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Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1874


1874:


1874 // about /// Frgs / Near Godalming, Surrey, after severe th. storm, road "alive" with small black frogs. / NQ 8-6-190. [IV; 1347. "A Shower of Frogs." Notes and Queries, s. 8 v. 6 (September 8, 1894): 189-191, at 190-191.]


1874 // Toronto Globe to May 23. [IV; 1348.]


1874 // Sunspots / Sci Amer, in "Astro. Notes. [IV; 1349. "Astronomical Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 30 (February 7, 1874): 84. "Astronomical Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 30 (March 7, 1874): 147. "Astronomical Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 30 (April 18, 1874): 248.  "Astronomical Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 30 (May 9, 1874): 292. "Astronomical Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 30 (June 6, 1874): 360. "Astronomical Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 31 (July 11, 1874): 20. "Astronomical Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 31 (November 7, 1874): 292. "Astronomical Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 31 (December 5, 1874): 356. "Astronomical Notes." Scientific American, n.s., 32 (January 2, 1875): 8.]


1874 / H.H. / N. 11th St, Philadelpha / See Ap. 21, 1883. [A; 878. See: 1883 Ap. 21, (B; 495).]


1874 / Fasting girl of Market Harborough / See Jan 8, 1878. [A; 879. See: 1878 Jan 8, (B; 178).]


1874 // Chili, N.Y., near Rochester / See Dec 16, 1876. [A; 880. See: 1876 Dec 16, (B; 124).]


1874 / Ellen Sudworth / near Leigh, England / Faster / See Ap., 1876. [A; 881. See: 1876 April, (B; 91).]


1874 / Ellen Sadler, Sleeping girl, near Henley, Eng. / See Feb. 12, 1875. [A; 882. See: 1875 Feb 12, (B; 41).]


1874 / A.W. Underwood / Negro boy /Paw Paw / fire breath / See May 1, 1880. [A; 883. See: 1880 May 1, (B; 289), and, 1882 Dec 1, (B; 408).]


1874 / Bewitched man named Weedstrand, at Meadville, Pa. / See July 29, 1875. [A; 884. See: 1875 July 29, (B; 61).]


1874 / Body of Mrs. W.I. Peters. / Frankfort, Ind. / See Dec 22, 1888. [A; 885. See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1874 ? / Eddys said been exposed / Religio Phil Jour, Jan 1 - 1876, p. 334. [A; 886. "Exposure of the Eddys." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 19 (no. 16; January 1, 1876): 334. "Exposure of the Eddys." New York Sun, November 26, 1875, p. 3 c. 1-3.]


1874 Jan / Disaps young men / Paris. * [A; 887. (Ref???)]


1874 Jan / Youths disap. / See Ap. 22, 1833. [A; 888. See: (1833 Ap. 22; no note for this date, probably wrong date.)]


1874 Jan and March 1-10 / Tribune for Jersey Devil / winter of '73-74 / Nothing. [A; 889.]


1874 Jan 1-March 1 / Herald. / No Jersey Devil. [A; 890.]


1874 Jan 1 / N.Y. Times, 4-4 / Editorial on Famine in Bengal / not much said. [IV; 1350. "The Indian Famine." New York Times, January 1, 1874, p. 4 c. 4-5.]


1874 Jan 3 / Trance / Rel-Ph. J., 1-1, copied from the Rochester (NY) Democrat and Chronicle—that in village of Avon, near Rochester, several months before, an unmarried woman, named Eleanor Bonney, told her friends, with whom she was living, that soon she would go into a long and peculiar trance—had been known as a clairvoyant. So trance—4 cols description. [A; 891.1, 891.2. "Five Weeks in a Trance." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. 16; January 3, 1874): 1, (c. 1-3). Bonney asked that, while in a trance, (begun on the night of November 10-11, 1873), her body would only be attended to by a few selected people. While the body showed no signs of life and would begin to decompose, her spirit was to return, and she would return to life, with news from the spirit world. "A Five Weeks' Trance." Human Nature, 8 (March 1874): 141-144. (Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, December 12, 1873, p. 4, and January 15, 1874, p. 2; @ newspapers.com.) See: 1874 Jan 17, (A; 892), and, 1874 Jan 24, (A; 894).]


1874 Jan 4 / Vesuvius unusually active, threatening violent eruption / N.Y. Times, 24-3-6. [IV; 1352. "The Expected Eruption of Vesuvius." New York Times, January 24, 1874, p. 3 c. 6.]


1874 Jan 5 / See Dec 21, '73. / Like Jan 6 / James A Grant, of Greenburg, 4 miles from Trenton, "complained of an ailment resulting from a carbuncle on one of his limbs." His doctor wrote a prescription, which he had filled. He died an hour later. Said been poisoned whether druggist's mistake or no. His ailment remains mysterious. Said that the small carbuncle may not have caused sickness, and—"Never saw a post mortem where the body was so healthy as in this case." / (Herald 11-7-4). [A; 872.1, 872.2, 872.3. "A Jersey Poisoning Case." New York Herald, January 11, 1874, p. 7 c. 4. A prescription for iodide of potassium was apparently made with cyanide of potassium by the druggist.]


1874 Jan 5 / [LT], 5-c / 24-5-a / Feb 3-10-c / March 10-5-c // Vesuvius. [IV; 1351. "Mount Vesuvius" London Times, January 5, 1874, p. 5. c. 3. "Mount Vesuvius." London Times, January 24, 1874, p. 5 c. 1. "Mount Vesuvius." London Times, February 3, 1874, p. 10 c. 3. "Southern Italy." London Times, March 10, 1874, p. 5 c. 3-4.]


1874 Jan 5 / N.Y. Times, 1-7 / Famine in 5 districts of the Russian province of Samara on the Volga. [IV; 1353. "Russia." New York Times, January 5, 1874, p. 1 c. 7.]


1874 Jan 5 / 4 p.m. / q / Osdensburg, N.Y. / sound / A J Sci, 3-7-387. [IV; 1354. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 4." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 7 (1874): 384-387, at 387.]


1874 Jan 6 / ab 6 p.m. / Brilliant meteor burst at Virginia City, Nevada. / N.Y. Times 19-8-6. [IV; 1355. "Brilliant Meteor." New York Times, January 19, 1874, p. 8 c. 6.]


1874 Jan 6 / (Ref) / q / Wolfboro, N.H. / A.J. Sci 3-9-331. [IV; 1356. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 5." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 9 (1875): 331-334, at 331.]


1874 Jan 6 / small wounds / Man dead in Brooklyn park—small wound on nose. / N.Y. Herald 7-7-5 / See Feb 1. [A; 873. "A Brooklyn Mystery." New York Herald, January 7, 1874, p. 7 c. 5. See: 1874 Feb 1, (A; 874).]


1874 Jan 17 / R-P J, 4-1 / Bonney Trance / 24-4-1 / N.Y. World quoted Jan 5, 1874. [A; 892. "The Avon Mystery!" Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. 18; January 17, 1874): 4, (c. 1-2). "The Avon Mystery." New York Herald, January 6, 1874, p. 6 c. 6. An inquest was begun on January 5, with a post-mortem showing that Bonney's body was already in a state of decay, (a "putrid mass" according to the Religio-Philosophical Journal). "Miss Eleanor Bonney—Is She Dead!" Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. 19; January 24, 1874): 4, (c. 1-3). See: 1874 Jan 3, (A; 891), and, 1874 Jan 24, (A; 894).]


1874 Jan 21 / [LT], 10-e / Miracle in California. [A; 893. "An Authenticated Miracle." London Times, January 21, 1874, p. 10 c. 5. "The Stigmata." New York Herald, April 27, 1873, p. 6 c. 5. "The Stigmata." New York Herald, January 6, 1874, p. 4 c. 4-5. A young woman identified as "Miss Collins" first displayed marks attributed to stigmata on April 4, 1873, in San Francisco. After being sent and watched at a house of the Sisters of Charity, Mount St. Joseph, by the Archbishop, it was discovered that she produced these marks with her own fingernails, and she was denounced as an impostress.]


1874 Jan 23 / 9 a.m. / Seen by Secchi, in Italy, prominence on the sun. It was succeeded by a spot. / N.Y. Times, 1874, July 13-1-5. [IV; 1357. "Solar Theories." New York Times, July 13, 1874, p. 1 c. 5.]


1874 Jan 24 / Buried / Rel-P. J. added note that been learned that Miss B. had been pronounced dead and was buried. [A; 894. "Miss Eleanor Bonney—Is She Dead!" Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. 19; January 24, 1874): 4, (c. 1-3). The latter article ends with the postscript: "Since the above was put in type, we learn that Miss Bonney's body has been consigned to the grave. That answers the question, Is she dead?" See: 1874 Jan 3, (A; 891), and, 1874 Jan 17, (A; 892).]


1874 Jan 25 / Activity at Vesuvius increasing / Nature 9-273. [IV; 1358. "Notes." Nature, 9 (February 5, 1874): 271-274, at 273. (London Sunday Times, January 25, 1874.)]


1874 Jan 25 / ab. noon / Chelmsford, Mass. / q / A.J. Sci 3-7-387. [IV; 1359. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 4." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 7 (1874): 384-387, at 387.]


1874 Jan 26 / 2 and 5 a.m. / Manchester, N.H. / qs / R—Jan 6. [IV; 1360. Refer to: 1874 Jan 6, (IV; 1356). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 5." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 9 (1875): 331-334, at 331.]


1874 Jan 28 / Herald, 5-6 / A family—members of which dropped into death-like trances. [A; 895. "A Jersey Sensation." New York Herald, January 28, 1874, p. 5 c. 6. Two brothers and a sister had "dropped off" only to revive from death, on different occasions, before they died, finally.]


1874 Jan 29 / (Polts) / Herald, 8-6 / Polts in a house in Long Island City. Crockery thrown around. In this era sounds that later "rumbling" are moans and spectral groans. Had been some time before this date. [A; 896. "A Haunted House." New York Herald, January 29, 1874, p. 8 c. 5.]


1874 Jan. 29 / N.Y. Times, 8-3—House in Long Island City. Landlord unable to rent on account of ghost, for a long time. Finally, for a small rent to a family named Daly—all quiet for a week but night of 26th Jan moans heard. 2 sounds as if of a heavy body falling. Then crockery thrown from a cupboard. One child thrown into into [sic] convulsions, it was said by fright, and died. Cries of "Murder!" heard. The Dalys moved out. / House on Jackson Ave. [A; 897.1, 897.2. "A Ghost in Long Island City." New York Times, January 29, 1874, p. 8 c. 3.]


1874 Feb 1 / (Feb 5-15-4, Herald) / Man found dead. On railroad track, New York. "An incised wound in his face as if done by some sharp instrument. / See Jan 6. [A; 874. "The Death of Mr. Doyle." New York Herald, February 5, 1874, p. 5 c. 4. See; 1874 Jan 6, (A; 873).]


1874 Feb 1 / Shocks / points near Quebec / Farther Point, etc. / 2:30 / 8 p.m./ N.Y. Times 3-1-2 / N.M. [IV; 1361. "An Earthquake Shock in Canada." New York Times, February 3, 1874, p. 1 c. 2. Farther Point is the English name for Pointe-au-Père, the maritime section of Rimouski, Quebec. There is no reference to "8 p.m." in this article. "Two distinct shocks of earthquake were felt here yesterday, between the hours of 2:30 and 3 o'clock P.M."]


1874 Feb 1 / Ab. 2:45 p.m., sharp shocks near Quebec / N.Y. Times 3-1-2. [IV; 1362. "An Earthquake Shock in Canada." New York Times, February 3, 1874, p. 1 c. 2.]


1874 Feb. 2 / (Ref) / q / Farther Point, Canada / N.Y. Times, 1874, Dec 20-10-1. [IV; 1363. "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1874 Feb 4 / Aurora / Sunderland, England / broad arch / south edge by Orion 6:40 to 7:40 p.m. / afterward in north / Symons' Met M. 9-22. [IV; 1364. "The Aurora Borealis of February 4, 1874." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 9 (March 1874): 22-23.]


1874 Feb. 4 / In Finland, the aurora renewed on 5th and 6th / La Sci Pour Tous 19-106. [IV; 1365. (La Science Pour Tous, 19-106.)]


1874 Feb 4 / Aurora / La Nat  1874/1/202, 261 / CR 78-404 / wheel-aurora. [IV; 1366. "L'Aurore Boréale du 4 Février 1874." La Nature, 1874 pt. 1 (no. 39; February 28): 202. "L'Aurore Boréale du 4 Février 1874 Observée à Orléans." La Nature, 1874 pt. 1 (no. 43; March 28): 261-262. Tisserand, F. "Observation de l'aurore boréale du 4 février 1874." Comptes Rendus, 78 (1874): 404-405.]


1874 Feb. 5 / 9:10 p.m. / Luminous arch / Donegal and several meteors / Nature 9-313 / Also at Durham / p 322. [IV; 1367. "Notes." Nature, 9 (February 19 1874): 311-313, at 313. Plummer, John J. "The so-called Meteor-cloud of Feb. 5." Nature, 9 (February 26, 1874): 322.]

 

1874 Feb 6 / Herald, 8-3 / Fires in Westport, Conn—supposed incendiarism. Forty Citizens formed a protective Association, 2 walking the streets each night. [A; 898. "Incendiarism." New York Herald, February 6, 1874, p. 8 c. 3-4.]


1874 Feb 6 / Venezuela / severest q. since 1812 / N.Y. Times, 24-1-5. [IV; 1371. "Venezuela." New York Times, February 24, 1874, p. 1 c. 5.]


1874 Feb. 7 / Rel-Ph. J., 6-2 / House near Halifax, Nova Scotia, haunted. [A; 899. "Spiritual Manifestation at Dartmouth." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. 21; February 7, 1874,): 6, (c. 2). (Halifax Express, ca. Nov.-Feb., 1874.)]


1874 Feb 7 / Rel-Ph, . J., 4-4 / House in Springvale, near Portland, Maine, occupied by a Mr. Bodwell, said be haunted by apparitions. [A; 900. "Another Haunted House." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. 21; February 7, 1874): 4, (c. 4).]


1874 Feb. 7 / Rel-Ph. J, 2-3, copying from Toronto (Canada) Sun. / Excitement in Toronto—report that Gurney's foundry was haunted—night watchman had been found dying—one chamber in his revolver discharged—said that other watchmen had given up the job, saying the place was haunted—said that a skeleton had been found on the premises. [A; 901.1, 901.2. "The West End Ghost." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. 21; February 7, 1874): 2, (c. 3). (Toronto Sun, 1873-1874???)]


