mai 1885. Vienna: Alfred Hölder, 1885, 229-230. Brezina dismisses this object as a piece of slag, found on the morning after the meteor had been seen.]


1883 Feb 3 / Morning, in fogvessel afire off Coney Island reportedno such vessel—might been fire in a mud scow. / World 5-1-4. [V; 1119. (New York World, February 5, 1883, p. 1 c. 4.)]


1883 Feb. 4 / evening / Agram, Hungary / q / Toronto Globe 6-2-3. [V; 1120. “Earthquakes.” Toronto Globe, February 6, 1883, p. 2 c. 3.]


1883 Feb. 4 / 5 h = 5 a.m. /  St. Louis, Mo / 2 sharp sounds. "Not at first attributed to subterranean causes, until it was found that they had been heard by many persons.” / A. J. Sci 3/27/359. [V; 1121. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 13.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 27 (1884): 358-364, at 359.]


1883 Feb 4 / 15 h, 5 m / Wolfborough, N.H. / and 15:16 this also at Cornish, Me. / Ref/. Jan 1. [V; 1122. Refer to: 1883 Jan 1, (V; 1078). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 13.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 27 (1884): 358-364, at 359.]


1883 Feb 4 / 3 p.m. and 3:10 / q / New Hamp[shire] / Feb 5—5 a.m. / Bloomington, Ill. / bet 4 and 5 / Michigan. / Evening of 4th, severe q., Agram, Hungary / Sun 6-1-4. [V; 1123. “Earthquakes at Home and Abroad.” New York Sun, February 6, 1883, p. 1 c. 4.]


1883 Feb 4 / 5 a.m. / Bloomington, Ill, northern Ind, and southern Mich, rumbling and shock. St. Louis, Mo—"two sharp sounds” ab. 4 seconds apart. / Ref, Jan 1. [V; 1124. Refer to: 1883 Jan 1, (V; 1078). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 13.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 27 (1884): 358-364, at 359.]


1883 Feb 4 / q's. / 5 a.m. / Bloomington, Ill (sic) / 3 p.m. / New Hampshire / ab 5 p.m. / Michigan / NYT, Feb 6-1-6. [V; 1125. “Earthquakes in Various Places.” New York Times, February 6, 1883, p. 1 c. 6.]


1883 Feb 5 / 6:45 p.m. / Arvika, Sweden / unusual meteor / Nature 27-423. [V; 1126. “Notes.” Nature, 27 (March 1, 1883): 422-424, at 423. “On February 5, at 6.45 p.m., a meteor of unusual size and appearance was observed near Arvika, in Sweden. An observer who happened at the time to be passing a lake—Glasfjorden—states that he first observed the meteor high on the horizon, going from south-east to north-west, when, after about eighteen seconds, it suddenly changed its course to south-east. During its progress to north-west, calculated at eighteen seconds, the meteor made several digressions from its plane, while its size varied from that of an ordinary star to that of the sun, sometimes emitting a white, at others a yellow light, and at times discharging showers of sparks. At the point of changing its direction when it was so near the surface of the lake that its path was reflected therein, it possessed a distinct tail, and with this adjunct it passed out of the range of sight in a south-easterly direction, after being observed for nearly fifty seconds.”]


1883 Feb. 5 / 10:37 a.m. / Sharp shock at Panama / LT, March 14-6-f. [V; 1127. “Earthquakes on the Pacific Coast.” London Times, March 14, 1883, p. 6 c. 6.]


1883 Feb 6 / [LT], 6-f / Explosion / gas / Fulham. [B; 429. "Fires." London Times, February 6, 1883, p. 6 c. 6.]


1883 Feb 11 / Trib, 3-6 / Ghost / English / Ed. [B; 447. “An English Ghost Story.” New York Tribune, February 11, 1883, p. 3 c. 6.]


1883 Feb 11 / World, 5-3 / Man who appeared in Uniontown, Paseized a house, Jan 15, 1831murdered, etc. Jail 50 years. Never identifiedany more than K Hauser. [B; 448. (New York World, February 11, 1883, p. 5 c. 3.)]


1883 Feb. 11 / Rain and floods in Prov of Galicia, Spain / D. News 12-3-2. [V; 1128. “Floods in Spain.” London Daily News, February 12, 1883, p. 3 c. 2.]


[1883 Feb 11. Wrong date. See: 1883 Jan 11, (V; 1129).]


1883 Feb 12 / Eng. / Feb 17, U.S. / Great floods / An. Reg. [V; 1130. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 1883: pt. 2, 1-53, at 7.]


1883 Feb. 12 / Snow fleas / Quebec Daily Mercury of / Had been several reports that the Russian snow flea had appeared in Canada. / See Nov 1, 1882. [V; 1131. "Unwelcome Visitors." Quebec Mercury, February 12, 1883, p. 3 c. 4. This article claims that "snow fleas" from Russia have been reported to begin biting people who've come inside from winter weather and become warmed by a fire. As "snow fleas," (also called "springtails"), do not "bite" people, these reports may represent a delusional parasitosis prompted by the belief that a new species of "flea" had been found in Canada. See: 1882 Nov. 1, (V; 1005).]


1883 Feb. 14 / [LT], 10-f / Meteors at Sea. [V; 1132. “Meteors at Sea.” London Times, February 14, 1883, p. 10 c. 6.]


1883 Feb 15 / Floods in Ohio / Sci Amer 48/135, 161. [V; 1133. “Floods in the Ohio Valley.” Scientific American, n.s., 48 (March 3, 1883): 135. “The Great Floods of 1883.” Scientific American, n.s., 48 (March 17, 1883): 161.]


1883 / middle of Feb / Rumblings, etc., of Nicaragua volc to May 4/ See. [V; 1134. See: 1883 May 4, (V; 1252). The Concepcion volcano.]


1883 Feb 12 / Unusual outbreak of sun spots reported by Prof. Brooks / NY Times 14-3-2. [V; 1135. “Outbreak of Sun Spots.” New York Times, February 14, 1883, p. 3 c. 2.]


1883 Feb 15 / Etna violent / Nature 27-422. [V; 1136. “Notes.” Nature, 27 (March 1, 1883): 422-424, at 422.]


1883 Feb 15 / 1:30 a.m. / Aurora at Brixham / Nature 27-413. [V; 1137. “Aurora.” Nature, 27 (March 1, 1883): 413.]


1883 Feb 16 / (volc) / 8:10 a.m. / Slight q at Bologna and the whole Southern Romagna and an increase in the activity of Vesuvius / Nature 27-445. [V; 1138. “Notes.” Nature, 27 (March 8, 1883): 443-445, at 445.]


1883 Feb. 16 / The aerolite of Brescia / ab 3 p.m. / Brescia 90 miles n.w. of Bologna. [V; 1139. This is the Alfianello meteorite.]


1883 Feb. 16 / Feb 29, '68 / Brescia / metite / See Nov. 12, 1856. / Feb 2, 1860. / Sc Am 48/261. [V; 1140. “Remarkable Meteor in Italy.” Scientific American, n.s., 48 (April 28, 1883): 261. See: 1856 Nov 12, (II; 2004); 1860 Feb 3, (II: 2321 & 2420); and, 1868 Feb 29, (III: 1297, 1298, 1300, 1301. This is the Alfianello meteorite.]


1883 Feb / Brescia / See Nov 12, 1856. [V; 1141. See: 1856 Nov 12, (II; 2004).]


1883 Feb 16 (?) / Metite of Trenzano, Nov. 12, 1856, is near Brescia. / L.T., 1861, June 20-12-d. [V; 1142. “Meteoric Stones.” London Times, June 20, 1861, p. 12 c. 4. See: 1856 Nov 12, (II; 2004). This is the Trezano meteorite, (which also fell in Brescia, in 1856).]


1883 Feb. 16 / Brescia / 2:43 p.m. / L A. Sci 27-9. [V; 1143. “La météorite d'Alfianello.” Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 27 (1883): 8-11. This is the Alfianello meteorite.]


[1883 Feb 22? Wrong date. See: 1884 Feb 21, (V; 1144).]


1883 Feb / Extraordinary sunsets in Natal / Knowledge 5-418. [V; 1145. Noble, William. “The Recent Extraordinary Sunrises and Sunsets.” Knowledge, o.s., 5 (June 6, 1884): 418. Edmund Neison wrote: “They began in Natal in February, 1883, but on a less grand scale, but gradually became more marked until June. Then for two months nothing was noticed. In the latter end of August they became most vivid.”]


1883 Feb 20-March / Polt / At Worksop / Jour Soc 1-199 / children possessed / things thrownrising and falling / especially in the presence of a half-witted girl (F). [B; 449. Podmore, Frank. "Report on the Worksop Disturbances." Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 1 (December 1884): 199-212. Podmore described the girl, as follows: "...Eliza Rose, the child of an imbecile mother, and herself regarded as half-witted..."; and, he noted: "After her departure nothing whatever of an abnormal character took place, and the house has remained undisturbed up to the present time." A week before Eliza Rose came into White's house, phenomena began in the kitchen. "Nothing remarkable had been seen or heard in the house until about the 20th or 21st February, 1883, when, as Mrs. White was alone with two of the children in the kitchen one evening, washing up the tea-things at the table; the table tilted up at a considerable angle; the candle was upset, and the washtub only saved by Mrs. W. holding it. She positively assured me that she exerted no pressure whatever upon the table, and the whole incident struck her as very extraordinary." On the night of  March 2-3, 1883, police constable William Higgs investigated and observed some of the phenomena in the house. "Then Mrs. White came in with Dr. Lloyd; also Tom White and Solomon Wass. After they had been in two or three minutes, something else happened. Tom White and Wass were standing with their backs to the fire, just in front of it. Eliza Rose and Dr. Lloyd were near them, with their backs turned towards the bin, the Doctor nearer to the door. I stood by the drawers, and Mrs. White was by me near the inner door. Then suddenly a basin, which stood on the end of the bin near the door, got up into the air, turning over and over as it went. It went up not very quickly,not as quickly as if it had been thrown. When it reached the ceiling it fell plump and smashed. I called Dr. Lloyd's attention to it, and we all saw it. No one was near it, and I don't know how it happened. I stayed about ten minutes more, but saw nothing else. I don't know what to make of it all. I don't think White or the girl could possibly have done the things which I saw."]


1883 Feb 20 / Etna eruption but only of burning lavaVesuvius passive / L.T. 27-8-c. [V; 1146. “Etna and Vesuvius.” London Times, February 27, 1883, p. 8 c. 3.]


1883 Feb 21-22 / An Soc Met de France, 1884-251 / This night there fell on the Canary Islands a rain of reddish sand. French consul gives his opinion that notwithstanding some persons who attributed it to a volcanic eruption it came from an African desert. He gives reasons founded upon barometric depressions. [V; 1147.1, 1147.2. Teisserenc de Bort, Léon Philippe. "Sur une pluie terreuse tombée aux iles Canaries, du 21 au 22 février 1883." Annuaire de la Societe Meteorologique de France, 32 (1884): 251-252.]


1883 Feb. 23 / Medium and Daybreak of / Rappings on the outside of a house in Scarborough. Reward offered for detection of offender. No one detected. [B; 434.11. "Scarborough." Medium and Daybreak, 14 (no. 673; February 23, 1883): 120. "The Bow-Street Ghost Again." York Herald, March 28, 1883, p. 3 c. 6. "Some few weeks ago a good deal of excitement was created by the reported vagaries of a 'ghost' at the house of Mr. Edmond, Prospect-place, Bow-street, where for a considerabie time unearthly knockings and the breaking of crockery, &c., were kept up, to the great annoyance of the family. About three weeks ago tha girl Alice Randall, aged only 13, was suspected of being the cause, and at length on being questioned by the Chief Constable, she admitted that she had played tbe pranks. She was discharged, and afterwards went, to another situation...." "Her father now applied to the magistrates to send her to a reformatory as she was quite beyond his control. The girl was by a former wife, but she made no complaint of the stepmother or of her father." "The magistrates said that she was not charged with any offence that would justify them in sending her to a reformatory, but they gave her a severe admonition, and advised the father to try her again."]


