Last updated: April 8, 2021. - Fortean Notes

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Last updated: April 8, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1859 to 1860


1859:


1859 / Sleeper Susan C. Godsey, near Hickman, Ky. / See July 14, 1869. [A; 398. See: 1869 July 14, (A; 547).]


1859 / In village of Stoke Lane, Somersetshire, England, shower of small fishes, ac to Mrs Ellen S. Marvin, 1646 E. 15th St., Sheepshead Bay, N.Y. See letter. [II; 2265. Pabst notes: "Letter is missing."]


1859 Ja. / (It) / (Sounds) / detonations not accompanied by quaking / See 1816. [II; 2266. See: 1816, (I; 547). Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 40. "Trevigiano": probably Trevignano, Italy.]


1859 Jan 4 / Large met / Holstein / BA 69-283. [II; 2267. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 283.]


1859 Jan 23 / Begins Mauna Loa / A. J. Sci 2/28/66, 284 / 29/301. [II; 2268. Haskell, Robert C. "On a Visit to the Recent Eruption of Mauna Loa, Hawaii." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 28 (1859): 66-71. "Eruption of Mauna Loa, Sandwich Islands." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 28 (1859): 284. "Eruption of Mauna Loa, Sandwich Islands." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 29 (1860): 301-302.]


1859 Jan 28 / [LT], 7-e / Sun Spots. [II; 2269. Dawes, W.R. "Large Solar Spots." London Times, January 28, 1859, p. 7 c. 5.]


1859 Feb 4 / [LT], 10-f / Ext effect of a met. [II; 2270."Extraordinary Effect of a Meteor." London Times, February 4, 1859, p. 10 c. 6. "At this moment a ball of fire, about the size of an orange, and of a dull colour, emitting some sparks, passed rather slowly between two of the party on the off side of the car, and immediately exploded." This "meteor" was undoubtedly an instance of globular lightning, at Binghamstown, County Mayo, Ireland, on January 18, 1859.]


1859 Feb. 7 / Aix, France / det met / BA 67-417. [II; 2271. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 417.]


1859 Feb. 11 / Fishes / Glamorganshire. [A; 399.]


1859 Feb. 11 / D-81 / Fish / Eng. / 36. [II; 2272. The note copies information from page 81 of The Book of the Damned. Griffith, John. "The Shower of Fish in the Valley of Abedare." Zoologist, 17 (1859): 6493. Gray, John Edward. "The Shower of Fishes." Zoologist, 17 (1859): 6540-6541.]


1859 Feb / Some of the fishes alive, on exhibition Regent's Park Zoological Gardens, ac to Frank Buckland. / Field, March 19. [II; 2273. Buckland, Frank Trevelyan. "The Shower of Fish." Field, March 19, 1859, pp. 223-224. Gray, John Edward. "The Shower of Fishes." Zoologist, 17 (1859): 6540-6541. Edward Newman notes that these fish "purporting to be the identical specimens submitted to Professor Owen's inspection" included a minnow and smooth-tailed sticklebacks.]


1859 Feb 25 / [LT], 12-a / 26-12-f / 28-12-e / Aurora. [II; 2274. Burder, W.C. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, February 25, 1859, p. 12 c. 1. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "Aurora Borealis and Meteor." London Times, February 26, 1859, p. 12 c. 6. "The Aurora." London Times, February 28, 1859, p. 12 c. 5.]


1859 Feb, end of / Unusual number of mets / Melbourne / BA '68-407. [II; 2275. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 407.]


1859 March 12 / (N) / Castillon-sur-Dordogne (Gironde) / white, friable substance / La Sci Pour Tous 4/144 / (Comptes Rendus 48-597). In small grains / in space of less than 8 kilometres. [II; 2276. "Pluie Crayeuse." La Science Pour Tous, 4 (no. 18; April 7, 1859): 144. "M. Paquerée adresse un échantillon d'une substance blanche friable...." Comptes Rendus, 48 (1859): 597.]


1859 March 18 / Wrottlesley Observatory / 1:23 1/2 a.m. / "From S to N. a few degrees below the moon." / B Ass. 1859/84. [II; 2277. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1858-59." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1859, Reports on the State of Science, 81-95, at 84-85.]


1859 March 22 / Quito—at 8:30 a.m. / after a slight atmospheric detonation, great q / Y.B. 60-268 / BA '11. [II; 2278. "Earthquake at Quito." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1860, 267-269. A class III earthquake. Milne, 714.]


1859 Mar. 26 / S / Spot Sun / Lescarbault / 104. [II; 2279. Lescarbault. "Passage d'une planète sur le disque du Soleil, observé à Orgères (Eure-et-Loir)." Comptes Rendus, 50 (1860): 40-46.]


1859 March 28 / (F) / Metites of Harrison Co, Indiana. / A.J. Sci., 2/28/409 / 4 p.m. / Dug up immediately. "No warmth." Another was warm. All with a black, vitrified surface. [II; 2280. Fletcher, 102. This is the Harrison County meteorite. Greg, 96. Smith, John Lawrence. "Account of several Meteoric Stones which fell in Harrison Co., Indiana, March 28th, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 28 (1859): 409.]


1859 March 28 / Aerolite / also 1860 / E Mec 79/383. [II; 2281. Monck, William Henry Stanley. "AerolitesPerpetual Motion.” English Mechanic, 79 (no. 2045; June 3, 1904): 383-384. See: 1860 March 28, (II; 2432).]


1859 Ap / Disap or ghst / Cowes, Isle of Wight / Real Ghost Stories, p. 90. [A; 400. Stead, William Thomas. Real Ghost Stories. London: Mowbray House, (1891), 90, cv. "The Murdered Miller on the Grey Horse." Stead, William Thomas. Real Ghost Stories. Revised edition. London: Grant Richards, 1897, 192-194. After crossing the path of a horseman at a crossroads, a rider called out "good-night," but failing to hear any reply, he turned about to discover the rider and his grey horse had vanished. A nearby farmer was aware of a miller, riding a grey horse, who was robbed and murdered at that crossroads forty years before, with numerous people telling of their encounter with the same apparition, to his mother and himself.]


1859 Ap 1 / Ext. cold at Rennes / Cosmos 14-515. [II; 2282. "Académie des Sciences." Cosmos, 14 (May 6, 1859): 514-523, at 515-516. Dujardin, Félix. "Sur un froid exceptional observée à Rennes le 1er avril 1859." Comptes Rendus, 48 (1859): 874-875.]


1859 April 4 / Pampanga (Mexico) / Philippines / (F). [II; 2283. Fletcher, 102. Daubrée, Gabriel-Auguste. "Météorite tombée (en 1859?) aux íles Philippines." Comptes Rendus, 66 (1868): 637-639. This is the Pampanga meteorite, (which was observed to fall in the village of Mexico, in Pampanga province, in the Philippines).]


1859 Ap. 6 / Fr / Vosges / q and sound like thunder / See Oct 16, '58. / C.R. 48/752. [II; 2284. Laurent, P. "Tremblement de terre ressenti le 6 avril dans le département des Vosges." Comptes Rendus, 48 (1859): 752. See: 1858 Oct 16, (II; 2242).]


1859 Ap 12 / 21 / q / shocks / Siena / L.T., Ap 15-10-b. [II; 2285. "The following telegrams have been received...." London Times, April 15, 1859, p. 10 c. 2. "Twenty-one shocks of earthquake were felt at Sienna yesterday."]


1859 Ap 13 / 9 a.m. / Explosion powder mill at Hastings / LT, Ap 15-10-e. [II; 2286. "Another Explosion of a Powder Mill." London Times, April 15, 1859, p. 10 c. 5.]


1859 Ap. 22 / 1:14 a.m. / Meteor / Beeston Observatory / fine aurora at the time / BA '59. [II; 2287. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1858-59." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1859, Reports on the State of Science, 81-95, at 82-83.]