1874 Feb. 8 / Eruption / Mt Tarumai, Yezo, Japan / Nature 35-472. [IV; 1368. "Notes." Nature, 35 (March 17, 1887): 471-474, at 472. The Shikotsu volcano.]


1874 Feb. 8 / Eruption / volc Foosiyama, Japan / N.Y. Times, Ap. 5-1-2. [IV; 1372. "Japan." New York Times, April 5, 1874, p. 1. c. 2. The Shikotsu volcano.]


1874 Feb. 10 / Sounds / mountains of Sinai / Nature 54/8. [IV; 1369. Fry, Edmund. "Barisal Guns." Nature, 54 (May 7, 1896): 8. Stanley, Arthur Penrhyn. Sinai and Palestine. London: John Murray, 1868, 14. Newbold, Thomas John. "A Visit from Wadi Tor to Gebel Nakús...." Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, 7 (1843): 78-82. "It would also be useful to take careful relative measurements of the locality, to ascertain the force and direction of the wind most favourable for producing the sounds, with a view of constructing a model on a small scale, from which similar effects might probably be produced artificially, and the curious question, regarding the possibility of moving lines of loose sand producing, under any circumstances, musical sounds, decided beyond the shadow of a doubt. It is not a little singular that Gebel Nakus should be, as far as I am aware, the only known spot on the globe where the necessary conditions exist for producing those remarkable sounds...." Burckhardt, John Lewis. Travels in Syria and the Holy Land. London: John Murray, 1822, 591. "In this chain, about five hours from Tor, northward, is the Djebel Nakous, or mountain of the Bell. On its side next the sea a mass of very fine sand, which has collected there, rushes down at times, and occasions a hollow sound, of which the Bedouins relate many stories; they compare it to the

ringing of bells, and a fable is repeated among them, that the bells belong to a convent buried under the sands."]


1874 Feb. 10, etc. / See Nor. Car. Lights / Oct. 26, 1922. [IV; 1370. See: (1922 Oct. 26.).]


1874 Feb. 10 / Nor Car Mt. / See Ap. 6, 1844. [IV; 1373. See: 1844 Ap. 6, (II; 721).]


1874 (?) / Feb // Bald Mt phe—See July 19, 1878. [IV; 1374. See: 1878 July 19, (IV; 2402).]


1874 Feb 10 / N. Car sounds / See Oct 8, 1897. [IV; 1375. See: (1897 Oct 8).]


1874 Feb / Nor Car Mts / See Trib, Nov 17-5-5, 1879 / July 26-5-3, 1880. [IV; 1376. Halleck, Joseph. "Danger in Carolina Mountains." New York Tribune, November 17, 1879, p. 5 c. 5. "Scenery in the South." New York Tribune, July 26, 1880, p. 5 c. 5-6. The 1879 letter simply disputes a claim of dangerous people living in these mountains, and the 1880 article relates a tour of these mountains.]


1874 Feb 10 / Sounds / Nor Car. / Oct 8, 1897 / See May 10, 1898. But this time of Spanish American War. [IV; 1377. See: (1898 May 10).]


1874 Feb 10 / Nor. Car. / Ap 6, 1844. [IV; 1378. See: 1844 Ap. 6, (II; 721).]


1874 Feb. 10 / See: 1812. / Stonefall / Caswell, N.C. / Jan 30, 1810. [IV; 1379. See: 1810 Jan 30, (I; 287), and 1812, (I; 362).]


1874 Feb / Bald Mt. / See Jan 28, 1880. [IV; 1380. See: 1880 Jan 28, 29, Feb 10, (V; 102).]


1874 Feb. 10 / Account in London Times of Ap 3—dated Knoxville, Tenn, March 20—for 25 miles around Bald Mt, which is in M'Dowell Co., extending into Rutherford Co—the part in M'Dowell Co known as Stone Mt. Began Feb 10—"terrible thunder" or "roaring of heavy artillery in the distance"—said that upon Feb 22, the noise was "absolutely terrible". Said that the whole mountain was shaking. Cattle had fled—Negroes gathering into camp meetings frenzied with "fear, despair and penitence". Said that their praying and yelling lasted 16 days and nights. / Usual to comment upon their superstititons, but something that I have noticed before as phe of catastrophes, accompanying supposed frenzies—"no attention was given to labor." Had been shocks here in 1812. / Phe continued into March. [IV; 1381.1 to 1381.4. "A New Volcano." London Times, April 3, 1874, p. 12 c. 1.]


1874 Feb. 10 / Myst mt. sounds / N.Q. 5/6/389. [IV; 1382. Blair, D. "Mysterious Mountain Sounds." Notes and Queries, s. 5 v. 6 (November 11, 1876): 389.]


1874 Feb 10, etc. / Nor. Car / Described in N.Y. Times, March 21-1-4, as "terrible thunder, gradually dying away in the distance" or "the roaring of heavy artillery in the distance." / In Times, Ap 4-2-2—that only a "third rate hoax" and nothing occurring there. [IV; 1383. "A Volcano in North Carolina." New York Times, March 21, 1874, p. 1 c. 4. "Bald Mountain." New York Times, April 4, 1874, p. 2 c. 2.]


1874 Feb 10 / Series q begins. / N. Car. / Rept. Smithson. 1874-254. [IV; 1384. Du Pre, Warren. "On a Series of Earthquakes in North Carolina, Commencing on the 10th of February, 1874." Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution, 1874, 254-260.]


1874 Feb 10 / (Sounds) / Explosive sounds reported from Stone and Bald Mountains, S. Car, investigated upon 19th and 20th of March, 1874, by Prof Du Pre, of Worford College, Spartanburgh, S.C. / Rept. Smithson Inst. 1874-254. / He heard several like "suppressed but sudden report of a quarry-blast." / Had been from 50 to 75 since Feb. 10. [IV; 1385.1, 1385.2. Du Pre, Warren. "On a Series of Earthquakes in North Carolina, Commencing on the 10th of February, 1874." Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution, 1874, 254-260, at 255-257. "It is unnecessary to give, in detail, all the testimony which we collected from the people while passing along the eastern and western side of this mountain, including a distance of eighteen miles. They all concurred in the following summary: That there were certain days marked by loud reports and severe shakes; that from fifty to seventy-five shocks have been felt since the 10th of February; that the noise begins with an explosion like a quarry-blast, followed by a rumbling sound, lasting only a few seconds; that the shocks are simultaneous, or almost so, with the reports, and seem to follow the direction of the rumbling sound, with this exception, that those near the top of the mountain assert they appear to be under and all around them; that the reports all came from the Stone and Bald Mountain Ridge, those living on the east side pointing to the west, and those on the west pointing to the east for the direction of sounds; that these reports occur as often during the night as the day, in fair weather as in foul; that the effects are felt five miles on each side of the mountain-ridge, and extend from Broad River on the southwest to Catawba on the north, a distance of twenty-five miles; that houses shake, trees with their dead leaves tremble, glasses and crockery rattle, shavings in their workshops shake and "quaver," as one expressed it." (Clingman, Thomas Lanier. "Earthquakes of North Carolina." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 9 (1875): 55-58, at 58.) (Bradley, F.H. "Note on the Recent Earthquakes of Bald Mountain, in Rutherford County, North Carolina." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 8 (1874): 79. "The sounds are variously described as resembling continuous musket firing, or heavy cannonading, of 'the rumble of a heavy iron-axled wagon rolling rapidly over a rocky road.' The shakings were wave-like vibrations of the surface, moving laterally from the center of disturbance, and causing cracks in wall and chimneys, and occasionally throwing down loose articles."]


1874 Feb 10 / Bald Mt, Nor Car / half way between Ashville and Rutherfordton. [IV; 1386.]


1874 Feb 10 / Herald of, 3-3 / Man in Jersey City—typhoid—been delusions. Left home—half-clad—tramped through snow to workhouse 4 miles, found alive, his frozen hands clinging to bars of a window. [A; 902. "A Terrible Journey." New York Herald, February 10, 1874, p. 3 c. 3.]


1874 Feb 11-13 / 500 miles west of Bombay / Milky Sea / L. and Water, March 21 / 600 miles wide. [IV; 1387. (Land and Water, March 21, 1874.)]


1874 Feb. 12 / 6:30 a.m. / Saco, Me / q / R—Jan 6. [IV; 1388. See: 1874 Jan 6, (IV; 1356). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 5." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 9 (1875): 331-334, at 332.]


1874 Feb 12 / Brockville, Ont / At 7:39 a.m., thermometer stood at 12 deg. below zero. On 13th, at same time, it stood 54 degrees higher (42). / Toronto Globe 18-4-8. [IV; 1389. "Canada." Toronto Globe, February 18, 1874, p. 4 c. 8. "Magnetic Observatory, Brockv'le." Brockville Recorder, February 19, 1874, p. 2 c. 10. No mention of "below zero" was stated during the week's observations ending on February 14, in Brockville; and, the greatest variation in temperature during that week was "35°," probably between 12° and about 46°, on the same day, (not different mornings).]


1874 Feb. 14 / Rel-Ph. J., 4-3 / Whitewater, Wis., visited by ghost of a former resident, Jacob Rees. [A; 903. "Another Ghost." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. 22; February 14, 1873): 4, (c. 3).]


1874 Feb. 21 / In the Religio Philosophical Journal of, copied in The Spiritualist, March 6, 1874, of Kinton's Bridge, a haunted bridge near Bedford, Pa. Two instances where unknown force had stopped wagons on bridge. No tugging by horses could make the wheels move. [A; 904. "Two Spirits Return—The Mysterious Bridge." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. 23; February 21, 1874): 4, (c. 2-3). "A Strange Story." Spiritualist Newspaper, (London), 4 (no. 10; March 6, 1874): 113.]


1874 Feb. 21 / Bewitched Bridge / Rel.-Ph. J., 4-3, copied from the Bedford (Pa.) Inquirer—six miles west of Bedford, a bridge known as Kinton's Bridge, which spans the Junista. For years stories had been told—latest was of a farmer crossing it. The horses halted. He could not whip them into action, though they strained to get away. He unhitched the horses and led them away. Tongue of the wagon firmly set and wheels unmovable. He had mounted a horse to ride home, but tried again and the wagon moved easily. This sometime before, but within a week of date of writing, another case was reported—two young men in a buggy—for about an hour it was frozen fast, as it were, to the bridge. [A; 905.1, 905.2, 905.3. "Two Spirits Return—The Mysterious Bridge." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. 23; February 21, 1874): 4, (c. 2-3). "A Haunted Bridge." Juaniata Sentinel and Republican, (Mifflintown, Pennsylvania), February 25, 1874, p. 3 c. 2-3. This article was subtitled "Bedford County's Latest Mystery—or Humbug." "Strange Effects of Local Option." Cambria Freeman, (Ebensburg, Pennsylvania), February 6, 1874, p. 4 c. 3. This article noted the article appeared a week earlier in an issue dated "February 30, 1874." Kinton's Bridge was replaced in 1902 by the Herline covered bridge, near Manns Choice, Pennsylvania.]


1874 Feb. 22 / See Feb. 10. [IV; 1390. See: 1874 Feb. 10, (IV; 1381).]


1874 Feb. 24 / N.Y. Times, 1-5 / Famine / India / ½ million persons receiving aid from the Government. [IV; 1391. "The Famine in India." New York Times, February 24, 1874, p. 1 c. 5.]


1874 Feb. 27 / 10:40 p.m. / Bangor and Eastport, Me / q / R—Jan 6. [IV; 1392. See: 1874 Jan 6, (IV; 1356). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 5." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 9 (1875): 331-334, at 332.]


1874 Feb. 28 / N.Y. Times, 9-7, copied from the Peoria (Ill.) Transcript—home of Mrs Lydia Bradley—housemaid Margaret Corvell. Phe in presence of girl—objects moved about—a heavy crash heard on a piano when her hands were held. Notes purporting to have come from Mr. Bradley, who had died, appeared. Money was taken from a drawer that Mrs. B thought she had locked. Vases appeared with a note, purporting to have been sent by Mr. B. The vases were traced to a Peoria store, and it was shown that the girl had bought them. She was accused and confessed to having caused most of the alleged phe, denying some, such as the crash on the piano. [A; 906.1, 906.2, 906.3. "Remarkable Imposture." New York Times, February 28, 1874, p. 9 c. 7. "Remarkable Imposture." Cambria Freeman, (Ebensburg, Pennsylvania), March 27, 1874, p. 1 c. 2-4.]


1874 March / Fits of Bewitched boy of Boyertown, begin. / See Oct 16, 1875. [A; 907. See: 1875 Oct 16, (B; 73).]


1874 March / Began phe of Henry Diener, the bewitched boy of Boyertown, Pa. / See Oct 16, 1875. [A; 908. See: 1875 Oct 16, (B; 73).]


1874 March 7 / Sci Amer / Farmerville, Livingston Co., Mo. / Enormous meteorite had fallen recently. [IV; 1393. "A Huge Aerolite." Scientific American, n.s., 30 (March 7, 1874): 145. ("The people near Farmersville...." Washington Evening Star, January 20, 1874, p. 1 c. 6.) ("Fall of a Monstrous Aerolite." Ottawa Free Trader, January 24, 1874, p. 2 c. 4.) (Chicago Times, ca. January, 1874.)]


1874 March 7 / 7 p.m. / Eastern U.S. / also less in W. / Aurora / at Albany—a continuous sheet of brilliant white light encircling the horizon / M.W.R., March, '74. [IV; 1394. "Peculiar Phenomena and Facts." Monthly Weather Review, 2 (March 1874): 4-5. "It was also reported, same night, from Albany, N.Y., where a 'continuous sheet of brilliant white light encircled the horizon, extending to an altitude of 35° in the Northeast and to an altitude of 12° in the Southwest, the light in the Northeast strongly contrasted with a dark segment of slate-color beneath it and fifty-two streamers of straw color.'"]


1874 March / Nor Car Phe again / ab May 25, 1878 / Sci Amer 75-188. [IV; 1395. Hooker, Augustus S. "More About Strange Explosive Sounds." Scientific American, n.s., 75 (August 29, 1896): 188.]


1874 March 7 / Rel.-Ph. J., 1-5 / Haunted house for 10 years back at Gardner, Kansas. [A; 909. Cummings, A.M. "A Haunted House for Bro. John Syphers." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. 25; March 7, 1874): 1, (c. 5).]


