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Last updated: July 15, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1897


1897:


1897 / Prof Salomon Auguste Andrée / Swedish engineer. Companions Strindberg and FrankelPort of Virgo, Spitzbergen. [C; 328. (Refs.???)]


1897 / (+) / Specialize this year. [VII; 1659.]


1897 Jan. / Poison fog, Belgium / like Dec 5, 1930 / See Dec 5, marked (+). [C; 329. See: (1930 Dec 5).]


1897 Jan. / Poison fog / Belgium / like Dec 5, 1930 / See Dec 5, marked (+). [VII; 1660. See: (1930 Dec 5).]


1897 / Balloon (?) found in Arctic / Jan. 4, 1910 / See Dec 9, 1909. / May 11, 1910. [MB-I; 6.1. See: (1909 Dec 9; not found); (1910 Jan. 4); and, (1910 May 11).]


1897 Jan. 1, ab / (See before). / Albina, Ore / Ac to Portland, (Ore) “Telegraph”, obj like lump of hard clay. / Lit Dig 14/400. [VII; 1661. “A Recovered Meteor.” Literary Digest, 14 (January 30, 1897): 400-401. Dearborn, Ella K. “A Bogus Meteor.” Literary Digest, 14 (February 27, 1897): 536. “As a resident of that lively little suburb of Portland permit me to explain that that 'meteor,' i.e., stone, was heated in a stove in Mr. Turner's cigar-store, and the sulfurous odor obtained by an external application of sulfur. The stone, still hot and smoking, was placed in the store-window that all might view the 'heavenly visitor,' while the perpetrators of the joke told of its wonderful descent.” “The local papers mentioned the meteor, and a few days later corrected the report, explaining that it was a joke played by some young men upon others.”]


1897 Jan 1-2 / night / Met shower from between Draco and Bootes / Nature 55-247. [VII; 1662. Denning, William Frederick. “Shooting Stars of January 2.” Nature, 55 (January 14, 1897): 247-248.]


1897 Jan 2 / bet 6 and 7 a.m. / Sheffield / Unusual number of meteors from near Corona / Nature 55/225 / at Belfast, p. 248. [VII; 1663. Sorby, H.C. “Shooting-stars observed on January 2.” Nature, 55 (January 7, 1897): 225. Denning, William Frederick. “Shooting Stars of January 2.” Nature, 55 (January 14, 1897): 247-248.]


1897 Jan 6 / Eagle, 3-6 / Sunspot. [VII; 1664. “New Sun Spot Found.” Brooklyn Eagle, January 6, 1897, p. 3 c. 6.]


1897 Jan. 7 to 16 / It Sound / Spello (Foligno) / rombi / See 1816. [VII; 1667. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 43. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1897 Jan 10 / (+) / Trib, 3-2 / Footprints of Forton. / Or Good Woods, before Jan. 10in Fenian times1884? Big black thing seen. Man's footprints alternating with an animal's. [C; 330. “Some French and English Ghosts.” New York Tribune, January 10, 1897, s. 3 p. 3 c. 2. Jane, John Frederick Thomas. “By Sea and By Land.” Good Words and Sunday Magazine, 38 (1897): 23-31, at 27-28. “Its latest authenticated appearance was at the time of the last Fenian scare, about fifteen years ago, when a guard was established to look after the magazine hard by, and the sentries had orders to shoot any one who did not halt at the challenge.” “It was on a winter evening, deep snow upon the ground, and all had gone well till after midnight. Then, suddenly, there came a sentry's challenge, and almost immediately the report of a rifle, followed shortly by another. The guard turned out, racing hither and thither in the snow, raising a hue and cry first in this direction, then in that. At last things settled down, and when the captain of the guard investigated the matter, he learned from the sentry that a large, black 'Thing' had jumped over the graveyard wall, and run at him on all fours when he challenged. He fired, whereupon the 'Thing' rose to its feet, and running sometimes on all fours, sometimes upright, rushed towards the creek followed by the sentry and the guard. Arrived at the creek it plunged in, breaking the ice, and though the pursuers waited long nothing was ever seen of it again. The captain, but half believing the story, yet thinking that some attempt may have been made, went and looked for the traces of the footsteps, which were visible enough in the moonlight. And now comes the extraordinary part of the story. For some twenty yards there would be a man's footprints, then, for a space, those of a large animal; sometimes the one, sometimes the other, but never the two together!” “Thus the Forton mystery. The ice was broken and the creek dragged the next day, but nothing was ever found. No satisfactory solution has ever been discovered, for the footprints began suddenly in the centre of the old burial ground, and led thence towards the magazine, sometimes man and sometimes beast, until they ended on the shores of the creek.” “Ghosts at Forton Barracks.” Western Gazette, (Yeovil), January 27, 1899, p. 2 c. 3. A young sentry fired four shots at the relieving guards, wounding a corporal; and, the incident, on January 24, 1899, was explained as the result of ghost stories and his hearing their approaching footsteps.]


1897 Jan 10 / “From seven hours after sunset [on Sunday night, the 10th of January,] until dawn” destructive shocks in Persia. / L.T., March 13-5-c. [VII; 1665. “Earthquakes in Persia.” London Times, March 13, 1897, p. 5 c. 3.]


1897 Jan 10 / Enormous naked eye sunspot / E Mec (Eng. Osc.)  64/502. [VII; 1668. "Naked-Eye Sunspot." English Mechanic, 64 (no. 1660; January 15, 1897): 502.]


[1897 Jan. 13. Wrong date. See: 1897 Feb. 8, (VII; 1669).]


1897 Jan 15 / q. / island in Persian Gulf / 1500 killed / Trib 22-1-2. [VII; 1670. "Thousands Killed by an Earthquake." New York Tribune, January 22, 1897, p. 1 c. 2.]


1897 Jan 16 / Sc. Am of / The metite of Albina, Oregon / See before. [VII; 1666. “The Meteor Fell at His Feet.” Scientific American, n.s., 76 (January 16, 1897): 38. See: 1892 Dec 16, (VII; 801), and, 1897 Jan. 1, ab, (VII; 1661).]


1897 Jan 16 / K-bug / La Nat Sup of, (p. 25) / That while working (filling a stove with coal) in a house in rue de la Tour, Paris, a concierge felt a stinging sensation in his arm. There was immediate inflammation. He was taken to a hospital, but died in the evening. People in the house said that gigantic wasps had been seen entering the house by way of the stove pipes. So the question is asked whether one of these had stung the man. [C; 331.1, 331.2. “Informations.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1233, supplement; January 16): 25.]


1897 Jan 17 / qs / Japan and Turkey / BA 11 / 18th, Philippines / Sims / See Feb. 18, 1889. [VII; 1671. A class III earthquake and a class II earthquake. Milne, 739. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1897 Jan 22 / [LT], 15-c / Eclipse discoveries. [VII; 1672. Baden-Powell, George. “The Eclipse Discoveries.” London Times, January 22, 1897, p. 15 c. 3.]


1897 Jan 22 / (q) / 10 p.m. / Bolide / Paris / La Nat Sup, Feb. 6, p. 38. [VII; 1673. “Communications.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1236, supplement; February 6): 38.]


1897 Jan 23, before / Bergerac / met train like serpent of fire / La Nat Sup, Jan 23, '97. [VII; 1674. “Informations.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1234, supplement; January 23): 29.]


1897 Jan 26 / 28 / Feb. 149 p.m. / See Sound. / Listed as qs in New Brunswick, in M.W.R. 1898-266. [VII; 1675. “Earthquakes in New Brunswick.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (no. 6; June 1898): 266. Kain, Samuel W. “List of Recorded Earthquakes in New Brunswick.” Bulletin of the Natural History Society of New Brunswick, 4 (1898-1902): 16-21, at 21.]


1897 Jan 28, Feb 14 / Sound / Grand Manan, New Brunswick / loud report / M.W.R. 1898-152 / Like Sept 25 / 17 days apart. [VII; 1676. Kain, Samuel K., et al. “Seismic and Oceanic Noises.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (no. 4; April 1898): 152-154. “When they take place under Gannet Rock and under the land they have the heavy rattle of a 24-pounder cannon, exploded 40 feet from the building.” Kain, Samuel W. “List of Recorded Earthquakes in New Brunswick.” Bulletin of the Natural History Society of New Brunswick, 4 (1898-1902): 16-21, at 21. On January 28: “A sharp shock felt at Southern Head, Grand Manan. Duration about two seconds. Mr. W. B. McLaughlan, the light-keeper, in writing, says: 'It shook us up so violently that it set my dogs barking and the horse and cattle in the stable tried to break loose.'” Regarding the sound on February 14, McLaughlin wrote: " I am of the opinion that these shocks are of frequent occurrence in the Bay of Fundy, and arc generally thought to be the reports of cannon.” See: 1897 Sept 25, (VIII; 105).]


1897 Jan 31 / Gabarret (Landes) / slow undulating bolide like a rocket / La Nat Sup, Feb 13, p. 42 / at Agen / At Agensee p. 46. [VII; 1677. “Communications.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1237, supplement; February 13): 42. “Communications.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1238, supplement; February 20): 46.]


1897 Feb. 1 / Intensely white spot that seemed to project from terminator of M[ars] / (Molesworth) / Mem. B.A.A. 6/67. [VII; 1678. “Section for the Observation of Mars.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 6 (1898): 55-122, at 67.]


1897 Feb. 4 / “A minute white spot projecting [well] beyond the limb”of Mars. / Molesworth / Mem. B.A.A. 6/67. [VII; 1679. “Section for the Observation of Mars.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 6 (1898): 55-122, at 67.]


1897 Feb 6 / Th stone / 10:30 p.m. / Bay Shore, L.I. / Said that large aerolite had fallen in heavy storm with great concussion. 2 holesone 6 and one 3 feet deep. Found but no aerolite. / Eagle 10-4-2. [VII; 1680. “Fall of an Aerolite.” Brooklyn Eagle, February 10, 1897, p. 4 c. 2.]


1897 Feb 6 / Orizaba, Mexico, active / Trib 7-6-6. [VII; 1681. "Orizaba Alarms The Mexicans." New York Tribune, February 7, 1897, p. 6 c. 6. The Pico de Orizaba volcano last erupted in 1846.]


1897 Feb. 7 / Bright projection on terminator of Mars, by Mr. Maw / Mem. BAA 6/67. [VII; 1682. “Section for the Observation of Mars.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 6 (1898): 55-122, at 67.]


1897 Feb. 8 / It Sounds / Cannara (Foligno) / light concussions and rombi during the day / See 1816. [VII; 1683. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 43. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


[1897 Feb. 8 /] 1897 Jan. 13, July 2, Sept 11 / (It) Sounds / Cannara (Foligno) / rombi / See 1816. [VII; 1669. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 43-44. The date of "1897 Jan. 13" was an error, (probably a mistake for June 13, 1896); the correct date was February 8, 1897. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1897 Feb. 14 / See Jan 28. [VII; 1684. See: 1897 Jan 26 / 28 / Feb. 14, (VII; 1675).]


1897 Feb. 16 / Prominence / limb of Mars / Griffiths / Mem BAA 6/68. [VII; 1685. “Section for the Observation of Mars.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 6 (1898): 55-122, at 68.]


1897 Feb. 16 / Buda Pesth / Aug. dark / by O. Hoffmann / Jour. B.A.A. 8/127. [VII; 1686. Hopman, Frits. "On Dark Meteors." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 8 (1897-1898): 127-131.]


1897 Feb 17 / Eagle, 6-5 / March 2-6-4 / 2 new volcs. [VII; 1687. “A New Volcano.” Brooklyn Eagle, February 17, 1897, p. 6 c. 5. “Still Another Volcano.” Brooklyn Eagle, March 2, 1897, p. 6 c. 4. “May be a new volcano has broken out in Utah and more likely it has not.” Two new volcanoes reported to be in Mexico, (in Oaxaca), and in Utah were only newspaper inventions. The Pico de Orizaba volcano, (visible from Vera Cruz, but distant from Oaxaca), has not erupted since 1846; and, apart from the activity of the Colima volcano, the Socorro volcano, (one of the Revillagigedo Islands south of Baja California), was the only Mexican volcano that had unconfirmed reports of eruptive activity in 1896-1897.]


1897 Feb 17 / Repeat 16th. [VII; 1688. (Ref.????)]


1897 Feb. 18 / Repeat 16th. [VII; 1689. (Ref.????)]


1897 Feb 20 / 4:05 a.m. / England / Sci Gos, NS, 5-172 / Edward A Martin, F.G.S., writes that loud noise in basement, followed by a jingling downstairs and in his bedroom sound like watch chain dangling against [the metal bed-post]. Presumbly on earthquake. / Sci Gos, N.S., 4-172. [VII; 1690. "Earthquake Shock." Science Gossip, n.s., 4 (no. 42; November 1897): 172.]


1897 Feb 20 / Ischia di Castro / 18 h, 15 m / meteor or q / See 1816. [VII; 1691. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 44. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1897 Feb 20 and 23 / Meteors from same place in sky. / E Mech. (Eng Soc) 65/81. [VII; 1692. Salmon, S.H.R. "Venus...." English Mechanic, 65 (no. 1666; February 26, 1897): 34-35. Gregg, Ivo F.H. Carr. "Variable StarsLarge Daylight Meteor." English Mechanic, 65 (no. 1668; March 12, 1897): 81.]


1897 Feb 24 / 3:45 p.m. / Great explosion heard over Tombstone, Arizona. Said that fragments of a met[eor] fell at St. David. / MWR 1897-56. [VII; 1693. “Fall of an Aerolite in Arizona.” Monthly Weather Review, 25 (no. 2; February 1897): 56. “From a newspaper slip inclosed by Mr. Gee, we learn that the meteoric stone which fell near the ranch of J.N. Curtis, a short distance below St. David, was secured by the latter. It weighed 27 pounds, and had buried itself in the ground after plowing up the earth for a considerable distance.”]


1897 March 5 / 10:40 p.m. / Niagara Falls / 30 miles each side of River / shock / at first thought an explosion / Trib 7-7-2. [VII; 1694. "An Earthquake Shock at Niagara." New York Tribune, March 7, 1897, p. 7 c. 2.]


1897 March 6 / ab. 9:30 a.m. / Shock at Eureka, Cal. / Smithson. Miscel. Cols., 49-appendix. / “It was very dark along the whole line seaward, as if smoke had been belched up from the sea depths, covering fully fifteen degrees of the sky”. [VII; 1695. McAdie, Alexander G. “Catalogue of Earthquake on the Pacific Coast, 1897 to 1906.” Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, v. 49 art. 5 (1907): 1-64, at 6.]