1859 Ap. 29 / A / A.J. Sci 2/28/154, 408. [II; 2288. "Auroral Arch." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 28 (1859): 154. "The Great Auroral Exhibition of August 28th to September 4th, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 28 (1859): 385-408.]


1859 May / Beuste / Basses-Pyrénées, France / (F) / (CR 76-314). [II; 2289. Fletcher, 102. This is the Beuste meteorite. Daubrée, Gabriel-Auguste. "Note sur des météorites représentant deux chutes inédites qui ont eu lieu en France, l'une à Montlivault (Loir-et-Cher), le 22 juillet 1838, l'autre a Beuste (Basses-Pyrénées) en mai 1859." Comptes Rendus, 76 (1873): 314-316.]


1859 May 4 / Chambon / milky substance in hail—said been sulphuric acid / Cosmos 14-678. [II; 2290. "Faits de science." Cosmos, 14 (June 17, 1859): 671-679, at 678-679.]


1859 May 8-17 / Period of unusual number of shooting stars / Melbourne / BA 68-407. [II; 2291. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1867-68." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1868, 344-428, at 407.]


1859 May 27, June 10 / Dry fog / verified / Cosmos 15/37, 88. [II; 2292. "Faits de science." Cosmos, 15 (July 8, 1859): 36-38, at 36-37. "Faits de science." Cosmos, 15 (July 22, 1859): 85-90, at 88.]


1859 May 27 / and other days / France / dry fog or thick smoke / at Paris / strong odor of sulphur or creosote / See June 2-7. [II; 2293. "Faits de science." Cosmos, 14 (June 17, 1859): 671-679, at 675-678. See: 1859 June 2 - 7, (II; 2301).]


1859 May 27 / dry fog / Paris / Dry fog / strong, nauseating odor / Cosmos 15/37. [II; 2294. "Faits de science." Cosmos, 15 (July 8, 1859): 36-38, at 37.]


1859 May 28 / Ext. hail / Brussels / Bull Ac Sci Brux 7-352. [II; 2295. Quetelet, Lambert Adolphe Jacques. "Grêle extraordinaire observée à Bruxelles, le 28 mai 1859." Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, s. 2 v. 7 (1859): 352-356.]


1859 May 28 / Brussels / hail / Fassig 2/343. [II; 2296. Fassig, Oliver Lanard, ed. Bibliography of Meteorology. Part II: Moisture. Washington: Signal Office, 1889, 343. Quetelet, Lambert Adolphe Jacques. "Grêle extraordinaire observée à Bruxelles, le 28 mai 1859." Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, s. 2 v. 7 (1859): 352-356. "Sur une Grêle Extraordinaire Tombée à Bruxelles." Annuaire de l'Observatoire Royal de Belgique, 27 (1860): 106-110.]


1859 May 29 / Large hailstones falling gently near Nottingham. Some more than an inch in diameter, ac to E.J. Lowe. / An Reg 1859/70. [II; 2297. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 101 (1859): pt. 2, 1-202, at 70-71, cv. "Extraordinary Hailstones." "The stones fell very gently, considering their extraordinary size; indeed, I have received much smarter raps from small hailstones than I did from these."]


1859 June 20 / Ottawa Co., Kansas / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 2298. Finley, 3.]


1859 / summer / Swarms of small wing insects / "Thrips." / Scarborough / See Aug 25, 1869. / Sci Op. 2-292. [II; 2299. (Scientific Opinion, 2-292).]


1859 / summer / Swarms of insects like in 1869-Aug 25 / Sci Opinion 2/292. [II; 2300. (Scientific Opinion, 2-292).]


1859 June 2-7 / The smoke or fog very thick at Munster / Cosmos 14-677 / See May 27. [II; 2301. "Faits de science." Cosmos, 14 (June 17, 1859): 671-679, at 675-678. See: 1859 May 27, (II; 2293).]


1859 July 4 / Fall of meteors / found later / Taney Co, Mo. / Sci. News, N.S., 1-148. [II; 2302. "Another Remarkable Meteorite." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (February 17, 1888): 148. Kunz, George Frederick. "On some American Meteorites." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 34 (1887): 467-477, at 467-471. "Prof. E. J. Cox says he was informed by Mrs. Scott of Van Buren, that when in the N.W. part of Crawford County, near Penneyoits, Sulphur Spring, attending a barbecue, on July 4th, 1859, about noon, a shower of small meteorites fell on the roof of a cabin half a mile distant, one of which was sent to Capt. Albert Pike, of Little Rock, Ark. Although twenty-eight years have elapsed nothing has been heard of any of these pieces, in spite of frequent inquiries."]


1859 July 4 / London / fireball / BA 67-418. [II; 2303. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 418.]


1859 July 13 / N.Y. City / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 2304. Finley, 3.]


1859 July 13 / [L], 5-c / Singular Fatality to a family. [A; 401. "Singular Fatality." London Times, July 13, 1859, p. 5 c. 3.]


1859 July 18 / Enfield / a little fly "Chlorops lineata" in a hailstone / Ent. Weekly Intelligencer, vol 7—p. 76. [II; 2305. Walker, Francis. "Hail-stone Fly." Entomologist's Weekly Intelligencer, 7 (December 3, 1859): 76. "Edward Ford, Esq., of Old Park, Enfield, observed a little fly enclosed in a hailstone of the storm of the 18th July. He gave it to me, and it proves to be Chlorops lineta, Fabr.,—the fly that occurs in immense swarms on the windows and ceilings of houses near London in the spring."]


1859 July 21 / Conj Jupiter and Venus / Observatory 24/156. [II; 2306. Johnson, Samuel Jenkins. "Planetary Conjunctions." Observatory, 24 (1901): 156-158, at 156. Ward, Mary. "The Conjunction of the Planets Jupiter and Venus, on the Morning of July 21st, 1859." Recreative Science, 1 (1860): 222-224.]


1859 July 24 / Elmira, N.Y. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 2307. Finley, 4.]


1859 July and Aug / Vesuvius active and devastating / Y.B. '60-276. [II; 2308. "Eruption of Vesuvius." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1860, 267. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1859 July 25 / Milan / hail / Fassig / 2/343. [II; 2309. Fassig, Oliver Lanard, ed. Bibliography of Meteorology. Part II: Moisture. Washington: Signal Office, 1889, 343. "Lavori del Reale Istituto Lombardo."  Atti del Reale Istituto Lombardo di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti, 1 (1858): 397-400, at  399, c.v. "Il professore [Luigi] Magrini ragguaglia interno alla grandine caduta a Milano it corente, in questi termini...." Volume one extends to September of 1859, tho its publication date is shown as "1858."]


1859 July 29 / Celebes / Sea waves / BA '11. [II; 2310. A class I earthquake. Milne, 715.]


1859 July 30 / Fish / Nusseerabad, Rajpootna, India—ac to cor to the Field, Oct 1, 1859 / After long absences of rain, a sudden heavy fall beginning 3 a.m. near his bungalow. Close to where he stood cor saw a small fish wriggling on gravel. Ab 2 inches long, and resembled a young dace. Then other living fishes found. No stream near. No pond nearer than a mile. [II; 2311.1, 2311.2. "Showers of Fish." Field, October 1, 1859, p. 283. "On Saturday, July 30, very heavy rain fell at Nusseerabad, in Rajpootana. For many previous days none had fallen, and it was much wanted for the crops. A furious storm of wind and rain, accompanied by continuous and tropically vivid lightning, commenced at 3 a.m., and the rain continued with little intermission to fall heavily all day. About four o'clock in the afternoon, whilst standing in the verandah of the bungalow, looking at the water which had spread over our compound to a depth of from one to three and four inches, we were surprised to observe a small fish wriggling on the gravel close to where we stood. Presently the servants noticed three or four more, near their houses at the other side of the compound. One of these was afterwards caught and brought to me, and I have kept it alive ever since. It is about two inches long, and resembles a young dace. There is no stream anywhere near our compound, which is situated on rather high ground. There are no ponds or 'tanks' nearer than a mile. One other person mentioned that his servants had seen similar fish near his bungalow. Can any of your readers account for the unlooked-for appearance of these trespassers on our carriage-road ? Are you not of opinion that, its the hurricane of wind in the morning, they must have been lifted out of one of the tanks and so carried through the air? The little fellow appears to thrive, and make himself very happy, and is looked on as a curiosity by the various persons who have seen him. It has been suggested that small fishes are capable of remaining for some time in the upper atmosphere, the clouds, during the monsoon being of sufficient density to support their weight. It seems incredible that so small a fish can live after the concussion of falling from so great a height to the ground." Nasirabad, Rajasthan, India.]