1874 [March 7] / BO / (with Badminton) / Cor, Land and Water, March 7, 1874, writes that he had heard of depredations in Cavan,—by a wolf; said it had slaughtered as many as 30 sheep in one night. / March 28th, a cor writes that in Cavan for 2 months sheep been killed in ways led to belief not a dog. He knew of 42 sheep in 3 townlands all similarly attacked; throats cut and blood sucked but flesh not eaten. The animal had been seen and fired at, had been seen night of 23rd of March in the village of Crossdowsey. Said that footprints not like a dog's; long and narrow and traces of strong laws. / Ap 11th, cor writes from Ireland that on 25th of March, the maurauder had been shot and was a large dog. / Ap. 18, cor takes up that there is no known blood-sucking quadraped. [A; 910.1 to 910.4. (Land and Water, March 7, March 28, April 18, 1874.) (Gosselin, N. "The Irish wolf." Land and Water, 17 (April 11, 1874): 279.)]


1874 March 11 / 4:30 a.m. / q. St Thomas, W. Indies / Nature 9-483. [IV; 1396. Palgrave, William Gifford.  "Earthquake in St. Thomas." Nature, 9 (April 23, 1874): 483-484.]


1874 March 11 and 18 / Bright spots on Jupiter / Astro Reg 12/88. [IV; 1397. Gledhill, Joseph. "Small Bright Spots on Jupiter." Astronomical Register, 12 ( 1874): 88.]


1874 March 12 / Slight shock / Yarmouth, Nova Scotia / N.Y. Times 18-1-3. [IV; 1398. "Shock of an Earthquake in Nova Scotia." New York Times, March 18, 1874, p. 1 c. 3.]


[1874 March 12] / 1874 March 15 / Yarmouth, N.S. / slight shock / Ref., Feb. 2. [IV; 1399. Refer to: 1874 Feb. 2, (IV; 1363). "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3. This review gives the wrong date of  "March 15" to the earthquake on March 12, 1874.]


1874 March 16 / California / 700 geese / Pop Sci 6/378. [IV; 1400. "Lightning among a Flock of Geese." Popular Science Monthly, 6 (January 1875): 378. "As the hail began to fall, and the lightning flashed, thousands of wild-geese, which were in the ponds of shallow water which exist in that locality during very wet winters, suddenly rose up in a great flutter, as if many hunters had discharged a volley among them. They went up and up, apparently to rise above the fearful cloud. It was nearly dark, and those who saw them rise thought no more of it until morning, when they began to find dead geese, and hear of hundreds being picked up by the neighbors. Some 700 were found. One man picked up on his farm all that two horses could haul. Their heads were badly torn, and their bills split into fragments."]


1874 March 16 / Severe q / Guerrero, Mexico / N.Y. Times, Ap. 8-1-7. [IV; 1401. "Mexico." New York Times, April 8, 1874, p. 1 c. 7.]


1874 March 18 / N.Y. Times of, 1-3 / The rumbling sounds N.C. had been heard 2 or 3 weeks before. [IV; 1402. "Volcanic Disturbance in North Carolina." New York Times, March 18, 1874, p. 1 c. 3.]


1874 March 18 / afternoon / near Cairo, Ill. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1403. Finley, 4.]


1874 March 18 / Murder of girl Katie Curran by Jessie Pomeroy in cellar of his mother's store in Boston—his confession on N.Y. Times, July 21-1-5. [A; 915. "A Youthful Fiend." New York Times, July 21, 1874, p. 1 c. 5.]


1874 March 18 / J. Pomeroy / See Ap. 22. [A; 916. See: 1874 Ap. 22, (A; 924).]


1874 March 19 / Toronto Globe of / Dispatch from Raleigh, N.C. / Sounds and vibrations from Bald Mt. and a stampede of inhabitants. [IV; 1404. "America." Toronto Globe, March 19, 1874, p.1 c. 6.]


1874 March 20 / Ext. tides in England. [IV; 1405. "Extraordinary Tide." Lincolnshire Chronicle, March 27, 1874, p. 3 c. 4. "The High Tide." London Times, March 23, 1874, p. 7 c. 4. Buckland, Frank. "The Bore on the Severn." London Times, March 23, 1874, p. 7 c. 5.]


1874 March 21 / Rel-Ph-J, 2-4, copying from Brownstown (Ind) Banner / Little girl Lizzie Winscott, aged 12, daughter of Richard J. Winscott, was medium of a spirit that communicated by her writing on a slate. [A; 917. "Visible Manifestations." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 16 (no. 1; March 21, 1874): 2, (c. 4). "A few mornings since, we were invited to Mr. Winscott’a residence, to experiment and investigate at our leisure—an invitation that we accepted. A small, oblong table, without drawer, and entirely open from the floor to the single thickness of wood that covered the top, was set out and covered with a wool cover. Little Lizzie, the medium, sat beside the table, her whole person in full view. Holding a slate in her right hand, it was put under the table, and writing commenced immediately. We submitted a question in writing, and were answered that spirits preferred to answer questions propounded orally. The spirit of a German having appeared, we asked a number of questions in the German language, to all of which we received appropriate, though not always correct, answers written in English. No developments worth relating were obtained through the writing process, probably on account the absence of communicative spirits." "Spirit Hands." Indiana State Sentinel, (Indianapolis), February 24, 1874, p. 7 c. 4.]


1874 March 21 / Religio-Ph. J., 8-3, from Windsor (Vt) Journal. / Home of Stephen Bailey, 2 miles from Proctorsville. Mr and Mrs B saw a spoon rise from a pan of milk, almost to ceiling, and fall. No other phe mentioned. [A; 918. "Singular Occurrence." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 15 (no. ; March 21, 1874): 8, (c. 3). "A Spoon Performance." Bellows Fall Times, (Vermont), March 6, 1874, p. 4 c. 1.]


1874 March 25 / Shocks at Stone Mt most violent since the first of them / T. Globe 28-1-7. / [???] [IV; 1406. "America." Toronto Globe, March 28, 1874, p. 1 c. 6-7.]


1874 March 25 / Cavan Weekly News, March 27—that some of those who saw the body of the animal shot by Archdeacon McGuinness, at Lismoreville, pronounced it to be a wolf.. / Body was to be sent to Dublin. [A; 911. (Cavan Weekly News, March 27, 1874.) "The Cavan Wolf." Irish Times, (Dublin), March 31, 1874, p. 2 c. 2.]


1874 March 27, 28 / Cyclone / Mauritius / Nature 10-15. [IV; 1407. "Notes." Nature, 10 (May 7, 1874): 14-17, at 15.]


1874 March 27 / Slight shock, 7:30 p.m., at Concepcion, Chile, and shortly afterward rain began to fall and fell all night. / Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, Ap. 4. [IV; 1408. (Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, April 4, 1874.)]


[1874 March 30] / Wolf / Clare Journal, March 30, said that the destruction of sheep was continuing—killed 20 sheep night of 25th near Killrush, all of them bitten in the same way on the breast and foreleg. Depredation so great as to be described as "terrible losses for poor people". / Ap 27—two other sheep been killed by the unknown animal. Had been attacked in the same way. Not said this was vampirism, but said that only a place was bitten off and not flesh sufficient for a dog was eaten. Said that two other dogs had been killed by farmers who had suspected them of being the maurauder, but that they had had nothing to do with the killings. ///

80

30

110 . [A; 912. (Clare Journal, March 30, 1874). "Sheep Killing in West Clare." Clare Journal, April 27, 1874, p. 3 c. 4.]


1874 [March] / BO / (wlf) / Northern Whig (Belfast), May 11, 1867—wolf killed in the Wicklow Mountains, in 1770—Ac to other cor the last wolf indigenous to Ireland was killed in 1712. [A; 914. "The Last Irish Wolf." Northern Whig, (Belfast), May 11, 1867, p. 4 c. 1. "The Irish Wolf-Dog." Irish Penny Journal, 1 (no. 45; May 8, 1841): 353-355, at 355. "I have not been able to ascertain with certainty the date of the death of the last Irish wolf, but there was a presentment for killing wolves granted in Cork in the year 1710. I am at present acquainted with an old gentleman between 80 and 90 years of age, whose mother remembered wolves to have been killed in tho county of Wexford about the year 1730-40; and it is asserted by many persons of weight and veracity that a wolf was killed in the Wicklow mountains so recently as 1770." Hamilton, William. Letters Concerning the Northern Coast of the County of Antrim. Coleraine: S. Hart, 1839, 235. "Passing the village of Cairnlough, near three miles from Glenarm, the country becomes still more romantic; tradition says the last wolf killed in Ireland, was shot here about the year 1712."]


1874 March 30 / [LT], 8-e / Wolf in Cavan. [A; 919. "An Irish Wolf." London Times, March 30, 1874, p. 8 c. 5.]


1874 March 31 / [LT], 12-a / q / Cherchell. [IV; 1409. "Algeria." London Times, March 31, 1874, p. 12 c. 1.]


1874 // spring /// Great rise of water in Lake Onandaga / Toronto Globe, Ap. 14 / N.M. [IV; 1410. "United States." Toronto Globe, April 14, 1874, p. 4 c. 8.]


1874 April / Polt / Oakland, Cal / Proc Amer Soc 7/250. [A; 920. Hyslop, James H. "A Case of Poltergeist." Proceedings of the American Society for Psychical Research, 7 (1913): 193-425, at 233-425.]


1874 Ap 3 / France / Conical luminous appendage each side moon / Am J Sci 3/15/231. [IV; 1411. "Moon's Zodiacal Light." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 231. "In your Journal for February, 1878, p. 88, is a note by M. Trouvelot, on "the Moon's Zodiacal Light," in which he describes a conical luminous appendage about 4½° long, extended on both sides of the moon, which was seen by him April 3, 1874." "Messier, in the Mémoires de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, 1771, p. 434, is noteworthy. In this memoir. Messier gives a rough wood-cut of its appearance, from which its length on each side of the moon is shown to be about 2½°." "The condition of the sky, as described by Trouvelot and Messier, appears to have been the same." Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "The Moon's Zodiacal Light." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 88-89. Messier, Charles. "Observation de l'Éclipse de Lune, La Nuit du 28 au 29 Avril 1771." Histoire de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, 1771, 430-434, (illustration). "M. L. Hugo adresse une Note sur une colonne lumineuse...." Comptes Rendus, 85 (1877): 44. The third example of luminous conical appendages extending from the Moon's disk was mentioned.]


1874 Ap. 4 / near Burlingame, Kansas / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1412. Finley, 4.]


1874 Ap. 4 / T. Globe of / Violent concussion at Bald Mt. [IV; 1413. "United States." Toronto Globe, April, 4, 1874, p. 4 c. 1.]


1874 Ap 4 / See without eyes / N.Y. Times, Aug 16-5-4 / Statement by Dr. H.D. LaCossitt, of Greenville, Pa, concerning Miss Jessie Perkins, of Kinsman, Ohio. He had attended her on Ap. 4, finding her suffering from inflammation of eyes, and paralysis of the eyelids. She had told him that she could not see with her eyes, but could see with her fingers. He tested and found that she could distinguish colors. The girl with her father came to Greenville, where Dr LaC. lived, on 1st of June, where other tests. Dr. LaC. said was convinced she could read as well as see objects without eyes. [A; 921. "A Girl Phenomenon." New York Times, August 16, 1874, p. 5 c. 4.]


1874 Ap. 10 / Met burst over [note cut off] near Kuttenberg, Bohemia. / See 76/Ap. 9. / '77-146 B Assoc. / 106/315 / [note cut off]/498. [IV; 1414. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 146. See: 1876 Ap. 9, (IV; 1836).]


1874 April 13 / Sabbia caduta insieme con la pioggia. Italy / Rendiconto Acc. Napoli 13/46. [IV; 1415. "Sabbia caduta insième con la pioggia del 13 Aprile 1874." Rendiconto dell'Accademia delle Scienze, Fisiche e Matematiche. (Napoli), 13 (1874): 46.]


1874 April 14 / Red rain / Castelbuono / Revista Sci. Ind 1874. [IV; 1416. (Minà-Palumbo, Francesco. Sulla pioggia terossa caduta in Castelbuono il 14 aprile 1874 (On the red rain fallen in Castelbuono on 14 April 1874. Rivista Scientifico-Industriale, Firenze, 1874, 201-204.)]


1874 Ap. 15 / near Brookhaven, Miss. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1417. Finley, 4.]


1874 Ap. 17 / Nor Car / One of the most terrific shocks at Chimney's Rock, at the foot of Stone Mt. / NY Times 23-1-6. [IV; 1418. "The Stone Mountain Volcanic Disturbances." New York Times, April 23, 1874, p. 1 c. 6.]


1874 Ap. 17 and 19 / Shocks / See these dates in Psychic notes. / The shaking mill. [IV; 1419. See: 1874 Ap 17 and 18, etc., (A; 922).]


[1874 Ap 17] / BO / Cavan Weekly News, Ap 17 / Have it that Archdeacon killed a dog. / Then that ([Ap 17]) from Limerick had come news that "a wolf, or something like it was killing sheep near Currigahilt. Writer says that something of reliability was given to the reports because several persons alleged to have been bitten by this animal, had been taken to the Ennis Lunatic Asylum, "laboring under strange symptoms of insanity". [A; 913. ("An Unwelcome Visitor." Cavan Weekly News, April 17, 1874, p. 3 c. 6.)]


1874 Ap 17 and 18, etc. / Q and Polt / Wrightsville, Jackson Co., Wisconsin / q's reported and a cor to the Milwaukee Sentinel visited the place and went to a grist-mill at which ac to reports the greatest shocks had been felt. In the building felt a strong shock. Also reported from a place 4 miles away. Then at a house near the mill more phenomena. "The bulding trembled, windows and doors rattled as though the whole structure with the ground underneath, was being lifted up by some mysterious and unseen power.... Doors would fly open, no one being near them, demonstrating to those present that they were in the presence of some mysterious power." The residents in the house believing it haunted. / See Nov 3, '8[note cut off].) / (See Oct. 6, '86.) [A; 922.1, 922.2, 922.3. (Milwaukee Sentinel, ab. April 24, 1874. @ NewsBank.) "A Wisconsin Earthquake." New York Times, April 30, 1874, p. 3 c. 6. See: (Nov 3, '8???; 1886 Oct 6.)]


1874 Ap 17 and 19 and later // N.Y. Times 30-3-6 / Shaking of a grist mill near Wrightsville, Jackson Co., Wisconsin. Mill shook and millpond too. Felt at least one place 4 miles away. Windows rattled. Doors flew open. Also a house from which people had fled declaring it haunted. / A Wright is named here as an old inhabitant. There is a Wrightsville. [A; 923.1, 923.2. "A Wisconsin Earthquake." New York Times, April 30, 1874, p. 3 c. 6.]