1897 March 9 / (Cut) / Parkersburg, W. Va. / NY Times, March 11-1-4 / That a cylindrical obj had fallen from the skyburstknocked down a man and killed a horse. / See June 6, 1897. / March 11. [VII; 1696. “Explosion of a Meteor.” New York Times, March 11, 1897, p. 1 c. 4. “Flaming.” Cincinnati Enquirer, March 10, 1897, p. 1 c. 6. “A Great Big Ball of Fire.” Shepherdstown Register, (West Virginia), March 18, 1897, p. 4 c. 4. The meteor exploded over New Martinsburg, Ohio. See: (1897 March 11), and, (1897 June 6).]


1897 March-May / B.M. / Have NY / San Fran. / Chicago / St. Louis / New Orleans / Toronto / Quebec / Montreal. [VII; 1697.]


1897 March 15 to May / The Airship. [VII; 1698.]


1897 March 15 to May 15 / Sun. [VII; 1699.]


1897 March 15 to May 1 / Have Herald. [VII; 1700.]


1897 March 20 to May 1 / Nothing in San Fran. Chronicle. [VII; 1701.]


1897 March 16 / Trib, 4-4 / Great fire / Bombay. [VII; 1702. "Fifteen Hundred Houses Burned." New York Tribune, March 16, 1897, p. 4 c. 4.]


1897 March-April / Great floods / Mississippi River Valley. [VII; 1703. (Refs.???)]


1897 March 21 / 6 a.m. / Mocksville, Nor. Car. / Det met with effects like [note cut off] earthquakes. / Climate and Crops, Nor Car Sect, March. / Also at Settle, Loud explosion and flash of light in sky. / See May 31. / 1897. [VII; 1704. “Remarks by Observers.” U.S. Department of Agriculture. North Carolina Section of the Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau, 2 (no. 3; March 1897): 3. “On the morning of the 21st, at 6 o'clock, a large meteor passed overhead, going from east to west, and when in the west it exploded, making a report like a cannon and shaking houses like an earthquake.” See: 1897 May 31, (VII; 1780).]


1897 March 21 / (+) / Sun, 5-6, from the Morning Oregonian / Ac to Capt Taylor, a live frog had fallen upon his ship, the Iroquois, in mid-ocean. / Pacific. [VII; 1705. “Strange Things at Sea.” New York Sun, March 21, 1897, p. 5 c. 6. “A Mizzen Frog That Mystified.” San Francisco Call, March 3, 1897, p. 7 c. 3. “When 1500 miles off the coast of Chile a frog was discovered in the main rigging and speculation was rife as to how it got there. The running-gear had been newly tarred and Mr. Frog got
entangled in the sticky mass and could not get away. There was considerable discussion among the officers as to how the batrachian got there, but no solution could be reached. Tne matter was solved
yesterday, however, when one of the crew explained at the Vallejo-street steps that it was a pet frog and had lived in one of the bunks from the time the vessel left New York. Its owner was playing with it
when the call came for all hands to shorten sail. The sailor put the frog in his pocket and went aloft. When he returned to the forecastle the frog was gone and was not discovered again until found in the rigging.”]


1897 March 21 / 11 a.m. / Chicago / An engine of train left Chicago 20 minutes before blown up. Parts hurled 1,200 feet—“unexplained accident.” / Chic Trib, 22nd. [VII; 1706. “Blows Up on Rails.” Chicago Tribune, March 22, 1897, p. 1 c. 7 & p. 2 c. 1-2. “A Locomotive Explodes.” New York Tribune, March 2, 1897, p. 1 c. 5.]


1897 March 22 / 9:50 p.m. / Vandalia, Ill / slight q / Sun 24-1-6. [VII; 1707. "Earthquake North Of Us." New York Sun, March 24, 1897, p. 1 c. 6.]


1897 March 22 / Davenham, Cheshire / Red dust / Nature 55/508. [VII; 1708. Yates, J.M. “Red Dust of Doubtful Origin.” Nature, 55 (April 1, 1897): 508.]


1897 March 23 / evening / q. / Montreal Herald 24-5-5 / A boom like sound of explosion at Malone, N.Y., ab 6 p.m. [VII; 1709. (Montreal Herald, March 24, 1897, p. 5 c. 5.)]


1897 March 23 / ab 6 p.m. / Montreal / Malone, N.Y. / and Vt. / q. / Sun 24-1-6. [VII; 1710. "Earthquake North Of Us." New York Sun, March 24, 1897, p. 1 c. 6.]


1897 March 24 / Eagle, 1-4 / Lightning. [VII; 1711. “A Child Struck by Lightning.” Brooklyn Eagle, March 24, 1897, p. 1 c. 4.]


1897 March 24 / 6 a.m. / Shock / Somerville, N.J. / Herald 25-7-4. [VII; 1712. (New York Herald, March 25, 1897, p. 7 c. 4.)]


1897 March 26 / Raps (Invalid) / Peterborough Advertiser, May 8Two cottages in Tick Fenn, near Ramsayold cottagesone occupied for 10 years by Samuel Rowthan, a middle-aged horse-keeper, employed by Mr. Alfred Fuller, J.P., and his daughter, aged 18, a bed-ridden invalid. Phe began on 26th. Adjoining cottage was vacant, but new tenants, Mr and Mrs Livett, were going to move inand did move in on 28th. Night of 26th on wall behind the girl's bed began rappings and crashing sounds. Reporters interviewed several persons who had heard the loud sounds, and had no doubt. At times the rappings made the girl's iron bed-stead resound. The Livetts told that the sounds had kept up so as to deprive them of sleep. / May 15th, Advertiser ofMrs Livett interviewednoises keeping up, as if by blows more powerful than a man could make with a hammer. Reporter says that story of an apparition was circulating, but Livetts said not. A letter published from a cor who accused the people of hoaxing and of profit and that no intelligent witnesses. The Editor appends a note that only fair to state that not true that the people were charging for admission to the houses, and that witnesses were of substantial standing and intelligence. / Advertiser, 22Raps continuing“sick girl terror-stricken”. A letter published from someone who makes the suggestion common as to sounds in housesthat from water pipes. There were no water pipes in these cottages. / May 29Knockings continuing. [C; 332.1 to 332.8. (Peterborough Advertiser, May 8, 1897.) (Peterborough Advertiser, May 15, 1897.)(Peterborough Advertiser, May 22 and May 29, 1897; not @ BNA.)]


1897 March 26 / Dust / Liverpool / E Mec (Eng Soc) 65/129. [VII; 1713. Pinnington, James. "Shower of Dust." English Mechanic, 65 (no. 1670; March 26, 1897): 129.]


1897 March 28 / near Lake Léman, Switzerland / Miragea dozen ships in a file. / Bull Soc. Belge D'Astro 3/72. [VII; 1714. Delessert, E. "Fata morgana." Bulletin de la Société Belge d'Astronomie, 3 (1898): 71-72.]


1897 March 29 / Altoona, Pa, News / Chic Trib 31“An attempt was made last night and early this morning to destroy Altoona, four incendiary fires being kindled in different parts of the city between 12 and 1:30 o'clock.” [C; 333. “Four Incendiary Fires in a Night.” Chicago Tribune, March 31, 1897. p. 3 c. 2.]


1897 March 30 / 6 p.m. / Cyclone near Gutherie, Oklahoma, at Chandler / See Flood in April. [VII; 1715. (Refs.???) See: (April).]


1897 March 31 / Herald, 9-3 / The ship Schillswer, abandoned at seain storm. Accounted for. Towed by the Samaria. [C; 334. (New York Herald, March 31, 1897, p. 9 c. 3.)]


1897 March 31 / At Pana, Ill, reported that a waterspout had thrown a train of cars from the track of the Illinois Central. / In M.W.R., May, 1897, argued that here on dry land whatever may have been, not a waterspout. / Metite, Pana, July 14, 1886. [VII; 1716. “Waterspout. Cloudburst, or Tornado.” Monthly Weather Review, 25 (no. 5; May 1897): 207. “Wind and Water.” Decatur Herald-Dispatch, (Illinois), April 3, 1897, p. 8 c. 5. “Between 9 and 10 o'clock last night a water spout crossed the Illinois Central tracks about two miles south of Pana. Just what damage was done could not be learned. A work train on the Illinois Central was struck by the water spout and derailed. The belief was that the water spout did not hit the train but that the cars reached its junction with the tracks so soon after the storm had passed that the cars were derailed by the spreading of the rails.” See: 1886 July 14, (VI; 533).]


1897 Ap or May / Flash from a well / See Aug 31, 1895. [C; 335. See: 1895 Aug. 31, (C; 276), and, 1897 Ap. 9, (C; 339).]


1897 April / Supposed accident to the Bohemia / [LT], May 19-1-f / 20-14-e / Aug. 21-7-e / Vessel attacked  by pirates. / June 10-9-e / Wreckage at Vancouver. / April 28-6-f / 29-6-f / May 3-11-f / Loss of the Vaillant. / Ap. 16-9-c—missing steamers / Shipping intelligence—every day. [C; 336.1, 336.2. “Supposed Accident to a Liner.” London Times, May 19, 1897, p. 12 c. 6. “The Accident to a Liner.” London Times, May 20, 1897, p. 14 c. 5. “A Vessel Attacked by Pirates.” London Times, August 21, 1897, p. 7 c. 5. “The Collision in the Channel,” and, “Reported Shipping Disaster.” London Times, June 10, 1897, p. 6 c. 6. “Loss of a French Vessel and 66 Lives.” London Times, April 28, 1897, p. 6 c. 6. (London Times, April 29-6-f, 1897; not @ Newspapers.com.) “The Wreck of the Vaillant.” May 3, 1897, p. 11 c. 6. “A Steamer Missing.” London Times, April 16, 1897, p. 9 c. 3.]


1897 April / Later / Write to these men or Postmaster. / Iowa heifer story. [C; 337. “Air Ship Takes a Cow!” Woodson County Advocate, (Yates Center, Kansas), April 23, 1897, p. 5 c. 4. “Air Ship Comments.” Woodson County Advocate, (Yates Center, Kansas) May 7, 1897, p. 4 c. 1. “The air ship story to be found in this paper taken from the Yates Center Advocate is a huge joke. The men who made the affidavit, we are informed by parties from Yates Center, believed the story at the time. Afterward they began to doubt and sent a man out to interview Mr. Hamilton's family and hired hands, when they then found that they were duped by the old man whose reputation for truth and veracity is unquestioned.Buffalo Advocate.” “Carried Off His Cow.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 27, 1897, p. 6 c. 7. At the time, the Woodson County Advocate was published as the “Farmer's Advocate.” A newspaper hoax. See: Objs / Sky / 1897 / April, (SF-IV; 192).]


1897 Ap— / Yates Center / See Idaho Dragon, Dec. 14, 1892. [VII; 1717. See: Animals / Dragon / Idao / 1892, (SF-I; 215).]


1897 April / Have New Orleans Picayune. [VII; 1718.]


1897 Ap. / Airships / See Nov 3, 1899. [VII; 1719. See: 1899 Nov. 3, (C; 433; and, VIII; 528).]


1897 April / Floods / Mississippi Valley. [VII; 1720. (Refs.???)]


1897 Ap 1 / night (at 6 a.m.) / q in Northern N.J. / ab midnight, great explosion of powder factory. Shamokin, Pa / Sun 2-4 and 6 / Sun 2-4 and 6. [VII; 1721. "Powder Magazine Blown Up." New York Sun, April 3, 1897, p. 2 c. 4. "Earthquake in Solid Jersey." New York Sun, April 3, 1897, p. 1 c. 6.]


1897 Ap. 1-2 / night / Hudson spanned by a bridge of fire / Herald 2-6-5. [VII; 1722. (New York Herald, April 2, 1897, p. 6 c. 5.)]


1897 April 3-4 / night / France / Graulges (Mareuil) / soles (fishes) / Cosmos, May '97, p. 543 / An Soc Met. 1897/146. [VII; 1723. “Pluie de poissons.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 36 (May 1, 1897): 543. “Pluie de poissons.” Annuaire de la Société Météorologique de France, 45 (April-May-June 1897): 141. Les Graulges is now identified at part of Mareuil en Périgord, France.]


1897 Ap 3-4 / Fishes of Dordogne / La Nat Sup, June 5, 1897, p. 4. [VII; 1724. “Pluie de poissons.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 2, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1253, supplement; June 5): 4. These salt-water fish were found upon hedges and upon the roofs of houses, allegedly confirming their being transported at least 150 kilometres by a whirlwind.]


1897 Ap 6 / Lat 49, Long 28 (Atlantic) / British steamer, Gertor, sighted the Norwegian ship, Senta, which had sailed from St John['s], N.B., on March 16, for Newport, England. Did not appear water-logged—her two boats were secured on top of her deck house, and foretower mast and bowsprit standing, with sails loose. / N.Y. World, Ap. 14-7-4. [C; 338.1, 338.2. (New York World, April 14, 1897, p. 7 c. 4; not @ Newspapers.com.)]


1897 (Ap. 6) / Detroit Evening News of / The other night” near Lee, Mich—ball of light moving zigzag. / MWR 1897-211. [VII; 1725. “Ignis Fatuus or Jack-O'-Lantern.” Monthly Weather Review, 25 (no. 5; May 1897): 211. “Between 10 and 11 o’clock the other night a bright light was seen emerging from the river [possibly the Kalamazoo River in southeastern Michigan]. On first sight it was thought to be a lantern, but further investigation proved it to be a ball of light about as large as a large hen’s egg floating through the air, about 10 feet from the ground, with whizzing sound and zigzag motion. It soon disappeared.” (Detroit Evening News, April 6, 1897.) (Three “Lee” townships in Michigan, which one?)]


1897 Ap. 9 / evening / People of East Ravenswood Park (Chicago) heard a loud explosion. A streak of flame shot from somewhere. It is said from a new well. A barn close to the well was set on fire and burned to the ground. / Chicago Tribune, 8-1-4. [C; 339. “Mysterious Flame Ignites a Barn.” Chicago Tribune, April 8, 1897, p. 1 c. 6.]


1897 Ap 9 or 16 / Sounds / 3:30 a.m. / Upper Lentaschthale / Detonations / Met Zeit 16/229. [VII; 1726. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 16 (1899): 215-232, at 227-229. The Kalkalpen are located in Austria.]


1897 / ab Ap. 10 / Celeste / Seen by the August Korff, a tank steamer, from Rotterdam, in mid-ocean, a vessel in seeming good condition except that her foremast was broken. “There was something so curious about the appearance of the vessel that the Korff steamed close to and around her. Not a sign of life was seen on board, and to repeated hailings no answer was received. Her name was made out to be the Patmas, a Norwegian bark of 327 tons, which Capt. Wold commanded when she sailed from Cardiff on April 1 for Para. There was no good explanation of why the ship had been abandoned.” / Trib, Ap 21-11-1. [C; 340.1, 340.2, 340.3. "Abandoned on the High Seas." New York Tribune, April 21, 1897, p. 11 c. 1.]