1883 Feb 23 / Etna in eruption / Field, March 3, '83, from Times. [V; 1148. (Field, March 3, 1883; not found here.) “Etna.” London Times, February 28, 1883, p. 8 c. 2.]


1883 Feb 23 / No sunspots / See May. / Science, Nov 14, 1884. [V; 1149. Todd, David Peck. “Sun-spots.” Science, s. 1 v. 4 (November 14, 1884): 453. See: 1883 May 25, 26, 27, 28, (V; 1296).]


1883 Feb 23 / Comet between Alpha and Beta in Pegasus moving toward Andromeda / D News, March 24-6-5. [V; 1150. “The New Comet.” London Daily News, March 24, 1883, p. 6 c. 5. Comet C/1883 D1.]


1883 Feb 23 / Grenoble / met fall: [illustration] / L'Astro 1883/227. [V; 1151. “Curieuse étoile filante.” Astronomie, 2 (1883): 227, (illustration).]


1883 Feb 24 / Trance / [source unidentified]. 4-5 / A trance-woman in Kingston, Ontario. [B; 450. (Ref???), February 24, 1883, p. 4 c. 5.) "Case of Protracted Trance in Canada." Portsmouth Evening News, February 28, 1883, p. 4 c. 1.]


1883 Feb. 26 / [LT], 6-b / Explosion / dynamite / near Brussels. [B; 430. "Dynamite Explosions." London Times, February 26, 1883, p. 6 c. 2.]


1883 Feb. 26 / The Worksop Case / Report of Frank Podmore upon his investigation, in Proc. S.P.R., vol. 12 / It was Mrs White's statement that there had been an occurrence before the girl came to the houseabout Feb 20th or 21st, a table had lifted as if by an unseen force while she was working at it. Told afterward, this may not have been a psychic tilt. On 26th, Mrs White allowed a girl, Eliza Rose, the child of an imbecile mother, to come into the house and share her bed at night. Night of March 1, Mrs White and girl in kitchenthings such as a corkscrew, clothes pegs, a salt cellar (?) came tumbling down the stairs. Following night, about the same time (11:30 o'clock) a noise as if of footsteps, and pieces of carpet, then knives, forks, and other things came down the stairs. Things in the room flew from the mantelpiece. / Child in the house, ill with an abscess on its back. / A policeman was brought in. According to his statement, saw things jump and fall to the floor and smash. Saw a basin go up to ceiling not so quickly as if thrown, and fall and smash. several things went to same corner of a room (see the Wisconsin case, Oct., 1873). Things would jump to the floor, and get up and jump out to the yard. Whatever the girl went, things jumped around. Finally, White told her that she would have to leave the house. She went and phenomena stopped. (Joseph White). Testimony by other witnessed of phe, in Proc., vol 12. [B; 451.1 to 451.7. Podmore, Frank. "Poltergeists." Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, 12 (1897): 45-115, at 45-58. See: 1873 Oct 4, (A: 858 & 859).]


1883 Feb. 26 / Protuberance on sunSee Sept 26, '79. [V; 1152. See: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 215-223, at 221-222, (figure 70).]


1883 Feb 26 / Fine sand and fine veg. matter on snow in northern Norway / Nature 27/496. [V; 1155. “Notes.” Nature, 27 (March 22, 1883): 495-497, at 496.]


1883 Feb. 26 / Trondhjem Amt, Northern Norway. / A fine dust in the snowparticles of vegetable matter in it. It came in a wind blowing strongly from N.N.W. / Chem News 88-33. [V; 1156. Liversidge, Archibald. "Meteoric Dusts, New South Wales." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 88 (July, 10, 17. 24, and 31, 1903): 16-18, 32-34, 41-45, 55-58; at 33.]


1883 Feb 27 / 8:30 p.m. / 3 paper bombs filled with powder thrown and exploded in 3 different parts of Rome. Attributed to anarchists. One place was in front of the Royal Palace. / D. News 28-5-5. [B; 452. “Explosions of Bombs in Rome.” London Daily News, February 28, 1883, p. 5 c. 5. No mention is made of anarchists in this article.]


1883 Feb 27 / Dust fall / Red Sea / Nature 27-516. [V; 1153. “Notes.” Nature, 27 (March 29, 1883): 515-517, at 516-517.]


1883 Feb. 27 / 10 p.m. / Ireland / 2 white auroral streams near Pleiades. They moved toward Orion. / Nature 27-434. [V; 1154. Murphy, Joseph John. “Aurora.” Nature, 27 (March 8, 1883): 434.]


1883 Feb. 27 / Conn and Rhode Island / 10:20 p.m. / buildings shaken violently in a supposed qlarge meteor seen / N.Y. Times, Feb 28-2-5 and March onewindow glass broken in Providence, R.I. / Best in March 4-2-5 / Said that whether met or not the earth did quake and there was a rumbling sound. [V; 1157.1, 1157.2. “Earthquake Shock in New-England.” New York Times, February 28, 1883, p. 2 c. 5. “At about the same time a brilliant meteor shot across the sky from north-east to north-west, emitting a dazzling white light and flames....” “The Earthquake at Newport.” New York Times, March 1, 1883, p. 1 c. 6. “At Norwich a meteor was observed by a large number of people three minutes before the shock.” “Rhode Island's Phenomenon.” New York Times, March 4, 1883, p. 2 c. 5. “He [Mr. Jonathan Kenney] turned and looked in the direction of Point Judith, but did not see the steamer's lights as usual; while looking he saw a flash of light and what appeared to be a large ball of fire falling from the heavens toward the water, it seemed to strike the water and bound upon its surface and explode with a fearful sound, at the same time it illuminated the whole visible heavens, the ocean, and the land as far as the eye could extend. He said objects could be as distinctly seen as at noonday.”]


1883 Feb 27 / q and met / In M.W.R., Feb, when reported from towns where met seen was supposed been an earthquake. Here are familiar q descriptions heard in a narrow belt / like a train or wagon. [V; 1158. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 11 (no. 2; February 1883): 49-51, at 50-51.]


1883 Feb 27 / (q met) / evening / q. / Newport, R.I. / At Norwich a met 3 minutes before the shock. / Sun, March 1-1-6 / Times 1-1-6 / Feb. 28-2-5. [V; 1160. “Newport Shaken by an Earthquake.” New York Sun, March 1, 1883, p. 1  c. 6. “Earthquake Shock in New-England.” New York Times, February 28, 1883, p. 2 c. 5. “At about the same time a brilliant meteor shot across the sky from north-east to north-west, emitting a dazzling white light and flames, which gave the meteor a total apparent diameter of 8 feet.” “The Earthquake at Newport.” New York Times, March 1, 1883, p. 1 c. 6. ]


1883 Feb 27 / Etna and Vesuvius / LT, 8-c / 28-8-b / See March 21. [V; 1161. “Etna and Vesuvius.” London Times, February 27, 1883, p. 8 c. 3. “Etna.” London Times, February 28, 1883, p. 8 c. 2. See: 1883 March 21, (V; 1204).]


1883 Feb 28 / (Polt) / For past 10 days in Montgomery Co, Alaloud rappings. / N.Y.T., March 1-1-6. [B; 453.1. “A Ghost Story From Georgia.” New York Times, March 1, 1883, p. 1 c. 6. The location was only given as “Montgomery County, near the line of the Macon and Brunswick Railroad”; thus, this was Montgomery County, Georgia, (not in Alabama).]


1883 Feb. 28 / 8:40 p.m. / at Luk-Lesjo, Värmland, Sweden / Brilliant meteor / Nature 27-517. [V; 1159. “Notes.” Nature, 27 (March 29, 1883): 515-517, at 517.]


1883 Feb / The glows like those of later in the year seen at Port Darwin / Jour Roy Soc N.S. Wales 18-20. [V; 1162. Smith. "Anniversary Address." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 18 (1884): 1-23, at 20.]


[1883 March] / In Land and Water, June 30, 1883, Rev. F.O. Morris writes from Hayton Yorks that sometime before, in month of March, he thought, he was walking over the cold when he heard sound he thought of a trotting horse. But then the sound seemed to come from a snowdrift by a hedge. Farther away he heard the sound as if under snow. Then he traced the sound backward and forward as if something were coursing in a tunnel under the snow. [B; 453.2, 453.2. (Land and Water, June 30, 1883).]


1883 March 1 / The Feb 26 phe began. [B; 454. See: 1883 Feb 26, (B; 451).]


1883 March 4 / q-met) / (Virginia) / NY Times 6-2-6 / ab 5 a.m. / Quaking of the earth. Loud detonations heard and a met light of which brilliantly illuminated. / Sun 6-1-6. [V; 1163. “Newport Shaken by an Earthquake.” New York Sun, March 1, 1883, p. 1  c. 6.]


1883 March 5 / BO / Teleport / Leeds Daily News of / At Worksop, Saturday before 5thcottage of Joseph White, Sandy Lane, Worksop. Wifeailing child of 2 and an infant. On Tuesday, a girl of 18, born in a workhouse, came to stay with them until she could get a situation. On Sat night, things flying about the house. White saw coals and candles and other things flying about, and disappear while he was watching them. From a locked chest of drawers all the drawers were pulled out. Police constable Higgs saw a cupboard door fly open and a large, wide, glass bottle bound out. Saw a cup and a jar containing flour fly out a window. Dr. Lloyd was attending the ailing child, moved next door to have an operation upon an abcess. After the operation, he looked in White's house, and he and Policeman Higgs saw a mirror that been placed on a chair fall to floor. Next day the girl sent away and no more phe. [B; 455.1 to 455.5. (Leeds Daily News, March 5, 1883; not at BNA) "Spiritualism Extraordinary." Sheffield Independent, March 5, 1883, p. 3 c. 3. "Ghost Trickery at Worksop." Sheffield Daily Telegraph, March 5, 1883, p. 2 c. 8. "More Truth About Ghosts." London Globe, March 8, 1883, p. 1 c. 4.]


1883 March 5 / Worksop / Leeds Daily Newssame storythings jump from mantelpiece and broken. One stone came through a window. His brother 12 years old. / Girl arrived on Feb. 27th1st phe ab. 11 p.m. on March 1st. [B; 456. (Leeds Daily News, ca. March 1883; not at BNA.) "Spiritualism Extraordinary." Sheffield Independent, March 5, 1883, p. 3 c. 3."Ghost Trickery at Worksop." Sheffield Daily Telegraph, March 5, 1883, p. 2 c. 8.]


1883 March 5 / Worksop is under Feb. 26. [B; 457. See: 1883 Feb 26,  (B; 451).]


1883 March 5 / World, 3-3 / Wild Man of Camas Prairie, known 10 years, finally killed. / Thick growth of hair 2 inches long on body. [B; 458. (New York World, March 5, 1883, p. 3 c. 3.) “Killed.” Idaho Semi-Weekly World, (Idaho City), February 13, 1883, p. 3 c. 2-3.]


1883 March 5 / 8:09 p.m. / Carlsrue / meteor twice as bright as Venus at maximum / Nature 27/540. [V; 1164. “Notes.” Nature 27 (April 5, 1883): 538-540, at 540.]


1883 March 5 / morning / Cyprus / Severe shock / no damage / L.T. 6-5-c. [V; 1165. “Cyprus.” London Times, March 6, 1883, p. 5 c. 3.]