1874 Ap. 20 / Lyrids conspicuous / Nature 67/585. /// 6. [IV; 1420.1. Henry, John R. "The Lyrid Meteors." Nature, 67 (April 23, 1903): 584-585.]


1874 Ap. 22 / See March. / J. Pomeroy / Saw the Miller boy and an obsession came upon him to torture, if not to kill the boy, ac to his confession, in the N.Y. Times, July 24-1-6. Mutilations were extreme. All he could say was, "I could not help it." [A; 924. "The Boy Murderer." New York Times, July 24, 1874, p. 1 c. 6. "The young murderer gives the same reason for committing this deed as he did for killing Katie Curran, "that he could not help it." See: 1874 March 18, (A; 915).]


[1874 Ap. 22] / Obsession / Jesse Pomeroy / Ap. 22, 1874. [IV; 1420.2. Jesse Harding Pomeroy assaulted and murdered other children in Boston; and, on April 22, 1874, the mutilated remains of Horace Millen was found on a marsh, which prompted a search for Pomeroy and the discovery of Katie Curran's body in the basement of his mother's shop. See: 1874 March 18, (A; 915), and, 1874 Ap. 22, (A; 924).]


1874 Ap. 22 / [LT], 9-f / Wtchcraft in Devonshire. [A; 925. "Witchcraft in Devonshire." London Times, April 22, 1874, p. 9 c. 6.]


1874 Ap. 23 / The q's that made their headquarters in a mill near Wrightsville, Wis. / Ref., Feb. 2. [A; 926. Refer to: 1874 Feb. 2, (IV; 1363). "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1874 Ap. 24 / (3) / (m[oon]) / Astro Reg., 23/205 / Prof Schafarik, of Prague, writes saw at about 3:30 p.m. upon moon illumined nearly [¾ in bright] sunshine "an object of [so] peculiar a character that I do not know what to make of it". A dazzling white object or [star] slowly traversing the disk of the moon and visible after leaving it. / Moon ¾ in sunshine. [IV; 1421.1, 1421.2. Šafárik, A. "Telescopic Meteors." Astronomical Register, (September 1885): 205-211, at 207-208.]


1874 Ap. 24 / San Francisco Chronicle, Ap. 25, copied in Religio Phil Jour., May 23-2-whole page / In Oakland, home of John G. Clark, paying teller of the Bank of California, in his home in Castro Street, Oakland. Three lodgers. Ab 12:30 morning of Ap 24—a long, loud wail—clatter and loud voices—louder and more confused voices. Changed in character—loud talk and then laughter. Now and then whole house jarred as if by fall of a heavy body. Clarks and lodgers alarmed—investigated. In parlor they were in the midst of the noises—a little tea bell began to ring violently. Now and then a note on the piano. Someone seemed to be drumming on a silver salver. A chair moved across the room. Chairs marched around the room in pairs. Next night similar phe. Other animated things—a sofa and a blower from the grate. A big chair spun around like a top. Clark had a daughter—age not stated. Ac to the reporter, other witnesses whom he interviewed, and they said had seen the phe. / In Religio Ph J of May 30, more from San Fran Chronicle, Ap. 27th. That been more phe night of 25th—Clark's statement, and he referred to a dozen persons who had been present. A chair at head of stairs had spun like a top, an three tremendous thumps. Bells all over house began to ring. Boxes bounded over bannisters and fell into hall below. Heavy chair flew down the stairs. Furniture in lodgers' rooms whirling. Chairs and tables marching. One of the lodgers' trunks, weighing 200 pounds, came from his room and flew down the stairs. Later at night "a wild, horrifying scream". Clarks' daughter terrified. Said that she saw a woman's agonized face. [A; 927.1 to 927.7. "A Ghostly Spectacle." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 16 (no. 10; May 23, 1874): 2, (c. 1-5). "The Oakland Mystery." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 16 (no. 11; May 20, 1874): 2, (c. 1-2). (San Francisco Chronicle, April 25, 1874. San Francisco Chronicle, April 27, 1874.) "The Periodical Ghost." Daily Alta California, April 27, 1874. p. 1 c. 3. "]


1874 Ap. 24 / For record of an investigation and report of testimony, see Proc Amer Soc for Psychical Research, 7-193. [A; 928. Hyslop, James H. "A Case of Poltergeist." Proceedings of the American Society for Psychical Research, 7 (1913): 193-425, at 233-425.]


1874 Ap. 24 / San Fran Ev. Bulletin not in N.Y. Library. [A; 929.]


1874 Ap. 24 / Ap. and May numbers of San Fran D. E. Bull. not available. In issue of July 6, in editorial says Clark did not agree with findings of a committee that investigated. [A; 930. (San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin,S May 11, 1874.) (San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, July 6, 1874.) "The Oakland Ghost Investigation." Sacramento Daily Union, May 12, 1874, p. 3 c. 4. The Committee found no evidence of any "supernaturalism" but was not publishing its conclusions without Clark's consent. "Another ghost has turned out a fraud...." Los Angeles Daily Herald, May 14, 1874, p. 2 c. 2.]


1874 Ap. 24 / See June 13. [A; 931. See: 1874 June 13, (A; 938).]


1874 Ap 27 / Doncaster q. / See Ap 29, 1873. [IV; 1422. See: 1873 Ap. 29, (IV; 1208). (Ref??? Roper??? Nothing at BNA for 1874 date.)]


1874 Ap. 29 / q / Connecticut / NY Times, May 3-10-6. [IV; 1423. "Earthquake in Connecticut." New York Times, May 3, 1874, p. 10 c. 6.]


1874 May / Scott, Barisal / Two quick reports that seemed to come from overhead. [IV; 1424. Scott, G.B. "Barisal Guns." Nature, 53 (January 2, 1896) 197.]


1874 May 1 / Booming as if of cannon, Bengal, and sharper reports as if of muskets / G.B. Scott / Nature 53-197. [IV; 1425. Scott, G.B. "Barisal Guns." Nature, 53 (January 2, 1896) 197.]


1874 May / Religio Ph. J—June 20 / Seance phe in home of Eddy family, Chittenden, Vermont. / The Eddy Brothers. [A; 932. "Wonderful Developments." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 16 (no. 14; June 20, 1874): 1, (c. 1- 2).]


1874 May 3 / q and polt / (q) / Woodbridge, Seymour, Bethany, Beacon Falls, Conn. "At first the people thought that an army of spirits had broken loose, but they finally came to the conclusion that they had been visited by an earthquake, and to this opinion they strictly adhere." / Ref, Feb. 2. [IV; 1426.1, 1426.2. Refer to: 1874 Feb. 2, (IV; 1363). "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1874 May 4 / q. / Asia Minor / II / BA '11. [IV; 1427. Milne, 724.]


[1874 May 6 /] 1874 May 8 / Toronto Globe of / "There has been a renewal of the Bald Mt. scare." [IV; 1429. "United States." Toronto Globe, May 6, 1874, p. 4 c. 3.]


1874 May 7 / Constitucion, Chile—shocks preceded rainfall. / Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, May 16. [IV; 1428. (Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, May 16, 1874.)]


1874 May 7 / NY Times, 10-3 / Polts and lights in Des Moines, Iowa. [A; 933. "Des Moines Ghosts." New York Times, May 7, 1874, p. 10 c. 3. (Iowa Daily State Register, May, 1874; on microfilm.)]


1874 May 7 / N.Y. Times, 10-3 / Ghsts in several houses in Des Moines. [A; 934. "Des Moines Ghosts." New York Times, May 7, 1874, p. 10 c. 3.]


[1874 May 8. Wrong date. See: 1874 May 6, (IV; 1429).]


1874 May 11 / Sevrukovo, Kursk, Russia / (F). [IV; 1430. Fletcher, 104. This is the Sevrukovo meteorite.]


1874 May 12 / 11 p.m., ab. / Bristol / met / BA 74-306. [IV; 1431. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 306-307. (Bristol Daily Post, May 13, 1874.)]


1874 May 14 / Nor Car series / See a Norway series ending with a metite, March 11, 1886. [IV; 1432. See: (1886 March 11.).]


1874 May 14 / Nash Co, Nor. Car / metite / 2:30 p.m. / Sounds like gunfire / 3/10/.147 / A.J. Sci. [IV; 1433. Smith, John Lawrence. "Description of the Nash County Meteorite, which fell in May, 1874. American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 10 (1875): 147-148. This is the Castalia meteorite.]


1874 May 14 / Severe shocks and increase of volcanic activity / Hawaii / NY Times, June 22-5-4. [IV; 1434. "Earthquake in Hawaii." New York Times, June 22, 1874, p. 5 c. 4.]


1874 May 14 / 2:30 p.m. / Castalia, Nash Co, Nor Car / luminous body / explosive and rumbling sounds / Stones fell. / BA '75/239 / See July 29. [IV; 1435. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1874-75." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1875, 199-359, at 239. This is the Castalia meteorite.]


1874 May 14 / bet. 3 and 4 p.m. / Loud explosive sound heard in Va—ac to the Petersburg Index, it seemed to be over the city of P. / NY Times 24-9-4. [IV; 1436. "Virginia Shaken." New York Times, May 24, 1874, p. 9 c. 4.]


1874 May 14 / near Castalia, Nash Co., N. Carolina / See Farrington. / (F) / See Feb. 10. / See May 24. / 2:30 p.m. / BA '75-239. [IV; 1437. Fletcher, 104. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1874-75." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1875, 199-359, at 239. This is the Castalia meteorite.]


1874 May 14 / [Isle of] Wight Co, Va. / Loud explosive sound heard. "Various theories have been suggested in solution, but none of a satisfactory character, and the matter stands now as profound a mystery as when it startled, [on last Thursday, as with the crack of doom,] the [quiet] people [of this section]." / Ref, Feb. 2. [IV; 1438. Refer to: 1874 Feb. 2, (IV; 1363). "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1874 May 14 / stat and then move / La Nature, 2/399 / Ernest Payan, astronomer, of Marseilles, writes that at 10:30 p.m. that he saw in the sky a splendid red star of first magnitude. It scintillated rapidly. Was stationary one minute, then moved slowly away and disappeared in the fog ½ minute later / Ch-37. [IV; 1439.1, 1439.2. "Un Bolide aux Environs de Marseille." La Nature, 1874 pt. 1 (no. 51; May 23): 399.]


1874 May 14 / q—metite / N. Eng and Canada / May 20, 23, 1848 / to Aug. 26. [IV; 1440. See: 1848 May 20, (II: 1187 & 1220), and, 1848 May 23, (II; 1221).]


1874 May 16 / Mainz., Germany / q / I / BA '11. [IV; 1441. Milne, 725.]


1874 May 19 / 12:50 a.m. / Off Holyhead, met—oval. Major diameter equal to apparent size of sun. / BA '74-306. [IV; 1442. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 306-307.]


1874 May 20 / (F) / Virba, near Vidin, Turkey / Stone / Appendix / BA 75-239 / A.J. Sci 3/8/399 / C.R. 79/276. [IV; 1443. Fletcher, 104. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1874-75." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1875, 199-359, at 239-240. "Meteorites." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 8 (1874): 399. Daubrée. "Note sur une météorite tombée, le 20 mai 1874, en Turquie, à Virba près Vidin." Comptes Rendus, 79 (1874): 276. This is the Virba meteorite. Vidin is now located in Bulgaria.]


1874 May 21 / T. Globe of / A new black bug in the peach orchards of Wilmington. [IV; 1444. (Toronto Globe, May 21, 1874; not found in May 21 to 23, 1874.) "Destruction of Fruit Trees by Bugs." Wilmington Daily Gazette, May 21, 1874, p. 2 c. 2. ]


1874 May 23 / [LT], 10-f / 25-12-e / Egyptian Mystery. [A; 935. "The Egyptian Mystery." London Times, May 23, 1874, p. 10 c. 6. "The Egyptian Mystery." London Times, May 25, 1874, p. 12 c. 5. This mystery only concerned an abusive marriage and fraud.]


1874 May 28 / Cass Co (Michigan) Republican of 28th, copied in the Religio-Ph. Jour, July 18-3-2—haunted sawmill—Hackley's mill, at Muskegon, Mich. Lumber been found cut in it during night. Men watched. Midnight, mill filled with a "supernatural light", and they saw shadowy forms handling lumber and cutting it. [A; 936.1, 936.2. "A Haunted Saw Mill." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 16 (no. 18; July 18, 1874): 3, (c. 2). (Cass County Republican, May 28, 1874.)]


1874 May 30 / Guttenburgh, Iowa / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1445. Finley, 4.]


1874 June 4 / Sam's Creek, Maryland / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1446. Finley, 4.]


1874 June 6 / water / Religio-Ph. Jour., 2-4 / House ab. 4 miles west of Heyworth, Ill., occupied by a Mr. White. A soldier had died on one of the rooms—insane first. Water was moistening the floor. [A; 937. "Strange Incident." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 16 (no. 12; June 6, 1874): 2, (c. 4-5).]


1874 June 9 / Carbonate of soda in hail / Elizabeth, N.J. / D-63. ** [IV; 1447. The note copies information from pages 63 to 64 of The Book of the Damned. "Soda Hailstones." Scientific American, n.s., 31 (October 24, 1874): 262. ]


1874 June 13 / Religio Phil Jour, 4-3, from Livermore, in home of J.L. Mitchell in room of a young lady, a visitor, a Miss Cayzres, almost every night for 2 weeks. Deafening sounds which followed her from room to room. Miss C taken ill and had to have watchers. This night the sounds ceased. Thumps resumed. Miss C. fled to San Fran and phe stopped. [A; 938.1, 938.2. "Ghostly Agitation in California." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 16 (no. 13; June 13, 1874): 4, (c. 3).]


1874 June 13 / [Religio Phil. Jour], 4-3 / See Ap. 24. [A; 939. "Ghostly Agitation in California." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 16 (no. 13; June 13, 1874): 4, (c. 3). See: 1874 Ap. 24, (A: 927, 928, & 930).]


1874 June 16 / near Mt. Desert, Me. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1448. Finley, 4.]


1874 June 17 / 7:30 p.m. / In Valparaiso and West Coast Mail of 20th, said that a large ball of fire had been seen in the sky—visible for 20 minutes. [IV; 1449. (Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, June 20, 1874.)]