1897 Ap 10 / St Louis Globe-Democrat of— / Floods without equal—storm swept states. [VII; 1727. “Flood Without Equal.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 10, 1897, p. 1 c. 1-3  & p. 2 c. 3-5.]


1897 Ap 12-23 / Toronto Globe / Nothing. [VII; 1728.]


1897 Ap. 13 / balls of snow / Toronto Globe of, p. 12 / At Ridgetown, a black cloud seemingly not more than fifty feet above the observers. Balls of snow fell as if under some force that prevented them from falling fast. About a hundred balls or lumps of snow in diameter from 4 to 8 inches. [VIII: 1029.1, 1029.2. “General News of the City.” Toronto Globe, April 13, 1897, p. 12 c. 1-3. “One, however, was as large as a pumpkin. Being called over this morning I saw these balls scattered over an area not more than six rods square. The cloud was unaccompanied by much wind, and the balls, which consisted of snow very loosely aggregated, seemed when descending as if under the influence of some force which restrained them from coming to the ground very suddenly.”]


1897 Ap. 14 / Pollen / Yellow powder said been pollen. Highly magnified grains shown in a sketch. / Bull Soc Belge D'Astro 2/193. [VII; 1729. Moye, Marcel. "Pluies de soufre." Bulletin de la Société Belge d'Astronomie, 2 (1898): 193. The substance fell at Bordeaux, France.]


1897 Ap. 14 / Daily Picayune (New Orleans) of / Houston, Texas, Ap. 13—swarms of buffalo gnats, the invasion attributed to the floods—horses and mules killed by the hundreds. Reports from Gregg County, Cherokee, Cass—hundreds dead, carcasses lying about in fields and woods—gnats slaying the animals to death or driving them to death by exhaustion. [VII: 1730.1, 1730.2. “Buffalo Gnats.” New Orleans Picayune, April 14, 1897, p. 10 c. 6.]


1897 Ap. 15 / (Hanna) / Prof. Boris Sidis, “Multiple Personality. / About 7 o'clock, evening of Ap. 15, Rev Thomas Carson Hanna, while returning in a carriage to his home, in Plantsville, Conn—getting from carriage, fell foremost and was picked up unconscious. Condition like that if K. Hauser. Memory a blank—could not distinguish between himself and surrounding objects—no idea of time, distance (all things seemed same distance), sex—like a new-born child—no understanding of simplest words—but he learned quickly. Still in this secondary personality, he had, several weeks later, another accident, having fallen from his horse. No psychic effects of this visible. / June 8, 1897, returned to first self and forgot the intervening experiences. June 9—he lapsed to the secondary state. / Other back-and-forths. His writing in secondary state was printing. This the easiest way for one who was faking. [C; 341.1 to 341.5. (Sidis, Boris, and, Goodhart, Simon Philip. Multiple Personality. New York: D. Appleton, 1904.)]


1897 Ap 15 / See Cate case, Ap., 1903. / or 1904? [C; 342. See: 1903 April 28, (C; 571).]


1897 Ap 15 / See case, Aug., 1894. / Green note. [C; 343. See: 1894 Aug., (C; 177).]


1897 Ap. 15 / Case of Rev. Ansel Bourne = Jan. 17, 1887. [C; 344. See: 1887 Jan 17, (B: 782 & 783). Sidis, Boris, and, Goodhart, Simon Philip. Multiple Personality. New York: D. Appleton, 1904, 376-382.]


1897 Ap. 16 / Metite of Vierville (Calvados) / La Nat Sup—May 1, '97, p. 88. [VII; 1731. “Un bolide.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1248, supplement; May 1): 88.]


1897 Ap. 16 / Buffalo gnats appear near Jackson, Tenn. By 19th, more than 500 horses and mules had been killed by them in western Tenn. “Soon after the animals are attacked they swell up and die.” The farmers had had no experience with the insects before and knew not what to do—cattle killed by buffalo gnats reported from Denison, Texas, Ap. 19. / St Louis Glb-Dem, 21-4-5. [VII; 1732.1, 1732.2. “Ravages of Buffalo Gnats.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 20, 1897, p. 6 c. 7. “Fearful Work of Buffalo Gnats.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 21, 1897, p. 3 c. 7.]


1897 Ap. 16 / off Cape Mendocino / Several hundred humming birds board a vessel. / San Francisco Chronicle 18-32-4. [VII; 1733. “Humming Bird Story From the Briny Deep.” San Francisco Chronicle, April 18, 1897, p. 32 c. 4.]


1897 Ap. 17 / q's again at Zante / (L.T., Ap. 18-9-e) / See Jan 31. / Continue several days. [VII; 1734. (London Sunday Times, April 18, 1897, p. 9 c. 5; not here, on 8 pages in Sunday Times, so recheck London Times index.) See: (Jan 31).]


1897 Ap 19 / early morning / Omaha / “heavy report” and concussion / Chic Trib 20-3-4. [VII; 1735. (Chicago Tribune, April 20, 1897, p. 3 c. 4; not found here.)]


1897 Ap. 19 / early hour / Omaha, Neb / Violent report heard—various attempts to explain. Finally supposed must been a q. / Sun—20-1-7 / Big exposition. The Trans-Mississippi Expos. opened at Omaha on 22. / Sun 23-2-3. [VII; 1736. "Was It An Earthquake At Omaha?" New York Sun, April 20, 1897, p. 1 c. 7. "Omaha's Exposition." New York Sun, April 23, 1897, p. 2 c. 3.]


1897 Ap 20 / (+) / Unknown vessel was seen off coast of N.J. near Sandy Hook, “showing three black balls in her rigging.” / Eagle 21-1-4 / Supposed was the Santo Domingo temporarily stopped. It disappeared and nothing could be learned by inquiries along the coast. / Look up other indexes. / See June, 1883. [C; 345.1, 345.2. “No News of This Ship.” Brooklyn Eagle, April 21, 1897, p. 1 c. 4. The Santo Domingo was a steamer used to send mail and continued to do this work later in 1897. The “three black balls” signalled that the ship was not under command Mexico. See: 1883 June 14, (B; 508), and, 1883 June 16, (B: 509, 510, and 511).]


1897 Ap. 20 / bet Cape and Sydney / Aurora / Nature 56-183. [VII; 1737. “Notes.” Nature, 56 (June 24, 1897): 182-185, at 183.]


1897 Ap. 20 / Ext. aurora noted by Capt. Hepworth, of the R.M.S. Aorangi, voyage between Cape of G[ood] H[ope and] Sydney. / Nature 56/183. [VII; 1738. “Notes.” Nature, 56 (June 24, 1897): 182-185, at 183.]


1897 Ap 20 / Very brilliant Aurora / Australia / Nature 56-183. [VII; 1739. “Notes.” Nature, 56 (June 24, 1897): 182-185, at 183.]


1897 Ap. 20 and 23 / bet. S[outh].A[frica]. and Australia / Aurora / Roy Soc N.S. Wales, Nov. 3, 1897. [VII; 1740. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. "Aurora Australis." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 31 (1897): 252-259.]


1897 (Ap. 24) / Staub- und Samen-regen, South Italy / Met Zeit 14/374. [VII; 1741. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 14 (1897): 371-392, at 374.]


1897 April 24 / Sand and seed fall / S. Italy / Met Zeit 14/374. [VII; 1742. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 14 (1897): 371-392, at 374.]


1897 Ap. 24 / Dust / Italy / Nature 66/41 / Seeds—56/161. [VII; 1743. Lockyer, William James Stewart. “Dust-falls and Their Origins.” Nature, 66 (May 8, 1902): 41-42. “Notes.” Nature, 56 (June 17, 1897): 159-162, at 161. Tacchini, Pietro. “Pioggia con sabbia e semi.” Atti della Reale Accademia dei Lincei, s. 5 v. 9 pt. 1 (1897): 299.]


1897 Ap. 25 / Daily Picayune (New Orleans) of / About half a mile from Franklin, Pa, is a small sluggish stream from which rise bubbles of gas. They rise from the water, some soon breaking, others soaring away, out of sight; from an inch to a foot in diameter; irisdescent things. Like gorgeous toy balloons. Said that a gas line and an oil line and leaks in both under the stream and that the oil made with an alkali in the muddy bottom of the stream a kind of soap. / A yarn. [VII: 1744.1, 1744.2. “Soap-Bubbles Strangely Made.” New Orleans Picayune, April 25, 1897, p. 12 c. 3.]


1897 Ap. 26 / New features of drought and [end of note]. [VII; 1745.]


1897 Ap. 26 / (Clbrst) / Two towns in Mexico destroyed by waterspout. / Ap. 28, “Oklahoma a Sea” / St Louis Globe-Democrat, Ap. 29—“At sunrise this morning (28th) a mighty wall of water, from 6 to 8 feet high and a mile wide, broke upon West Gutherie, without warning, crushing houses, sweeping away property, and drowning people by the score.” It came down the river valley. Explained must have been a cloudburst. (It came after a dry spell. There had been prayers for rain. Everything parched. For ten days farmers had been praying for rain. [VII; 1746.1, 1746.2, 1746.3. “Oklahoma a Sea.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 29, 1897, p. 1 c. 1-3 & p. 2 c. 5. “Mexican Towns Destroyed.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 29, 1897, p. 2 c. 7.]


1897 April 28 / Inf conjunction / Venus-Sun. [VII; 1747. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1897, 490.]


1897 Ap 29 / Sun, 1-6 / A ghostly red lantern that flagged the midnight express nightly near Williamsport, Pa. / See early summer, 1883. [C; 346. "A Ghost Signals A Train." New York Sun, April 29, 1897, p. 1 c. 6. See: 1883 Aug 14, (B: 526 & 527).]


1897 Ap 29 / afternoon / Extraordinary flight of white meteors for ½ hour in the sun, by Prof Brooks, Geneva, N.Y. / Trib 30-1-5. [VII; 1748. "Remarkable Flight of Meteors." New York Tribune, April 30, 1897, p. 1 c. 5.]


1897 Ap 29 / q. / Dominica, etc., W.I. / BA '11. [VII; 1749. A class II earthquake. Milne, 739.]


1897 Ap. 29 / q / West Indies, especially Guadaloupe / BA 1911-54. [VII; 1750. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 54.]


1897 Ap 30 / (Animal) / Herald, 4-3That farmers norwest of Lagrange, Ind, were aroused over the appearance of “an animal which resembles a man. It had been reported at different times for 2 years, but this time definitely seen. “It had every appearance of a man except that the body was covered with hair.” [C; 347.1, 347.2. (New York Herald, April 30, 1897, p. 4 c. 3.)]


1897 April 30 / wld animal / Chicago Tribune ofThat the farmers living near Sailor, northwest of La Grange, Ind., were aroused by the appearance in the woods of a strange, man-like animal. It is said that for several years there had been reports of a strange animal inhabiting the woods. Our concern is with a definite story in this period. And the story is that two farmers, Adam Gardner and Ed. Swinehart, had seen and had shot at it. “The men report that the beast walked on its hind feet and had every appearance of a man, except that the body was covered with hair. The height was that of an average-sized man. When the animal saw the men approaching, it jumped and started for the thick portion of the woods, upon its hind feet, but afterward dropped on its hands and disappeared with rabbit-like bounds. Gardner shot at the animal, and thinks he hit it, as the animal seemed lamed. A searching party is being organized to hunt for the mysterious animal. [C; 348.1 to 348.5. (Chicago Tribune, April 30, 1897; not found here.) (“Strange Animal Near Elkhart,” Bremen Enquirer,  (Indiana), May 7, 1897, p. 1 c. 5-6.) (“Monster ape” only in Indiana newspapers.)]


1897 Ap. 30 / Repeat / Near Ivangorod, Russian Poland, hail with black granules of iron like meteoric iron. / Nature 58-352 / Some time before, hail containing ashes had fallenthe iron said come from external regionsashes from Vesuvius. / (p. 94Orenburg?). [VII; 1751. "Notes." Nature, 58 (August 11, 1898): 351-356, at 352-353. Karpinski, Alexander Petrovich. "Sur des grêlons, observés à Ivanogorod le 18 avril 1896 par Mr. Tchernik." Bulletin de l'Académie Impériale des Sciences de St.-Pétersbourg, s. 5 v. 7 (1897): XII-XIII. Fort may have recognized metallic matter in hail as occurring at Orenburg, Russia, in September, 1824, and, repeating, on January 25, 1825. See: 1824 Sept, (I; 1142); 16, (I; 1143); 1824, (I; 1144); 1824 Oct 20, (I; 1147); and, 1825 Jan 25, (I; 1184).]


1897 Ap. 30 / 10:30 a.m. / Guadeloupe, West Indies / Nature 56-87 / Severe shock. [VII; 1752. "Notes." Nature, 57 (May 27, 1897): 86-89, at 87.]


1897 Ap. 30 / 10:30 a.m. / Violent q. / Guadeloupe, W. Indies / Daily Gleaner, Kingston, Jamaica, (June 16). [VII; 1753. (Daily Gleaner, Kingston, Jamaica, June 16, 1897.)]


1897 May / qGiles Co., Va / Science, N.S., 7-233. [VII; 1754. Campbell, M.R. "Earthquake Shocks in Giles Co., Va." Science, n.s., 7 (February 25, 1898): 233-235.]


1897 May 2 / dispatches / Floods in Pa and Ky / St Louis G-Dem, May 3-1-3. [VII; 1755. “Flood Danger Not Over.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 3, 1897, p. 1 c. 4-5.]


1897 May 1 / Dispatch of, from Monticello, Ky. that several miles from these a waterspout struck a farm house, killing five persons. / St. Louis Globe-Democrat 2-9-6. [VII; 1756. “Killed by a Waterspout.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 2, 1897, p. 5 c. 5-6.]


1897 May 3 / bet 12 and 1 p.m. / Slight q / Nor Car / See May 31. / See March 21. [VII; 1757. See: 1897 March 21, (VII; 1704), and, 1897 May 31, (VII; 1780).]


1897 May 3 / sounds to q of May 31 / Giles Co, Va. / Science, N.S., 7-233 / Then to June 6. [VII; 1758. Campbell, M.R. "Earthquake Shocks in Giles Co., Va." Science, n.s., 7 (February 25, 1898): 233-235. See: (June 6).]


1897 May 3 / qs / May 3N coast IcelandI / 10S AustraliaI / 13PhilippinesII / 15ItalyI / 28ItalyI / BA '11. [VII; 1759. Milne, 739.]