1883 March 6 / Melbourne Argus of, 6-5 / Myst murder—man with wounds in throat. / So injured at home—body found in sea. / His wounds not mortal. He would have had to walk, bleeding, mile or so to sea. / 8-6-4+ / 16-10-3. [B; 459.1, 459.2. “The Brighton Mystery.” Melbourne Argus. March 6, 1883, p. 6 c. 5-6. “Country News.” Melbourne Argus, March 8, 1883, p. 6 c. 4. “The Brighton Mystery.” Melbourne Argus. March 16, 1883, p. 10 c. 3-4.]


1883 March 7 / Tamaulipas, Mexico / 2 p.m. / met seen and heard / Sc Am 48-181. [V; 1166. “A Meteor in Mexico.” Scientific American, n.s., 48 (March 24, 1883): 181.]


1883 Mar 7 / (Ch) / Light soft and woolly / Eng. Mechanic 37/124 / Cut / Ch-26. * [V; 1167. Gemmill, S. Maitland Baird. "Variable Stars in CassiopeiaThe Zodiacal Light.MeteorsEpsilon Draconis." English Mechanic, 37 (no. 942; April 13, 1883): 124. "Meteor.— On March 7th, at 10.30 p.m., I saw a fine and curious meteor. It passed from a little below β Leonis to a little below γ Bootis, and was of a soft white, and about equal to a second magnitude star. It had a soft woolly appearance; but what was singular about it, was the character of its motion—a floating, flying, movement, utterly unlike the shooting flight of most meteors. It seemed to 'wing its way.'"]


1883 March 8 / BO / John Pagden, 3 Copenhagen street, Leeds, at noon missed from his place of employment. Was in shirt-sleeves; coat and hat hanging up. Nothing learned later. / Leeds D. News, 13th. [B; 460. (Leeds Daily News, March 13, 1883.)]


1883 March 8 / Leeds D. News of / Ghost in house of Mr. Henry Laurensen, at Skelmersdale. [B; 461. (Leeds Daily Mail, March 8, 1883.) “A Ghostly Transaction.” Cheshire Observer, March 10, 1883, p. 3 c. 1.]


1883 [March 8] / Disaps / 1883, NY Times, March 8-2-5 / 25-14-3. [B; 462. “Medico Legal Society.” New York Times, March 8, 1883, p. 2 c. 5. “The Ranks of the Missing.” New York Times, March 25, 1883, p. 14 c. 3.]


1883 March 8 / 3 p.m. / Mayenne, France / concussions and sound like thunder / C.R. 96/869. [V; 1168. Faucon, A. “Sur des secousses de tremblement de terre observées dans le département de la Mayenne.” Comptes Rendus, 96 (1883): 869.]


1883 March 10 / (+) / Melbourne Argus, March 13-10-1"An immense ball of fire with a peculiar yellow appearance was observed here [Geelong] about a quarter to 3 on Saturday morning [March 10th]. The ball appeared to proceed from the east to the south, where it hovered for more than an hour. It moved from one point to another, like a kite in a gale of wind, and occasional sparks of fire were seen to shoot from the main body. Mr. Thompson, the second mate of the Lindus, who was on duty at the time, noticed the phenomenon to the eastward, when abreast of Cape Paterson, about 50 miles from the Heads, a little before 3 o'clock on the same morning." [V; 1169.1, 1169.2, 1169.3. "Geelong." Melbourne Argus, March 13, 1883, p. 10 c. 1.]


1883 March 10 / Not for Pub / In Ballarat Courier of 13th, ac to Bendigo Advertiser of 14th, from a correspondent / "It would be wise for the men on duty in Ballarat, and the lighthouses, to watch the sky until the month of May. After May we will have happier days.Victim." [V; 1170.1, 1170.2. (Ballarat Courier, March 13, 1883; not online.) "What Does It Mean?" Bendigo Advertiser, March 14, 1883, p. 2.]


1883 March 10 / Nothing in Sydney Daily Telegraphbut weather described / 10th warm and fine till 4 p.m., when heavy clouds, thunder and lightning but no rainat dusk a "singular [electrical] phenomenon”flashes of lightningmasses of flame in the south—(very little rain—the 11th warm and fine) / gleaming, massing, suddenly going out, leaving black blots. [V; 1171.1, 1171.2. “The Weather.” Sydney Daily Telegraph, March 12, 1883, p. 3 c. 4.]


1883 March 10 / (S) / No Geelong paper procurable. G not far from Melbourne. Try another M. paper. The Age, 12th, nothing under Geelong news but—Sydney, March 11—"A singular appearance was seen last night during a thunderstorm. A huge ball of fire appeared in the clouds in the south for upwards of two hours, and it occasionally burst forth, sending shoots of fire in all directions." / Age of 14th—Reported from Dimboola, Victoria—"A curious appearance in the sky, resembling a large stationary ball of fire, was seen in the sky Sunday night [11th] between nine and ten. It was observed by several persons for some minutes, when a cloud passed over it and hid it from view."—So though first reports obj when Venus a morning star, this not Venus. / The Geelong Advertiser is quoted in the Age, March 15th, p 6, col. 2. Ab 2:45 morning of the 10th there was a yellowish light extending for considerable distance along the eastern horizon. "Suddenly an immense ball of fire, apparently of a yellow hue, appeared in the sky, which was perfectly clear at the time, the stars to the westward being remarkably brilliant. The phenomenon worked gradually from the east to the south, the pitching and tossing resembling the motion of a kite in a gale of wind. At intervals the ball of fire appeared to detach portions of its luminous composition, the brilliance of which caused the star lights to disappear. The strange visitor hovered about several points to the southward for more than an hour." Then the account by the second mate of the Lindus. "We have been informed that a similar ball of fire was noticed in the south-western sky about a quarter past nine o'clock on Sunday evening [11th] and that, as our informant was gazing at it, it burst and melted away in a shower of red and blue sparks." [V; 1172.1 to 1172.9. "Remarkable Appearance in the Sky." The Age, (Melbourne), March 12, 1883, p. 3 c. 3. "Country News." The Age, (Melbourne), March 14, 1883, p. 6 c. 5. "A Strange Sight." The Age, (Melbourne), March 15, 1883, p. 6 c. 2. "A Strange Sight." Geelong Advertiser, March 13, 1883, p. 4 c. 3. "We learn that the phenomenon was witnessed at sea, as well as on land. Mr Thompson, second mate of the steamer Lindus, which arrived in Corio Bay at four o'clock on Saturday afternoon, from Newcastle, states that when the steamer was abreast of Cape Paterson, fully 50 miles from Port Phillip Heads, he noticed the singular appearance of a ball of fire to the eastward shortly before three o'clock on Saturday morning. It dodged about with the waving motion of a kite, and frequently streaks of flame shot away from the main body of fire. On the previous morning, Mr Thompson states, he observed, some hours before sunrise, that the eastern horizon was of a bright yellow color, the western horizon being of a greenish tint."]


1883 March 10 / Kite like sparkling body / See 1897 Chicago Tribune of Ap. 17. / or March 17. / Light obj / Florida / ab 1890. [V; 1173. (Chicago Tribune, March 17 or April 17, 1897; not found on either date. Possibly, Chicago Tribune, 1897.   (“A Texas Yarn.” Chicago Tribune, April 17, 1883, p. 5 c. 3. G

Giant meteor story.) See: 1891 Ap. 5, (B; 1133).]


1883 March 10 / See Nov 3, 1899. [V; 1174. See: 1899 Nov. 3, (C; 433), and, 1899 Nov. 3, (VIII; 528).]


1883 March 10 / See obj, Sept 15, 1886. [V; 1175. See: 1886 (Aug 15, ab.), (VI; 601).]


1883 March 10 / Nothing in Brisbane Courier. [V; 1176.]


1883 March 10 / Obj cast sparks / Sept. 4, 1898. [V; 1177. See: 1898 Sept 4, (VIII; 317).]


1883 March 10 / Have tried all Melbourne papers. [V; 1178. "Intercolonial News." Melbourne Leader, March 17, 1883, p. 32 c. 3-4. "Summary of Events." Illustrated Australian News, (Melbourne), March 21, 1883, pp. 34-36, at p. 34 c. 4.]


1883 March 10 / at Geelong, ab one a.m. / Fire of unknown origin broke out. A factory and several other buildings destroyed. / The Age 12-1-5. [V; 1179. "Country News." The Age, (Melbourne), March 12, 1883, p. 1 c. 5. The fire destroyed a coach factory and a house behind it, then spread to a stationer's shop and a copper's premises. "The origin of the fire is unknown."]


1883 March 10 / (+) / Australian obj—lights in horizon = stress disintegration like Vermont obj. [V; 1180. See: (Vermont obj).]


1883 March 10 / Anything sail around so several days—a light on a thing. [V; 1181.]


1883 March 10 / Have all Melbourne papers. [V; 1182.]


1883 Mar. 10 / Light and aurora / See Jan 4, 1889. [V; 1183. See: (1889 Jan 4; not found).]


1883 March 10 / I find nothing in Sydney Morning Herald. [V; 1184.]


1883 March 10 / See March 25. / (?) [V; 1185. See: (March 25).]


1883 March 10 / Similar obj March, 1897 / See Chicago note 2. [V; 1186. See: Objs / Sky / C1, (SF-IV; 193).]


1883 March 11 / q-phenomenon / N.Y. Times 14-5-4 / Harford Co., Maryland, earthquake said been violent—in the early evening. A loud report like of a cannon and a rumbling at 6:57 and another at 1 a.m. on 12th. / 6:57 = 18 hr, 57 / MWR, March—[note cut off]. [V; 1187. “Earthquake in Maryland.” New York Times, March 14, 1883, p. 5 c. 4. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 11 (no. 3; March 1883): 72-74, at 73.]


1883 (March 11 / evening) / Harford Co, Md / A loud report like a cannon blast. "It was all over in an instant." So was sound. / NY Times 14-5-4. [V; 1188. “Earthquake in Maryland.” New York Times, March 14, 1883, p. 5 c. 4.]


1883 March 11 / Waterloo, Quebec / bet. 10 and 11 a.m. / q's / also severe storm / World 12-1-3. [V; 1189. (New York World, March 12, 1883, p. 1 c. 3.)]


1883 March 11 / 10 h, 57 m / 11 h, 7 m / Shocks in Quebec / Am J. Sci 3/27/360 / See March 11, 23, Ap. 1. [V; 1190. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 13.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 27 (1884): 358-364, at 360. See: (1883 March 11, 23, Ap. 1).]


1883 March 12 / Polt / NY Times, 5-5 / No. 33 Church Street, Hartford / Sounds like trampling. Obj such as spoons fly about. A sound heard and breaking glass and a tumbler with a round hole as if from a pistol ball through it. "Strange lights." / See March 22. [B; 476.1, 476.2. “A Connecticut Phantom.” New York Times, March 12, 1883, p. 5 c. 5. See: 1883 March 31, (B; 475).]


1883 March 12-21 / Iceland / "Violent volcanic water eruptions." / Nature 28-89. [V; 1191. “Notes.” Nature, 28 (May 24, 1883): 88-89, at 89.]


1883 March 12 / Italy / 27Hungary / q's / Nature 27-540. [V; 1192. “Notes.” Nature 27 (April 5, 1883): 538-540, at 540.]


1883 March 13 / 7:30 p.m. / Great met in Germany / Zeit Met 18/137 / others. [V; 1193. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 18 (1883): 127-140, at 137-140.]


1883 March 13 / 10:30 p.m. / Met  / Germany / Zeit Met 18/137. [V; 1194. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 18 (1883): 127-140, at 137-140.]


1883 March 13, 18 / Meteors / vol. 18 / Ref, Jan 1, 1866. [V; 1195. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 18 (1883): 127-140, at 137-140.]