1874 June 17 / N. / (1887 / Cochin China) / Sulphur / Austria / Nature 10/430. [IV; 1451. "The British Association." Nature, 10 (September 24, 1874): 430-434, at 430. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 272. "It is remarkable that perfectly authentic statements were received of the deposition, soon after, or about the time of, the meteor's explosion over Zittau and its neighbourhood, of a mass of melted and burning sulphur the size of a man's fist, on the roadway of a village, Proschwitz, about 4 miles south of Reichenberg, where the meteor exploded nearly in the zenith. It was stamped out by a crowd of the villagers, who could give no other explanation of its appearance on the spot than that it had proceeded from the meteor; on examination at Breslau some remnants of the substance proved to be pure sulphur." A footnote, here, also states: "Some accounts of a brownish dust having been seen falling, and of a deposit of fine yellow sand having been collected in its descent from the air, are contained in the original descriptions; but the evidence of these occurrences appears to have been too slight and indistinct to allow them to be certainly connected with the meteor." Niessl [von Mayendorf], Gustav. "Ueber das Meteor vom 17. Juni 1873." Astronomische Nachrichten, 83 (1874): 161-174, at 167-168. Following the lightning flash of the fireball, with detonations following, the Reichberger Zeitung reported: "Einige dieser brennenden Theile der geborstenen Feuerkugel fielen in unserem Dorfe, vielleicht auch in der nächsten Umgebung nieder, eines gerade auf die Strasse, nicht weit von dem Orte, wo icli mich befand und wo dasselbe in der Grösse einer Faust mit einer blauen Flamme und Schwefelgeruch fortbrannte, von herbeieilenden Leuten jedoch mit Fusstritten ausgelöscht wurde. Leider wurde durch diese gewaltsame Einwirkung die brennende Masse auseinandergetrieben, mit Staub und Sand vermengt, so dass nach dem Erkalten nur kleine Stückchen in der Grösse einer Erbse gesammelt werden konnten, von denen einige in meinen Händen sind und ein schlacken-bimsteinartiges Aussehen haben. Obwohl die Stelle, wo die brennende Masse niederfiel, nur höchstens 600 Schritte von meinem Beobachtungsorte entfernt ist, dauerte es doch fast zwei Minuten, ehe der Schall der Detonation mein Ohr erreichte." Galle, Johann Gottfried. "Ueber die Berechnung der Bahnen heller an vielen Orten beobachteter Meteore, mit einer Anwendung auf das Meteor vom 17. Juni v. J." Astronomische Nachrichten, 83 (1874): 321-350, at 324. "Der bereits in No. 1955 der Astr. Nachr. erwähnte kleine Klumpen einer schleimigen brennenden Masse, welcher in Proschwitz bei Reichenberg in Böhmen kurz nach der Meteor-Erscheinung auf dem Fusswege der Chaussee gefunden wurde und deren aufgesammelte Reste Herr Oberlehrer Appelt daselbst mir zu überlassen die Gefälligkeit hatte, erwies sich nach einer Untersuchung meiner hiesigen Collegen der Herren Prof. Dr. Websky und Prof. Dr. Poleck als reiner Schwefel. Es ist bis jetzt unaufgeklärt geblieben, wie dieser geschmolzene und brennende Schwefel auf den glatt getretenen Fussweg der Chaussee (die dort gerade gegen 50 Schritte von den weitläufig zerstreuten kleinen Häusern des Dorfes entfernt war) gekommen ist, besonders da das Meteor, wenn mau auch einen Zusammenhang damit annehmen wollte, gegen 3 Meilen südwestlich von Proschwitz vorüberzog." Reichenberg is now Liberec, in the Czech Republic. See: (1887 Oct 25??? "A Remarkable Meteor." Scientific American, n.s.,  58 (May 12, 1888): 289. Delauney. "Uranolithe Colossal Tombê en Cochinchine." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 93-96.)???).]


1874 June 18-19 / ab midnight / Shocks / Salt Lake City / N.Y. Times, 25-3-5. [IV; 1450. "Earthquake in Utah." New York Times, June 25, 1874, p. 3 c. 5.]


[1874 June 20. Wrong date. See: 1874 June 26, (IV; 1452).]


1874 June 22 / afternoon / Butler Co., Kansas / Tornado. / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1453. Finley, 4.]


1874 June 22 / (See 23.) / q. / Hong Kong / NY Times, Dec 20-10-1. [IV; 1454. See: 1874 June 23, (IV; 1455). "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1874 June 23 / Hong Kong. / Ab. 1:30 a.m., heavy fall of rain began. Ceased at 8, and 8:40 shocks. / North China Herald, Dec. 14, 1878, p. 573. [IV; 1455. (North China Herald, December 14, 1878, p. 573; possibly at Proquest.)]


1874 June 25 / Marion, Va / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1456. Finley, 4.]


[1874 June 26 /] 1874 June 20 / or 26? // Montgomery Co., Kansas / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1452. Finley, 4. The date given by Finley was June 26, 1874. Finley, John Park. "Paper 49. Tornadoes." Annual Report of the Chief Signal Officer to the Secretary of War for the Year 1880, 984-1096, at 1095.]


1874 June 26 / South Bend, Ind. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1457. Finley, 4.]


1874 June 26 / Strong shocks / Constantinople / NY Times 29-1-5. [IV; 1458. "Turkey." New York Times, June 29, 1874, p. 1 c. 5.]


1874 June 26 / near Independence, Iowa / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1459. Finley, 4.]


1874 June 26 / South Bend, Ind. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1460. Finley, 4.]


1874 June 27 / Strong shocks / Constantinople / San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin 29-1-2. [IV; 1461. (San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, June 29, 1874, p. 1 c. 2.)]


1874 June 30 / San Fran. Daily Ev. Bulletin, 4-2. / In a house in Omaha, every other night at 12 o'clock, a baby heard to cry and a cradle rocking, though the house was babyless and cradleless. [A; 940. (San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, June 30, 1874, p. 4 c. 2.)]


1874 [Aug 18] // summer /// Cambridge, Eng / Ants / D-91. [IV; 1462. The note copies information from page 91 of The Book of the Damned. "Queer rains." Scientific American, n.s., 31 (September 26, 1874): 193. "The Ant Cloud of August 18." Cambridge Chronicle and Journal, August 22, 1874, p. 8 c. 4-5. "The Ant Shower of August 18." Cambridge Chronicle and Journal, August 29, 1874, p. 8 c. 5.]


1874 // summer /// Grasshopper plague in Minnesota. In later writings say the same not becoming so peculiar about date in Aug / [note cut off] and disturbances [note cut off] 1882. [IV; 1463. "The Western Locust Plague." Scientific American, n.s., 31 (August 22, 1874): 119, (illustration). Department of the Interior. Second Report of the United States Entomological Commission for the Years 1878 and 1879 Relating to the Rocky Mountain Locust.... Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1880. The Rocky Mountain locust was a distinct species, which repeatedly devastated farms across the prairie states; and, Dr. Albert Lyman Child, at Plattsmouth, Nebraska, has been credited for measuring the largest swarm of locusts, in 1875. He wrote, (at page 92): "The extent of the swarm it is difficult to ascertain, as the observer can only see a small belt. They may extend indefinitely right or left. During the flight from June 15 to 25 of 1875, I telegraphed east and west. I found a continuous line moving northward of 110 miles, and then somewhat broken 40 miles farther. The movements of the winds for five days (15th to 20th) averaged about 10 miles per hour; and the locust evidently moved considerably faster than the wind, at least 15 miles per hour. The swarm I estimated at from one-quarter to one-half mile deep. It seemed like piercing the milky-way of the heavens; my glass found no limits to them. They might have been a mile or more in depth. They were visible from six to seven hours of each of the successive five days, and I can see no reason to suppose that their flight was checked during the whole five days. If so, the army in the line of advance would be 120 hours by 15 miles per hour = 1,800 miles in length, and say at even 110 miles in width, an area of 198,000 miles ! and then from one-quarter to one-half mile deep. This is utterly incredible, yet how can we put it aside?" Did these locusts actually remain aloft in a swarm, flying "1,800 miles" for five whole days, without ever landing or feeding? One could readily put his calculations aside, by asking just how far this swarm actually travelled. Was this "continuous line" observed anywhere beyond as much as half of the distance of his estimated movement, (ie. half of that "1,800 miles"), away from Plattsmouth, Nebraska? A circle with a radius of 500 miles, around Plattsmouth, would extend from the Rockies in Colorado, (westward), into Indiana and Kentucky, (eastward), to the southern border of Oklahoma, (southward),  and across most of Minnesota, (northward). Was this swarm reported by any observer in Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Chicago, St. Louis, Evansville, Memphis, Oklahoma City, or Kansas City? A circular cloud of locusts, (198,000 square miles in area), would have a radius of about 250 miles, (which, centered upon Plattsmouth), would cover most of Iowa, half of Nebraska, Kansas, and Missouri, and southern parts of South Dakota and Minnesota. "Miscellaneous Phenomena." Monthly Weather Review, 3 (no. 6; June 1875): 7. "Locusts.—At Plattsmouth, Neb., immense swarms of locusts moved north, northeast, and northwest, from the 13th to the end of the month. The river-observer there says: 'Vast quantities of locusts were seen flying over from the 15th to the 25th of June, inclusive, except the 19th, 20th and 21st. The line was from 100 to 150 miles in width and from one-quarter to one-half mile in depth. As only a few descended, no serious damage resulted.' They seem to have floated along in the prevailing wind. Locusts were at Ellenwood, Kan., on the 17th." Where else? Grasshoppers were reported at Denver, at Leavenworth, ("gone by the 13th"), in Iowa, ("Grasshoppers left Iowa on the 18th"), in Kansas ("on the 3d" and "on the 12th"), in New Mexico, and, "Millions are reported drowned by the heavy rains in the Missouri valley.". "Miscellaneous Phenomena." Monthly Weather Review, 3 (no. 7; July 1875): 8. In July, grasshoppers and locusts were reported from Burlingame and Colton, (Kansas), Newark, (New Jersey), and Virginia City, (as well as Plattsmouth, on the 2d, the 6th, and the 7th and 8th, respectively to the west, south, and northwest). Apart from the "continuous line" (east and west from Plattsmouth), the few reports by other weather observers do not suggest a massive swarm, ("1,800 miles" in length), extending into neighbouring Iowa, nor to Minnesota and the Dakota Territory. "Grasshoppers." Chicago Tribune, July 6, 1875, p. 7 c. 1-2. The region devastated in Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, and Kansas, was reviewed, county by county. "Its extreme length is about 250 miles, and its greatest width about 160 miles. Were it reduced to an exact parallelogram, its dimensions would be in the neighbourhood of 85 by 210 miles—nearly twenty thousand square miles." Holliday, Neil J. "Norman Criddle: Pioneer Entomologist of the Prairies." Manitoba History, no. 51 (February 2006): 8-15, at 11. The last living specimens of the Rocky Mountain locust were collected by Norman Criddle, in Manitoba, in 1902, during the last outbreak involving them, in 1898 to 1903. The species was declared extinct in 2014.]


1874 // summer /// West. / Grasshopper plague / I have not all in N.Y. Times Index, "Grasshoppers". [IV; 1464.  "The Grasshoppers." New York Times, July 7, 1874, p. 2 c. 7. "The Grasshopper Plague." New York Times, July 14, 1874, p. 2 c. 1-2. "The Grasshoppers Moving East." New York Times, July 17, 1874, p. 4 c. 6. "The Grasshoppers in Iowa." New York Times, July 20, 1874, p. 8 c. 5-6. "The Grasshoppers in the North-West." New York Times, July 21, 1874, p. 8 c. 4. "The Grasshoppers." New York Times, July 30, 1874, p. 2 c. 5-6. "The Grasshoppers." New York Times, July 31, 1874, p. 2 c. 5. "The Grasshoppers." New York Times, August 1, 1874, p. 4 c. 7. "The Insect Plague." New York Times, August 3, 1874, p. 5 c. 1-2. "The Locusts of the West." New York Times, August 17, 1874, p. 5 c. 4-5.]


1874 July-Dec / I have not all cases of Child-stealing in N.Y. Times index. [A; 941. "Child-Stealing." New York Times, July 26, 1874, p. 5 c. 3-4. "Some Recent Instances of Kidnapping." New York Times, December 6, 1874, p. 5 c. 4.]


1874 July-Dec / Child-stealing in U.S. / See if L. Times Index. [A; 942. "Police." London Times, August 17, 1874, p. 11 c. 5-6. "Police." London Times, September 10, 1874, p. 11 c. 4-6. "Central Criminal Court." London Times, September 19, 1874, p. 5 c. 2. "Central Criminal Court, Sept. 23." London Times, September 24, 1874, p. 9 c. 1-4.]   


1874 July 1 / afternoon / Charlie Ross stolen / aged 4. [A; 943. Ross, Christian Kunkel. The Father's Story of Charley Ross, the Kidnapped Child. Philadelphia: J.E. Potter, 1876.]


1874 July 6 / Trumpet form in the sky / Oaxaca / Mexico / D-275 / Comet? ** [V; 1465. The note copies information from page 275 of The Book of the Damned. "An Aerial Meteorite." Scientific American Supplement, 6 (no. 149; November 9, 1878): 2365, (illustration). "The aerial meteorite had the form of a gigantic spiral trumpet, suspended vertically in the air, its mouth toward the earth. It was estimated to be about 425 feet long, 200 feet diameter at the widest part of its base, and 76 feet at its narrowest diameter. It ha a clear limpid crystal color. It oscillated gently, and remained floating in the air for five or six minutes, when it vanished. There was no wind or rain at the time, although there were clouds, indicative of the approach of rain. Time, 4 P.M." Villafane, Lucas. "Memoria que el que suscribe dirige á la Sociedad de Geografia y Estadistica de la República, acerca del meteoro aéreo observado en esta ciudad el 8 del corriente." Boletín de la Sociedad Mexicana de Geografía y Estadística, s. 3 v. 4 (1878): 45-46, (illustration). The illustration of this "tromba," (waterspout), does not show the reference points in the author's description for the estimated (metric) measurements. Its height was estimated as 128 meters, its base upon the water as 13 meters wide, and rising into a clear column, ("claro y limpio como el cristal"), only 2 meters across.]


1874 July 7 / San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, 3-6 / the comet in the northern heavens was attracting the attention of thousands of people every night. [IV; 1466. (San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, July 7, 1874, p. 3 c. 6.) "The Comet." New York Herald, July 8, 1874, p. 3 c. 1-3. Comet C/1874 H1.]


1874 June, July / Coggia's Comet discovered Ap 17 but not visible till June. [IV; 1467. (Hind, John Russell. London Times, "June 6, 7-f" 1874.) Comet C/1874 H1.]


1874 July 7 / Repeat / 2:07 a.m. / Strong shock / Valparaiso / See July 7, 1873. / Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, July 11. [IV; 1468. (Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, July 11, 1874.)]