1859 July 31 / Montpreis (Styria) / Cosmos 19-567. Metites of stone. [II; 2312. "Science Étrangère." Cosmos, 19 (November 22, 1861): 566-568, at 567-568. (Illustration, in Merrill's Minerals from Earth and Sky. plate 11.) Ritter von Haidinger, Wilhelm Karl. "Der Meteorsteinfall zu Montpreis am 31. Juli 1859." Sitzungsberichte der Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftlichen Classe der Kaiserlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 44 (1861): 373-378. Kirkwood, Daniel. Meteoric Astronomy: A Treatise on Shooting-stars, Fire-balls, and Aerolites. Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott, 1867, 68-69. "On the 31st of July, 1859, about half-past nine o'clock in the evening, three inhabitants of the bourg of Montpreis, in Styria, saw a small luminous globe, very similar to a shooting-star, and followed by a luminous streak in the heavens, fall directly to the earth, which it attained close to the château that exists in the locality. The fall was accompanied by a whistling or hissing noise in the air, and terminated by a slight detonation. The three observers, rushing to the spot where the meteor fell, immediately found a small cavity in the hard, sandy soil, from which they extracted three small meteoric stones about the size of nuts, and a quantity of black powder. For five to eight seconds these stones continued in a state of incandescence, and it was necessary to allow upwards of a quarter of an hour to elapse before they could be touched without inflicting a burn. They appear to have been ordinary meteoric stones, covered with the usual black rind. The possessors would not give them up to be analyzed."]


1859 July 31 / Metites / 9:30 p.m. / Montpreis, Stryia / 3 small hot stones / BA 67-418. [II; 2313. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 418.]


1859 Aug 1 / Beeston Observatory / many meteors / BA 59. [II; 2314. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1858-59." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1859, Reports on the State of Science, 81-95, at 82-83.]


[1859 ab Aug 1. Wrong date. See: 1859 Aug 11, (II; 2315).]


1859 Aug 3 / Destructive gale at Bahia / N.Y. Ev Post, 16th. [II; 2316. (New York Evening Post, August 16, 1859; not found here; also on microfilm.)]


1859 Aug 7 / 8:30 p.m. / Germany / det met / BA 60-94. [II; 2317. Greg, 96.]


1859 Aug 9 / Date of the moths / D News, 15th. [II; 2318. (Daily News, August 15, 1859; not found here).]


1859 Aug. 10 / Met—at Beeston—by E.J. Lowe—listed by him as "Curious. Rec. Sci., 1/138. [II; 2319. Lowe, 138.]


1859 Aug 10 / Mets at Wolverhampton / "very grand" / BA 59-95. [II; 2320. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1858-59." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1859, Reports on the State of Science, 81-95, at 86-87 & 95.]


1859 Aug 10 / At Beeston Observatory ab 70 per hour in 1/4 part of the heavens / BA 59. [II; 2321. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1858-59." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1859, Reports on the State of Science, 81-95, at 84-85.]


1859 Aug 11 / midnight / Siberia / in the S. great detonating meteor / BA 61. [II; 2322. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 2-3.]


[1859 Aug 11 /] 1859 / ab Aug 1 / Metite near Albany, NY / L.T., Sept 30-10-e. [II; 2315. "Meteoric Phenomenon." London Times, September 30, 1859, p. 10 c. 5. This is the Bethlehem meteorite.]


1859 Aug 11 / Metite / ab 7:20 a.m. / Northern NY, Vt, Mass. / violent det meteor / A. J. Sci 2/28/300. Stone said fallen near Albany—near Bethlehem. [II; 2323. "Meteor of August 11, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 28 (October 1859): 300-303, at 302-303. This is the Bethlehem meteorite.]


1859 Aug 11 / (F) / Sounds / ab 7:20 a.m. / Blandford, Mass / Troy, N.Y. / Bennington, Vt. / Albany / 2 explosions. Ac to one witness, 3. Meteor was seen by many. Am. J. Sci 3/28/300 / (F). [II; 2324. Fletcher, 102. This is the Bethlehem meteorite. Greg, 96. "Meteor of August 11, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 28 (October 1859): 300-303, at 300.]


1859 Aug 11 / Meteor of / Stone said to have fallen on a farm in the village of Jericho, ab 4 miles from Bethlehem Centre, N.Y. / N.Y. Ev Post, Sept 12. About size of pigeon egg. [II; 2325.1, 2325.2. (New York Evening Post, September 12, 1859; not found here). This is the Bethlehem meteorite.]


1859 Aug 13 / Sound / 10:15 a.m. / Hopton—near E. Harling / (+) / Norfolk / cloudless sky / rumbling like distant cannonading / Times 20-7-f / Noticed at Brighton sky "perfectly cloudless. Said was supposed to be from cannonading at Portsmouth, where the Duke Constantine had recently arrived, but it was learned that no salutes there until late in the evening. Ac to another cor at Wallisfield, Suffolk, "a sudden, loud rumbling noise overhead" bet 9 and 10 a.m. Another cor notes that at sea, near Brighton he had heard a succession of heavy rumbling sounds lasting from 10:15 to 10:35 a.m. his [LT] 27-5-f. He had questioned boatmen who said that cannonading at Spithead, from which though 50 miles away, cannonading had been heard when wind favourable. However, this morning the wind had not been from direction of Spithead, only showing a tendency so to veer. [II; 2326.1 to 2326.5. "Earthquake at Hopton." London Times, August 20, 1859, p. 7 c. 6. "Supposed Earthquake." London Times, August 25, 1859, p. 9 c. 2. "Earthquake in the Eastern Counties." London Times, August 25, 1859, p. 9 c. 2.  "Supposed Earthquake." London Times, August 27, 1859, p. 5 c. 6.]


1859 Aug. 15 / Spot appeared on edge of sun but the great spot appeared 25th. / D. News 31-3-5. [II; 2327. Newall, Robert Stirling. "Solar Spots and the Weather." London Daily News, August 31, 1859. p. 3 c. 5. Newall had observed the great spot from August 15, (when appearing on the edge of the Sun), to August 25; and, he had only observed the sunspot's appearance as a "notch" once before, in 1850. See: 1850 March 25, (II; 1380); and, 1859 Aug 21, (II; 2329).]


1859 Aug 18 / Flashes from Ft. Hood, Oregon / 19th and 20, clouds of vapor from the crater and at night shafts of flame / A. J. Sci 2/28/448. [II; 2328. "Eruption of Mount Hood." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 28 (1859): 448.]


1859 Aug 21 / From 6 to 7 p.m., large sun spot visible to n.e. reported by E J Lowe. / L.T. 24-12-e / 27-5-f / Another cor writes been visible since the 15th. Others—but all small compared with a new one that began to appear morning of 24th, ab 4 times the size of Lowe's. [II; 2329.1, 2329.2. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "Solar Spot." London Times, August 24, 1859, p. 12 c. 5. Newall, Robert Stirling. "Solar Spots and the Weather." London Times, August 27, 1859, p. 5 c. 6.]