1883 March 15 / 9 p.m. / Terrific explosion near Houses of Parliament / Fenian. [B; 463. “Fenian Attempt to Destroy Public Offices by Dynamite.” London Globe, March 16, 1883, p. 5 c. 1-3.]


1883 March 15 / 8 p.m. / Explosion near Times office / D News 17-5-8. [B; 464. “The Explosion at the Times Office.” London Daily News, March 17, 1883, p. 5 c. 8.]


1883 March 15 / Bark Freedom off Madeira covered with yellow mud / Sun, Ap 6-1-5. [V; 1196. “Was It Ashes from Ætna?” New York Sun, April 6, 1883, p. 1 c. 5. “Capt. Lawrence of the bark Freedom, from Havre reports that off the Madeira Islands on March 15, a strong northeast wind blew and the sky and clouds became discolored. Then the vessel was covered from trucks to the water, especially on the windward side with 'an average sample of New York ochre'” “The brig Starlight, from Monte Christi, reports that on March 30, sixty miles north of Hatteras, a large ball of fire appeared on her maintop masthead.”]


1883 March 16 / A woman walking along Lambton-quay, Wellington, New Zealand. / N.Z. Times 19-2-5) / She was struck a violent blow on the arm. So violently as to knock her arm out of joint at the elbow. It was her account that a woman walking the opposite way had struck hera stranger, not drunk, must have been insane. / See Jan 23, 1909. [B; 465.1, 465.2. “A singular case of assault....” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), March 19, 1883, p. 2 c. 5. See: (1909 Jan 23).]


1883 March 16 / Ab last of April, at this place, Lambton-quay, a woman beats another woman,. A landlady strikes her barmaid who had left her. / N.Z. Times, Ap 28/2/7. [B; 466. “It appears that a peculiar assault case....” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), April 28, 1883, p. 2 c. 7.]


1883 March 17 / Dispatch from Lemberg of / House in Taganrog blown upsaid that unexploded dynamite was found. / D News 19-5-7. [B; 467. "Attempt to Blow Up a House with Dynamite." London Daily News, March 19, 1883, p. 5 c. 7. Lemberg is now identified as Lviv, Ukraine.]


1883 March 17 / See Jan 20 and 26. / near Amsterdam, ab. 5 a.m. / Explosion of a powder factory followed by a quake from Harlem and Amsterdam to Leiden and Utrecht / La Nat, 21/30. [V; 1197. “Le tremblement de terre du 17 mars 1883 dans les Pays-Bas.” La Nature, 1883 pt. 2 (no. 523; June 9): 30. See: 1883 Jan 19, (V; 1106; and, B; 435), and, 1883 Jan 26, (B: 444 to 446).]


1883 March 17 / 5:10 a.m. / Strong q between Harlem and Amsterdam, Holland. Several geological explanations are given. One scientists thought that the phe was shock from a meteor. / La Nature 1883/2/30. [V; 1198. “Le tremblement de terre du 17 mars 1883 dans les Pays-Bas.” La Nature, 1883 pt. 2 (no. 523; June 9): 30.]


1883 March 17 / 5 a.m. / Amsterdam, Holland. Series of shocks believed were due to an earthquake. Lasted several seconds. Vertical movement. / LT, March 19-6-f. [V; 1199. “Holland.” London Times, March 19, 1883, p. 6 c. 6.]


1883 March 17 / Pay-Bas, Holland / shock and sound of explosion. Prof. H. von Baumhauer thought it might have been a meteor. / La Nat 21-30. [V; 1200. “Le tremblement de terre du 17 mars 1883 dans les Pays-Bas.” La Nature, 1883 pt. 2 (no. 523; June 9): 30.]


1883 March 19 / Nothing in Rockhampton paper. [B; 468. See: Animal / 1883 / ab. Jan 1, (SF-I; 208).]


1883 March 20 / Etna serious / An. Reg. [V; 1201. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 1883: pt. 2, 1-53, at 11.]


1883 March 20 / afternoon / Etna / Shower of small stones falling at Messina. / L.T. 21-5-d / See Science 1/390. [V; 1202. “Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, March 21, 1883, p. 5 c. 4. (Science, 1-390.)]


1883 March 20 / Etna / Science 1/390. [V; 1203. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” Science, s. 1 v. 1 (May 11, 1883): 390-391.]


1883 March 21 / Leeds Daily News of 27th / At Deptford, Harriet Etherington, aged 18, arriving home, said she had been frightened by a ghost, a man with a "white choker", coming out of the cemetery. A few minutes later, she fellto the floor and died. Police sergeant Young, at the inquest, said that there had been three other complaints from women who had been stopped at this point by a man. [B; 469.1, 469.2. (Leeds Daily News, March 27, 1883; not at BNA.) "A Young Woman Frightened to Death." Dublin Daily Express, March 27, 1883, p. 6 c. 7. "She then took her waterproof off, drew a chair up to the table to have her supper, fell forward with her head on the table, and expired after a brief struggle." "The jury returned a verdict of 'Death from syncope due to shock to the nervous system.'"]


1883 March 21 / Trib, 4-5 / Ghost / Hartford / Ed / See March 12. [B; 470. “Spooks.” New York Tribune, March 21, 1883, p. 4 c. 5. See: 1883 March 12, (B; 476).]


1883 March 21 / Etna very active and q's all around / LT 22-3-b. [V; 1204. “Italy.” London Times, March 22, 1883, p. 3 c. 2.]


1883 March 22 / Trib, 1-4 / 25-9-1 / Etna. [V; 1205. “An Eruption of Mount Etna.” New York Tribune, March 22, 1883, p. 1 c. 4. “Eruption of Mount Etna.” New York Tribune, March 25, 1883, p. 9 c. 1.]


1883 March 22-25 / Alarm around Etna / 25th had not been very important. [V; 1206. “The Mount Etna Eruption Subsiding.” New York Tribune, March 26, 1883, p. 1 c. 4. “Alarm Near Mount Etna.” New York Tribune, March 27, 1883, p. 1 c. 1.]


1883 March 22 / World, 4-6 / Remarkable mirage at Huron, Dakota, "recently". Place 55 miles away plainly seen. [V; 1207. (New York World, March 22, 1883, p. 4 c. 6.)]


1883 March 22 / bet 10:30 and 11:20 / Mobile, Ala / in northern sky 3 luminous beams of pale yellow lighta gradual lateral motion from E to W . one luminous band in S.W. sky / M.W.R, March / p. 71. [V; 1208. “Atmospheric Electricity.” Monthly Weather Review, 11 (no. 3; March 1883): 71-72, at 71.]


1883 March 23 / World, 9-6 / Chicago ghost. [B; 472. (New York World, March 23, 1883, p. 9 c. 6.)]


1883 March 23 / 21 h, 25 m / Slight shock / Huntingdon, Quebec / Am J. Sci 3/27/360. [V; 1209. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 13.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 27 (1884): 358-364, at 360.]


1883 March 23 / Etna / Sun 24-1-4 / small erupt26-1-3. [V; 1210. “Mount Ætna in Commotion.” New York Sun, March 24, 1883, p. 1 c. 4. “Mount Ætna's Little Eruption.” New York Sun, March 26, 1883, p. 1 c. 3.]


1883 March 24 / Animal / Adelaide Observer of / That there was talk of a mysterious animal near Clare, S. Australia, and that a hunting party might be organized. [B; 471. “Country News.” Adelaide Observer, March 24, 1883., p. 16 c. 2-4. “There is some talk of a party going out and spending their Easter holidays at the Waterhole, where the bunyip resides, in the hope of capturing the mysterious animal, which has never been so hunted down before, or shown himself as often as quite recently.”]


1883 March 25 / World, 9-6, from Pittsburg Leader. / Home of Jesse Miller, Greenville township, Somerset Co, Pa., objects displaced and thrown about. Daughter spirited out of locked room several times, as far as front yard. Twice in view of her mother and others. To others nothing visible. The girl described a witch, "hoary locks, hairy face, and wearing a white cap." [B; 473.1, 473.2. "Worried by a Witch." New York World, March 25, 1883, p. 9 c. 6. (Check quote.)]


1883 March 25 / reported from Adelaide / Heavy showers at 5:30 p.m. at Unley / Melbourne Age / An "immense ball of fire" fell, with loud detonation. The Age26-3-2. [V; 1211. “South Australia.” The Age, (Melbourne), March 26, 1883, p. 3 c. 2.]


1883 March 25 / Volcanic ashes falling at Drontheim, Norway. Supposed from Hecla. / See March 12. / Toronto Globe, 26 / See Feb. 26. [V; 1212. “Volcanoes at Work.” Toronto Globe, March 26, 1883, p. 2 c. 3. See: 1883 Feb 26, (V; 1155); 1883 Feb. 26, (V; 1156); and, 1883 March 12-21, (V; 1191).]


1883 March 26 / World, 4-6 / Wild Woman in Nor. Car. [B; 474. (New York World, March 26, 1883, p. 4 c. 6.)]


1883 March 26 /4 a.m. / 30 / Ap. 112:30 a.m. / 310 p.m. / 2410 p.m. / Auroras / Glasgow / E Mec 37/216. [V; 1213. Gemmill, S. Maitland Baird. “In Re π Draconisε Bootisβ and γ CepheiAuroræ'Rudimentary Astronomy'Astronomical Work.” English Mechanic, 37 (no. 946; May 11, 1883): 216.]


1883 March 31 / missile-less / (Religio-Ph. Jour), 4-5 / No. 33 Church Street, Hartford, Conn., haunted / woman offered the house had been ill. While preparing medicine in a cup, the spoon flew out the cup. Something punctured a glass in a cupboard, leaving a hole like a bullet-hole. Woman said she saw visible forms, one a man with a long black beard. Sounds like footsteps. / See March 12. [B; 475.1, 475.2. "General Notes ." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 34 (no. 5; March 31, 1883): 4, (c. 5). “A Connecticut Phantom.” Boston Globe, March 12, 1883, p. 4 c. 7. See: 1883 March 12, (B; 476).]


1883 March 31 / Tidal Wave / 1 a.m. / In Channel weather calm and clear. Sudden "mountainous seascalm 5 minutes later. / Symons Met 18-42. [V; 1214. “Extraordinary Wave in the Channel.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 18 (April 1883): 42.]


1883 / last of March / Boiler explosions and dynamites explosions in France / D News. [B; 477. “The Explosion in France.” London Daily News, April 3, 1883, p. 5 c. 5.]


1883 April / qs / India / Peshawar / II / BA '11. [V; 1221. A class II earthquake. Milne, 730.]


1883 Ap. 1 / Hamilton, Ontario / 1 a.m. / rumbling sound and q / Toronto Globe, Ap. 3. [V; 1215. (Toronto Globe, April 3, 1883; not available on microfilm.)]


1883 Ap 1-9 / Cor, E Mec 37-288, that saw a rather large sunspot on 1st. On 9th when passed away the nucleus did not look depressed upon the limb but seen detached. [V; 1216. Richards, Edward M. “A Sunspot That Was Not a Depression'Odic' (?) Light from the Living Body.” English Mechanic, 37 (no. 949; June 1, 1883): 288-289.]


1883 Ap 1-15 / Great fires / whole cities / D News / 1883 / BM / Toronto Globe / March 8. [B; 478. (Toronto Globe, March 8, 1883; not found here.)]


1883 Ap. 2 / L.T. 8-c / 18-5-a / Etna. [V; 1217. “The Eruption of Etna.” London Times, April 2, 1883, p. 8 c. 3. “Southern Italy.” London Times, April 18, 1883, p. 5 c. 1.]