1874 July 7 / anti-visitors / 8:55 p.m. / bet Harrow and Southall. / Three rifle balls whizzed past the balloon of J. Simmons, who complaining in LT 10-11-f. / Heard the reports. [A; 944. Simmons, J. "Shooting at a Balloon." London Times, July 10, 1874, p. 11 c. 6.]


1874 July 9 / 4 p.m. / Cairo, Ill / q / Ref, Jan 6. [IV; 1469. Refer to: 1874 Jan 6, (IV; 1356). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 5." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 9 (1875): 331-334, at 333.]


1874 /ab July 10 // "Some magnificent clusters of spots on the sun." / LT 10-12-c. [IV; 1470. "Spots on the Sun." London Times, July 10, 1874, p. 12 c. 3.]


1874 July 10 / N.Y. Times, 4-6 / The grasshopper plague, Iowa and Nebraska. [IV; 1471. "The Grasshopper Plague." New York Times, July 10, 1874, p. 4 c. 6.]


1874 July 11 / Rainfall of Symons Met Mag 9-97. [IV; 1472. "The Rainfall of July 11th, 1874." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 9 (August 1874): 97-100.]


1874 July 11 / Ball lightning / Nature 36/215. [A; 945. "Societies and Academies." Nature, 36 (June 30, 1889): 214-216, at 215. Marcet. W. "On Atmospheric Electricity." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 14 (1888): 197-207, at 203-204.]


1874 July 11 / Like polt house / San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, 4-7 / A "witches' glen" near Dubuque near track of the Illinois Central Railroad. "Mysterious noises, fairy voices, thrilling shrieks and agonizing moans." [A; 946. (San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, July 11, 1874, p. 4 c. 7.)]


1874 July 14 / N.Y. Times, 2-4 / Yarn of human figures seen under the sun / In Kentucky. [IV; 1473. "A Kentucky Marvel." New York Times, July 14, 1874, p. 2 c. 4.]


1874 July 16 / 12:45 a.m. / Kent / great met / BA 74-308. [IV; 1474. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 308-309.]


1874 July 18 / ab. 9 p.m. / Central Ky. / great met / A.J. Sci 3/10/203 / Prof Smith notes this but also refers to it as of 8th. [IV; 1475. Smith, John Lawrence. "On the Passage of two Bolides in 1872 and 1874, over Middle Kentucky." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 10 (1875): 203-205.]


1874 July 18 / Religio-Phil. Jour, p. 4 / At Okalona, Mississippi—brickbats, pieces of plaster, smoothing irons, etc., flying about in a house. Some persons bruised a little—no one seriously hurt. [A; 947. "The Spirits at Work." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 16 (no. 18; July 18, 1874): 4, (c. 3-4).]


1874 July 18 / Aurora / London. / by Herbert Ingall—bright bluish flames shooting over S.W. and W horizon. / Capron, Aurorae, p. 23. [IV; 1476. Capron, John Rand. Aurorae: Their Characters and Spectra. London: E. & F.N. Spon, 1879, 23.]


1874 July 18 / Aurora or flickering rays in SW. / E. Mec 591 / 19/511. [IV; 1477. Ingall, Herbert. "Aurora on July 18." English Mechanic, 19 (no. 488; July 31, 1874): 510-511, (illustration). "I had just set out for home, walking through the fields, and was remarking [sic, regarding] the sky in the extreme. S.E. and S. horizon, which appeared more luminous than usual, when my attention was arrested by a growing brightness in the SW., and a moment afterwards bright bluish flames swept over the SW. and W. horizons as if before a high wind!| They were not streamers, but were like pale blue flames; I have never seen anything like them before. They lasted for about a minute and faded, but about two minutes afterwards a growing luminosity appeared above the WSW. horizon, breaking out suddenly into the most intensely brilliant beams and streamers of greenish light. The phenomenon was confined completely to the western sky, but the extreme rays made an angle of 90° with each other, the central ray reaching an altitude of over 30°." "The extreme divergence of the beams or streamers (showing, to my mind, their great length, in comparison to their height above the earth’s surface) and their direction (from WSW. to ENE.) being at right angles to the magnetic meridian, and to the ordinary polar aurora, seem points indicating disturbance of an abnormal character." Lowdon, Ralph. "Aurora—Meteoric Display—Saturn's Satellites." English Mechanic, 19 (no. 491; August 21, 1874): 591.]


1874 July 18  / 9:40 p.m. / Versailles / Met almost size of moon passed near Cho and Lambda of "Vierge" / C.R. 79/177. [IV; 1478. Brettes, Martin de. "Observation d'un bolide, dans la soirée du 18 juillet, à Versailles." Comptes Rendus, 79 (1874): 177. "Vierge" is Virgo.]


1874 July 18 / ab. 11:30 p.m. / N.Y. Times 25-2-2 / Detonating meteor near Bangor, Maine. [IV; 1479. "Fall of a Meteor." New York Times, July 25, 1874, p. 2 c. 2.]


1874 July 21 / Time of Hydrophobia / N.Y. Times, 2-7 / Young man, William War, in Baltimore scare. All signs of hydrophobia. Said been bitten by a dog ten years before. [A; 948. "Imaginary Hydrophobia." New York Times, July 21, 1874, p. 2 c. 7.]


[End of Series A.]


1874 July 24 / Waterspout burst near Eureka, Nevada. / N.Y. Times 26-1-4. [IV; 1480. "Latest Particulars of the Storm—Houses Swept Away and Lives Lost." New York Times, July 26, 1874, p. 1 c. 4. No waterspout is mentioned in this article, (only a cloudburst and flash flood).]


1874 July 26 / evening / Lemberg / meteor / Zeit Met 10-272. [IV; 1481. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 10 (1875): 268-272, at 272.]


1874 July 27 / 4:50 p.m. / Waterspout off Milford Haven / Nature 10-263. [IV; 1482. Scott, Robert H. "A Waterspout at Milford Haven." Nature, 10 (August 6, 1874): 263.]


1874 July 27 / (Fr) / 8:15 p.m.—Toulon / 8:50, Versailles / great mets / BA 74-308. [IV; 1483. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 308-309. Brettes, Martin de. "Observation d'un bolide à Versailles, dans la soirée du 27 juillet,." Comptes Rendus, 79 (1874): 329. Lecourgeon. "Observation d'un bolide à Toulon, le 27 juillet,." Comptes Rendus, 79 (1874): 329.]


1874 July 27 / 8:15 p.m. / Bolide / Toulon / C.R., 79-329 / ¼ size of moon. [IV; 1484. Lecourgeon. "Observation d'un bolide à Toulon, le 27 juillet,." Comptes Rendus, 79 (1874): 329.]


1874 July 28 / Vegetable debris in hail / Toulouse, France / (D-175). ** [IV; 1485. The note copies information from page 175 of The Book of the Damned. Joly. "Grélons tombés a Toulouse, le 28 Juillet." La Science Pour Tous, 19 (1874): 270.]


1874 July 29 / In Chowan Co., Nor. Car. In 6 hours rain fell to the depth of 12 inches. / Pop. Sci Mo 6/256 / Nor Car series, Jan-May, 1874. [IV; 1486. "Notes." Popular Science Monthly, 6 (December 1874): 255-256, at 256.]


1874 July 30 / Comet in Draco / Sc Am 31-104. [IV; 1487. "Another New Comet." Scientific American, n.s., 31 (August 15, 1874): 104. Comet C/1874 O1.]


1874 Aug 1 / 10:50 p.m. / Corbridge, Northumberland / "Large ball of fire with many smaller ones with train. / BA '74-310. [IV; 1488. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 310-311. (Newcastle Daily Chronicle, August 3, 1874; not at BNA.)]


1874 Aug, early / Shocks in Guatemala up to q. of Sept 3. [IV; 1489. Milne, 725. "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1874 Aug 1 / q's in Guatemala from Aug 1 / N.Y. Times, Dec 20-10-1 / deluge of volcanic mud. [IV; 1490. "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


[Series B begins.]


1874 Aug 7 / Medium and Daybreak of, from N.Y. Times / In Russell Co., Kentucky, reported by a Mr. Davis and 2 brothers named Pierce in a cloudless sky—human figures emerging from side of the sun. Then a large eagle which circled around. [B; 1. (Medium and Daybreak, August 7, 1874.) (New York Times, bef. August 7, 1874.) (Daily Telegraph, bef. August 7, 1874.) (Possibly: See: 1874 July 14, (IV; 1473)??? / "A Kentucky Marvel." New York Times, July 14, 1874, p. 2 c. 4. / Yarn of human figures seen under the sun / In Kentucky.]


1874 Aug 7 / Bazile, Portneuf, Canada / low rumblings, loud reverberations—and shocks of earth. / Ref, Feb. 2. [IV; 1491. Refer to: 1874 Feb. 2, (IV; 1363). "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3. Saint-Basile, Quebec.]


1874 Aug 8 / Shocks / St. Thomas and St Kitts / N.Y. Times, Dec 20-10-3. [IV; 1492. "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1874 Aug / Maximum of Perseids / Observatory 46-169. [V; 1493. Denning, William Frederick. "Meteor Notes." Observatory, 46 (1923): 169-170.]


1874 Aug / 252 Perseids in 4 hours / Nature 90-93. [IV; 1494. "The Perseid Shower of Meteors." Nature, 90 (September 19, 1912): 93.]


1874 Aug 11 / Disap summit of Mt. Snowdon. [B; 2. "Frederic Wilton, of the City of London School, is stated to be missing...." Edinburgh Evening News, August 19, 1874, p. 3 c. 2.]


1874 Aug 11 / Daily News before Aug 29 has an account —. [B; 3. "The body of Mr. Frederick Roberts Wilton...." London Daily News, August 26, 1874, p. 4 c. 4. "The Fatal Accident at Snowdon." London Daily News, August 27, 1874, p. 6 c. 5.]


1874 Aug 11 / In the Carnarvon and Denbigh Herald of 29th said that far from any path the body was found on the 24th. There were bruises upon the body and the verdict at the inquest was that the deceased had slipped and fallen from a great height. But though there were bruises there were no injuries to coount for death, ac to testimony of the surgeon who had examined the body. Glass of watch unbroken. Straw hat covering face, umbrella near by. There was no evidence of his having fallen. One witness testified that in his belief deceased had not fallen but had slipped, his head striking a stone. Ac to surgeo no injuries to head. No broken bones. Hat on face as if shading eyes. And yet surgeon thought that his bruises had prevented his moving, and that he had hied of exposure. / He was Mr. F.R. Wilton, fo London. Nothing to indicate internal injuries. [B; 4.1 to 4.5. (Carnarvon and Denbigh Herald, August 29, 1874.)]


1874 Aug 11 / See Aug 29, 1910. [IV; 1495. See: (1910 Aug 29.)]


1874 Aug 15 / Religio-P. J, 4-4 / In cemetery, Georgetown, Ky. Found that a massive monument had been moved around—facing another way. [B; 5. "A Mystery." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 16 (no. 22; August 15, 1874): 4, (c. 4).]


1874 Aug 18 // N.Y. Evening Post of (copied in the Spiritualist) Sept. 11 / Home of Henry Nolan, Fishing Creek, ab. 20 miles from Burton, W. Va. Son, John, ab 13, told that he was followed about by an old grey haired man, whom he but no one else, could see. Sent away and the annoyance stopped. Returned and "every step dogged in the same mysterious manner." Then stones were hurled at him by the figure. Neighbors surrounded the house and saw the stones falling upon the roof. The boy walked in a field and stones fell around him. Boy pointed at the figure and armed men rushed to the place, finding nothing. Upon one occasion the figure became visible to all. Stones flew around the boy. Boy had "wasted away to a shadow of his former self." [B; 6.1 to 6.4. "Strange Story about Stone Throwing by Spirits." Spiritualist Newspaper, (London),  5 (no. 11; September 11, 1874): 129-130. "A Strange Story." Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, (West Virginia), August 14, 1874, p. 3 c. 1-2. The dates, when the neighbors witnessed the stones falling about John Nolan and their attempts to capture the phantom, were from July 29 to 31, 1874.]


1874 Aug 18 / Prodigious swarms of ants winged and wingless, in London / LT—20-5-f / 21-7-a / 22-9-b / 24-11-e / North of England / The roads are covered with them and they are flying in clouds on the tops of the mountains. / 25-4-f, swarms in Scotland—on 19th, Curmberland and Isle of Wight. / See B.D.-91. [IV; 1496.1, 1496.2. (D-91.) "Ants." London Times, August 20, 1874, p. 5 c. 6. "Swarm of Ants." London Times, August 21, 1874, p. 7 c. 1. "Swarm of Ants." London Times, August 22, 1874, p. 9 c. 2. "Ants." London Times, August 24, 1874, p. 11 c. 5. "Ants." London Times, August 25, 1874, p. 4 c. 6.]


1874 Aug 20 / Hot / Winona, Miss / N.Y. Times 30-5-5 / After a thunderstorm, came blasts of hot air. "These gusts felt like blasts from a furnace, parching the cheek and causing headache and slight giddiness, and soon excited the attention of everybody in town." Phe lasted from 5 to 6 p.m. [IV; 1497.1, 1497.2. "Singular Phenomenon." New York Times, August 30, 1874, p. 5 c. 5. "Thermometers were suspended in the air currents, and went up, in a few minutes, from 88° to 98°. The difference between a thermometer in open air on Front street and a thermometer in the open air on Summit street was 10° at the same moment—they being only about thirty yards apart. Nothing of the kind has ever been known to any person there, and no satisfactory reason has been offered."]


1874 Aug 24 / Russia / 25—Phillipines / 25—Russia / 26—W. Indies, Porto Rico // q's / B.A. '11. / Sims / See Feb 18, 1889. [IV; 1498. Milne, 725. See: (1889 Feb 18.)]


1874 Aug 24, 25 / Vladikavkas, Russia / small qs / BA '11. [IV; 1499. Milne, 725.]


1874 Aug. 29, etc. / Eruption / Etna / Phil Mag 4/49/129-34. / C.R. 79-790. [IV; 1500. Silvestri, Orazio. "The Eruption of Etna on the 29th of August, 1874." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 49 (January & June, 1875): 126-134. "M. le Ministre des Affaires Étrangères transmet à l'Académie...." Comptes Rendus, 79 (1874): 790.]