1897 May 4 / 4 p.m. / The fire in the Charity Bazaar, Paris. [C; 349. (Refs.???)]


1897 May 5 / [LT], 14-e / 24-5-f / q / W. Indies. [VII; 1760. “The Earthquake in the West Indies.” London Times, May 5, 1897, p. 14 c. 5. “The Earthquake in Guadeloupe.” London Times, May 24, 1897, p. 5 c. 6.]


1897 May 6 / 8:45 p.m. / Shock / Barnwell Co, S. Car / Trib 7-1-3. [VII; 1761. "An Earthquake in South Carolina." New York Tribune, May 7, 1897, p. 1 c. 3.]


1897 May 10 / q. / South Australia / BA 1911-47. [VII; 1762. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 47-48.]


1897 May 10 / At Walkerville a well that had been dry 20 years suddenly filled, and remained full. / Adelaide Advertiser, May 14-6-1. [VII; 1763. “A Curious Effect.” Adelaide Advertiser, May 14, 1897, p. 6 c. 1.]


1897 May 10 / BO / Succeeding issues of Adelaide Advertiser report from several places a little rain on day of q and then continuing dry weather. [VII; 1764. (Adelaide Advertiser, ca. May, 1897.)]


1897 May 11 and 12 / Vesuvius in Eruption / Peterborough Advertiser, 15th. [VII; 1765. (Peterborough Advertiser, May 15, 1897; not @ BNA.)]


[The following seven notes were [faded writing]. VII: 1766-1772.]


1897 May 15 / Severe shock, 2 a.m., South Australia. / South Australian Register, May 17. / “Furious dust storms” bet 12th and 15th, but it was in a time of drought. [VII; 1766. “Country News.” South Australian Register, (Adelaide), May 17, 1897, p. 6 c. 4-5.]


1897 May 14 / South Australia / 90 q's in 3 days / Chicago Tribune 15-2-5. [VII; 1767. “Ninety Earthquakes in Three Days.” Chicago Tribune, May 15, 1897, p. 2 c. 7.]


1897 May 10 / q / Adelaide / and others up to 20th / Friend of India, June 22 / Like the one on Assam, there were fissures and water and sand thrown up. [VII; 1768. (Friend of India, June 22, 1897.)]


1897 May 10 / q. / South Australia / MWR, Jan. 1902-10. [VII; 1769. Styles, George H. “Earthquakes, Clouds, and Gales at Port Carolina, South Australia.” Monthly Weather Review, 30 (no. 1; January 1902): 10-11. “During all these tremors the sky was usually covered with heavy cumulus clouds, one or two of them bright, as though lighted by the moon even during the darkest moonless nights. No two cumulus clouds ever coalesced On one overtaking another, they were mutually repelled. and drifted away in feathery flakes. I never saw one, even the largest cumulus cloud, reach the opposite horizon. It had to melt into clear sky. We have no longer the blue sky of the old days; it is of a milky and watery color, and never deeper blue then that on Plate XI in the United States Hydrographic Office classification of clouds.” Port Caroline, South Australia, (not Port Carolina).]


1897 May 10 / At Kingston, after the first shock (S. Aust Register 20-5-9), the clouds were of an appearance never seen there before“streaked with peculiar yellow lines of light.” 2:55 a.m. on 19th, severe shock at Kingstonin the period gales and th. storms. Like at Charleston. With other materials, “Sea sand”: thrown out of fissures. [VII; 1770.1, 1770.2. “The Earthquake.” South Australia Register, (Adelaide), May 20, 1897, p. 5 c. 9.]


1897 May 10 / At Adelaide, shocks at 2:26 p.m. That night there was a strongly marked circle around the moon. / Adelaide Observer 15-13-4 / Severe shockbuildings swayed and plaster fellloud, rumbling sound. Water and sand thrown out of fissuresloud roars like thunder. / 22-13-3—many geysers. [VII; 1771.1, 1771.2. “Severe Shock of Earthquake.” Adelaide Observer, May 15, 1897, p. 13 c. 4-5, p. 14, & p. 15 c. 1-4. “Then when at night the sky presented the phenomenon of a strongly-marked 'circle round the moon,' ordinary people were impressed with the coincidence, while a few extraordinary folk talked depressingly of signs and portents.” “The Earthquakes.” Adelaide Observer, May 22, 1897, p. 13 c. 3-5.]


1897 May 10 / There were public prayers for rain at this time, and after the q. the rain did come plentifully, but in many places did not. [VII; 1772. (Refs.???)]


1897 May 15 / Italy and Sicily / q. / BA '11. [VII; 1773. A class I earthquake. Milne, 739.]


1897 May 19 / Meuselbach / Thuringia, Germany / (F). [VII; 1774. Fletcher, 106. This is the Meuselbach meteorite.]


1897 May 27 / 10:15 p.m. / Burlington, Vt, and Montreal / q / Trib 28-1-3 / See 29-11-1, northern N.Y. [VII; 1775. "Vermont and Canada Shaken." New York Tribune, May 28, 1897, p. 1 c. 3. "All Northern New York Felt It." New York Tribune, May 29, 1897, p. 11 c. 1.]


1897 May 29 / Raps near Ramsay still heard. / See March 26. [C; 350. See: 1897 March 26, (C; 332).]


1897 May 30 / Remarkable th. storm, Sussex / hail chunks, Seaford / Nature 57/567. [VII; 1776. “Notes.” Nature, 57 (April 14, 1898): 565-568, at 567.]


1897 May 30 / Reproduction of photo of Seaford hailstones in Nature 57-567. / Diameter some ab 2½ inches. [VII; 1777. “Notes.” Nature, 57 (April 14, 1898): 565-568, at 567.]


1897 May 30 / Hail / Seaford / Lumps of icesome of them bet 4 and 5 inches in circumference. / Seafordab 6:45 p.m. / Maidstonesoon after 6 the clouds congregated and then hail fell, size of walnuts. Another account, the hail at Maidstone fell bet. 7 and 7:30. / Point is that in all places the same huge and unprecedented (in local annals) stones fell and presumably those of Maidstone been at least half an hour longer in the air than those of Seaford. / Symons' Met 32-69. [VII: 1778.1, 1778.2, 1778.3. "Hailstorm at Seaford, Sussex, May 30th, 1897." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 32 (June 1897): 65-72.]


1897 May 31 / (mirage) / St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 2-6-3That at Duluth, Minn., [May 31], the mirage of a battle had been seen in the sky. Policeman Kashmer, who was one of those who saw it, tells the following story: “About 4 o'clock Monday morning, while I was walking my beat, my attention was attracted by a brilliant illumination in the sky. I thought it was the sun rising. While I was watching, however, the sky became brighter and suddenly what seemed to be a large body of men marched into the illuminated space and stopped. Another body of men appeared from the opposite direction, and at this time I could easily see that both bodies were armed with small arms and artillery. The two detachments drew up in line of battle and opened fire on each other. It seemed as if it was only a half mile away, everything was so plain. At this time the sky darkened again, and the picture faded from view. I am now anxiously scanning all the papers to see if there is any account in them of a battle having been fought in Cuba at a time to correspond with the time I saw the phenomenon.” / Reserved / [indecipherable] Fort / Oct. 20. [VII; 1779.1 to 1779.6. “Mirage Seen From Duluth.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 2, 1897, p. 6 c. 5.]


1897 May 31 / See June 28. / 1:58 p.m. / Nor. Car / severe q and preceded by a roaring sound / Climate and Crops, Nor. Car. Sect., May. [VII; 1780. “Remarks by Observers.” U.S. Department of Agriculture. North Carolina Section of the Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau, 2 (no. 5; May 1897): 3-4. “Lenoir.Slight earthquakw on 3d, between 12 and 1 p.m. Earthquake on 31st; bricks fell of chmneys; a loud roar accompanied the shock.” “Henderson.At 1:57 p.m., on 31st a severe earthquake shock was felt, lasting about 10 seconds and seemingly moving from south or southeast. It was preceded by a roaring sound. Many think it more severe than the one of 1886.” See: 1897 June 28, (VIII; 37).]


1897 (May / May 31) / (q) / Zanesville, Ohio, 1 p.m. / Richmond, Va,, 1:30 / Baltimore, towns in Va., 2 / Georgia, Tenn., No Car, Ind, Penn / Trib 1-1-4. [VII; 1781. "South and West Shaken." New York Tribune, June 1, 1897, p. 1 c. 4.]


1897 June, July, etc. / Revolts / India / time of q's. [C; 351. (Refs.???)]


1897 June / Trail of a Ghost / See L.T., 1897, Nov. 2-6-c / 6-9-e / 8-6-d. [C; 352. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, November 2, 1897, p. 6 c. 5. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, November 6, 1897, p. 9 c. 5. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, November 8, 1897, p. 6 c. 4.]


1897 June / Similar green moon and dusts in India after Pelée / See June 12, 1902. [VII; 1782. See: (1902 June 12).]


1897 June / q / India / Sim effects, see June 4, 1902. [VII; 1783. See: 1902 June 4, (VIII: 1238).]


1897 June / Great famine / India. [VII; 1784. (Refs.???)]


1897 June 2 / Trib. / q / N.J. [VII; 1785. "The Earthquake Felt in Jersey." New York Tribune, June 2, 1897, p. 4 c. 2.]


1897 June 5 / MexicoI / 15AustriaI / BA '11. [VII; 1786. Two class I earthquakes. Milne, 739.]


1897 June 5 / At Vorion (Isère), waterspout burstgreat destruction. / La Nat Sup., June 12. [VII; 1787. “Informations.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 2, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1254, supplement; June 12): 5.]


1897 / ab June 6 / clbrst at Grenoblealso in Switzerland, at the town of Voiron on the Morge. In cafes and shops occupants up to their shoulders in flood before knew what had happened. / St Louis G. Dem 9-9-5. [VII; 1788. “Flood Damage in France.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 8, 1897, p. 1 c. 1.]


1897 June 6 / moon / Cor in Englishman, July 21-13-3, writes that upon the 6th, at Allahabad, he saw the moon greenish. [VII; 1789. (Englishman, July 21, 1897, p. 13 c. 3.)]


1897 June 6 / Green moon / See June 11. [VII; 1790. See: 1897 June 11, (VII; 1799).]


1897 June 7 / 7:53 p.m. / Jackson's Mills, N.J. / shock / Trib 9-4-2. [VII; 1791. "New Jersey News." New York Tribune, June 9, 1897, p. 4 c. 2.]


1897 June 8, etc. / LT Index / See “On”. / On trail of ghost. [C; 353. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, June 8, 1897, p. 10 c. 3-5. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, June 9, 1897, p. 6 c. 3. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, June 10, 1897, p. 4 c. 6. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, June 12, 1897, p. 11 c. 1. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, June 14, 1897, p. 6 c. 4. Myers, Frederic William Henry. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, June 15, 1897, p. 12 c. 6. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, June 16, 1897, p. 9 c. 6. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, June 18, 1897, p. 6 c. 6. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, June 19, 1897, p. 10 c. 1-2. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, June 21, 1897, p. 4 c. 5-6. Myers, Frederic William Henry. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, June 22, 1897, p. 14 c. 4. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, June 24, 1897, p. 10 c. 6. Wicks, Frederick. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, August 16, 1897, p. 6 c. 5. Tabor, M.C. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, August 25, 1897, p. 4 c. 6. Fauvel, A.A. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, August 27, 1897, p. 8 c. 3. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, November 2, 1897, p. 6 c. 5. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, November 6, 1897, p. 9 c. 5. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, November 8, 1897, p. 6 c. 4.]


1897 June 10 / Cyclone / Windward Islands / Demarara D. Chronicle, 15th. [VII; 1792. (Demarara Daily Chronicle, June 15, 1897.)]


1897 June 10 / 6:50 p.m. / Tornado in Iowa / NY Trib 11-1-3. [VII; 1793. "Deadly Western Tornado." New York Tribune, June 11, 1897, p. 1 c. 3.]


1897 June 10 / At Poona everything parchednot good rain in 10 months. [VII; 1794. (Refs.???)]


1897 June 11 / Naga Hills, Assam, after a “comparative drought”, heavy rain on 12th till q. / Pioneer Mail, 16th. [VII; 1795. (Pioneer Mail, June 16, 1897.)]


1897 June 11 / Naga Hills (Assam) / heavy rain after comparative drought / Pioneer Mail, 16-13-2. [VII; 1796. (Pioneer Mail, June 16, 1897, p. 13 c. 2.)]


1897 June 11 / Cyclone and destructive hail at Caprino. / Levant Herald, 21st. [VII; 1797. (Levant Herald, June 21, 1897.)]


1897 June 11 / At Rodosto, torrents5 persons drownedfields into lakes in which wheat sheaves were floating islands. / Levant Herald, 21st. [VII; 1798. (Levant Herald, June 21, 1897.)]


1897 June 11 / moon / Cor to Englishman, July 14-16-4, writes that his servant had told him that the moon had looked green, evening before the q. [VII; 1799. (Englishman, July 14, 1897, p. 16 c. 4.)]


1897 June 11 / In Upper Assam, sudden violent downpour of rain. Ac to the writer in the Englishman, July 14-16-1, exceeding any downpour he had ever before seen in Assam or anywhere else. [VII; 1800. (Englishman, July 14, 1897, p. 16 c. 1.)]


1897 June 12 / Parkersburg, W. Va / See March 9, '97. / Tribune, June 14/10/1 / “broken ice” several inches long. [VII; 1801. "Broken Ice Fell From the Clouds." New York Tribune, June 14, 1897, p. 10 c. 1.]


1897 June 12 / No need for rain in the zone. Especially in Smyrna and Turkey, crops flourishing. [VII; 1802. (Refs.???)]


1897 June 12 / Englishman / F. of India / Madras Mail / Pioneer Mail / Times of India. [VII; 1803.]


1897 June 12 / In some places shocks every day for a month. [VII; 1804. (Refs.???)]


1897 June 12 / In Upper Assam / also on 14th, 19th, 26, 27th / Englishman, July 14, p. 15. [VII; 1805. (Englishman, July 14, 1897, p. 15.)]


1897 June 12 / Light Stroke / See one of the early Chile Series. [VII; 1806. (Refs.???)]


1897 June 12 / In Times of India, June 18 (Bombay), reported from Shilliongheavy and continuous rain all day and all night and frequent shocks. [VII; 1807. (Times of India, June 18, 1897.)]


1897 June 12 / 5 p.m. / Very severe q, India / Calcutta / also Bombay, Simla, Agra, etc. / (See June 25.) / Nature, vol 56 / On morning of 12th, recorded at Isle of Wight seismograph began 11:30 a.m. / M Chirra Hills said bet 4000 and 6000 perished. [VII; 1808. “Notes.” Nature, 56 (June 17, 1897): 159-162, at 160. “Notes.” Nature, 56 (June 24, 1897): 182-185, at 182-183. See: 1897 June 25, (VIII; 33).]