1883 Ap. 3, etc. / 4 a.m. / 11:30 a.m. / Shocks / Sicily / L.T. 4-7-c / On night of 3rd frequent and alarming / Times of 5th. [V; 1218. “Earthquakes in Sicily.” London Times, April 4, 1883, p. 7 c. 3. “Earthquakes in Sicily.” London Times, April 5, 1883, p. 5 c. 5.]


1883 Ap. 3 / N. e. sunspot at sunset / cor. to Knowledge 3/254. [V; 1219. “Large Sun-Spot.” Knowledge, o.s., 3 (April 27, 1883): 254, (illustration).]


1883 Ap 4 / L.T., 7-c / 5-5-e / 6-3-a / May 9-7-c / q / Sicily. [V; 1220. “Earthquakes in Sicily.” London Times, April 4, 1883, p. 7 c. 3. “Earthquakes in Sicily.” London Times, April 5, 1883, p. 5 c. 5. “Southern Italy.” London Times, April 6, 1883, p. 3 c. 1. “Earthquake in Sicily.” London Times, May 9, 1883, p. 7 c. 3.]


1883 Ap. 4 / 1 a.m. / Wellington, New Zealand / Large part of the southern sky a brilliant red that extended until almost all southern sky. Brilliant columns of yellow light. / N.Z. Times-5-2-5. [V; 1222. “A very beautiful Aurora Australis was visible....” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), April 5, 1883, p. 2 c. 5.]


1883 Ap. 5 / Explosion of dynamite stored in Rome / 40 persons killed / D News 6-5-5. [B; 479. “Explosion of Dynamite.” London Daily News, April 6, 1883, p. 5 c. 5.]


1883 Ap. 6 / [LT], 5-c / 7-7-b / Explosion near railroad station at Passo Corese. [B; 480. “Italy.” London Times, April 6, 1883, p. 5 c. 2-3. “Italy.” London Times, April 7, 1883, p. 7 c. 2.]


1883 Ap. 5 / "Waterspout" / th. and lightning / flooded Nashville, Tenn. / Toronto Globe 7-3-4. [V; 1223. “Waterspout on Tennessee.” Toronto Globe, April 7, 1883, p. 3 c. 4.]


1883 Ap. 6 / Sun pillar / Hertfordshire / Nature 27/605 / at sunset. [V; 1224. “The Zodiacal Light (?).” Nature, 27 (April 19, 1883): 580. “The Zodiacal Light (?)” Nature, 27 (April 26, 1883): 605-606.]


1883 Ap 8 / [La] Nature 1883/1/382 / small toads / April 8, 1883 / Sancerre, France. / Progress b[note cut off] ensues. [V; 1225. “Une invasion de crapauds.” La Nature, 1883 pt. 1 (no. 519; May 12): 382.]


1883 Ap. 8 / frgs / Called an invasion and a shower. [V; 1226. “Une invasion de crapauds.” La Nature, 1883 pt. 1 (no. 519; May 12): 382. The “invasion” was the appearance of large toads, (“gros,” not small), in vast numbers throughout a park at Sancerre, on April 8; the next day, a pond was filled with them; but, a few days later, none could be found. No shower of toads was reported, only their appearance in large numbers, and, then, their disappearance.]


1883 Ap 10 / Most destructive prairie fire recorded in Nebraska / Sun 11-1-4. [V; 1227. “Fifty Square Miles of Prairie on Fire.” New York Sun, April 11, 1883, p. 1 c. 4.]


1883 Ap 12 / 2:36 a.m. / q / Cairo. Ill / Ref, Jan. 1. [V; 1228. Refer to: 1883 Jan 1, (V; 1078). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 13.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 27 (1884): 358-364, at 360.]


1883 Ap. 15 / Trib, 7-3 / Storm / Arkansas. [V; 1229. “Destructive Storm in Arkansas.” New York Tribune, April 15, 1883, p. 7 c. 3.]


1883 Ap 15 / Great metite reported fell in Williams' Ranch, Texas. Ab 70 feet protruded from ground covering an acre. /. NY Times 17-4-5 / Near Fort Worth, Texas / 2 a.m. / Sun 16-1-5. [V; 1230. “An Alleged Meteor.” New York Times, April 17, 1883, p. 4 c. 5. “Monster Meteor in Texas.” New York Sun, April 16, 1883, p. 1 c. 5. “The Texas Aerolite.” Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, (West Virginia), April 21, 1883, p. 1 c. 2. “Professor Baird, of the Smithsonian Institution, was not deceived by the story telegraphed from Texas Monday night about the falling of a remarkable aerolite a few days ago, but said yesterday before the hoax became known that he would wait for further information before venturing any opinion.”]


1883 Ap. 15 / See Ap. 25. / Augs. / France / Marseilles / D-210. [V; 1231. The note copies information from page 210 of The Book of the Damned. "Passage d'un essaim de corpuscles devant le Soleil." Astronomie, 5 (1886): 70-71.]


1883 April 15, 16 / L'Astro 5/70 / by M. Bruguière, Marseilles / Watched for several hours streams of bodies cross the sun, marching sometimes four abreast. / On 16th from 8 a.m. till noon he watched the procession. / The military mirages. [V; 1232.1, 1232.2. “Passage d'un essaim de corpuscles devant le Soleil.” Astronomie, 5 (1886): 70-71.]


1883 Ap. 16 / L.T., 5-e / Snow / Tornado in Arkansas. [V; 1233. “The United States.” London Times, April 16, 1883, p. 5 c. 5.]


1883 Ap. 16 / evening / Moncalieri / Saluces / Volpeglino / brilliant met twice diameter of Jupiter / Les Mondes 3-5-3. [V; 1234. “Météore.” Cosmos, s. 3 v. 5 (May 5, 1883): 3.]


1883 April / Coins / 1893 / March 9, 1893 / on mt.Nov. 3, 1913 / Clay Coalring / March 4, 1891. [V; 1235. See: (1893); (1893 March 9); (1913 Nov 3); and (1891 March 4).]


1883 April / See May 26, 1920. [V; 1236. See: (1920 May 26; not found here).]


1883 April / See aeroplanes falling. / See Sept., 1910. [V; 1237. See: 1910 Sept. 22, (IX: 1756, 1757, and 1758).]


1883 April / + / Carved piece of chalk, on ground. Brought up by rabbits? / Man, Feb., 1919 / But see Nature, 103-25, also p. 45. [V; 1238. (Moir, James Reid. “A Piece of Carved Chalk from Suffolk.” Man, 19 (February, 1919): 17-18,  pl. B.) “Notes.” Nature, 103 (March 6, 1919): 6-10, at 9. Andrews, Charles W. “Curious Markings on Chalk.” Nature, 103 (March 13, 1919): 25. Moir, James Reid. “Curious Markings in Chalk.” Nature, 103 (March 20, 1919): 45-46.]


1883 Ap. / A rocket? / Ap. 14, 1911. [V; 1239. See: 1911 Ap. 14, (IX: 1947 & 1948).]


1883 April 17 / evening / Explosion of dynamite (not said anarachists) in Spain. At Carballeno (Orense) / cause not known / D. News 19-5-5. [B; 492. “Explosion in Spain.” London Daily News, April 19, 1883, p. 5 c. 5.]


1883 Ap. 19 / Great fire / Delhi, India / 2000 homes destroyed / D News 21-5-7. [B; 493. “Great Fire in India.” London Daily News, April 21, 1883, p. 5 c. 7.]


1883 Ap. 19 / Fire, Quebec, Parliament Housesupposed Fenian / D News 21-5-7. [B; 494. “Great Fire at Quebec.” London Daily News, April 21, 1883, p. 5 c. 7.]


1883 Ap. 20 / Lumps of ice, some a pound each, fell at Capertee. / Ac to Sydney Morning Herald, quoted in Durban (Natal) Mercury, Sept. 5. / A carrier placed a board on head of his house to protect it. One of these lumps struck and split it. [V; 1240. “A hailstorm of unprecedented severity passed over Capertee....” Sydney Morning Herald, April 25, 1883, p. 9 c. 4. “A carrier whose horses were bolting placed a ¾-inch board, about two foot long, on his head for protection while he endeavoured to quieten the almost maddened brutes, when, a hailstone struck the board and split it clean in two.” (Durban Mercury, (Natal), September 5, 1883.)]


1883 Ap. 21 / Religio-Phil. Jour., 3-2, copying from Philadelphia Timesghost in household of Benjamin Shane, 992 N. Eleventh St. Philadelphia. / raps of doora crash like a thunderboltfootsteps heardrunning awaynext night again the crashlater sound like pounding with a stone mallet / Neighbors said that for 10 years been ghosts and drove tenants away. [B; 495.1, 495.2. "The Midnight Doings of a Noisy Phantom...." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 34 (no. 8; April 21, 1883): 3, (c. 2). “Worried by a Hobgoblin.” Philadelphia Times, April 2, 1883, p. 1 c. 3.]


1883 Ap. 22 / night / Powder magazine explosion at St Chamas, France / D. News 24-5-7. [B; 496. “Explosion of a Gunpowder Magazine.” London Daily News, April 24, 1883, p. 5 c. 7.]


1883 Ap. 22 / afternoon / Explosion in a dynamite factory at La Perucca (Leon), Spain / D. News 23-5-8. [B; 497. “Explosion at a Dynamite Factory.” London Daily News, April 23, 1883, p. 5 c. 8.]


1883 Ap. 22, about / Great cyclone, southern states, especially Americus, Georgia / D. News, Ap 25-5-7. [V; 1241. “The Cyclone in the United States.” London Daily News, April 25, 1883, p. 5 c. 7.]


1883 Ap 22 / Trib, 9-1 / Comet and mets. [V; 1242. “Comets and Shooting Stars.” New York Tribune, April 22, 1883, p. 9 c. 1.]


1883 Ap. 22 / ab. 9 p.m. / Brilliant bolide near Blois (Loir-et-Cher) / L.'A. Sci 27/11. [V; 1245. “Bolide de Vineuil.” Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 27 (1883): 11.]


1883 Ap. 23 / night / Explosion outside house of a miner near Montceau-les-Mines, France. "The outrage is attributed to personal vengeance." / D News 25-5-7. [B; 498. “Dynamite Explosion in France.” London Daily News, April 25, 1883, p. 5 c. 7.]


1883 Ap. 23 / [LT], 6-d / 24-12-a / Explosion / Endfield / small arms factory. [B; 481. "Explosion at Enfield." London Times, April 23, 1883, p. 6 c. 4. "The Explosion at Enfield." London Times, April 24, 1883, p. 12 c. 1. The flash and report in a field adjoining the small arms factory was dismissed as a "practical joke."]


1883 Ap 23 / (+) / NY Times, 4-3 / Phe / New Haven / not found. / wrong year? / date? / or Trib? [V; 1243. (New York Times, April 23, 1883, p. 4 c. 3; possibly 1877, or 1884; or, New York Tribune. Not found in NYT Index 1880-1885; not this date in New York Tribune.) (See: 1877 Sept 8 and 9, (IV; 2205); 1886 June 30, (B; 698); and, 1888 Jan 14, (B; 845). (sound phe.) Or: See: 1885 May 16, (B; 654). (polt.).]


1883 Ap 24 / Trib, 1-2 / Storm / Iowa. [V; 1244. “Loss of Life and Property in Iowa.” New York Tribune, April 24, 1883, p. 1 c. 2.]


1883 Ap. 26 / [LT], 9-f / May 18-9-f / 19-9-d / Overdue Vessels. [B; 499. “An Overdue Steamer.” London Times, April 26, 1883, p. 9 c. 6. The Norddeutscher Lloyd steamer Habsvurg was only overdue and continued in service until 1898, when sold for scrap. “An Overdue Royal Mail Steamer.” London Times, May 18, 1883, p. 9 c. 6. “The Overdue Mail Steamer Don.” London Times, May 19, 1883, p. 9 c. 4. The steamer Don was involved in a collision with another ship and was thus delayed; and, it continued to operate as a mail steamer until 1901, when it was scrapped.]