1859 Aug 22 / Norcia, Italy, q / 25-Sept 3, Sea waves at Salvador / Aug 31, q, Turkey / BA '11. [II; 2330. Three class II earthquakes. Milne, 715.]


1859 Aug 22 / (q and versus sky) / Ital / At Norcia, ac to Secchi, the stories of fire and of other flames were absurd. / Cosmos, N.S., 69/422. [II; 2331. Secchi, Pietro Angelo. "Escursione scientifica fatta a Norcia ad occasione dei terremoti del 22 Agosto 1859." Atti dell'Accademia Pontificia de'Nuovi Lincei, 13 (1860): 63-104, at 88-90. “Les phénomènes lumineux des tremblements de terre.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 69 (October 16, 1913): 422.]


1859 Aug 23 / letter dated / Naples / Times 29-8-c / Vesuvius  "bursting out into patches of fire in all directions." [II; 2332. "Naples." London Times, August 29, 1859, p. 8 c. 3.]


1859 Aug 22 / (It) / Norcia (?) / q and column of fire and smoke / See 1805. [II; 2333. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 367-368. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1859 Aug 28-29 / Cupola of the Aurora at 12:45 open space surrounded by circle of light exactly on Alpha Andromedae. Lowe / [LT], Sept 1-10-b / At 2:30 cupola, close to Gamma Trianguli. [II; 2334. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "Brilliant Aurora Borealis." London Times, September 1, 1859, p. 10 c. 2.]


1859 Aug 28 / At Beeston—the Aurora-Cupola / 12:45 a.m.—on A. Andromedae / 1:15—2° E of Alpha / 2:30—close to Gamma Trianguli / E J. Lowe / LT, Sept. 1. [II; 2335. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "Brilliant Aurora Borealis." London Times, September 1, 1859, p. 10 c. 2.]


1859 Aug 28 / 8:40—9 p.m. / Aurora and position of rays given-by Lowe. Exactly on Alpha Andromeda / An Reg 1859-129. [II; 2336. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 101 (1859): pt. 2, 1-202, at 128-129, cv. "Brilliant Aurora Borealis."]


1859 [Aug] 28-29 / Paris / Aurora / C.R. 49/338 / Rome—p. 346 / Noyelles-sur-Mer p. 367, 397, 424. [II; 2337. Coulvier-Gravier. "Aurores boréale observée dans la nuit du 28 au 29 août." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 338. Fournet. "Aperçu météorologiques relatifs aux aurores boréales du 29 août 1859 et du 17 novembre 1848." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 397-402. Secchi, Angelo. "Observations de la planète Mars.—Le tremblement de terre de Norcia ressenti à Rome.—Aurore boréale de la nuit du 28 au 29 août." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 346-347. Lartigue, H. "Aurores boréale observée dans la nuit du 28 au 29 août, à Noyelles-sur-Mer...." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 367-368. De la Rive, Auguste Arthur. "Aurores boréale du 29 août." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 424-428.]


1859 Aug 25-Sept 3 / qs and sea waves at Salvador / BA '11. [II; 2338. A class II earthquake. Milne, 715.]


1859 Aug 27 / N.Y. Ev. Post, 3-10 / in Maine. Brooks dry that were never known to be dry before. [II; 2339. "Unprecedented Drought in Maine." New York Evening Post, August 27, 1859, p. 3 c. 10.]


1859 Aug 28 / Aurora seen in Jamaica / probably first time on record / NY Ev Post, Sept 29-1-4. [II; 2340. "The Aurora in the Tropics." New York Evening Post, September 29, 1859, p. 1 c. 4. "By way of Havana we have some later intelligence from Jamaica. The Aurora Borealis was witnessed in that island, it seems, for the first time, perhaps, since its discovery by Christopher Columbus. So rare is the phenomenon in these latitudes, that it was taken for the glare of a fire, and was associated with the recent riots."]


1859 Aug 28 / Aurora brilliant in northern sky at Savannah, Georgia / NY Ev Post, Sept 2-1-4. [II; 2341. "The Aurora Borealis at the South." New York Evening Post, September 2, 1859, p. 1 c. 4.]


1859 Aug 28 to Sept 4 / Auroral effect / The horizontal ring of light / Between Portland and Boston, telegraph operators sent messages without their batteries. / An. Sci D 1860/414. [II; 2342. "On the Great Auroral Display of August 28th to Sept. 4th, 1859." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1860, 414.]


1859 Aug 28 - Sept 4 / Long article on the Auroras / A. J. Sci 2/32/7. [II; 2343. Loomis, Elias. "The Great Auroral Exhibition of Aug. 28th to Sept. 4th, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 32 (1861): 71-84.]


1859 Aug 28 / The Aurora as seen in Nova Scotia / LT, Oct 4-10-c. [II; 2344. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, October 4, 1859, p. 10 c. 3.]


1859 Aug 29 / [LT], 8-c / Outbreak of Vesuvius. [II; 2345. "Naples." London Times, August 29, 1859, p. 8 c. 3.]


1859 Aug 30 / Dispatching date / q / Norcia, Italy / 200 killed / LT 31-6-f. [II; 2346. "Latest Intelligence." London Times, August 31, 1859, p. 6 c. 6.]


1859 Aug 30 / D. News of / Vesuvius bursting out into patches of fire / all directions. [II; 2347. (London Daily News, August 30, 1859.) The Vesuvius volcano.]


1859 Aug 28-29 / night / Great storm / England / France / C.R. 49-399. [II; 2348. Fournet. "Aperçu météorologiques relatifs aux aurores boréales du 29 août 1859 et du 17 novembre 1848." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 397-402, at 399.]


1859 Aug 28 / The Aurora / N.Y. Ev Post, 29th / Aug 28 unusually cold. / 1859 Sept 20 / N.Y. Ev. Post of / Hysterical Revival in North of Ireland. [II; 2349. "Remarkable Atmospheric Phenomenon." New York Evening Post, August 29, 1859, p. 2 c. 3. "The Irish Revival." New York Evening Post, September 20, 1859, p. 3 c. 8.]


1859 Aug 29, etc. / Aurora / great deal in C.R., vol. 49. [II; 2350. Coulvier-Gravier. "Aurores boréale observée dans la nuit du 28 au 29 août." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 338. Fournet. "Aperçu météorologiques relatifs aux aurores boréales du 29 août 1859 et du 17 novembre 1848." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 397-402. Secchi, Angelo. "Observations de la planète Mars.—Le tremblement de terre de Norcia ressenti à Rome.—Aurore boréale de la nuit du 28 au 29 août." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 346-347. Lartigue, H. "Aurores boréale observée dans la nuit du 28 au 29 août, à Noyelles-sur-Mer...." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 367-368. De la Rive, Auguste Arthur. "Aurores boréale du 29 août." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 424-428.]


1859 Aug and Sept / It / Sounds. / Norcia / Same as Jan. at Trevig. [II; 2351.]


1859 Aug 28 / In Times, Oct 5, Robert Rawlinson publishes his meteorological observations in Lapland from Aug 25 to Sept. 7. Aurora noticed Aug 25 only. [II; 2352. Rawlinson, Robert. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, October 5, 1859, p. 11 c. 3.]


1859 Aug 28-Sept 4 / Ext. Aurora / Am J Sci 2/28/407 / 29/92. M. W. Rev 32/322. [II; 2353. "The Great Auroral Exhibition of August 28th to September 4th, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 28 (1859): 385-408. "The Great Auroral Exhibition of August 28th to September 4th, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 29 (1860): 92-97. "Does the Aurora Ever Envelope the Whole Earth?" Monthly Weather Review, 32 (no. 7; July 1904): 322.]