1897 June 12 / Fall of water was great. Accounts in the Englishman, from various places, of deluges and of fields turned into “inland seas”. [VII; 1809. (Englishman, ca. June 12, 1897.)]


1897 June 12 / Mr. R.D. Oldham's report, published by Indian Government in Mems. Geolog. Survey of India, 29reviewed in Nature 62-305. No phe of my interests noted. [VII; 1810. Oldham, Richard Dixon. “Report on the Great Earthquake of 12th June 1897.” Memoirs of the Geological Survey of India, 29 (1899): i-xxx, 1-379. In discussing the sound phenomena, Oldham's report suggests that the Barisal guns are probably seismic in origin, (pages 200 to 207). “The Great Earthquake of June 12, 1897.” Nature, 62 (July 26, 1900): 305-307.]


1897 June 12 and after / Heavy rain, west coast of India. One day at Karwar, 15 inches and 10 another. / Pioneer Mail 23-11-1. [VII; 1811. (Pioneer Mail, June 23, 1897, p. 11 c. 1.)]


1897 June 12 / (BO) / In A Study of Recent Earthquakes, Dr Charles Davison gives 57 pages and no mention of these phe. [VII; 1812. Davison, Charles. A Study of Recent Earthquakes. London: Walter Scott, 1905, 262-320.]


1897 June 12 / (+) / At time or before the q at Shilling not a cloud in the sky. Then torrents. / Times of India, July 2-14-4. [VII; 1813. (Times of India, July 2, 1897, p. 14 c. 4.)]


1897 June 12 / BO / A new volcano broken out near Tehuantepec, Mexico, and quakes. / San Francisco Bulletin, 13th. [VII; 1814. (San Francisco Bulletin, June 13, 1897.) “Laid Waste by Earthquake Shocks.” Sacramento Daily Record-Union, June 22, 1897, p. 1 c. 7. “The scientists have not found any signs of a new volcano, about which so much has been said, and as was reported several times by the Indians, who asserted that they had seen it.”]


1897 June 12 / Like Charleston / Englishman, July 14, p 16 / Water and sand that then for 12 hours gushed from fissures. [VII; 1815. (Englishman, July 14, 1897, p. 16.)]


1897 June 12 / All over the affected region numberless small volcanoes throwing up dark red sand or white ashes. / LT, July 12-5-f. [VII; 1816. “The Earthquake in India.” London Times, July 12, 1897, p. 5 c. 6. The “small volcanoes” were only fissures produced by the earthquake.]


1897 June 12 / Afterward, frequency of Barisal Guns even in places where never heard before. / Madras Mail, July 14 / So writes B.D. Oldham, Director of the Geological Survey, ac to many letters received by him. [VII; 1817. (Madras Mail, July 14, 1897.)]


1897 June 12 / LTAug 10-6-2 / At 5:15 p.m., followed by rain from the hillsides. / Avalanches of rocks. [VII; 1818. “The Earthquakes in India.” London Times, August 10, 1897, p. 6 c. 2.]


1897 June 12 / Like Krakatoa / q at 5 p.m. After it “an almost inconceivably beautiful sunset. “The entire west was a glory of deepest purple, and the colors did not fade out until half an hour after darkness is unusually completeFriend of India (Calcutta) 15-14-4. [VII; 1819.1, 1819.2. (Friend of India, June 15, 1897, p. 14 c. 4.)]


1897 June 12 / q and disease / Great q. / Assam / L.T., Ap 24, 1905 / Henry Collon writes that in the following autumn most appalling disease in Assam, tens of thousands dying of malignant fever. [VII; 1820. Cotton, Henry. “The Indian Earthquake.” London Times, April 24, 1905, p. 10 c. 2.]


1897 June 12 / India to like Aust, which = new star. [VII; 1821.]


1897 June 12 / Rept on these qs / L.T., Nov. 16-7-e. [VII; 1822. “The Assam Earthquake.” London Times, November 16, 1897, p. 7 c. 5.]


1897 June 12 / Light That night / The Englishman,, July 21-3 / “From a ship in the port (Calcutta), a most extraordinary phenomenon was reported. A strange luminous appearance was observed, extending from Chandpal Ghat north-westward for some distance. The moon at the time was densely obscured. This mysterious brightness is said to have closed in around the ship, and immediately upon this embrace a severe tremor was felt throughout. [VII; 1823.1, 1823.2. (The Englishman, July 21, 1897, p. 3.)]


1897 June 12 / Fish / Cor to The Englishman, July 14-15-2, writes that at Partabganj on the thirteenth the markets were crowded with sellers of very large fish. He inquired and learned that they had been found dead “along the shores of the Kosi River”. He thinks there must have been a tidal wave so to deposit them on land, If so, as he says, it was unknown to any European. It seems that these “very large fish”of one species, it seemswere not killed in the river and tossed by the shock upon the shores, because town of P not the center of the shock, and fishes would have been “tossed” from other places, “but no fishes reported from anywhere else along this river. Whether close, on the shores, to the river, or stuck in the general region of the river not told. [VII; 1824.1 to 1824.4. (The Englishman, July 14, 1897, p. 15 c. 2.)]


1897 June 12 / Tidal wave at Goalpara swept away 60 persons, / The Englishman 22-2-4 / (q on a river?) [VII; 1825. (The Englishman, June 22, 1897, p. 2 c. 4.)]


1897 June / Shrimps / See July, 1918. [VIII; 1. See: 1918 July [27], (X; 869).]


1897 June / Frgs of Bizerte / Nothing in Tangiers Chronicle. [VIII; 2. “Parisian Topics.” London Standard, June 30, 1897, p. 5 c. 6. “Paris, Tuesday Night.” “The Débats has received the following curious telegram from a Correspondent at Tunis, dated this day:'An abundant shower of frogs has fallen at Bizerta after a storm. The largest were the size of a man's thumb.'”]


1897 June 15 / BO / San Francisco Chronicle 17-4-3 / A flood poured upon the town of Frehimilic, near Oaxaca, Mexico, and several persons were drowned. [VIII; 3. “Severe Earthquakes in Southern Mexico.” San Francisco Chronicle, June 17, 1897, p. 4 c. 3.]


1897 June 15 / q. / Mexico / Indians reported a volcano but scientists unable to find it. / D. Picayune 22-1-7. [VIII; 4. “Earthquakes in Mexico.” New Orleans Picayune, June 22, 1897, p. 1 c. 7. See: 1897 June 12, (VII; 1814).]


1897 June 15 / (moon) / E Mc., 65/435, copied from a newspaper, that Mr. F.C.B. Childe, of Tenbury, Worcestershire, had seen something like three black bars across the moon, which was very red at the time and looked unusually largethe “bars quickly disappeared quickly. Later [indecipherable] a ball of light projecting from the moon. [VIII; 5.1, 5.2. "Scientific News." English Mechanic, 65 (no. 1683; June 25, 1897): 435. “By the Way.” London Globe, June 21, 1897, p. 1 c. 4. “Tenbury, in Worcestershire, has been highly favoured. Mr. F.C. Baldwyn Childe writes from that place to state that three black bars like boards were observable on the surface of the moon on the 15th inst. 'The moon was very red at the time, and looked unusually large. There was also a projecting ball of light, described by one of the observers as 'something like crown.’” “F.C. Baldwyn-Childe” of Tenbury was probably Frances Christina Baldwyn-Childe, (a local historian and wife of Edward George Baldwin Childe).]


1897 June 15 / Projecting ball of light, something like a crown”. [VIII; 6. See: 1897 June 15, (VIII; 5).]


1897 June 15 / [LT], 7-e / 15-11-f / 16-7-d / 18-7-a / 19-7-a / 21-9-c / 25-5-b / 26-7-d / 23-5-b / See July. / q. / India. [VII; 7. “The Earthquake in India.” London Times, June 15, 1897, p. 7 c. 5. “The Earthquakes in India.” London Times, June 15, 1897, p. 11 c. 6. “The Earthquake in India.” London Times, June 16, 1897, p. 7 c. 4. “The Earthquake in India.” London Times, June 18, 1897, p. 8 c. 1-2. “The Earthquake in India.” London Times, June 19, 1897, p. 7 c. 1. “The Earthquake in India.” London Times, June 21, 1897, p. 9 c. 3. “The Earthquake in India.” London Times, June 23, 1897, p. 5 c. 2. “The Earthquake in India.” London Times, June 25, 1897, p. 5 c. 2. “The Earthquake in India.” London Times, June 26, 1897, p. 7 c. 4. See: (July).]


1897 June 15 / Disastrous floods at Adrianople and in Smyrna. / Levant Herald, 21st. [VIII; 8. (Levant Herald, June 21, 1897.)]


1897 June 15 and afterward / Oaxaca., Mexico / one of the most violent q[s] in history of Mexico / Cosmos, N.S., 37/96. [VIII; 9. “Tremblement de terre au Mexique.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 37 (January 24, 1897): 96.]


1897 June 16 / Trib, 9-1 / q / U.S. somewhere. [VIII; 10. Smith, William G. "Binghamton Felt the Shock." New York Tribune, June 16, 1897, p. 9 c. 1. Binghampton, New York. See: 1897 June 2, (VII; 1785).]


1897 June 16 / Began early morningGeorgetownB. Guiana / downpourat 9 a.m. reported 4.90 inches. Many streets flooded. Backyards a foot deep. / Georgetown D. Chronicle, June 17. [VIII; 11. (Georgetown Daily Chronicle, British Guiana, June 17, 1897.)]


1897 June 16 / 2 a.m. / Tidal wave damage on Otsuka coast, Japan / Japan Weekly Times, July 3, p. 1. [VIII; 12. (Japan Weekly Times, July 3, 1897, p. 1.)]


1897 June 16, 17 / Havoc by th storms / Ohio, Ind., W. Va. / San Fran Chronicle, 18th. [VIII; 13. “Havoc by Rain and Lightning.” San Francisco Chronicle, June 18, 1897, p. 1 c. 6.]


[1897 June 17. Wrong date. See: 1897 January 17, (C; 354).]


[1897 January 17 /] 1897 June 17 / (+) / Eagle, 26-4 / M. Celeste recalled. / Can't find. / See Index. [C; 354. "Questions Answered." Brooklyn Eagle, January 17, 1897, p. 26 c. 4.]


1897 June 17 / 17 bodies in 3 weeks from Thames / not robbed. [C; 355. (Refs.???)]


1897 June 18 / A trombe / La Nat 1897/2/65. [VIII; 14. Gall, J.-F. “La Trombe du 18 Juin 1897.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 2 (no. 1257; July 5): 65-66.]


1897 June 18 / Tornado in France. 20 killed. 90 injured. / NY Trib 19-1-3. [VIII; 15. "Fatal Storm in France." New York Tribune, June 19, 1897, p. 1 c. 3.]


1897 June 18 / Windstorms and th. storms violent in Nebraska, Ind., Ohio, Ky / Trib 19-1-4. [VIII; 16. "Many Victims of Storm." New York Tribune, June 19, 1897, p. 1 c. 4.]


1897 June 18 / 3:45 p.m. / Destructive tornado / Iowa, NY Trib 19-1-4. [VIII; 17. "Many Victims of Storm." New York Tribune, June 19, 1897, p. 1 c. 4.]


1897 June 18 / Succession of cyclones and hailstorms in Spain / NY Trib 18-1-2. [VIII; 18.1. "Storms and Cyclones in Spain." New York Tribune, June 18, 1897, p. 1 c. 2.]


1897 June 18 / St Louis Globe-Democrat, 19-2-1 / at Wabash, Ind / At 4 a.m. a heavy th. storm approached from (the west but suddenly veered) and went around the town and immediately afterwarda red hazeeverything looked as if seen through highly colored glass. It disappeared and was followed by intense darkness. [VIII; 18.2, 18.3. “Peculiar Atmospheric Phenomenon.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 19, 1897, p. 2 c. 2. “Seen Through a Glass Darkly.” Indianapolis News, June 18, 1897, p. 1 c. 8. ]


1897 June 20-21 / night and morning / 2 shocks / Oaxaca, Mexico / severe / D. Picayune 22-1-7. [VIII; 19. “Earthquakes in Mexico.” New Orleans Picayune, June 22, 1897, p. 1 c. 7.]


1897 June 20 / 12:14 p.m. / Severe shocks / California / NY Trib 21-1-5. [VIII; 20. "Severe Earthquakes in California." New York Tribune, June 21, 1897, p. 1 c. 5.]


1897 June 20 / qmet / 10:50 p.m. / Wichita, Kansas / meteor from s.e. to n.w. / Chicago Tribune, 22-1-4 / Boom of it terrificstreets filled with peoplea horse knocked down. The Come-Outers and the Seventh-Day Adventists started a religious revival, preparing for the end of the world. [VIII; 21.1, 21.2. “Wichita People See Great Light.” Chicago Tribune, June 22, 1897, p. 1 c. 4.]


1897 June 20 / 10:45 p.m. / Augusta, Kansas / det met / M.W.R. 1897-261. [VIII; 22. “Bright Meteor.” Monthly Weather Review. 25 (no. 6; June 1897): 261.]


1897 June 20 / C.R. 131-969 / Lancon, Bouches-du-Rhone, France / (F). [VIII; 23. Fletcher, 106. This is the Lançon meteorite.]


1897 June 22 / bet. 8:30 amd 9 a.m. / Nova Scotia / meteor size of moon / Science 6-99. [VIII; 24. "A Brilliant Meteor." Science, n.s., 6 (July 16, 1897): 99-100.]


1897 June 24 / 11:05 a.m. / Louisville, Ky / 2 shocks during heavy storm / Trib 25-1-3. [VIII; 25. "Earthquake Shocks in Kentucky." New York Tribune, June 25, 1897, p. 1 c. 3.]


1897 June 24 / The storm in EssexBirmingham Daily Post, July 1“almost incredible in its violence and most appalling in its results“devastations that in this latitude are unfamiliar”—bombarded with hailstones of an enormous size—blotted out the hopes of a season's agriculture—the fury lasted barely ¼ hour—hailstones 5 or 6 inches in circumference—such a water-burst, a heavy plough washed over a hedge 300 yards into another field. [VIII; 26.1, 26.1. (Birmingham Daily Post, July 1, 1897; not @ BNA.)]


1897 June 25 / The first dust shower was upon June 25, near Calcutta. I say that I have no record of any eruption upon this earth to which it could be attributed. Upon the same day there was an eruption of the Mayon Volcano, in the Philippines (Luzon). Very destructive though lasting only 24 hours. This volcano is about 2500 miles from Calcutta. / (No records of falls of dust except in India.) [VIII; 27.1, 27.2. (Refs.???)]