1883 April 26 / After an interval of 13 years, outburst of the volc. Tongariro, N. Zealand. Immense volume of black smoke. / N. Zealand Jour of Sci 1-421. [V; 1246.”Tongariro.” New Zealand Journal of Science, 1 (May 1883): 421. The Tongariro volcano.]


1883 Ap. 26 / Tongariro, at Taupo, in eruption / New Zealand Times, May 18th / See May 22. [V; 1247.

(New Zealand Times, May 18, 1883.) See: 1883 May 22, (V; 1292). The Tongariro volcano.]


1883 Ap. 28 / Ottawa / Supposed bomb found. [B; 500. (Refs??? Nil in NYT Index, Annual Register, & BNA.)]


1883 / last of April / Explosion of dynamite in a mail car. / exp of a main / D News 26-5-5. [B; 501. “Dynamite Explosion in Bavaria.” London Daily News, April 26, 1883, p. 5. c. 5.]


1883 May 1 / Nicaragua volc / See May 4terrific rumblings and eruption. / Had been rumblings since middle of Feb. / N.Y. World, July 4-6-2. [V; 1248. (New York World, July 4, 1883, p. 6 c. 2.) See: 1883 June 19, (V; 1311). The Concepción volcano.]


1883 May [17-20] / Flood / Deadwood, Dakota / M. Weather Rev. 1883-119. [V; 1249. “Navigation.” Monthly Weather Review, 11 (no. 5; May 1883): 119-120, at 119.]


1883 May 1 / Nicaragua volcsee June 19. [V; 1250. See: 1883 June 19, (V; 1311). The Concepción volcano.]


1883 May 2 / Just after midnight / q / Persia / D News 5-5-6 / (BA '11). [V; 1251. “Earthquake in Persia.” London Daily News, May 5, 1883, p. 5 c. 6. A class III earthquake. Milne, 730.]


1883 May 4 / See May 1. / Series of eruptions and terrific noise, ashes, and lava. The volc in the Lake of Nicaragua. / LT, Sept. 11-6-e. [V; 1252. “The Eruption at Omotopek.” London Times, September 11, 1883, p. 6 c. 5. “Ausbruch des Vulkans von Omotepek im Nikaraguasee.” Das Ausland, 56 (August 27, 1883): 697. See: 1883 May 1, (V: 1248 & 1250). The Concepción volcano.]


1883 May 6 / Sand / 5:55 o'clock / shock"It was like the discharge of a gun." / See May 3, '09. / Teignmouth. [V; 1253. Refer to: 1809 May 3, (I; 265). Parfitt, Edward. "On Earthquakes in Devonshire." Report and Transactions of the Devonshire Association, 16 (1884): 641-661, at 655.]


1883 May 6 / Eclipse sun / Caroline Islands / D. News, June 13 / or 7th? [V; 1254. “The Solar Eclipse.” London Daily News, June 13, 1883, p. 5 c. 6.]


1883 May 6 / Ec. Sun / Science 1-594 / Nature 28-31, 145 / Chambers' Jour 60-721 / Knowledge 3-384 / 4-363. [V; 1255. (Science, 1-594.) “The Solar Eclipse of 1883.” Nature, 28 (May 10, 1883): 31-33. “The Eclipse Observations.” Nature, June 14, 1883): 145-146. “The Recent Eclipse of the Sun.” Chambers's Journal, s. 4 v. 20 (November 17, 1883): 721-723. Proctor, Richard Anthony. “The Recent Solar Eclipse.” Knowledge, o.s, 3 (June 29, 1883): 384-385. “The Eclipse of Last May.” Knowledge, o.s., 4 (December 14, 1883): 363, (illustration).]


1883 May 6 / Ec. Sun / many obs. / See R G, vol. 2, Eclipse. [V; 1256. See: (Readers Guide???, v. 2.)]


1883 May 6 / Luminous body seen near sun (or moon?) during total eclipse of sun. M. Trouvelotlooked for in vain afterward. / (intra-Merc) / C.R. 97-665. [V; 1257. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Recherche de l'étoile rouge observée pendant l'éclipse totale de Soleil le 6 mai 1883. Comptes Rendus, 95 (1883): 665. Trouvelot observed the same stellar region, on September 5 and 7, 1883, but did not recognize his "red star," (tho he did identify Delta Arietis and 41 Arietis as the "white stars" that he observed during the eclipse). "Je dirigeai la lunette à l'endroit même où le Soleil était éclipse le 6 mai et, comme durant l'éclipse, je l'éloignai vers le nord de 10° en déclinaison, puis je balayai le ciel de l'est vers l'ouest. Au premier balayage, je ne tardai pas à retrouver 'l'étoile blanche et pâle' que j'avais rencontrée durant l'éclipse. Cette étoile, qui est la 41e du Bélier, est de la 3e,8 grandeur. La seconde petite étoile blanche que j'avais reconnue est sans doute l'étoile double ε de la même constellation. Quant à l'étoile 'brillante, d'un rouge prononcé,' que j'avais observée, je ne l'ai pas retrouvée, et il est certain qu'aujourd'hui aucune étoile de celte grandeur et de cette couleur ne se trouve dans le voisinage de la position approximative que je lui avais assignée, ni même à une distance beaucoup plus grande que celle qu'il est permis d'attribuer à une erreur probable." "Bien que l'absence d'une étoile rouge aussi brillante que celle que j'ai observée durant l'éclipsé semble tout naturellement conduire à supposer que l'astre en question n'était autre qu'une planète intra-mercurielle, cependant, comme les éléments les plus nécessaires, tels que la position et un disque ou une phase sensible, manquent à mon observation, je crois qu'il est de mon devoir de me tenir sur la réserve et de suspendre quant à présent mes conclusions sur la nature probable de cet astre." Davidson, George. "Intra-Mercurial Planets." Bulletin of the California Academy of Sciences, 1 (1884-1886): 51-54. Davidson, George. "Intra-Mercurial Planets." Sidereal Messenger, 3 (May 1884): 113-115. Davidson gives the date of the eclipse as 1882, (it was in 1883); and, he identifies Trouvelot's "red star" as Delta Arietis, (or, Botein), and only finds its description as having red color problematic. Delta Arietis is identified as a K2 III spectral classification, which would be an orange hued star. Harrison, Henry. "Intra-Mercurial Planets." Sidereal Messenger, 3 (June 1884): 135-136. "Societies and Academies." Nature, 28 (September 27, 1883): 535-536, at 536. "M. Trouvelot's Red Star." Nature, 28 (October 4, 1883): 546. Caroline Island is located in Kiribati, at 9.9138° S, 150.2038° W. “Intra-Mercurial Planet.” New York Times, July 29, 1883, p. 2 c. 5. Swift, Lewis. “Vulcan Beyond Reasonable Doubt.” New York Times, August 4, 1883, p. 3 c. 5. "The Eclipse Observations." Nature, 28 (June 14, 1883): 145-146. "...The intra-Mercurial planet Vulcan was not seen by M. Palisa." Johann Palisa was the director of the Austrian Naval Observatory at Pula, who later discovered 122 asteroids. "Vermischte Nachrichten." Astronomisch Nachrichten, 107 (1883): 47-48. "Nach einer Mittheilung von Prof. E.S. Holden vom 20. Jui d. J., die ich seit längerer Zeit in Händen habe, ist es gar night zu bezweiseln, dass der rothe Stern identisch mit α Arietis ist." Holden identified Trouvelot's "red star" as Alpha Arietus, (or Hamal).) "Report of the Eclipse Expedition to Caroline Island, May 1883." Memoirs of the National Academy of Science, 2 (1883): 100-101. Holden also searched for Vulcan, with a six-inch telescope. "On May 6 1 began sweeping a few seconds after totality commenced, and swept carefully and deliberately over the space marked on the accompanying map without finding any new object. I am positive that no star as bright as five and a half magnitude could have escaped me. I saw all the sixth magnitude stars within this space except the three nearest the sun. I saw no seventh magnitude stars anywhere." "My instrumental means were sufficient to have detected it had it existed." "...I must regard the fact of the non-existence of Vulcan as definitively settled by Dr. Palisa's observations and my own." "Scientific News." English Mechanic, 38 (no. 972; November 9, 1883): 216. (Athenaeum, ca. 1883-1885; 1884, pt. 1, pp. 540, 636???, nil in 1884 pt. 2.) Ball, Robert Stawell. Star-land. 1890, 39-41, (figure 18). "A pretty picture of the total eclipse of the sun which occurred on 6th May, 1883, is here shown (Fig. 18.)." "This was completed within less than half of the duration of totality, and the artist had still three minutes left to devote to another and quite different part of the work, which does not concern us at present." The sketch of the eclipse, at totality, made by Trouvelot shows stars and a tropical horizon, (probably as a fanciful background to the coronal display, but without any reference to the "red star"). "Académie des Sciences." La Nature, 1883 pt. 2 (no. 525; June 23): 63-64. "De grandes photographies ont été prises jusqu'à 15 degrés du soleil dans le but de découvrir des planètes intra-mercurielles; le résultat a été complètement négatif." The photographic search for Vulcan failed to find anything, (with no apparent attempt to identify the "red star").]


1883 May 7 / [LT], 7-e / Explosion near Portsmouth. [B; 482. "Fatal Shell Explosion." London Times, May 7, 1883, p. 7 c. 5.]


1883 May 7 / 3:10 a.m. / Nashville, Tenn. / met train / 37 seconds / MWR 07-391. [V; 1258. Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (September 1907): 390-397, at 391, (table 5).]


1883 May 8 / morning / Strong q. / Catania, Sicily / L.T. 9-7-c. [V; 1259. “Earthquake in Sicily.” London Times, May 9, 1883, p. 7 c. 3.]


1883 May 9 / afterglow / Tyrol. / Symons Met 19-23. [V; 1260. Ward, Michael Foster. “The Sunsets and the Java Earthquake.”Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 19 (March 1884): 22-24.]


1883 May 9 / Protuberances on sun / RSept 26, '79. [V; 1261. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 215-223., at 221-223, (figure 71).]


1883 May 9, 11 / Aug 26 / Brilliant "unusual” sunsets noted in Switzerland, May 9, 11, 1883. / Symons 19-23. [V; 1262. Ward, Michael Foster. “The Sunsets and the Java Earthquake.”Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 19 (March 1884): 22-24. Ward was in Bavaria and in Austria, (but did not mention being in Switzerland).]


1883 May 9 and 11 / See Ap. 26. / Brilliant, unusual sunsets noted in New Zealand / Symons, 19-23. [V; 1263. Ward, Michael Foster. “The Sunsets and the Java Earthquake.”Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 19 (March 1884): 22-24. See: 1883 April 26, (V; 1246), and, 1883 Ap. 26, (V; 1247). Before the eruption of Krakatoa, in August, similar “unusual” sunsets and afterflows followed the eruption of Tongariro, in 1883.]


1883 May 12 / See May 17. [V; 1264. See: 17 May 1883, (V; 1271 to 1276, & 1280).]


1883 May / Extraordinary sunsets in Natal becoming more marked from Feb to June / Knowledge 5-418. [V; 1265. Noble, William. “The Recent Extraordinary Sunrises and Sunsets.” Knowledge, o.s., 5 (June 6, 1884): 418.]


1883 May 13 / Trib, 9-5 / Ghost in ship. [B; 502. “Seeing a Ghost on Shipboard.” New York Tribune, May 13, 1883, p. 9 c. 5.]