1859 Aug 29 / Adelaide, S. Australia / 7 p.m. / very brilliant meteor almost immediately followed by aurora / Neumayer, "Meteorological Observations, p. 241. [II; 2354. Neumayer, Georg Balthasar von. Results of the Meteorological Observations Taken in the Colony of Victoria, During the Years 1859-1862.... Melbourne: J. Ferres, 1864, 241. "Adelaide.A very brilliant meteor was seen about 7 p.m. towards the south, which fell in a curved course from about 45 elevation to the eastward. Almost immediately following the object the glowing rays of a vivid Aurora lit up the sky, being at first more fully developed to the westward, but afterwards stretching across the whole of the south from the hills to the sea."]


[1859 Aug. 29 /] 1859 / ab. last Sept / Very great aurora in Australia / Nature 81/524. [II; 2381. "Mr. W. E. Cooke, Government astronomer, Western Australia, informs us...." Nature, 81 (October 28, 1909): 524. "By a curious coincidence, the last great display in Australia occurred almost exactly fifty years ago." The aurora australis was noticed at the Observatory, in Sydney, at 7:20 P.M., on August 29, 1859. Scott, W. "Southern Aurora." Sydney Morning Herald, August 30, 1859, p. 5 c. 6, ]


1859 Aug 29-Sept 4 / "The week was extremely remarkable in consequence of an almost constant display of the Aurora Australis." / The Age (Melbourne), Sept 8-6-5. / Evening of 28, magnetic disturbance. Increased, morning of 29th. [II; 2355. Neumayer, Georg Balthasar von. The Age, (Melbourne), September 8, 1859 p. 6 c. 5.]


1859 Aug 31 / Near Milan, Italy, a deluge, called a waterspout / D. News, 12-7-2. [II; 2356. "Atmospheric Disturbance of Electric Telegraphs." London Daily News, September 12, 1859, p. 7 c. 2. "The telegraph office at Milan soon afterwards announced hat a powerful waterspout had broken over the country between Castel Pusterlengo and Pizzighettone on the 31st ult., and had destoryed five kilometres of the telegraph line between those two places." "Castel Pusterlengo" would be Casalpusterlengo.]


1859 Sept. 1. / See 1891, June 17. [II; 2357. See: 1891 June 17, (VII; 119).]


1859 Sept 1 / C-21+ / (Ch) / 2 luminous bodies near sun / M Notices 20/13, 15, 88. [II; 2358. Carrington, Richard Christopher. "Description of a Singular Appearance seen in the Sun on September 1, 1859." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 20 (November 11, 1859): 13-15. Hodgson, Richard. "On a curious Appearance seen in the Sun." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 20 (November 11, 1859): 15-16. Piazzi Smyth, Charles. "Suggestions connected with the Carrington-and-Hodgson Solar Phenomenon of 1st Sept. 1859." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 20 (January 13, 1860): 88-91. The Carrington event was the first observation of a solar flare which produced a powerful geomagnetic storm beginning on the next day.]


1859 Sept 1 / Great magnetic storm / E Mec 111/224. [II; 2359. Cortie, Aloysius Laurence. "Solar Outbursts—Magnetic Storms—Auroræ." English Mechanic, 51 (no. 1320; July 11, 1890): 422. "The Ether-Magnetic Storms." English Mechanic, 51 (no. 1320; July 11, 1890): 422-423. Cotterell, Arthur E. “Magnetic Storms and Sunspots.” English Mechanic, 111 (no. 2880; June 4, 1920): 224.]]


1859 Sept 1 / Det. met / Tenn. / Am J. Sci 2/29/138 / 10 a.m. / BA 60-94. [II; 2360. Greg, 96. McDonnold, Benjamin Wilburn. "Meteoric Explosion in West Tennessee, Sept. 1st, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 29 (1860): 138.]


1859 Sept 2 / The Aurora in Chile / C.R. 49-1009 / toward S. horizon moving from E to W. [II; 2361. Poey, Andrés. "Coincidence de l'aurore boréale de 1er au 2 septembre dernier avec un aurore australe observée au Chili." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 1009-1011.]


1859 Sept 2 / The Age (Melbourne), Sept 3-5-2—The Aurora Australis was again very beautiful and very conspicuous last night—in southern sky soon after sunset shooting rays toward zenith. [II; 2362. "The Aurora Australis was again very conspicuous...." The Age, (Melbourne), September 3, 1859, p. 5 c. 2.]


[1859 Sept 2. Wrong date. See: 1872 Feb 4, (II; 2363).]


1859 Sept 2 / from midnight to 2 a.m. / in Chili / Aurora in south—moved from east to west / C.R. 49-1009. [II; 2364. Poey, Andrés. "Coincidence de l'aurore boréale de 1er au 2 septembre dernier avec un aurore australe observée au Chili." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 1009-1011.]


1859 Sept 2 / 7 a.m. / France / telegraph instruments charged with electricity / L.T., Sept 6-5-d. [II; 2365. "Atmospheric Phenomenon." London Times, September 6, 1859, p. 5 c. 4.]


1859 Sept 2 / Telegraph instruments charged with electricity. / D. News, 7-2-5 / Throughout France, in the morning. Charged as if with a constant current. [II; 2366. "Atmospheric Phenomenon." London Daily News, September 7, 1859, p. 2 c. 5.]


1859 Sept 2 / Extraordinary electric current in telegraph wires in Italy from 5 a.m., decreasing until 3 p.m. / D. News, 12th. [II; 2367. "Atmospheric Disturbance of Electric Telegraphs." London Daily News, September 12, 1859, p. 7 c. 2.]


1859 Sept. 3 / Aurora again brilliant / Southampton / D News, 7-3-5. [II; 2368. Fletcher, John. "A Waterspout." London Daily News, September 7, 1859, p. 3 c. 5.]


1859 Aug 28—Sept 4 / (g.) Aurora / A J. Sci 2-28-index. [II; 2369. "The Great Auroral Exhibition of August 28th to September 4th, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 28 (1859): 385-408. "The Great Auroral Exhibition of August 28th to September 4th, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 29 (1860): 92-97.]


1859 Sept 4 / Waterspout seen at Southampton ab. one o'clock / D. News 7-3-5. That is, a downward projection from a distant cloud. [II; 2370. Fletcher, John. "A Waterspout." London Daily News, September 7, 1859, p. 3 c. 5.]


1859 Sept 5 / 2 p.m. till 4 / Halo around the sun seen at Warwick / D. News 8-2-2. [II; 2371. "Solar Phenomenon." London Daily News, September 8, 1859, p. 2 c. 2.]


1859 Sept 12 / Ext. whirl / Constance (Manche) / C.R. 49/414, 824. [II; 2372. Ginard. "Effets produits par une trombe aux environs de Coutances (Manche)." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 414-415. "M. L'Abbé Ginard, qui avait précédemment fait connaître les résultats de ses observations sur les effets produits...." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 824-825.]


[1859 Sept 12. Wrong date. See: 1859 Oct 12, (II; 2373).]


1859 Sept 15 / Sc Am. 35/389 / John H. Tice, St. Louis, Mo, known as an alarmist weather prophet. / Mr Weber s[[note cut off]] the spot. [II; 2374. Tice, John H. "The Supposed Planet Vulcan." Scientific American, n.s., 35 (December 16, 1876): 389.]


1859 Sept. 15 / Tice oj. / Tice was Supt of Public Schools in St Louis up to 1857 and then Principal of the Laclede School. / Dec 1-1-4, World, 1883. [II; 2375. (New York World, December 1, 1883, 1-4; on microfilm.)]


1859 Sept 18 / q in Cornwall and great gale s. of England and Channel / Timbs. 60-269. [II; 2376. "Earthquake in Cornwall." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1860, 269.]


1859 Sept 20 / N. Y. Ev. Post / Revival in north of Ireland. [A; 402. "The Irish Revival." New York Evening Post, September 20, 1859, p. 3 c. 8.]


1859 Sept 20 / N. Y. Ev. Post / Hysterical Revival in North of Ireland. [II; 2377. "The Irish Revival." New York Evening Post, September 20, 1859, p. 3 c. 8.]