1897 June 25 / This no. of The Englishman (Calcutta) may be in July parcel. [VIII; 28.]


1897 June 25 / Mayon Volc / s.e. Luzon / ab. 2500 miles from Calcutta.[VIII; 29. The distance from the Mayon volcano to Calcutta is about 2,375 miles, (or 3835 km.).]


1897 June 25 / Dust shower / Chittagong, near Calcutta / The Englishman (Calcutta), July 3, 1902, p. 15. [VIII; 30. (The Englishman, July 3, 1902, p. 15.)]


1897 June 25 / The shocks of June 12 continue to date of a letter in Nature 56/444 (July 23), dated from Shillong. [VIII; 31. La Touche, James Digues. “The late Earthquake in India.” Nature, 56 (September 9, 1897): 444-445.]


1897 June 25 / [LT], 7-f / 26-13-e / Th. storms / Letters on. [VIII; 32. Symons, George James. “Yesteday's Thunderstorm.” London Times, June 25, 1897, p. 7 c. 6. “The Afternoon Thunderstorm of June 24.” London Times, June 26, 1897, p. 13 c. 5.]


1897 June 25 / See June 12. [VIII; 33. See: 1897 June 12, (VII: 1808 to 1813, and 1815 to 1825).]


1897 June 25 / Eruption Mayon Volc, Philippines, very destructive and lasting 24 hours / Ref, Feb 1, 1814. [VIII; 34. Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


1897 June 26 / Naval review. Firing of salutes at Portsmouth heard in wills, 45 miles away. / Nature 56/204 / Near London, ab 2 till ab 3 p.m. / p. 248ab. 60 miles. [VIII; 35. “Notes.” Nature, 56 (July 1, 1897): 203-206, at 204. Mostyn, C. “Sound of Distant Firing.” Nature, 56 (July 1, 1897): 248.]


1897 June 27 / dispatch of, from Honey City, Iowa / Woman of 70 attacked by an eagle in her garden. No one else saw. Mrs. James Mortenson wounded by beak and claws, and because of shock, she died. /

Chicago Tribune 28-10-3. [C; 356.1, 356.2. Chicago Tribune, June 28, 1897, p. 10 c. 3.) “Attacked by an Eagle.” Butler Weekly Times, (Missouri), June 24, 1897, p. 1 c. 4. “Council Bluffs, Io, June 22Mrs. Christina Mortenson, living near Honey Creek, Pottawatomie county, was attacked by at eagle this morning while hoeing in her garden.”]


1897 June 27 / Mud rain / See week July 7-14. [VIII; 36. See: (July 7-14).]


1897 June 28 / (May 3-31-June 28 / 28 days apart / 11:30 p.m. / Slight q / Nor Car / Climate and Crops, Nor Car Section / See Oct 8. [VIII; 37.1. “State Summary for June, 1897,” and, “Remarks by Observers.” U.S. Department of Agriculture. North Carolina Section of the Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau, 2 (no. 6; June 1897): 3, and 3-4. “Slight earthquake shocks were reported on two days of June, the most distinct occurring on the 28th at 11:30 p.m.” “Southport.The most important phenomenon during June was the slight earthquake on the 1st. It was quite perceptible, being noticed by swinging of doors and jarring of windows and crockery.” See: 1897 May 31, (VII; 1780), and, (Oct 8).]


1897 June 28 / bet 11 and 12 p.m. / Slight shock / Wytheville and other points, Va. / Trib 30/14/4. [VIII; 37.2. "An Earthquake Shock in Virginia." New York Tribune, June 30, 1897, p. 14 c. 4.]


[The following nine[faded] notes were clipped together by Fort. VIII: 37-4[faded].]


1897 June 29 / Nothing in Birmingham Daily Gazette. [VIII; 38.]


1897 June 29 / Shrimps / Birmingham Daily Mail / “The shrimps that fell like the gentle dew on Birmingham were nearly white. They were discovered the morning after Tuesday's storm (29th). Two ladies living in a house in Homer Street found them dotted abut like raindrops. How they came there no one knows. The incredulous will suggest that they were thrown over the garden wall but the position in which they were found does not favor this theory.” They were said to be sea-shrimps. “The absence of any tint” might be attributed to stress of weather, although an ordinary thunderstorm should hardly be enough to wash away the external glories of an ocean resident.” / Homer street, Moseley. [VIII; 39.1, 39.2, 39.3. (Birmingham Daily Mail, June 29, 1897; not @ BNA.) ”Shower of Shrimps in Birmingham.” Sheffield Daily Telegraph, July 2, 1897, p. 7 c. 7. “Egypt, through the medium of the east wind, had locusts. Bizerta, the other day, responded with frogs. Now Birmingham has had a shower shrimps. The characteristic the Egyptian was vegetarian voracity without a parallel. Bizerta frogs were the size of a man's thumb. The shrimps that fell like the gentle dew on Birmingham were nearly white. They were discovered the morning after Tuesdays storm. Two ladies living in a house in Homer Street found them in the back yard, dotted about like the rain drops. How they came there no one known knows. The incredulous will suggest that they were thrown over the garden wall, but the position in which they were found does not favour this theory The ladies and their neighbours believe that, even as the locusts came with the east wind to Egypt, so the shrimps came with the rain to Birmingham. They were of the proper shape and size, and the absence any tint might be attributed stress of weather, although an ordinary thunderstorm should hardly enough to wash away the external glories of an ocean resident. Be this as it may, there they were. Possibly a force akin to that which bore the booming of the Spithead  monsters to Great Malvern lifted these little strangers from their seaside mansion, and transferred them to our midst. Perhaps the unbelieving will suggest that inquiries should made of local fishmongers as any shrimps which may missing from their stalls or an investigation instituted into the bills of fare at the supper parties held in that neighbourhood on Tuesday night.  But it is a scientific fact that shrimps caught up in a waterspout often travel hundreds of miles before falling, and as Birmingham is being very generally visited this summer, there is no reason to deprecate the addition of a Shrimp-laden waterspout.'Birmingham Mail.'"]


1897 June 29 / Symons Met Mag, 32-107, giving date as June 30, says 6 “white frogs” “had evidently been absorbed in a small waterspout that was driven over Birmingham by the tempest.” / N.M. [VIII; 40. "Whirlwinds on June 30th and July 16th." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 32 (August 1897): 106-107. (No mention of "6" frogs, here, possibly a bad decipherment.)]


1897 June 30 / date verified / Birmingham D Post of July for frogs. [VIII; 41.(Birmingham Daily Post, ca. July 1897; not at BNA.)]


1897 June 29 / Birmingham Daily Mail, July 3-3-3 / That erroneously the London newspapers had reported fall of frogs instead of shrimps. [VIII; 42. (Birmingham Daily Mail, July 3, 1897, p. 3 c. 3; not at BNA.)]


[VIIIl; 43. Voidcombined with VIII; 39.]


1897 June 29 / Nearest sea / Liverpool, 85 miles, N.W. / Cardigan Bay, Wales, W., 95 / Bristol Channel, SW, 80 / NE, Lincolnshore90. [VIII; 44. (Confirm.)]


1897 June 29 / Shrimps / Shower of crabs / Dec. 18, 1889. [VIII; 45.1. See: 1889 Dec. 18, (VI; 1934).]


1897 June 29 / Mud and (Sandol) / in Bengal / In the Magurah Sub-division, Jessore District, ac to the Madras Mail, July 8 / In the night mud fell from the sky covering leaves of treesbut fell from a cloudless sky while the stars were shining. The next evening the sun set white. / (Sandal) / date not given / From another cor that at Nadia fell a “muddy substance more or less resembling the sandal used by the natives in worshipping their gods”. [VIII; 45.2, 45.3. (Madras Mail, July 8, 1897.)]


1897 / ab last of June / Frgs / Frgs at Bizerte (Tunis) / Birmingham Daily Mail, July 1-2-5. [VIII; 45.4.

(Birmingham Daily Mail, July 1, 1897, p. 2 c. 5; not @ BNA.) See: 1897 June 29, (VIII; 39).]


1897 June 29 / A peculiarity of a fall of mud in the Jessore District of Bengal is that it fell “from a cloudless sky., while the stars were shining. / (Madras Mail, July 8). [VIII; 45.5. (Madras Mail, July 8, 1897.)]


1897 June 29 / early morning / House blown up in south Scranton, Pa. 20 other houses injured. / Said cause unknown but the owner attrib to “the work of enemies he had made during political and church disputes”. / Chicago Tribune, 30-3-6. [C; 357. (Chicago Tribune, June 30, 1897, p. 3 c. 6; not found here.)]


1897 / ab. last of June / Haunted Family in Paris. [C; 358. (Refs.???)]


[1896 June 30 /] 1892 June 30 / (D-80) / Frogs almost white / near Birmingham / Symons Met M 32/106. ** [VIII; 46.1. The note copies information from page 80 of The Book of the Damned. "Whirlwinds on June 30th and July 16th." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 32 (August 1897): 106-107. "A Shower of Frogs in Birmingham." Edinburgh Evening News, July 1, 1897, p. 3 c. 2. "During storm which raged with considerable fury in Birmingham yesterday morning, a shower of frogs fell in the suburb of Moseley. They were found scattered about several, gardens. They were almost white in colour, and had evidently been absorbed by small water spout, which was driven over Birmingham by the storm."]


1897 June 30 / Mud / At Ghattal after a rainfall the leaves of trees marked with a substance “resembling mud”. / Friend of India, July 14-8-2 / Said that such a phe never been seen there before. [VIII; 46.2. (Friend of India, July 14, 1897, p. 8 c. 2.)]


1897 June 30 (?) / Shrimps / See Prawns, Sept 26, 1883. [VIII; 46.3. See: 1897 June 29, (VIII; 39), and, 1883 Sept 19, (V. 1629).]


1897 July 1 / 4:20 a.m. / New Hampshire / Centre Harbor / q and sound like heavy clap of thunder / Trib. 2-1-5. [VIII; 47. "Earthquake in New Hampshire." New York Tribune, July 2, 1897, p. 1 c. 5.]


1897 July 1 / Eruption of Mayon (Philippines) / Nature 56-183. [VIII; 48. “Notes.” Nature, 56 (July 8, 1897): 229-232, at 229. The Mayon volcano.]


1897 / ab. July 1 / Eruption Mayon Volc in Philippines / Nature 56-229. [VIII; 49. “Notes.” Nature, 56 (July 8, 1897): 229-232, at 229. The Mayon volcano.]


1897 July 1 / sun effect / at Calcutta / The Englishman 8-15-2 / bet 5 and 6 p.m. / Sun seen through a haze. “One could see the sun's disc covered, as it were, with a second disc, which appeared to be revolving at great speed, sometimes one way, sometimes the reverse.” / See a Canadian phe, time of an eclipse in Australia. [VIII; 50.1, 50.2. (The Englishman, July 8, 1897, p. 15 c. 2.)]


1897 July 1 / Dispatch dated 1st / Violent eruption, Mayon Volcano, Philippines / L.T. 2-5-e. [VIII; 51. “Volcanic Eruption in the Philippines.” London Times, July 2, 1897, p. 5 c. 5.]


1897 July 2 / Sea at Barcelona rising and falling (3 feet) at intervals of 10 minutes. / Birmingham Gazette, July 3. [VIII; 52. (Birmingham Gazette, July 3, 1897; not @ BNA.)]


1897 July 2 / Rombi / See Jan. 13. [VIII; 53. See: 1897 Feb. 8, (VII: 1669 & 1683).]


1897 July 2 and 3 / about noon each time / A slight q. at South Sylhet. “The weather is very peculiar and there is a perpetual haze on the horizon, all around. / The Englishman 7-8-4. [VIII; 54. (The Englishman, July 7, 1897, p. 8 c. 4.)]


1897 July 2 / 11:30 a.m. / South Sylhlet. / shock / “A perpetual haze on the horizon all around.” / Madras Mail, 5th. [VIII; 55. (Madras Mail, July 5, 1897.)]


1897 July 5 / at Berhampore / “The sky is covered with thick layers of dust resembling a foggy atmosphere. / Friend of India 14-8-2. [VIII; 56. (Friend of India, July 14, 1897, p. 8 c. 2.)]


1897 July 6 / Eagle, 2-2 / Myst shooting. [C; 359. "Shot on a Ferryboat." Brooklyn Eagle, July 6, 1897, p. 2 c. 2.]


1897 July 9 / Cor dating sothat a few days before, muddy rain had fallen at Hemamphore (Beerbhoom). No one had seen it fall but the marks were so upon leaves of trees as to alarm the people. / Friend of India 14-8-3. [VIII; 57. (Friend of India, July 14, 1897, p. 8 c. 3.)]


1897 / week July 7-14 / mist and mud / At Calcutta, “a most peculiar mist” noted by a meteorologist of the Calcutta Observatory. The Englishman 14-20-2, He asks, “Was the mist volcanic or cosmic?” He thinks was cosmic. He writes that on June 27, at Thargram (Midnapur), fell a rain of mud. [VIII; 58.1, 58.2. (The Englishman, July 14, 1897, p. 20 c. 2.)]


1897 July 7 / Strange substance / The Englishman (Calcutta), 15-2 / Cor at Khurdah / That for several days before writing there had been a slight shower of rain at midnight, whereupon “The whole atmosphere was filled with the smell of sandalwood.” The next morning everything was found covered with “a colored matter” which emitted the scent of sandalwood. / See LilleshallAp., 1884. [VIII; 59.1, 59.2. (The Englishman, July 15, 1897???)]


1897 July 8 / Madras Mail of / Cor writes that at Nadia had fallen a “muddy substance more or less resembling the sandal used by the natives in worshipping their gods. [VIII; 60. (Madras Mail, July 8, 1897.)]


1897 July 14 / bet. 12:30 and 12:45 p.m. / Sharp shocks at Wuhu, China / Japan Weekly Times, Aug 14, p. 581. [VIII; 61. (Japan Weekly Times, August 14, 1897, p. 581.)]


1897 July 17night / and 18morning / Shocks / South Sylhet / Englishman, 21-8-2. [VIII; 62. (The Englishman, July 21, 1897, p. 8 c. 2.)]


1897 July 18 / Stromboli / Cosmos, NS, 37/160. [VIII; 63. “Tremblement de terre et éruption du Stromboli.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 37 (August 7, 1897): 160.]


1897 / before Aug / Kangra Valley, N.E. Punjab, India / (F). [VIII; 64. Fletcher, 106. This is the Kangra Valley meteorite.]