1883 May (13 / 8 p.m.) / and 14 / Epinal, France / A great met seen also in Switzerland. On 14th, 9 p.m., another but greater. / Jour. des Debats 21-3-3. [V; 1266. “Plusieurs personnes d'Epinal et des environs signalent....” Journal des Debats, May 21, 1883, p. 3 c. 3.]


1883 May 13 / Tornado / Kansas / Kansas Review 7-121. [V; 1267. “The Kansas City Tornado, May 13, 1883.” Kansas City Review of Science and Industry, 7 (no. 2; June, 1883): 121-124.]


1883 May 13 / 8 p.m. / At Epinal, travelling from S.E. to N.W., large detonating meteor / Nature 28/88 / N.M. [V; 1268. “Notes.” Nature, 28 (May 24, 1883): 88-89, at 88.]


1883 May 15 / 6:30 p.m. / at sunset / Sun pillar / Observatory 6-253. [V; 1269. “The Sun-Pillar and the Zodiacal Light.” Observatory, 6 (1883): 252-254. Hall, Maxwell. “Sun Pillar seen in Jamaica.” Nature, 28 (July 5, 1883): 225.]


1883 May 16 / Concussions and loud sounds / Jour. des Debats, May 18-2-5 / In Valence (Fr) / Spain. [V; 1270. “On télégraphie de Madrid, le 16 mai....” Journal des Debats, May 18, 1883, p. 2 c. 5.]


1883 May 17 / D. fog / Paris / May 3, 1868. [V; 1271. See: 1868 May 3, (III: 1340, 1341, & 1342).]


1883 May 17 / Was a dry fog. Similar odor at Paris, May 17, 18, 1842. / C.R. 14-840. [V; 1272. "M. Lerond adresse...." Comptes Rendus, 14 (1842): 840. See: 1842 May 17 and 18, (II; 457).]


1883 May 17 / D. fog. / France / and volc., Java / See May 24, 1919. [V; 1273. See: 1919 May 24-30, (X: 930).]


1883 May 17, 19, 31 / See L'Annee Sci 1884/37. [V; 1274. “Les lueurs crépusculaires de 1883-184.” Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 28 (1884): 35-52, at 39.Ainsi, le 17 janvier, [1884,] vers 5 heures du soir, le ciel était teint en rouge sur toute l'étendue de l'horizon ouest.”]


1883 May 17 / Iceland / See March 12-21. [V; 1275. See: 1883 March 12-21, (V; 1191).]


1883 May 17 / Fontenay (Côte-d-Or) / At 5 a.m. came a thick fog, turning the sun red, spreading an unsupportable sulphurous odor. / L Astro 2/264 / Lasted all day, but in evening the moon shone almost unaffected. / Flammarion adds that the phe had been observed at Besançon, Langres, Autun, Chalon-sur-Saône, Salins, and Dijon. At Phalsburg, 17, 19, and 31. Says that ac to letters from Iceland there had been violent eruptions there especially on the 12th and 21st. [V; 1276.1, 1276.2. Bazerolle, F. “Brouillard sec.” Astronomie, 2 (1883): 264-265.]


1883 May 17 / La Nat, 21/47, a cor writes that at Dijon the most remarkable fog that had ever appeared thereso intense as to shut out the sun and having a strong sulphurous odor. It had appeared in many places in the Cote-d'Or and l'Yonne. It appeared to be brought on a wind from the North or N.W. [V; 1280.1, 1280.2. Bazin, Henry Émile. “Brouillard Extraordinaire.” La Nature, 1883 pt. 2 (no. 524; June 16): 47.]


1883 May 19, etc. / In Nature, Jan 3, 1884, p. 226, said that in 1883 reports of a volcanic eruption in Iceland were current, and were founded upon peculiar appearances of the sky and upon columns of smoke or vapor rising in the far distance"Nothing definite, has, however, been ascertained as to these phenomena." / See March, ab. 12  and later. [V; 1277.1, 1277.2. “Notes.” Nature, 29 (January 3, 1884): 225-226, at 226. See: (March , ab. 12 and later.). The Grímsvötn volcano was in eruption from January 15 to about April 15, 1883.]


1883 May 19 / BA 1911 / no mention of q or eruption in Iceland. [V; 1278. Milne, 730-731. Milne records earthquakes in Iceland on December 21, 1882, ( a class I earthquake), and on November 2, 1884, (a class I earthquake), but nothing in 1883. The Grímsvötn volcano was in eruption from January 15 to about April 15, 1883.]


1883 May 19 / Nothing of phe in Iceland in Nature, Knowledge, etc. [V; 1279.]


1883 May 19 / The volc. fog. Nothing in Times of the eruption in Iceland. If so a small one. Was earlier in year. [V; 1281.]


1883 May 19 and 31 / Explanations in La N., p. 70. Burning grass, etc. But had been observed in Phalsbourg, (Alsace-Lorraine) 17, 19, 31st. Very intense and spreading an odor of sulphur. On 31st strongest and greatest stenchsaid easily explainedfarmers had burned off grasses, etc. [V; 1282.1, 1282.2. “Brouillard Sulfureux du 19 Mai 1883.” La Nature, 1883 pt. 2 (no. 526; June 30): 70-71. The sulphurous fogs were supposedly produced by farmers in Holland and Germany burning vegetation and and peat bogs, to clear their land of weeds and to cheaply fertilize their crops.]


1883 May 18-19 / night / Cyclone / Wis / Ill / Sun 20-1-3 / 21-1-4. [V; 1283. “Cyclones Dealing Death.” New York Sun, May 20, 1883, p. 1, c. 3-4. “The Work of the Cyclone.” New York Sun, May 21, 1883, p. 1 c. 4.]


1883 May 18 / strange pebbles / Hillsboro, Illinois / D-168. ** [V; 1284. The note copies information from page 168 of The Book of the Damned. “Winds.” Monthly Weather Review, 11 (no. 5; May 1883): 114-118, at 115. "A number of stones, of peculiar formation and shapes uncommon in this region, were showered upon a farm near its track.” The “stones” that fell near Hillsboro, in association with a tornado, were probably hailstones.]


1883 May 18-19 / Turtle 11 inches diameter fell at Vienna, Mo. Said been scooped from a creek 3 miles away. How know. / Horses, etc., carried far. / Sun 25-2-6. [V; 1285. “Tornado in Missouri.” New York Sun, May 25, 1883, p. 2 c. 6.]


1883 May 19, about / 10 p.m.band of light said been auroralthis looked like a lake in Monsteras with shores covered with trees and faint outlines of farms. / at Lake Ludvika, Sweden / M.W.R., May, 1883. [V; 1286. “Atmospheric Electricity.” Monthly Weather Review, 11 (no. 5; May, 1883): 120-121. “Notes.” Nature, 28 (June 7, 1883):133-135, at 134. Mönsterås, Sweden.]


1883 May 20 / to 9 a.m. night / and night of 21st / Fall of dust near Krakatoa / BA '85/773. [V; 1287. Meldrum, Charles. “A Tabular Statement of the Dates at which, and the Localities where, Pumice or Volcanic Dust was seen in the Indian Ocean in 1883-84.” Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1885, 773-779, at 773. “Very fine dust commenced to fall about 2 p.m. The fall continued all night, and stopped about 9 a.m. on the 21st. Small quantities fell again during the night.” The Krakatau volcano began erupting on May 20, 1883; and, the barque Actœa was about four degrees of longitude to the west of Krakatau.]


1883 May / Krakatoa / 2 fertile and densely inhabited islands covered with mud several yards deep. All inhabitants perished. / Nature 30-372 / 3 other islands near K disappeared. [V; 1288. “Notes.” Nature, 30 (August 14, 1884): 371-374, at 372-373.]


1883 May (18) / NY Times 19-1-7 / 20-1-5 / 21-1-3 / Tornado / Illinois and Wis / Especially Racine, Wis. [V; 1289. “Struck by a Tornado,” and, “Tornado in Illinois.” New York Times, May 19, 1883, p. 1 c. 7. “Devastated by Cyclones.” New York Times, May 20, 1883, p. 1 c. 4-5. “The Illinois Tornado.” New York Times, May 20, 1883, p. 1 c. 5-6. “The Western Cyclones.” New York Times, May 21, 1883, p. 1 c. 3-4.]


1883 May 20 / Sea captain's account of eruption of Krakatoa / World, Oct 2-8-6. [V; 1290. (New York World, October 2, 1883, p. 8 c. 6.)]


1883 May 21 / Look up where volc? / Bay of Sunda / Darkness and fall of ashes from a volcanic eruption / M.W.R., Aug., p. 191. [V; 1291. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 11 (no. 8; August 1883): 190-193, at 191-192. The Krakatau volcano is 6° South latitude and 105° East longtiude. See: 1883 May 20, (V; 1287).]


1883 May 22 / See April 26. / New Zealand volc. Tongariro most violent in 13 years / D News, June 14-5-4 / See Ap. 26. [V; 1292. “New Zealand.” London Daily News, June 14, 1883, p. 5 c. 4. See: 1883 April 26, (V; 1246), and, 1883 Ap. 26, (V; 1247). The Tongariro volcano.]


1883 May 22 / 23 h., 55 m / 2 shocks / Catlettsburg, Ky. / Ref., Jan. 1. [V; 1293. Refer to: 1883 Jan 1, (V; 1078). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 13.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 27 (1884): 358-364, at 361. The time was stated as “23h 30m,” (not “23h 55m”).]


1883 May 24 / L.T., 12-b / Volc in Java. [V; 1294. “Volcanic Eruption.” London Times, May 24, 1883, p. 12 c. 2.]


1883 May 24 / (The fog) / In Jour. des Debat, June 1, said that upon the 24th in the East of France in the Valley of the Saöne, the Rhine and the Meuse, an intense fog had formed suddenly. There were electric clouds in it and it spread a strong sulphurous odor. [V; 1295. “Un phénomène météorologique....” Journal des Debats, June 1, 1883, p. 2 c. 4-5.]


1883 May 25 / [LT], 8-b / Explosion / Gunpowder works / Pembery. [B; 483. "The Pembery Burrows Explosion." London Times, May 25, 1883, p. 8 c. 2.]


1883 May 25, 26, 27, 28 / No sunspots / these and Feb 23, the only such days in 1883 / Science, Nov. 14, 1884. [V; 1296. Todd, David Peck. “Sun-spots.” Science, s. 1 v. 4 (November 14, 1884): 453.]


1883 May 26 / Great protuberance from limb of sun / Knowledge 3/346. [V; 1297. Prosses, W. Owen. “Singular Solar Phenomenon.” Knowledge, o.s., 3 (June 8, 1883): 346, (illustration).]


1883 May 26 / Disap of George Simonson of N.Y. / See World, June 5-1-3, etc. [B; 503. (New York World, June 5, 1883, p. 1 c. 3.) “Strange Story of Disappearance.” New York Tribune, June 4, 1883, p. 8 c. 1.]


1883 May 28 / mirage / bet 6-7:30 p.m. / Finsbo, Sweden / at short intervals scenesmountains, lakes, forests, and farms / Nature 28/158. [V; 1298. “Notes.” Nature, 28 (June 14, 1883): 155-158, at 158.]


1883 June / Trance / Religio-Ph J, Jan 26, 1884, p. 7 / Woman aged 35, in Glasgow in a trance from June to end of Nov. Fed with a stomach tube. [B; 504. "A Long Trance." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 35 (no. 22; January 26, 1884): 7, (c. 1).]