1859 Sept. 24 / 11 a.m. / Vienna / det met / BA 60-94. [II; 2378. Greg, 96.]


1859 Sept. 24 / 9:3011 p.m. / Isle of Wight / Aurora / LT, Sept 27-10-e. [II; 2379. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, September 27, 1859, p. 10 c. 5.]


1859 Sept 28 / 8:47 / In the Dragon and spreading from / met train / at Anvers / Cosmos 15/421. [II; 2380. "Nouvelles de la Semaine." Cosmos, 15 (October 14, 1859): 421-424, at 421.]


[1859 / ab. last Sept. Wrong date. See: 1859 Aug. 29, (II; 2381).]


1859 Oct 1 / midnight / Lymington, Hants. / Bright light near northern horizonthen Great Bear and sky around tinged a deep rose colora similar ap. not so bright to the westward. Coruscation from it. / LT, Oct 4-10-c. [II; 2382. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, October 4, 1859 p. 10 c. 3.]


1859 Oct 1 / Aurora / C.R. 49/481, 548. [II; 2383. Laussedat, A. "Observation de l'aurore boréale du 1er octobre." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 478-481. Goldschmidt, H. "Sur l'aurore boréale du 1er octobre." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 548-549.]


1859 Oct 7 / Waterspout burst near Calcutta. / Jour Asiatic Soc Bengal 29/368. [II; 2384. Sherwill, Walter Stanhope. "Notes upon some remarkable Waterspouts seen in Bengal between the years 1852 and 1860." Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, 29 (1860): 366-375, at 368-372.]


1859 Oct 12 / Amiens / Aurora / CR 49/549. [II; 2385. Decharmes, C. "Aurore boréale observée à Amiens le 12 octobre." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 549-550. ]


[1859 Oct 12 /] 1859 Sept 12 / Sainte-Ame (Vosges) / Aurora / C.R. 49/584 / at Yzeure (Allier)—585, 603 / See 943. [II; 2373. Laurent, P. "Aurore boréale du 12 octobre observée à Saint-Amé (Vosges)." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 584-585. Laussédat. "Aurore boréale observée à Yzeure (Allier) le 12 octobre." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 585-587. Fournet. "Aurore boréale du 12 octobre." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 603. Poey, Andrés. "Parallèle entre les caractères  observés en Europe et à la Havane dans les aurores boréales du 28 au 29 août et du 2 septembre derniers." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 943-946.]


1859 Oct 12 / (Aurora) / Aurora, Nantes, ab 7 p.m., and at Montins. / In Vosges, at 8 p.m., like vast conflagration from S.W. to N.E. 6 or seven white stripes radiating from a pont below the horizon. Ab 8:15, luminous masses. One bet tail of Ursa Major and head of Dragonother around Corona Borealis and at times as far as Lyra. Moon had a strong halo. Other dets. / L.T., Nov. 4-4-f. [II; 2386. "Another Aurora Borealis." London Times, November 4, 1859, p. 4 c. 6.]


1859 Oct. 12 / in B.D. / 7:20 to 8:15 / Solva, Pembrokeshire / Brilliant red light with oblong nucleus rising in sky south by east toward zenith. But stars shone through it. Rays from it. / L.T., Oct 15-11-c. Oct, 19, someone from Hastingdon saw itnotes absence of light in north, so thinks not aurora. Thought glow from a foundrybut visited the foundry and found it closed. [II; 2387.1, 2387.2. The note copies information from page 262 of The Book of the Damned. Knight, Charles P. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, October 15, 1859, p. 11 c. 3. (London Times, October 19+, 1859. Not found. Fix.)]


1859 Oct. 19 / 6:20 p.m. / San Francisco / violent shock / 1:20 a.m., 20th, another violent shock, S. F. Ev. Bulletin, 20th. [II; 2388. (San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, October 20, 1859; on microfilm; @ GeneaologyBank.com.)]


1859 Oct 19 and 23 / Magnetic perturbations / Namur, Belgium / Bull de l'Acad de Belgique 2/8/157. [II; 2389. "Perturbations atmosphériques." Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, s. 2 v. 8 (1859): 352-353. The atmospheric perturbations reviewed in this article are barometric, (not magnetic).]


1859 Oct 21 / Lightning and mets / 5:45 p.m. / Diss, Norfolk / large meteor / between 9 and 10 p.m., much lightning / LT, Oct 25.-12-f. [II; 2390. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, October 25, 1859, p. 12 c. 6. A daylight fireball was observed at 5:45 P.M., on the 21st,  as well as lightning, that night between 9 and 10 P.M.; and, on the next night, the 22nd, many shooting stars were observed.]


1859 Oct 21 / Shock Cornwall / See Jan 13, 1860. Times, Nov. 1-10-a. [II; 2391. "Earthquake in Cornwall." London Times, November 1, 1859 p. 10 c. 1. "A shock of an earthquake was felt at Newquay on the 21st inst., about 7.10." See: 1860 Jan. 13, (II; 2411).]


1859 Oct 22 / If many mets, evidently some not falling. / Diss Norfolk / vivid lightning in the east and many mets / Same cor as Oct 21. [II; 2392. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, October 25, 1859, p. 12 c. 6.]


1859 Oct 21 / Lightning at 7 p.m. on q. / at 10 p.m. more vivid lightning in E / Nottingham / E. J. Lowe / LT, Oct 25-12-f. [II; 2393. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "Great Cold." London Times, October 25, 1859, p. 12 c. 6. Lowe observed lightning at 7 P.M., to the west of Beeston, where the earthquake struck Cornwall about ten minutes later.]


1859 Oct 22 / 3 p.m. / Flash of lightning and thunder in a snowstorm / Macclesfield / L.T., Oct 25-12-f. [II; 2394. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, October 25, 1859, p. 12 c. 6. "In the evening, the sky being clear and the thermometer below the freezing point, lightning was observed similar to that seen on summer evenings."]


1859 Oct 23 / 7:45 p.m. / Large meteor on a night clear but with occasional flashes of lightning / L.T., Oct 27/11/b / This the year of Oct 23-24? [II; 2395. "Meteors." London Times, October 27, 1859, p. 11 c. 2.]


1859 Oct 25 / 7:15 p.m. at Holyheadand ab. 7:30 p.m. (Irish time?) at Ballinaman, 13 miles west of Athlone, in Ireland. At Holyhead, it was immediately followed by rain in a deluge. / BA 61. [II; 2396. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 2-3 & 28-29.]


1859 Nov 1 / [LT], 7-a / Sun spots. [II; 2397. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, November 1, 1859, p. 7 c. 1.]


1859 Nov 12 / [LT], 10-a / Aerolites. [II; 2398. (London Times, November 12, 1859, p. 10 c. 1; not here.)]


1859 Nov. 15 / 9:30 a.m. / N.J. / N.Y. / Meteor / A. J. Sci 2/30/186. [II; 2399. Newton, Hubert Anson. "On the Meteor of November 15th, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 30 (1860): 186-193.]


1859 Nov. 15 / 9:30 a.m. / Mass. to Va. / great meteor / At one place, Dennisville, left behind a column of smoke estimated 1000 feet in diameter. BA 60-12. [II; 2400. Greg, 96-97. Marsh, Benjamin Vail. "Collection of Observations on the Day-light Meteor of Nov. 15, 1859...." Journal of the Franklin Institute, s. 3 v. 57 (1869): 205-210, 253-259. "The column of smoke was near 1000 feet in diameter, and its base was vertical about 4 miles north of Dennisville, at a height of near 8 miles, which may be assumed to be the approximate position of one point in the meteor's path."]