1897 July 19 / Hereford / at 3:50 a.m. / (Q) slight / Nature 56/347. [VIII; 65. “Notes.” Nature, 56 (August 12, 1897): 346-350, at 347.]


1897 July 19, 21 / Insects / Rowman. [VIII; 66. (Refs.???) (Roumania???)]


1897 July 21 / 9:30 a.m. / Great explosion / New Haven, Conn / Winchester Repeating Arms Co. [VIII; 67. (Refs.???)]


1897 July 22 / 3 and 3:20 a.m. / q's / Saratoga / Trib 23-8-1. [VIII; 68. "Saratoga Fells an Earthquake." New York Tribune, July 23, 1897, p. 8 c. 1.]


1897 July 28 / 11 a.m. / Slight q. / Sierra Leone / BA 1911-53. [VIII; 69. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 53.]


1897 July 29 / Ec sign / Ec of sun and strange image taken on a sensitive plate by L E Martindale, of St Mary's, Ohiosomething like photos of knotted lightning / [illustration] / Photography, May 26, 1898. [VIII; 70. “Peculiar Eclipse Pictures.” Photography, 10 (May 26, 1898): 355-356. Vevers, C.C. “Peculiar Eclipse Pictures.” Photography, 10 (June 2, 1898): 374. Vevers suggested the “snake-like images” were produced by light leaked through a pin-hole in either the camera or the smoked glass filter.]]


1897 Aug. 1 / Zavid, Zwornik, Bosnia / (F). [VIII; 71. Fletcher, 106. This is the Zavid meteorite.]


1897 Aug 1 / Aerolite / also one in 1898 / E Mec 79/383. [VIII; 72. Monck, William Henry Stanley. "AerolitesPerpetual Motion.” English Mechanic, 79 (no. 2045; June 3, 1904): 383-384. See: (1898.)]


1897 Aug 2 / 9 p.m. / Decided shock / Calcutta / Englishman 4-5-4. [VIII; 73. (Englishman, August 4, 1897, p. 5 c. 4.)]


1897 Aug 3 / 7:30 p.m. / Numerous rays of light, at Whitby, from a spot exactly opposite to the sun, 10 degrees above horizon. / Sci Gos, N-S-4-152. [VIII; 74. Turner, G. Creswell. "Weather Signs at Whitby." Science Gossip, n.s., 4 (no. 41; October 1897): 152.]


[1897 Aug 4-7 (?) /] 1898 July (?) / S / Obj Sky / Canada / (D-249). [VIII; 289. The note copies information from page 249 of The Book of the Damned. "Notes." Nature, 58 (August 11, 1898): 351-356, at 353. Payne, Frank F. “Imaginary Balloons.” Monthly Weather Review,  (Canada), 22 (March, 1898): 4. “A report recently current that Professor Andree's balloon had been seen near Quesnelle Forks, British Columbia, and the matter having been investigated, it transpired that an intelligent woman near that place had declared she had seen something coloured grey, exactly the shape of a balloon, sailing across the sky. This report regarding a balloon agreeing with so many that have occurred from time to time in different parts of the world, and have sometimes suggested war balloons, it may be of some interest and may help in part to clear up the mystery if the writer describes his own observations of a 'Gray Balloon' seen and noted by him some time ago. The place of observation was on the west shore of Stony Lake, Ontario, and the time about three o'clock in the afternoon, the writer sitting idly upon a rock. The sky was covered with a thin stratum of cirro-stratus cloud which was apparently motionless. Suddenly, as if by magic, immediately behind this stratum of cirro-stratus, a large, grey, pear-shaped object appeared sailing rapidly across the sky. At first, it must be confessed, the object was taken for a balloon, its outline being sharply defined and its shape and size exactly corresponding to one; but as no cage was seen, it was concluded that it must be a mass of cloud, and after watching it for about six minutes, its mass became less dense and finally it disappeared. Whilst no whirling motion could be noticed, this balloon-like mass was undoubtedly of cyclonic formation, appearing less elongated when viewed at a distance probably of a mile and only about 30° from the zenith.” “Was It Andree's Balloon?” San Francisco Call, December 26, 1897, p. 18 c. 1-6, (illustration). The observation of the supposed balloon at Quesnelle Forks, British Columbia, was “between the 4th and 7th of August,” 1897.]


1897 Aug 5 and 6 / Great q and tidal wave / Japan / LT, Sept 16-6-1. [VIII; 75. Milne, John. “An Earthquake and Wave in Japan.” London Times, September 16, 1897, p. 6 c. 1.]


1897 Aug 10 / Ice / Manassas, Va. / D-180. [VIII; 76. The note copies information from page 180 of The Book of the Damned. Winston, Charles H. "Remarkable Hailstones." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 32 (December 1897): 171-172. "A Peculiar Storm." Alexandria Gazette, (Virginia), August 11, 1897, p. 3 c. 3. "At 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon a very peculiar storm passed over the Manassas section. It commingled with rain and hail. The rain poured down at intervals, and between the showers immense hail-stones would fall to the ground. Many of the pieces weighed one ounce and a half. Some were perfect stars of ice, measuring three and a quarter inches from point to point, and over an inch through the centre. If these hail-stones came in a shower out in the country great damage has been done the growing corn."]


1897 Aug. 11 / Hiashikoen, Chikuzen, Japan / (F). [VIII; 77. Fletcher, 106. This is the Hiashikoen meteorite.]


1897 Aug 12 / 8 a.m. / 5 waterspouts seen on Lake Erie. / Trib 13-1-4. [VIII; 78. "Five Large Waterspouts." New York Tribune, August 13, 1897, p. 1 c. 4.]


1897 Aug 13 / Yatton, England / reported fall of th. stone down chimney / E. Mec 66/15. [VIII; 79. Dale, E.R. "Fall of a Thunderbolt." English Mechanic, 66 (no. 1691; August 20, 1897): 15. (Salisbury Times, August 13, 1897; not at BNA.)]


1897 Aug 14 / Japan Weekly Times of, reports (undated) seismic waves which carried away buildings on coast of Miyagi. [VIII; 80. (Japan Weekly Times, August 14 1897.)]


1897 Aug 14 / (+) / Eagle, 1-4 / 15-1-2 / Unknown balloon at sea. / At sea near Norway. [VIII; 81. "Sighted a Balloon At Sea." Brooklyn Eagle, August 14, 1897, p. 1 c. 4. "Not Cetti's Balloon." Brooklyn Eagle, August 15, 1897, p. 1 c. 2.]


1897 Aug 15 / Sept 21 / Oct 19-20 / Severe q's. / Philippines / Nature 62-555. [VIII; 82. “Notes.” Nature, 62 (October 4, 1900): 552-556, at 555.]


1897 Aug 16 / [LT], 6-e / 25-4-f / 27-8-c / Trail of a Ghost / See June Indexword “On”. [C; 360. Wicks, Frederick. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, August 16, 1897, p. 6 c. 5. Tabor, M.C. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, August 25, 1897, p. 4 c. 6. Fauvel, A.A. “On the Trail of a Ghost.” London Times, August 27, 1897, p. 8 c. 3. See: 1897 June 8, etc., (C; 353).]


1897 Aug 16 / Eagle, 1-7 / Flying Man. [C; 361. "Where Is Felts, the Flyer?" Brooklyn Eagle, August 16, 1897, p. 1 c. 7.]


1897 Aug. 18 / (3) / Malta / brilliant red thing in skyshape like a five-fingered star-fish / by Rev. T.H. Foulkes, at Malta / Mem B.A.A. 7/12. [VIII; 83. “Section for the Observation of Meteors.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 7 (1899): 1-16, at 12.]


1897 Aug 19 / 5:30 a.m. / q reported from Buffalopowder house blown up by lightning in storm / Trib 20-1-5. [VIII; 84. "Western New York's Earthquake." New York Tribune, August 20, 1897, p. 1 c. 5.]


1897 Aug 20 / met ship / Reported by Capt of British ship Cawdor. During electrical storm a great met that cast waves over the deck and strong sulphurous odor. Near Cape Horn / Sun 21-1-6. [VIII; 85. "A Huge Meteor Fell Beside Her." New York Sun, November 21, 1897, p. 1 c. 6. The ship was off Cape Horn, (not Cape Town).]


1897 Aug 21 / [LT], 10-f / Youthloss of memory. [C; 362. (London Times, August 21, 1897, p. 10 c. 6.; not found here; not found in Palmer's Index to the Times Newspaper.)]


1897 Aug. [30] / [LT], 5-f / Myst. solved. [C; 363. “A Mystery Solved.” London Times, August 30, 1897, p. 5 c. 6. A woman who had disappeared and had been presumed to have drowned, at Ullswater, was found at Manchester. “Her mind was quite a blank from the time she left the lake.”]


1897 Sept 4 / Waterspoutnot / At Cromer, a waterspout, but it was a “terrific column of water descending, not ascending”. / L.T. 13-10-a / It was followed by another ten minutes later. / Sci Gos, N.S., 4/152. [VIII; 86. “The Weather.” London Times, September 7, 1897, p. 9 c. 4-5. “The Waterspout at Cromer.” London Times, September 13, 1897, p. 10 c. 1. "Waterspout Off Cromer." Science Gossip, n.s., 4 (no. 41; October 1897): 152. “Waterspout off the Norfolk Coast.” The Graphic, (London), 56 (September 11, 1897): 346, (illustration).]


1897 Sept 7 / [LT], 9-f / Ext. affair in Wales. [C; 364. “Extraordinary Affair in Wales.” London Times, September 7, 1897, p. 9 c. 6. A fight involving a butcher's cleaver.]


1897 Sept 7 / [LT], 9-d / 13-10-a. [VIII; 87. “The Weather.” London Times, September 7, 1897, p. 9 c. 4-5. “The Waterspout at Cromer.” London Times, September 13, 1897, p. 10 c. 1.]


1897 Sept 9 / [LT], 6-c / q / India. [VIII; 88. “The Earthquake in India.” London Times, September 9, 1897, p. 6 c. 3.]


1897 / latter part Aug / came the floods / Sept 9 / [LT], 7-e / Potential Floods in Norway after an exceptionally dry summer. [VIII; 89. “Floods in Southern Norway.” London Times, September 9, 1897, p. 7 c. 5.]


1897 Sept 10 / E Mec. that date / City / Alaska / 203+. [VIII; 90. "Curious Mirage in British Columbia...." English Mechanic, 66 (no. 1694; September 10, 1897): 81. "Yukon Goldfields." London Weekly Times and Echo, September 5, 1897, p. 9 c. 1-2. ("203+"???)]


1897 Sept 11 / Rombi / See Jan. 13. [VIII; 91. See: (Jan 13).]


1897 Sept. 13 / Servant girl, Emma Johnson, murdered in a lane at Windsor, England, 3 months later, another such murder. / LoganGuilty or not Guilty?, p. 245. [C; 365. (Logan, Guy B.H. Guilty or Not Guilty? London: Stanley Paul, 1928, p. 245.)]


1897 Sept 13, 18 / Like Sept 23, 25, 1899. [VIII; 92. See: 1897 Sept 23, 25. (VIII; 519).]


1897 Sept 13 / night / Shocks on the Nilgiris / Times of India, Sept 18, p. 271. [VIII; 93. (Times of India, September 18, 1897, p. 271.)]


1897 Sept. 15 / (See Oct 18.) / Gambat, Sind, India / (F). [VIII; 94. Fletcher, 106. See: 1897 Oct 18, (VIII; 112). This is the Gambit meteorite.]


1897 Sept 17 / q / Turkestan / Nature 59-277. [VIII; 95. “Notes.” Nature, 59 (January 19, 1899): 275-279, at 277.]


1897 Sept 18 / Russian Turkestan / 20Peru / 21Italy / qs / BA '11. [VIII; 96. Milne, 739.]


1897 Sept 18 / Russ. Turkestan / 20Peru / 21Italy / 21Philippines. [VIII; 97. Three class III earthquakes. Milne, 739-740.]


1897 Sept 20 / [LT], 4-c or e / 24-3-f / q's / Miscellaneous. [VIII; 98. “Earthquakes.” London Times, September 20, 1897, p. 4 c. 3. “Recent Earthquakes.” London Times, September 24, 1897, p. 3 c. 6.]


1897 Sept 20 and 21 / Strong q's., island of Labuan, near Borneo / Nature 59-206. [VIII; 99. “Notes.” Nature, 59 (December 29, 1898): 205-208, at 206.]


1897 Sept 20 / Severe shock / Lima, Peru / LT 21-3-f. [VIII; 100. “Earthquake at Lima.” London Times, September 21, 1897, p. 3 c. 6.]


1897 Sept 21 / [LT], 3-f / qLima / 22-3-f / Italy. [VIII; 101. “Earthquake at Lima.” London Times, September 21, 1897, p. 3 c. 6. “Earthquake in Italy.” London Times, September 22, 1897, p. 3 c. 6.]


1897 Sept 21 / 2 p.m. / Strong shocks / Italy / LT 22-3-f. [VIII; 102. “Earthquake in Italy.” London Times, September 22, 1897, p. 3 c. 6.]


1897 Sept. 21 / (Cut) / Aristarchus / by Molesworth / When in shadow and its terraces should have been invisible, faint knotted, glimmering streaks of light were seen under both eastern and western walls and its central peak dimly visible. / Maunder, “Are the Planets Inhabited?”, p. 49. [VIII; 103. Maunder, Edward Walter. Are the Planets Inhabited? London: Harper, 1913, 49. “In 1897, on September 21, the late Major Molesworth noticed that the crater was at that time under the rays of the setting Sun, and filled with shadow, and the inner terraces, which should have been invisible, were seen as faint, knotted, glimmering streaks under both the eastern and western walls, and the central peak was also dimly discernible. He thought this unusual lighting up of rocks on which the Sun had already set might be due either to phosphorescence produced by long exposure to the Sun's rays, or to inherent heat, or to reflected glare from the western rampart.” “Section for the Observation of the Moon.” Memoirs of the British Astronomical Association, 7 (1899): 47-70, at 49.]


1897 Sept 21 / Oct 8, 19 / qs / Philippines / [BA] '11. [VIII; 104. Milne, 740.]


1897 Sept 25 / 1:30 p.m. / Oct 12, 10:35 p.m. / q's / New Brunswick / MWR '98-266 / Like Jan 28. / 17 days apart. / Ab 1 p.m. in Maine, / Trib 26-8-6. [VIII; 105. “Earthquakes in New Brunswick.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (no. 6; June 1898): 266. Kain, Samuel W. “List of Recorded Earthquakes in New Brunswick.” Bulletin of the Natural History Society of New Brunswick, 4 (1898-1902): 16-21, at 21. "Earthquake in Maine." New York Tribune, September 26, 1897, p. 8 c. 6. See: 1897 Jan 28, Feb 14, (VII; 1676).]