1883 June 2 / Tornado / Texas / Sun 5-1-7. [V; 1299. “Tornadoes in the South.” New York Sun, June 5, 1883, p. 1 c. 7.]


1883 June 3 / 2 large fireballs. one in Austria and one in Germany, with same radiant in Scorpio. Almost identical at ab. 7 degrees N.E. of Antares. Same as June 17, 1873. / ac to Prof Niessl / also June 7, 1878 / July 13, 1879 / Observatory 7-136. [V; 1300. Denning, William Frederick. “The Fireball-radiant in Scorpio (June).” Observatory, 7 (1884): 136-138, at 136. See: 1873 June 17, (IV; 1228); 1878 June 7, (IV; 2377); and, 1879 July 13, (IV; 2744).]


1883 June 3 / 10:55 p.m. / Bolide / Chatelineau, Belgium / traversed Cepheus and Cassiopeia / L Astro 3/32. [V; 1301. “Bolide remarquable.” Astronomie, 3 (1884): 32-33.]


1883 June 3 / 9:45 p.m. / Germany / Great met / Zeit Met 18/259, 297 / Laibach433. [V; 1302. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 18 (1883): 248-260, at 259-260. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 18 (1883): 296-306, at 297-298. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 18 (1883): 423-434, at 433.]


[1883 June 3 /] 1883 Jan 3 / 10:40 p.m. / London met10 seconds and then disap behind houses. / E Mec 37/288. [V; 1077. Goodacre, Walter. “A Brilliant Meteor.” English Mechanic, 37 (no. 950; June 8, 1883): 313.]


1883 June 4 / World, 5-1 / Disaps / not solved / 5-1-3. [B; 505. (New York World, June 4, 1883, p. 5 c. 1.) (New York World, June 5, 1883, p. 1 c. 3.)]


1883 June 5 / whirl / New Zealand Times, Aug 29-2-4Village of Neelisnallur, attached to the Kurkulputti Station, according to the Superintendent of Police in the Tinnevelly district of the Madras Presidency, a whirlwind picked up 3 children, a man, and a woman who were working in a field, dropped them, killing the man and woman. In another field sheep were similarly treated. [V; 1303.1, 1303.2. “An account of  a remarkable atmospherical phenomenon....” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), August 29, 1883, p. 2 c. 4. “Kurkulputti Station” was probably the village of  Kurukkalpatti, Tamil Nadu, India.]


1883 June 7 / [LT], 13-d / Abandonment of the Gloucester City / See Aug 9. / See Sept 4. / See Sept 25, Aug 29. / March 23 / Jan 22, 23 / Ap. 26. [B; 506. (London Times, June 7, 1883, p. 13 c. 4; not found here.) “Disasters at Sea.” London Times, March 8, 1883, p. 10 c. 5. The Gloucester City sank after colliding with ice floes on voyage from Bristol to New York, on February 23, 1883; but, its fate was not known until the steamer that had rescued its crew arrived in Havre. See: 1883 Jan 23, (B; 442); 1883 Ap. 26, (B; 499); 1883 Aug 9, (B; 524); 1883 Aug 29, (V; 1565); (Sept. 4; Sept 25; March 23; Jan 22).]


1883 June 8 / 7:51 p.m. / Met train over the Persian Gulf / M.W.R. '07/395 / 40 minutes / Denning, Telescopic Work, p. 278. [V; 1304. (Denning, William Frederick. Telescopic Work, p. 278.) Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (September 1907): 390-397, at 393 & 395.]


1883 June 8 / met train / 7:51 p.m. / A meteortrain lasted to 8:33 p.m. / Persian Gulf met appeared like a star of 3rd mag in Ursa Major, brightened and then seen to be moving, leaving a train that never moved from the point of first appearance (while met lasted? I ask.), increased to size of suntoo brilliant for eyes to bearthe train then zigzagged. / Cape Jask, Persian Gulf / Observatory 6-270.“Cape Jask” is now identified as Jask, (Bandar-e Jask), Iran. The meteor disappeared at the horizon, (apparently into the Persian Gulf); but, its train, “a thin whip-like streak of flame,” (from the point midway between its first appearance and the horizon), brightened over 5 minutes and remained constant another 12 minutes, before it “paled down.”]


1883 June 9 / [LT], 7-d / 11-8-c / 15-5-c / Explosion gunpowder by lightning at Fortress of Scutari / See June 16. [B; 484. "Explosion at Scutari." London Times, June 9, 1883, p. 7 c. 4. "The Explosion at Scutari." London Times, June 11, 1883, p. 8 c. 3. "Albania." London Times, June 15, 1883, p. 5 c. 3. See: 1883 June 16, (B; 485).]


1883 Jun 11 / Tornado / Iowa / Sun 12-1-5. [V; 1306. “A Tornado in Iowa.” New York Sun, June 12, 1883, p. 1 c. 5.]


1883 / night June 11-12 / q / Belg / C et T 8-38. [V; 1307. Lancaster, Albert Benoît Marie. "Les Tremblements de terre en Belgique." Ciel et Terre, 8 (March 16, 1887): 25-43, at 39.]


1883 June 13 / L.T., 7-a / 15-5-a / Lost Balloon. [B; 507. "The Lost Balloon." London Times, June 13, 1883, p. 7 c. 1. "France." London Times, June 15, 1883, p. 5 c. 1. The balloon, which ascended at Dunkirk and headed toward the North Sea, was rescued off Kent.]


1883 June 13 / 2:15 p.m. / Tornado / Long Island / Sun 14-1-7 / 15-1-3 / also Missouri. [V; 1308. “Tornado on Long Island.” New York Sun, June 14, 1883, p. 1 c. 7. “Ten Seconds in a Tornado.” New York Sun, June 15, 1883, p. 1 c. 3.]


1883 June 14 / Like a Celeste / found Atlantic / but crew's clothes and bedding gone / supposed that murdered the capt / World 19-1-2. [B; 508. (New York World, June 19, 1883, p. 1 c. 2.)]


1883 June 15 / Meteors / vol. 18 / Ref, Jan. 1866. [V; 1309. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 18 (1883): 296-306, at 297-298.]


1883 June 16 / [LT], 12-a / Explosion / Lightning strikes Powder Mill at Basingill. / See June 9. [B; 485. "Gunpowder Mill Struck by Lightning." London Times, June 16, 1883, p. 12 c. 1. See: 1883 June 9, (B; 484).]


1883 June 16 / Capt. Harding of brig Aristos, sent boat with 5 men to a vessel. Vessel carried them off. / N.Y.World, June 29-2-5. [B; 509. (New York World, June 29, 1883, p. 2 c. 5.)]


1883 June 16 / For a disap and a Celeste, see Ap 20, 1897. [B; 510. See: 1897 Ap 20, (C; 345).]


1883 June 16 / Lat 42° and 63 / A captain sends boat and sailors to a vessel to ask for food. Vessel carries them off. 6 men. NY Times 29-2-5 / 30-4-6 / See Aug. 17. [B; 511. “Deserted on the High Seas.” New York Times, June 29, 1883, p. 2 c. 5. “The Flying Dutchman.” New York Times, June 30, 1883, p. 4 c. 5-6. See: (Aug. 17).]


1883 June 18 / Lib / [LT], 4-c / Wtchcraft Curious at Halstock / 6-6-c / in Prussia. [B; 512. "Witchcraft in West Prussia." London Times, June 6, 1883, p. 6 c. 3. Meredith, R.F. "Witchcraft." London Times, June. 18, 1883, p. 4 c. 3 ]


1883 June 18 / Tornado / Ohio / Sun 20-1-4 / on 20th in Missouri / 22-1-3+. [V; 1310. “Monday's Tornado.” New York Sun, June 20, 1883, p. 1 c. 4. “Tornado in Missouri.” New York Sun, June 22, 1883, p. 1 c. 3.]


1883 June 19 / Eruption of the volc in Lake Nicaragua / L.T., Aug. 22-3-e / See May 1. / Nature 28-401. [V; 1311. “An American Volcanic Earthquake.” London Times, August 22, 1883, p. 3 c. 5. “Notes.” Nature, 28 (August 23, 1883): 400-403, at 401. See: 1883 May 1, (V; 1248). The Concepción volcano.]


1883 June 19-28 / Volc. activity began in an island in Lake Nicaragua, supposed extinct. Eruption highest intensity 26-28. / Sci Amer 49-85. [V; 1312. “Eruption of a Volcano in Lake Nicaragua.” Scientific American, n.s., 49 (August 11, 1883): 85. The Concepción volcano.]


1883 June 20 / Devastating floods in Silesia / D News, 22nd. [V; 1313. “The Floods in Silesia.” London Daily News, June 22, 1883, p. 5 c. 6.]


1883 June 21, etc. / Column of flame visible a great distance over Vesuvius. fiery glow every evening. / L.T. 12-11-d. [V; 1314. “Vesuvius.” London Times, July 12, 1883, p. 11 c. 4.]


1883 June 21 / Cl. burst in Silesia / An. Reg. [V; 1315. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 1883: pt. 2, 1-53, at 24.]


1883 June 23 / D. News of / For a month rained almost every day in SwitzerlandFloods there. [V; 1316. “The Weather in Switzerland.” London Daily News, June 23, 1883, p. 5 c. 4.]


1883 June 24 / 10 p.m. / Lunar rainbow / Kaikoura, N Zealand / at 11:50 a shock of q. / New Zealand Times 26-2-6. [V; 1317. “Telegraphic News.” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), June 26, 1883, p. 2 c. 6.]


1883 June 25 / E. Cornwall and W. Devon / q / Ashburton / 1st ab 1:45 p.m. / loud rumbling noise / small 2 at Ashburton / one at 1:36 / Reported from Widecombe Vicarage as like distant thunder or like the firing of a gun. / Trans Devonshire Assoc. 16/77 / (C.O.) [V; 1318.1, 1318.2. “Ninth Report of the Committee on Scientific Memoranda.” Report and Transactions of the Devonshire Association, 16 (1884): 70-85, at 77-85.]


1883 June 24-26 / Melmo, Sweden, extraordinary flight of dragon-flies. More on 25th. But on 26th, millions. For more than 12 hours. / Reported for all southern and central Sweden and Denmark. / Nature 28/271. [V; 1319. Newton, Alfred. “Extraordinary Flight of Dragon-Flies.” Nature, 28 (July 19, 1883): 271.]


1883 June 25 / Launceton, Cornwall / 1:40 p.m. / Shock apparently of earthquake and a rumbling sound. About an hour later was repeated. / L.T. 26-5-e. [V; 1320. “Earthquake in Cornwall.” London Times, June 26, 1883, p. 5 c. 3.]


1883 June 25 / Near Holsworthy, Devonshire, q and a sound not like thunder but like the rumbling of a wagon. Half an hour later, a clap of thunder. / Symons 18-89. [V; 1321. “Earthquakes of June 25th.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 18 (July 1883): 89-90.]


1883 June 25 / 3 / From Launceston to Holsworthy / Devonshire sound like rumble underground and q at 1:40 p.m. / again ab. 1:50 / 2:05. One cor says that the shock at 2:05 was a clap of thunder but quite certain first shock was not. / Symons' Met 18-89. [V; 1322. “Earthquakes of June 25th.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 18 (July 1883): 89-90.]


1883 June 26 / Floods on Lower Missouri. [V; 1323. “The Low Lands Still Submerged.” New York Sun, June 27, 1883, p. 1 c. 4.]


1883 June 30 / Great group of sunspots / Knowledge 4-60. [V; 1324. “Large Sun-Spot.” Knowledge, o.s., 4 (July 27, 1883): 60.]


1883 June 30 / One of the largest of measured sunspots / Flammarion, Pop. Astro, p. 256. [V; 1325. Flammarion, Camille. Popular Astronomy: A General Description of the Heavens. New York: D. Appleton, 1894, 256.]


1883 June 30 / Tremendous sunspot / L'Astro 7/125. [V; 1326. “Taches solaires visibles à œil nu.” Astronomie, 7 (1888): 123-133, at 125, (figure 38).]

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