1874 Aug 26 / Violent shocks / Porto Rico / N.Y. Times, Dec 20-10-3. [IV; 1501. "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1874 Aug 29, ab / Religio-Philosoph Journal (Chicago), Aug 29 / or the Spiritualist, Oct 16 / Polt in a boarding house in Milwaukee after arrival of a new servant girl, Mary Spiegel, ab 14 years old. Things thrown about. Full details. [B; 7. "Bewitched." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 16 (no. 24; August 29, 1874): 2, (c. 1-3) . "Household Work Disturbed by Spirits." Spiritualist Newspaper, (London), 5 (no. 16; October 16, 1874): 183-185.]


1874 Aug 30 / Etna / Nature 10-361. [IV; 1502. "Notes." Nature, 10 (September 3, 1874): 359-361, at 361.]


1874 / ab last of Aug // Loud detonations but short eruption on island of Reunion / Nature 14-333. [IV; 1503. Vélain, Charles. "The Volcano of Réunion." Nature, 14 (August 17, 1874): 333-336, at 333. Vélain, Charles. "Une Excursion au Volcan de la  Réunion." La Nature, 1876 pt. 2 (no. 160; June 24): 50-54, (illustrations). The Piton de la Fournaise volcano.]


1874 Sept, about / Myst stone said fallen on farm near Byron, Mich / Phe later. See Sept. 14, 1875. [B; 8. See: (1875 Sept. 14)1875 Sept. 4 / Stones / Religio-P. J., 196-4, copying from Detroit Free Press—on farm of Mrs. Turner, near Byron, Mich—She and the hired girl startled by stones arriving "more as if the stones were carried about swiftly in an invisible hand than if they were thrown." / There was a Mr Turner. / Out in fields, men said stones were falling about them. Someone told of a mysterious stone that fell about a year before—then said that pictures were forming on window glass. [B; 67. "A Haunted Farm House." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 18 (no. 25; September 4, 1875): 196, (c. 4).]


1874 Sept. 1 / Serial bolide / Eng. 71-78 / Observatory 2/271. [IV; 1504. Denning, William Frederick. "Meteor Notes for December." Observatory, 2 (1878): 270-271. See: 1871 Sept 1, (IV; 499).]


1874 Sept 1 / [LT], 3-a / 3-3-a / 7-3-a / 15-3-b // Etna. [IV; 1505. "Eruption of Mount Etna." London Times, September 1, 1874, p. 3 c. 1. "Italy." London Times, September 3, 1874, p. 3 c. 1. "Italy." London Times, September 7, 1874, p. 3 c. 1. "Mount Etna." London Times, September 15, 1874, p. 3 c. 2.]


1874 Sept 3 / q in Guatemala—had been shocks from early in Aug. / L.T., Nov. 9-5-f / Sky overcast with dense clouds—shock at 9:18 p.m. / and volc eruption. Great eruption of mud in a stream that carried trees. [IV; 1506. "The Earthquake in Guatemala." London Times, November 9, 1874, p. 5 c. 6. Neither the Cerro del Tigre volcano, in El Salvador, nor the Agua volcano, near Antigua, Guatemala, have erupted in historical times; but, the "stream of mud" that swept into Antigua could have resulted from an eruption of a mud volcano, hot spring, or a lahar.]


1874 Sept 5, 6, 7 / (NM) / Aug. / Toulouse / La Nat 1874/2/239. [IV; 1507. "Corpuscles sur le soleil." La Nature, 1874 pt. 2 (no. 67; September 12): 239.]


1874 Sept. 8 / See Showers. / At Newcastle, England, a spiritualistic circle—showers of water. [B; 9. See: (Showers.)]


1874 Sept 9 / A supposed rock in the Atlantic reported by a sea captain. Or a wreck? / L.T., Nov. 23-4-f. [IV; 1508. "Supposed Rock in the Atlantic." London Times, November 23, 1874, p. 4 c. 6.]


1874 Sept 10 / N.Y. Times, 3-2 / Drought / Delaware Valley. [IV; 1509."Drought in the Delaware Valley." New York Times, September 10, 1874, p. 3 c. 2.]


1874 Sept. 14 / 9:28 p.m. / Versailles / bolide from the "Dauphin" / C.R. 79-704. [IV; 1510. Brettes, Martin de. "Observation d'un bolide à Versailles, dans la soirée du 14 septembre." Comptes Rendus, 79 (1874): 704-705. The "Dauphin" is the Delphinus constellation.]


1874 Sept. 16, 21, 23 / Oct. 9, 10, 11 / Nov. 10, 12 // Zodiacal light / Toulouse / C.R. 79/1250. [IV; 1511. Gruey. "Observations de la lumière zodiacale à Toulouse les 16, 21, 23 septembre; 9, 10, 11 octobre; 10, 12 novembre 1874." Comptes Rendus, 79 (1874): 1250-1253.]


1874 Sept 16 / 8:53 p.m. / Hampshire met / BA 75-203. [IV; 1512. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1874-75." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1875, 199-359, at 203. Hopkins, G.H. "Meteor." Nature, 10 ( September 16, 1874): 419.]


1874 Sept. 16 / Philippines / 17—Italy // q's / BA '11. / Sims / See Feb 18, 1889. [IV; 1513. Milne, 725. See: (1889 Feb 18).]


1874 Sept 19 / 5 a.m. / q. / Ceylon, where q's. are rare. / Nature 10-529. [IV; 1514. "Notes." Nature, 10 (October 29, 1874): 527-530, at 529.]


1874 Sept. 20 / Bloomington, Ind / fall of spider webs / Sc. Am. 45-389. [IV; 1515. Wylie, T.A. "Rain of Spider Webs." Scientific American, n.s., 45 (December 17, 1874): 389.]


1874 Sept 22-23 / Typhoon / China / 30,000 perished. [IV; 1516. (Ref??? London Times, New York Times, and Nature only report 1,000 persons dead.)]


1874 Sept 23 / [LT], 11-d / Superstition in Bedworth. [B; 10. (London Times, September 23, 1874, p. 11 c. 4.)]


1874 Sept 26 / [source unidentified] / 1-page / The Eddys / mediums of Chittenden, Vermont. [B; 11. (Ref???)]


1874 Sept 26-27 / a. midnight / Shock / Valparaiso / L.T., Nov. 18-4-d. [IV; 1517. "Life in Chili." London Times, November 18, 1874, p. 4 c. 4-5.]


[1874 Sep 26 /] 1874 Oct 26 / q. / Chile / L.T., Nov. 18-4-e / ab 5 minutes after midnight, night of 26th. [IV; 1539. "Life in Chili." London Times, November 18, 1874, p. 4 c. 4-5.]


1874 Sept 26 / Great q / Antigua, West Indies / [BA] '11. [IV; 1518. Milne, 725.]


1874 Sept 29 / N.Y. Times, 4-7 / Drought / Ohio. [IV; 1519. "The Drought in Ohio." New York Times, September 29, 1874, p. 4 c. 7.]


1874 Sept 29 / [LT], 5-c / Ants in London. [IV; 1520. "London Ants." London Times, September 29, 1874, p. 5 c. 1.]


1874 Oct 1 / The butterflies approaching Bermuda were seen—supposed to be a cloud at first. Said be common in southern states of America. / Hurdis, Rough Notes, p. 322. [IV; 1521. Hurdis, John L. Rough Notes and Memoranda Relating to the Natural History of the Bermudas.... London: R.H. Porter, 1897, 321-322.]


1874 Oct 1 / Only other instance of immense flight of small butterflies to Bermuda / See Oct. 10, '47. / (Terias lisa) / Hurdis, Rough Notes—p. 321. [IV; 1522. Hurdis, John L. Rough Notes and Memoranda Relating to the Natural History of the Bermudas.... London: R.H. Porter, 1897, 322-323.]


1874 Oct 2 / At Boston, ab 6 p.m., on eastern horizon, distinct image if a ship at sea / MWR, Oct., p. 8. [IV; 1523. "Miscellaneous Phenomena." Monthly Weather Review, 2 (October 1874): 7-8.]


1874 Oct. 2 / Great explosion of gun powder on barges on Thames. [IV; 1524. "Gunpowder Explosion." London Times, October 3, 1874, p. 9 c. 6 & p. 10 c. 1.]


1874 Oct 4-5 / Liknoes, Norway / Fall of rain so that the river went higher than in 100 years. / Symons Met 9-167. [IV; 1525. Gabrielsen, Hans. "Heavy Fall of Rain in Norway." Symon's Meteorological Magazine, 9 (December 1874): 167.]


1874 Oct 6 / [LT, 6-d / Sunspots. [IV; 1526. Denning, William Frederick. "Sun Spots." London Times, October 6, 1874, p. 6 c. 4.]


1874 Oct 6 / [LT, 4-d / Waterspout at Caterham. [IV; 1527. "The Weather." London Times, October 6, 1874, p. 4 c. 4.]


1874 Oct / Rains and famine in India considered over. Hundreds of thousands still receiving aid from Government, but that would be stopped. [IV; 1528. "The Bengal Famine." London Times, October 26, 1874, p. 11 c. 1-3.]


1874 Oct 7 and 12 / Shocks / Mazatlan, Mexico / N.Y. Times, Dec 20-10-1. [IV; 1529. "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1874 Oct. 11 / Birmingham / Oct. 11, 1847 / "A bar of fire as even as a measure, 4 or 5 yards long and 2 inches thick, in a horizontal position. It was very bright, and remained so for a minute and a half. It appeared in the N.E. / B Assoc 1875/201. [IV; 1530. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1874-75." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1875, 199-359, at 201. "Louth." Lincolnshire Chronicle, October 16, 1874, p. 8 c. 3.]


1874 Oct 11 / 8:55 p.m. / Loud det. meteor at Leeds / BA 75-202. [IV; 1531. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1874-75." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1875, 199-359, at 202. "A Remarkable Meteor." Birmingham Daily Post, October 17, 1874, p. 5 c. 6.]


1874 Oct 11 / Sound / 8:55 p.m. / near Maidstone, Kent / Met seen and loud det / BA 75/202. [IV; 1532. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1874-75." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1875, 199-359, at 202. "A Remarkable Meteor." Birmingham Daily Post, October 17, 1874, p. 5 c. 6.]


1874 Oct 12 / N.Y. Times, 5-4 / Bell ringing / Baltimore / Investigated by Prof Uhler and several other members of the Maryland Academy of Sciences, unavailingly. [B; 12. (New York Times, October 12, 1874, p. 5 c. 4.) "Puzzler for the Baltimore Academy of Sciences." Louisiana Democrat, (Alexandria, Louisiana), November 4, 1874, p. 3 c. 6. (Washington Evening Star, October 10, 1874; at newspapers.com.)]


1874 Oct 12 / (Polt) / NY Times, 5-4 / On North Stricker street, Baltimore, bells in a house ringing day and night. House surrounded by curious people.[B; 13. (New York Times, October 12, 1874, p. 5 c. 4.)]


1874 Oct , ab. middle / Floods/ Madras / N.Y. Times, Dec 28-2-6. [IV; 1533. "The October Floods in Madras." New York Times, December 28, 1874, p. 2 c. 6. "The dangerous river floods...." Pall Mall Gazette, December 11, 1874, p. 4 c. 2.]


1874 Oct 16 / Cyclone / Calcutta / L.T., Nov. 17-10.a. [IV; 1534. "The Indian Cyclone." London Times, November 17, 1874, p. 10 c. 1.]


1874 Oct 17 / Shock / Malta and Zante / L.T., Nov. 3-5-e. [IV; 1535. "Shocks of Earthquake." London Times, November 3, 1874, p. 5 c. 5.]


1874 Oct 18 / Severe shock / Malta / Nature 10-512. [IV; 1536. "Notes." Nature, 10 (October 22, 1874): 511-513, at 512.]


1874 Oct 20 / N.Y. Times, 5-4 / Famine in the Russian provinces of Kherson and Bessarabia. [IV; 1537. "Russia." London Times, October 20, 1874, p. 3 c. 4-5. "Russia." New York Times, October 20, 1874, p. 5 c. 4.]


1874 Oct 23 / [LT], 9-f / Locusts and witchcraft in Greece. [B; 14. (London Times, October 23, 1874, p. 9 c. 6.)]


1874 Oct 25 / Paris / eclipse of moon / Flammarion saw black corpuscles, passing in front of it. Flying birds, he says. / Flammarion, Pop. Astro., p. 187. [IV; 1538. Flammarion, Camille. Popular Astronomy: A General Description of the Heavens. New York: D. Appleton, 1894, 187-188. "Neither the ‘Connaissance des Temps’ nor the ‘Annuaire du Bureau des Longitudes’ accurately announced the conditions of this eclipse. One announced it for the evening; the other supposed that the full moon would rise at 6 o‘clock in the morning! In 1887 the ‘Annuaire’ also announced that the total eclipse of the sun of August 19 would pass over Egypt instead of Russia. These errors are to be regretted, especially when they occur in official publications."]


[1874 Oct 26. Wrong date. See: 1874 Sep 26, (IV; 1539).]


1874 Oct 27 / [LT], 7-f / History repeats. [B; 15. (London Times, October 27, 1874, p. 7 c. 6.)]


1874 Oct 27 / Flames and smoke from Stromboli / L.T., Nov. 12-10-f. [IV; 1540. "Stromboli." London Times, November 12, 1874, p. 10 c. 6.]


1874 Oct 30 / [LT], 9-f / quake / Australia. [IV; 1541. "Earthquake in Australia." London Times, October 30, 1874, p. 9 c. 6. "A slight shock of earthquake was felt in the colony of Victoria on the 30th of August."]


1874 Nov. 1 / Most violent hurricane in W. Indies in 40 years / L.T., 3-10-d. [IV; 1542. "The Hurricane in the West Indies." London Times, November 3, 1874, p. 10 c. 4.]


1874 Nov. 2 / Large meteor / 5 seconds / Martley, Worcestershire / L.T., 5-10-d. [IV; 1543. "Meteor." London Times, November 5, 1874, p. 10 c. 4.]


1874 Nov. 5 / Great storm raging at Montevideo. / L.T., 9-5-c. [IV; 1544. "Buenos Ayres." London Times, November 9, 1874, p. 5 c. 3.]


1874 Nov 12 / night / Shock / Virginia City, Nevada. / N.Y. Times, Dec 20-10-3. [IV; 1545. "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1874 Nov. 12-13 / Midnight to dawn at N.Y. City, scarcely any consecutive 10 minutes without a meteor, and sometimes several together. / L.T., Dec 1-10-d. [IV; 1546. "The November Meteors." New York Times, November 14, 1874, p. 2. c. 5. "November Meteors." London Times, December 1, 1874, p. 10 c. 4.]