1897 Sept 30 / It Sounds / Scheggino (Perugia) / rombi / See 1816. [VIII; 106. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 44. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1897 Oct, Nov, Dec / Sun / first-paged. [VIII; 107.]


1897 Oct 8 / (Sounds) / Letter dated above, in M.W.R., Sept., 1897 / Sounds like cannonading / Black Mt., N. Car. / (Nor Car) / See June 28, Oct 21. [VIII; 108. Hawkins, Barry C. “Seismic Noises in North Carolina and Georgia.” Monthly Weather Review, 25 (no. 9; September 1897): 393-394. “In northern Georgia, in the extreme north of Rabun County, close to the North Carolina State line and thirty-fifth parallel of latitude, is Rabun Bald Mountain, forming one of the highest peaks on the very crest of the Blue Ridge....” “Now, on this mountain are heard mysterious sounds resembling distant cannon firing, and these sounds have been heard for many years, probably at least fifty; they have been heard in all kinds of weather and at various points on the mountain.” “Numerous observers have noted the sounds, and two reliable gentlemen once spent a night on the summit. About 10 o’clock p. m., sounds were heard which were supposed to be cannon firing in Walhalla, S. C., in celebration of the presidential election, this being in November, 1884; but soon the sounds were found to issue from the ground and from a ridge to the southwest of the mountain. The explosive sounds continued till late in the night. At times they seemed to proceed from the ground immediately under the observers.” See: (June 28), and, (Oct 21).]


1897 Oct 8 / 8 p.m. / q / New Madrid, Mo. / Sun 9-1-6. [VIII; 109. "Earthquake at New Madrid, Mo." New York Sun, October 9, 1897, p. 1 c. 6.]


[1897 Oct 10-11 /] 1897 Dec 3 / See Nov. 9. / Science of / That ac to cor to the N.Y. Sun, the Moodus Sounds had been heard again and had been heard in 1852 and 1885. / Science, NS, 6-83. [VIII; 141. "The Moodus Noises." Science, n.s., 6 (December 3, 1897): 834-835. "The Moodus Noises Again." New York Sun, October 17, 1897, p. 25 c. 7. "This latest manifestation astonished the East Haddam people on Sunday afternoon, about 4 o'clock, when what was at first thought to be a clap of thunder was heard. Then came a roar like the echoes of a distant cataract, increasing and dying away from time to time. The sounds came directly from Mount Tom, and the good people of East Haddam were not long in guessing what they were. After a period of about two hours the noises died away, only to return again on Monday morning between 2 and 4 o'clock. At this time there was the crashing of  heavy muffled thunder, mingled with a roaring sound not unlike the wind in a tempest, The ground was shaken, causing houses to tremble and crockery and glassware to rattle as though in an earthquake. Prolonged undergrouud rumbling seemed to accompany the distiubance, and occasionally there would be a short, sharp shock."]


1897 Oct 12 / See Sept 25. [VIII; 110. See: 1897 Sept 25, (VIII; 105).]


1897 Oct, middle / Tremendous flightsmillions of white butterflies fromN to S bet. Salin and Bangalore, India. / Madras Mail, 19th / Also dragon flies20th. / Mail, 22seen near Kurnool. [VIII; 111. (Madras Mail, October 19, 1897.) (Madras Mail, October 22, 1897.)]


1897 Oct 18 / Delhi / Punjab, India / metite / RAp 18'38 / See Sept 15. [VIII; 112. Refer to: 1838 Ap, 18, (I; 2306). Brown, John Coggin. “A Descriptive Catalogue of the Meteorites Comprised in the Collection of the Geological Survey of India, Calcutta (On August 1st, 1914)." Memoirs of the Geological Survey of India, 43 (1916): part 2, 149-287, at 190. This is the Delhi meteorite. See: 1897 Sept. 15, (VIII; 94).]


1897 Oct 19 / Great q's / Philippines / BA '11. [VIII; 113. A class III earthquake. Milne, 740.]


1897 Oct 21 / See Nov. 21. / See Oct 8. / q / slight / Lenoir, Nor Car / Climate and Crops Nor Car Sect, Oct. [VIII; 114. (U.S. Department of Agriculture. North Carolina Section of the Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau, 2 (no. 10; October 1897).)]


1897 Oct 25 / [LT], 10-b / New Volc / island. [VIII; 115. “A New Volcanic Island.” London Times, October 25, 1897, p. 10 c. 2.]


1897 Oct 28 / It Sounds / Siena / Rombi / Considerable detail / See 1816. [VIII; 116. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 44-45. The shocks continued until November 7, and the sounds heard at this time were compared to matter falling in a mine or an underground abyss. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1897 Oct 30 / 9:30 p.m. / Marlborough St, Dublin, a commission agent, named Charles Thorpe, ac to the Dublin Daily Express, Nov. 2, struck down by a violent electric shock. He was within 2 yards of an electric lamp on a corner. A Mr. Darling, who went to his assistance, was similarly struck. Thorpe was taken to Mercer's Hospital, but sent home with nothing the matter with him. Five minutes after this experience the electric light went out. [C: 366.1, 366.2. "Street Shock From an Electric Lamp." Dublin Daily Express, November 2, 1897, p. 5 c. 5. Thorpe was shocked at the corner of Grafton and Nasaau streets, (he resided on Marlborough Street).]


1897 Oct. 31 / Heavy rains, Malaga, Spain. Streets inundated so that several homes collapsed. / Dublin Daily Express, Nov. 2. [VIII; 117. "Floods and Darkness in Spain." Dublin Daily Express, November 2, 1897, p. 5 c. 5.]


1897 Nov. 1 / Shock, 4:30 p.m., of “some violence” at Constantinople, preceded by rumbling sound like thunder. / Dublin D. Express 2-5-3 / N.M. [VIII; 118. "Earthquake in Constantinople." Dublin Daily Express, November 2, 1897, p. 5 c. 3.]


1897 Nov 2-3 and Dec 18 / Violent q. / Madagascar / La Nat. Sup, Jan 1, 1898, p.[note cut off]. [VIII; 119. “Tremblements de terre.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1283, supplement; January 1): 20. The earthquake on December 18, 1897, was at Città di Castello and at Perugia, in Italy.]


1897 Nov 8 / Vesuvius active / La Nat Sup., Nov. 21. [VIII; 120. “Informations.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 2, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1277, supplement; November 20): 97. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1897 Nov. 8 / Dispatch dated 8thfor some days Vesuvius been in active eruption. / L.T. 9-5-f. [VIII; 121. “Vesuvius in Activity.” London Times, November 9, 1897, p. 5 c. 6. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1897 Nov 8 / Eruption Vesuvius begins, / Trib 12-1-2. [VIII; 122. "Vesuvius in Active Eruption." New York Tribune, November 12, 1897, p. 1 c. 2. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1897 Nov. 8 / (Boom) / Key West, Florida / between 9 and 10 p,m, / “Well-defined light stretching across the sky, similar to the rays projected by an electric search light.” At 9:50 p.m., it passed over Orion, over a line from uppermost star in the “belt” of Rigel. / M.W.R. 1898-260. [VIII; 123.1, 123.2. “Anomalous and Sporadic Auroras.” Monthly Weather Review, 26 (no. 6; June 1898): 260-261.]


1897 Nov 9 / Moodus / See Dec 3. / 10 p.m. / 2 or 3 shocks / Danbury, Conn. / attributed to an explosion but none could be heard of / Sun 11-1-6. [VIII; 124. See: 1897 Oct 10-11, (VIII; 141).]


1897 Nov 9 / [LT], 5-f / Vesuvius active. [VIII; 125. “Vesuvius in Activity.” London Times, November 9, 1897, p. 5 c. 6.]]


1897 Nov. 12 / Floods in Spain. Rivers overflowed; houses and cattle carried away. / L.T. 13-7-f. [VIII; 126. “Floods in Spain.” London Times, November 13, 1897, p. 7 c. 6.]


1897 Nov 12 / Oaxaca, Mexico / q / Sun 13-1-6. [VIII; 127. "His Earthquake Prophecy True." New York Sun, November 13, 1897, p. 1 c. 6.]


1897 Nov 12 / Binghampton obj in other dept. [VIII; 128. (Refs.???)]


1897 Nov. 13 / Prof Pickering exposed 81 plates but only 2 meteor trails were secured. / Nature 59-38. [VIII; 129. Denning, William Frederick. “The Expected Meteoric Shower.” Nature, 59 (November 10. 1898): 37-38. Pickering, William Henry. “Meteoric Shower of Nov. 13, 1897.” Popular Astronomy, 6 (nos. 5 & 6; July & August 1898.): 294-298 & 326-339, at 331.]


1897 Nov 15 / early morn / Santa Barbara / Met that looked like a pyramid the size of a mountain fell into the sea. Strong sulphurous odor in lower parts of town. / Sun 17-1-6. [VIII; 130. "A Celestial Visitor." New York Sun, November 17, 1897, p. 1 c. 6. "Two Brilliant Meteors." San Francisco Call, November 16, 1897, p. 4 c. 2-3.]


1897 Nov. 14 / Trans Mercury. [VIII; 131. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1897, 490-491. There was no transit of Mercury in 1897.]


1897 Nov. 19 / night / Terrific dust storm, N.W. Victoria, Australia. Cyclone and great damage. / L.T. 23-5-b. [VIII; 132. “Dust-Storm in Victoria.” London Times, November 23, 1897, p. 5 c. 2-3.]


1897 Nov 21 / See Oct 21. / ab. 11:25 / Mt Pleasant, Nor Car. / brilliant light / supposed been meteoric / C and C., N.C. Sect. [VIII; 133. (U.S. Department of Agriculture. North Carolina Section of the Climate and Crop Service of the Weather Bureau, 2 (no.  ; 1897).) See: (Oct 21).]


1897 Nov. 21 / 6:43 p.m. / Large det met / Stony Brook, L.I. / Eagle, Nov 24-5-1. [VIII; 134. "Meteor at Stony Brook." Brooklyn Eagle, November 24, 1897, p. 5 c. 1.]


1897 Nov. 25 / Spot on Jupiter / See Jan 28, 1898. [VIII; 135. See: 1898 Jan 28, (VIII; 176).]


1897 Nov. 27 / 3:56 p.m. / Ashland, 17 miles n. of Richmond, Va / Trib 28-7-3 / See Dec. 18. [VIII; 136. "Earthquake Shock in Virginia." New York Tribune, November 28, 1873, p. 7 c. 3. See: 1897 Dec 18, (VIII; 149).]


1897 Nov 28-29 / France and England / Most violent tempest since Nov 12, 1894. / La Nat Sup, Dec 4, p. 1 / See p. 8dets. [VIII; 137. “Informations.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1279, supplement; December 4): 1. “La tempête du 29 novembre.” La Nature, 1897 pt. 2, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1280, supplement; December 11): 8.]


1897 Nov. 29 / Lurid afterglow / Torres Straits / Nature 66-390. [VIII; 138. “Sunset Effects.” Nature, 66 (August 21, 1902): 390.]


1897 Dec 1 / Violent q near d'Arras / La Nat Sup, Dec 11, p. 5. [VIII; 139. “Informations.” La Nature, 1898 pt. 1, Nouvelles Scientifiques, (no. 1280, supplement; December 11): 5.]


1897 Dec 2 / 1 a.m. / Slight q / Kansas / Sun 3-1-7. [VIII; 140. "Earthquake in Kansas." New York Sun, December 3, 1897, p. 1 c. 7.]


[1897 Dec 3. Wrong date. See: 1897 Oct 10-11, (VIII; 141).]


1897 Dec 3 / Ab midnight, near Madison, Wis / 3:30 a.m., Galena, Ill / Trib 4-16-5. [VIII; 142. "Earthquake Shocks in the West." New York Tribune, December 4, 1897, p. 16 c. 5.]


1897 Dec 5 / Sky object / Sandstone and Motley, Minn / seeming airship / N.Y. Sun 6-1-6 / See Nov. 3, 1899. [C; 367. "The Airship Is Loose Again." New York Sun, December 6, 1897, p. 1 c. 6. See: 1899 Nov. 3, (VIII; 528).]


1897 Dec. 5 / Airship / Minn. / See Nov. 3, 1899. [VIII; 143. See: 1899 Nov. 3, (VIII; 528).]


1897 Dec. 5 / Nothing in Winnipeg paper. / (?). [VIII; 144.]


1897 Dec 11 / Eagle, 1-4 / Myst explosion. [C; 368. "Powder or Vulcanizer?" Brooklyn Eagle, December 11, 1897, p. 1 c. 4.]


1897 Dec 12 / 8:15 p.m. / Sheffield / magnificent meteor / Nature 57-271. [VIII; 145. Lehmann, Susanna. “A Bright Meteor.” Nature, 57 (January 20, 1898): 271.]


1897 Dec. 12 / ab 8 p.m. / Mets and sound like thunder / Whitby / Nature 57-228 / Coast York. [VIII; 146. “Notes.” Nature, 57 (January 6, 1898): 227-230, at 228.]


1897 Dec 15-16 / 24 hours / At Nedunkeni, in the Northern Province of Ceylon, rain fell 31.76 inches. Average annual fall here = 64.70. / Nature 58-78. [VIII; 147. Drieberg, Christopher. ”Heavy Rainfalls.” Nature, 58 (May 26, 1898): 78.]


1897 Dec 18 and 27 / (It) / q and phe / See 1805. [VIII; 148.  Refer to: 1805 July 26, (I; 146). Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 402-403.]


1897 Dec 18 / 6:45 p.m. / Another slight shock / Ashland / Trib 19-4-4 / See Nov. 27. [VIII; 149. "An Earthquake Shock in Virginia." New York Tribune, December 19, 1897, p. 4 c. 4. See: 1897 Nov. 27, (VIII; 136).]


1897 Dec 19 / 5 p.m., ec. / Violent qs / Aidin, Turkey / Levant Herald, Jan 3. [VIII; 150. (Levant Herald, January 3, 1898.)]


1897 Dec 24 / 1:13 a.m. / Bournemouth / intense illumination / meteor / Nature 57-204. [VIII; 151. “Notes.” Nature, 57 (December 30, 1897): 204- 207, at 204.]


1897 Dec. 25 / Great met / Germany / Met Zeit 15/74, 233. [VIII; 152. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 15 (1898): 55-80, at 74-75. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 15 (1898): 225-240, at 233-234.]


1897 Dec. 27 / It Sounds / Frontone (Urbino) / Rombi / See 1816. [VIII; 153. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 45. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1897 Dec 29 / q / Hayti / Nature 59-471. [VIII; 154. “Notes.” Nature, 59 (March 16, 1899): 469-473, at 471.]

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