1859 Nov 15 / (=) / 9:30 a.m., det. met., New England to Vanot seen in the region where report was loudest (good). / J. F. Inst 69/205, 253. A. J. Sci 2/29/137, 298. [II; 2401. Marsh, Benjamin Vail. "Collection of Observations on the Day-light Meteor of Nov. 15, 1859...." Journal of the Franklin Institute, s. 3 v. 57 (1869): 205-210, 253-259. Loomis, Elias. "Notice of the Meteor of Nov. 15, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 29 (1860): 137-138. Loomis, Elias. "Notice of the Meteor of Nov. 15, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 29 (1860): 298-300.]


1859 Nov 18-26 / A luminous fog at Geneva / La Sci Pour Tous 5-46. [II; 2402. "Météorologie.Sur un Brouilliard Lumineux." La Science Pour Tous, 5 (no. 6; January 12, 1860): 46-47.]


1859 Nov 18-26 / luminous fog / C.R. 49/1011. [II; 2403. Wartmann, Louis François. "Notice sur un brouillard lumineux observé à Geneve du 18 au 26 novembre 1859." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 1011-1013.]


1859 Nov. 28 / Bohemia / met det / BA 60. [II; 2404. Greg, 96.]


1859 Dec 15 / bet 2 and 3 a.m. / Yorkshire q and rattling sound / L.T., Dec 27-10-e. [II; 2405. "Shock of an Earthquake Felt in Yorkshire." London Times, December 27, 1859, p. 10 c. 5.]


1859 Dec 15 / [LT], 6-e / Piracy extraordinary. [A; 403. "Extraordinary Case of Piracy." London Times, December 15, 1859, p. 6 c. 5. While on a second trip back from another ship, in a small boat, with some supplies, the captain and four men saw their schooner sail off and abandon them. The U.S. schooner William was en route from Savannah to Smyrna, with two female passengers, bales of silk, and $27,000 in Spanish doubloons, on the Atlantic; and, Captain George Walker pursued his ship for four hours, until darkness, and believed his first mate had decided to steal the ship and money.]


1859 Dec 20 / [LT], 10-b / Ghst / Maidstone. [A; 404. "A Ghost Story." London Times, December 20, 1859, p. 10 c. 2. Mysterious door bell ringing and violently shaken doors, which had plagued a household for three weeks to a month, were investigated by the police. A servant girl was charged by a police sergeant for perpetrating these tricks, (supposedly to throw suspicion onto robbers, rather than her visitors); yet, these disturbances had continued for some time "when a policeman was almost constantly in the house," (which makes her "confession" to such deceptions in a guarded house even more "remarkable."]


1859 Dec 21 / Colored snow / brownsome places black / Germany / Tissandier / Les Poussières de l'Air, p. 77 / Westphalia. [II; 2406. Tissandier, Gaston. Les Poussières de l'Air. Paris: Gauthier-Villars, 1877, 77-78.]


1859 Dec 21-29 / Col snow, diff places, Germany / La Nat 8-103. [II; 2407. Tissandier, Gaston. "Les Pluies de Poussière." La Nature, 1877 pt. 1 (no. 189, January 13): 102-106, and, (no. 190, January 20): 115-118, at 103. The colored snows fell from December 21 to 28, (with a newspaper report of one that fell on December 21, published on December 29).]


1860:


1860 / about / Soldiers / 210+. [II; 2408. Crowe, Catherine. The Night Side of Nature. New York: J.S. Redfield, 1850, 417. "In October, 1836, on the very same spot, there was a review of twenty thousand men; and the people then concluded that the former vision was a second-sight." Date is obviously in error, as the vision preceded 1836, as well as Crowe's book.]


1860 / frogs / "early sixties / Briton Ferry, Glamorganshire / E Mechanic 94/118. [II; 2409. Green., E. Llewellyn. "Showers of Frogs." English Mechanic, 94 (no. 2423; September 1, 1911): 118.]


1860 / The body at Blandford Churchyard, Peterburg, Va. / See Oct. 27, 1888. [A; 405. See: 1888 Oct. 27, (B; 964 & 965).]


1860 / Dymoch Hall, Denbighshire / strange murders / not said this year / See March 15, 1901. [A; 406. See: 1901 March 15, (C; 500).]


1860 / Sleeper Susan C. Godsey, near Hickman, Ky. / See July 14, 1869. [A; 407. See: 1869 July 14, (A; 547).]


[1860 Jan 1. Wrong date. See: 1869 Jan 1, (II; 2410).]


1860 Jan. 13 / q / Falmouth / Cornwall / Daily News, Jan. 18 / (Like Oct. 21, '59) / See Timbs-1861-257. Better in Morn Post, 19th / 10:30 p.m. / all west Cornwall / Times-20 / Sound like of thunder. [II; 2411. "Earthquake in Cornwall." London Daily News, January 18, 1860, p. 6 c. 6. "Shock of an Earthquake." London Morning Post, January 19, 1860, p. 3 c. 6. Tennant, George, and others. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, January 20, 1860, p. 10 c. 5. "Earthquake in Cornwall." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1861, 257.]


1860 Jan 14 / Ice / Blakiston / D-177. ** [II; 2412. The note copies information from page 177 of The Book of the Damned. "Extract of a Letter from Captain Blakiston...." Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 10 (1859-1860): 468.]


1860 Jan. 17 / about 11:45 a.m. / Reading / 3 letters in Times of Jan 20explosion overhead. [II; 2413. Tennant, George, and others. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, January 20, 1860, p. 10 c. 5. "Yesterday morningviz., Tuesday, about half-past 11, a sound resembling the discharge of a gun high up in the air, the sky being perfectly cloudless, was heard by a number of persons in this neighbourhood."]


1860 Jan 17 / 3 cors. in Times of 20th write as to sound "resembling the discharge of a gun high in air" according to [word out off paper] aerial sound according to all, heard near Reading. 24th, Cor writes heard it and his impression at "an immense height". Ab 11:45 a.m. [II; 2414. Tennant, George, and others. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, January 20, 1860, p. 10 c. 5. Taylor, Robert. "Meteorological Phenomena." London Times, January 24, 1860, p. 11 c. 6. "The whole sky was perfectly clear at the time. The sound came as from a dull explosion high in the air, in a direction south-south-east, followed by a thunder of about 15 seconds' duration. A remarkable circumstance about the sound was the idea it gave of immense heightthe thunder seeming continually to descend, not to spread laterally as in ordinary cases." These correspondents ranged as far apart as Reading and Northumberland.]


1860 Jan 18 / Guatemala / II / q / BA '11. [II; 2415. A class II earthquake. Milne, 715.]


1860 Jan 20 / (Det Met) / ab. 5:45 a.m. / Plombieres / loud detonation supposed of a meteor, preceded by a vivid light / C.R. 50-322 / Light illumined the horizon (like so many q-lights). Detonation was tremendous. [II; 2416. Jutier, Sylvain-Charles-Prosper. "Détonation précedée d'une vive lumiere indiquant probablement le passage d'un bolide." Comptes Rendus, 50 (1860): 322-323.]


1860 Jan 20 / Meteor / Plombières / Cosmos 16/592. [II; 2417. "Académie des Sciences." Cosmos, 16 (February 10, 1860): 155-163, at 155.]


1860 Jan 20 / 5 a.m. / Cassel, etc. / intense sudden light / BA 60-106. [II; 2418. Greg, 107.]


1860 Jan. 29 / V. / London / ab. 8 a.m. / "perfectly round black object," of apparent size of (Vulcan), passing over disc of sun until egress at ab. 9:30 / by F. A. R. Russell and 3 other persons, ac to Mr. Russell,in Nature 15/505 / D-192. [II; 2419. The note copies information from page 192 of The Book of the Damned. Russell, F.A.R. "An Intra-Mercurial Planet." Nature, 14 (October 5, 1876): 505. Russell stated that the object was about the size of "Mercury," (not Vulcan).]