1874 Nov 12 and 13 / at New York / mornings / Scarcely any ten consecutive minutes without a meteor, and occasionally several meteors at once. / N.Y. Times 14-2-5. [IV; 1547. "The November Meteors." New York Times, November 14, 1874, p. 2. c. 5.]


1874 Nov. 13 / q. / Mexico / BA '11. [IV; 1548. Milne, 725.]


1874 Nov 13 / morning / q. / Mexico / destructive to property / Lives lost. / N.Y. Times Nov 29-5-7. [IV; 1549. "Earthquake in Mexico." New York Times, November 29, 1874, p. 5 c. 7.]


1874 Nov. 14 / Unnown animal shot near Stratford. Hairs sent to Frank Buckland (Land and Water, Nov 14). He said probably an escaped raccoon. [B; 16. (Land and Water, November 14, 1874.)]


1874 Nov 14 / Valparaiso / objs like full moon and a star about noon / BA 75/202. [IV; 1550. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1874-75." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1875, 199-359, at 202. "'The inhabitants of Valparaiso were in a terrible state of alarm on the 14th ultimo [November 1874]. A bright star and full moon appeared at middle day, notwithstanding the fact that the sun was shining brightly at the time. The ignorant amongst the populace thought that an earthquake was about to take place. Nothing of the sort, however, occurred.'—Birmingham Local Newspaper, Dec. 1874." At mid-day, a quarter (crescent) moon would have been about 38 degrees above the eastern horizon; and, Venus, with an apparent magnitude of about -4.6 and an elongation of +32 degrees, would have been 66 degrees above the eastern horizon, between the sun and the moon.]


1874 Nov. 14 / In issue of Valparaiso and West Coast Mail (a weekly) of 21st, nothing said of this, but see June 17, 1874. [IV; 1551. See: 1874 June 17, (IV; 1449). (Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, June 20, 1874.)]


1874 Nov 15 / 2 a.m. / Shock in North Carnarvonshire / L.T., 17-7-f. [IV; 1552. "Earthquake." London Times, November 17, 1874, p. 7 c. 6.]


1874 Nov 16 / Cookstown ghost / See clipping 1924 (?) / See Dec. [B; 18. See: (Dec.)]


1874 Nov 16 / Leisurely stones / Belfast News Letter of, copied in the Spiritualist, Nov. 27; house on Old Town Hill, Cookstown, occupied by Mr Allen, a grocer. Phe began 18 months before. Windows broke—sometimes by stones; sometimes no discoverable cause. At one often broken window, a shutter was placed. This was taken down by something. Then objects jumped from tables and flew about rooms, Potatoes in a pot of water, covered with a lid, disappeared. Large stones rolled At a "leisurely" rate down the stairs. Family was Mr and Mrs Allen, two sons and a daughter. Age of one son 22; other ages not stated. Boots missing and discovered in garden, hacked to pieces. [B; 19.1 to 19.4. "The Royal Irish Constabulary Defied by Spirits." Spiritualist Newspaper, (London), 5 (no. 22;  November 27, 1874): 259-262. "The Cookstown Ghost." Belfast News-Letter, November 16, 1874, p. 3 c. 3. "The Cookstown Ghost—Further Particulars." Belfast News-Letter, November 19, 1874, p. 4 c. 1. "The Cookstown Ghost." Belfast News-Letter, November 23, 1874, p. 3 c. 7. "The Cookstown Phantoms." Belfast News-Letter, December 5, 1874, p. 4 c. 2-3.]


1874 Nov. 16 / (+) / Spiritualist of Dec 4, quotes from News Letter that near the little town of Markethill, Ireland, there had [for] some time [been] phe, in home of a family named Sharpe. Seven beds had burned with fires of unknown origin. Clothes were cut in a zig-zag way a if by a sharp knife. Daily persecutions for 3 or 4 months. [B; 20. "Disturbances by Spirits at Markethill, Ireland." Spiritualist Newspaper, (London), 5 (no. 23;  December 4, 1874): 269. "Another Ghost Story." Belfast News-Letter, November 25, 1874, p. 2 c. 9.]


1874 Nov. 16 / Phe of Aug 29 and Nov. 16 both in places occupied by a family named Allen. [B; 22. See: 1874 Aug 29, ab, (B; 7). The boarding house in Milwaukee was simply owned by "Messrs. Allen, the proprietors of the Wisconsin Leather Company Works." The two-story house in Cookstown, Ireland, was actually occupied by Mr. Allen, "who carries on a respectable business as a grocer," and his family.]


1874 Nov 18 / (Newburyport) / N.Y. Times, 1-4 / A lead mine, the ore of it rich and abundant, discovered at Newburyport, Mass. [B; 23. (New York Times, November 18, 1874, p. 1 c. 4.)]


1874 Nov. 18 / 11:50 a.m. / Remarkable darkness, Cambuslang, Lanarkshire. Cor took out his watch and could make out its form but not see the hands. / Symons 9-164. [IV; 1553. Muirhead, Henry. "Remarkable Darkness."  Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 9 (December 1874): 164.]


1874 Nov. 18 / Cambuslang, Lanarkshire / remarkable darkness / 11:50 a.m. / near Glascow / Symons Met 9/164. [IV; 1554. Muirhead, Henry. "Remarkable Darkness."  Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 9 (December 1874): 164.]


1874 Nov. 22 / Green Springs, Ala / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1555. Finley, 4.]


1874 Nov. 22 / Tuscombia. Ala / Tornado / 12 persons killed—100 buildings destroyed / F's Report. [IV; 1556. Finley, 4-5.]


1874 Nov. 22 / Town nearly destroyed / Montevallo, Ala / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1557. Finley, 4-5.]


1874 Nov. 23 / [LT], 4-f / Supposed rock in Atlantic. [ B; 17. (London Times, November 23, 1874, p. 4 c. 6.)]


1874 Nov. 23 / Mount Holly, N.J. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 1558. Finley, 4.]


1874 Nov 24 / Animal and footprints / NY Times, 6-1, from Chicago Inter-Ocean / That in Benton Co., Ind., for a year an unknown animal had been seen at times. It disappeared and then 9 months later another over a radius of 20 miles. "The trail of an unknown animal, measuring four or five inches in breadth, and unlike that ever discovered hereabouts, was traced in September." Said that excited curiosity and then anxiety when mutilated sheep and frogs were found. Said that probably a pair of them. Hunting parties had come to naught. Called "lions" but nothing to indicate what they were. [B; 24.1 to 24.3. ("Lions in Indiana." New York Times, November 24, 1874, p. 6 c. 1.) "State News" Indiana State Sentinel, (Indianapolis), September 29, 1874, p. 5 c. 1. "The Attica Ledger gives the latest report of the roaring lioness in Benton, which goes around seeking whom she may devour some body. It says: The wild animal that has created so much consternation recently in Benton county, had at last taken refuge in Parish Grove." "State News" Indiana State Sentinel, (Indianapolis), October 6, 1874, p. 5 c. 4. "The lion of Parish Grove now has a mate, so said, but all is mystery, except the dead animals which it has sacrificed." "State News" Indiana State Sentinel, (Indianapolis), Novembe 24, 1874, p. 5 c. 2. "About two and a half miles north of Fowler[,] A.L. Hays, J. Elmore] and sister and another gentleman, while on their way from William Elmore's to Robert Trett's to attend a party on Tuesday, the 10th, while driving a two horse wagon, going in a fast trot, the Benton county beast, emerging from a corn field, pursued them. They put the team to the top of its speed. Several times it bounded for the wagon, and as often they fought it off with the seat board, frequently with heavy blows, with little effect upon the beast. It never ceased its efforts to reach them until they arrived at an intermediate house on the way."]


1874 Nov. 24 / Shock / Mass. / N.Y. Times, Dec 20-10-3. [IV; 1559. "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1874 Nov. 26 / Kerilis, Côtes-du-Nord, France / (F). [IV; 1560. Fletcher, 104. This is the Kerilis meteorite.]


1874 Nov. 26 / 10:30 a.m. / details / Metite / Kerilis (Côtes-du-Nord) / BA '80-52. [IV; 1561. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1879-80." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1880, 39-55, at 52-53. Daubrée. "Sur une météorite tombée le 26 septembre 1874 à Kerilis, commune de Maël-Pestivien, canton de Callac (Côtes-du-Nord)." Comptes Rendus, 91 (1880): 28-30.]


1874 Nov. 27 / Carlowsville, Ala / Tornado / F's Rept. [IV; 1562. Finley, 4.]


1874 Nov. 27 / 8 p.m. / Strong shock at Serena / Valparaiso Mail, Dec. 5. [IV; 1563. (Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, December 5, 1874.)]


1874 Dec / Cookstown Polt in Medium and Daybreak, Dec 18, 1874, p. 800. [B; 21. "The Cookstown Ghost." Medium and Daybreak, 5 (no. 246; December 18, 1874): 800-801. This is only a reprint of the article in Belfast News-Letter of November 16, 1874. "The Cookstown Ghost." Belfast News-Letter, November 16, 1874, p. 3 c. 3. See: 1874 Nov 16, (B; 19).]


1874 Dec. / (Chico) / Pop. Sci. Mo. of, p. 256 / Stones and a boy blamed? / "Another Jesse Pomeroy has appeared in Chico, California. A boy in that town has developed an uncontrollable propensity for injuring with stones, clubs, etc., all the little children that he meets. He has been lodged in jail, and now threatens to kill a number of his companions as soon as he is released." [B; 25.1, 25.2. "Notes." Popular Science Monthly, 6 (December 1874): 255-256, at 256.]


1874 Dec 1 / 3:30 p.m. / Severe shock and alarm but no damage at Valparaiso. / Strong at Santiago. /  Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, Dec 5. [IV; 1564. (Valparaiso and West Coast Mail, December 5, 1874.)]


1874 Dec / q / Am. J. Sci 110-191. [IV; 1565. Martin, Daniel S. "Notes upon the Earthquake of December, 1874." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 10 (1875): 191-194.]


1874 Dec 3 / evening / Colored man, of New Jersey, named Thomas Brook, entered store, 377 South Ave, and snatched up switches. He was caught. He ad several terms on Blackwell's Island for stealing switches. / N.Y. Times, 5-2-4. [B; 26. (New York Times, December 5, 1874, p. 2 c. 4.)]


1874 Dec 7 and 8 / Shocks / Westchester Co., N.Y. / and Long Island / NY Times, Dec 20-10-3. [IV; 1566. "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1874 Dec. 9 / Transit of Venus. [IV; 1567.]


1874 Dec 10 / 10:30 p.m. / Crashing and rumbling sounds and q / Westchester Co / NY Times 12-3-4. [IV; 1568. "Earthquake in Westchester County." New York Times, December 12, 1874, p. 3 c. 4.]


1874 Dec. 10 / met? / 10:30 p.m. / Westchester, NY and Bergen, N.J. / q / R—Jan. 6 / sound like of violent explosion / See Feb. 2. [IV; 1569. Refer to: 1874 Jan 6, (IV; 1356). Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notice of Recent Earthquakes.—No. 5." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 9 (1875): 331-334, at 334. See: 1874 Feb. 2, (IV; 1363). "Earthquakes: A Record of the Shocks in 1874." New York Times, December 20, 1874, p. 10 c. 1-3.]


1874 Dec. 11 / Medium and Daybreak of / Polt in home of a widow and her 2 daughters in Southwark. Crockery, etc., violently thrown on floor in 2 rooms adjoining their bedroom. Spirit forms said been seen. Spiritualist arrived and said he in communication with spirit of departed husband. [B; 27. "Dr. Monck's Seance in a Haunted House." Medium and Daybreak, 5 (no. 245; December 11, 1874): 789.]


1874 Dec 12 / bet 10 and 11 p.m. / Garrison's, N.Y. / q / A.J. Sci 3-12-25. [IV; 1570. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. "Notices of Recent American Earthquakes.—No. 6." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 12 (1876): 25-30. ]


1874 Dec 16-25 / (+) / Paris / Snow that fell—greyish powder with organic matter rich in carbon" / M. Tissandier suggested that some of this matter may have been of cosmic origin. / Chem News 31-60. [IV; 1571. "Chemical Notices from Foreign Sources." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 31 (February 5, 1875): 59-62, at 60. Tissandier, Gaston. "Corpuscles aériens et matières salines contenus dans la neige." Comptes Rendus, 80 (1875): 58-61, (illustrations).]


1874 Dec. 20 / Flames from Vesuvius / La Nat 9-286. [IV; 1572. "Phénomènes volcaniques de l'année 1875." La Nature, 1877 pt. 2 (no. 226; September 29): 286.]


1874 Dec. 21 / "Tidal wave" at Malta / L.T., Jan 5-6-d, 1875. [IV; 1573. "An Unexplained Wave." London Times, January 5, 1875, p. 6 c. 4.]


1874 Dec. 25 / Eruption in north of Iceland. Foggy and flames not seen till Jan. 2nd. Then magnificent. / L.T. 22-8-d / 23-10-f // See May—20-10-f / 21-5-c. [IV; 1574. "Eruption in Iceland," London Times, April 22, 1875, p. 8 c. 4. "The Eruption in Iceland." London Times, April 23, 1875, p. 10 c. 6. "The Eruption in Iceland." London Times, May 20, 1875, p. 10 c. 6. "The Eruption in Iceland." London Times, May 21, 1875, p. 5 c. 3. The Askja volcano.]


1874 / ab Dec 25 // Hecla / See March 29-30, 1875. / Nature 11-505. [IV; 1575. "Notes." Nature, 11 (April 29, 1875): 514-516, at 515. Dust, which fell on Norway and on Sweden, was "recognized" as "identical with the Hecla pumice-stone"; thus, a volcanic eruption on Iceland was suspected. The Hekla volcano was not erupting in 1874 nor in 1875. The Askja volcano erupted from January 1 to October 17, 1875. See: 1875 March 29-30, (IV: 1638 & 1639).]


1874 Dec 26 / Religio-Phil Jour, 1-5 / Haunted house in Louisville, Ky. / not much more. [B; 28. "Genuine Haunted House." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 17 (no. 15; December 26, 1874): 1, (c. 5).]


1874 Dec 27 / 8:57 p.m. / Budapest / met in direction of Cassiopeia / Zeit Met 10-46. [IV; 1576. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 10 (1875): 42-47, at 46.]


1874 Dec. 30 / Switzerland / felt at the Grand Hotel des Salines, Bex en Suisse / 12:30 p.m. / sharp shock and loud report / LT, Jan 2-9-d / Various parts of Canton Vaud (7-4-d). Another at 8:12 p.m. Had been slight a. midnight. 29-30th. [IV; 1577. (Possibly wrong year, as not found for these dates in the London Times.)]

 
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