1860 Feb 3 / See Feb 16, 1883. / Alessandria, Piedmont, Italy / (F). Details / LA Science Pour Tous 8-154. [II; 2420. Fletcher, 102. This is the Alessandria meteorite. "Aérolithe." La Science Pour Tous, 8 (no. 20; April 16, 1863): 154. Schrauf, Albrecht. "Ueber den Meteorit von Alessandria." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, s. 2 v. 118 (1863): 361-363.]


1860 Feb 3 / Stone fell / Alexandrie, Italy / L. S. P. Tous 8-154. [II; 2321. "Aérolithe." La Science Pour Tous, 8 (no. 20; April 16, 1863): 154.]


1860 Feb. 6 / morning / q and th. storm / Athens / The Geologist 4-145. [II; 2322. "Foreign Correspondence." Geologist, 4 (1861): 142-145, at 145, c.v. "Earthquakes and their connection with Meteorological Phenomena."]


1860 March / Remarkable disturbances in North Temperate Belt of Jupiter. Observatory 23-215. [II; 2323. Denning, William Frederick. "Periodically Recurrent Disturbances in the North Temperate Belt of Jupiter." Observatory, 23 (1900): 215-216.]


1860 March 1-2 / New Star / at Moscow / A star to s.w. of the Great Bear increased in size and turned red. / Wolverhampton Chronicle, Ap. 18, p. 3, col. 5. At 9:45, night of 1st, remained so till 11:30, reaching half size of moon. Then waned and in 1/2 hour disappeared. A dark spot could be seen in its place. [II; 2424. "At Moscow, at a quarter to ten o'clock in the night...." Wolverhampton Chronicle and Staffordshire Advertiser, April 18, 1860 p. 3 c. 5.]


1860 March 10 / 9 p.m. / Bradford / Cheshire / Leeds / etc. / Meteor / BA 61-2. [II; 2425. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 2-3.]


1860 March 10 / 9:50 p.m. / Bradford / met 2/3rds size moon / BA-'60. [II; 2426. Greg, 96.]


1860 March 15 / Sound and ice / Ice of Upper Wasdale, night of, in a "terrible snowstorm""a singular rolling noise in the air, which resembled the noise of musketry." In morning the ice found. / LT, Ap. 7-7-e / ice found morning of 16th/ (D-177). [II; 2427. The note copies information from page 177 of The Book of the Damned. "Singular Phenomenon in a Snowstorm." London Times, April 7, 1860. p. 7 c. 5. "About two weeks ago a terrible snowstorm raged in Upper Wasdale, accompanied on Longton Beck and Swinhope Fell by a singular rolling noise in the air, which resembled the noise of musketry. On the morning of the 16th ult. many of the shepherds proceeded on to the Fell to look after their sheep, when they were astonished to find the ground, for the space of a mile in length and half a mile in width, covered with large pieces of ice, which had evidently fallen from the clouds. It was as though a mountain of ice had been suddenly shattered and the fragments scattered over the earth. The blocks were of such a size that at a little distance they resembled a flock of sheep."]


1860 March 19 / 8:30 p.m. / Volc of Isle of Reunion / C.R. 50-899 / great but lasted 1 hour. [II; 2428. "Éruption du volcan de l'île de la Réunion." Comptes Rendus, 50 (1860): 899-901. The Piton de la Fournaise volcano.]


1860 / ab. March / Dark spot on Jupiter / M. Notices 20/244 / 59/76. [II; 2429. "On the Appearance of Jupiter." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 22 (April 13, 1860): 243, (illustrations). Airy, George Biddell. "Remarks on the Appearance of Jupiter." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 22 (April 13, 1860): 243-245. Denning, William Frederick. "On a probable Instance of periodically recurrent Disturbance on the Surface of Jupiter." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 59 (December 9, 1898): 76-79.]


1860 March 24-25 / night / Luminous band ap and disap regularly / called Aurora / at Havana / La Sci Pour Tous 5/221. C.R. 50-998 / 11 p.m. to 4 a.m. [II; 2430. "Météorologie.Aurore boréale-orientale observée à la Havane." La Science Pour Tous, 5 (no. 27; June 7, 1860): 221. Poey, Andrés. "Aurore boréale-orientale observée à la Havane dans la nuit du 24 au 25 mars 1860." Comptes Rendus, 50 (1860): 998-1000.]


1860 March 28 / Khiragurh, N. W. Provinces, India / (F) / S.E. of Bhurthur. [II; 2431. Fletcher, 102. This is the Khiragurh meteorite.]


1860 March 28 / (See 1859.) / Aerolite. [II; 2432. See: 1859 March 28, (II; 2281).]


1860 April 1 / Met from Auriga to Venus, which it crossed and instantly disappeared. B Assoc 1860-6. [II; 2433. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1859-60." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1860, 1-27, at 6-7.]


1860 April / Vesuvius still active / Y.B. '61-255. [II; 2434. "Eruption of Vesuvius." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1861, 255. "Our Weekly Gossip." Athenæum, 1860 (no. 1692; March 31): 444-445, at 445. "Our Weekly Gossip." Athenæum, 1860 (no. 1694; April 14): 511-512, at 511. "Our Weekly Gossip." Athenæum, 1860 (no. 1698; May 12): 651-652, at 652.]


1860 Ap. 11 / Dark or eclipse / Pernambuco / D-230. [II; 2435. The note copies information from page 230 of The Book of the Damned. Liais, Emmanuel. "Sur un phénomène météorolgique et une offuscation du soleil analogue à celle des années 1106, 1208, 1547 et 1706, observés dans la province de Pernambuco, le 11 avril 1860." Comptes Rendus, 50 (1860): 1197-1200.]


1860 Ap. 11 / Light to E of sun, said been Venus. / C.R. 50/1198+ / But Venus was not visible to naked eye (p 1199) and, as writer says, if obscured sun, Venus instead of more visible should less visible. Venus Inf Conjunction Sun / July 18, 1860. [II; 2436. Between the Sun and the eastern horizon, at this time at Rio Formoso, Brazil, the brightest stars would have been Hamal, (α Arietis), Menkar (α Ceti), and Aldebaran (α Tauri), all of which were not as brilliant as Venus, with an apparent magnitude of about -4.1 and elongation of +43°. Liais, Emmanuel. "Sur un phénomène météorolgique et une offuscation du soleil analogue à celle des années 1106, 1208, 1547 et 1706, observés dans la province de Pernambuco, le 11 avril 1860." Comptes Rendus, 50 (1860): 1197-1200.]


1860 Ap 11 / Sun obscured, province of Pernambuco. / That night at another place in P. / But Venus visible. Thick vapors and a burning wind. / C.R. 50-1198. [II; 2437. Liais, Emmanuel. "Sur un phénomène météorolgique et une offuscation du soleil analogue à celle des années 1106, 1208, 1547 et 1706, observés dans la province de Pernambuco, le 11 avril 1860." Comptes Rendus, 50 (1860): 1197-1200.]


[1860 Ap. 21. Wrong date. See: 1860 May 1, (I; 2438).]


1860 Ap. 26 / 11:45 a.m. / Shock at Sylhet (near Calcutta) / Indian Field, May 12, p. 89. [II; 2439. (Indian Field, May 12, p. 89; on microfilm).]


1860 Ap. 27 / Shock at Surat / Indian Field, May 19, 1860. [II; 2440. (Indian Field, May 19, 1860; on microfilm).]


1860 Ap. 27 / Great q / Peru / Cosmos 16/592. [II; 2441. "Nouvelles de la Semaine." Cosmos, 16 (June 8, 1860): 589-593, at 592.]


1860 May 1 / Met explosion. Fall of stones over Guernsey Co, Oh[io]. So violent heard [ov]er area 150 miles in diameter. Am J Sci 2/31/89 / (F). [II; 2442. Fletcher, 102. This is the New Concord meteorite. Greg, 96. Smith, John Lawrence. "The Guernsey County (Ohio) Meteorites...." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 31 (1861): 87- 98. Farrington, Oliver Cummings. "Catalogue of the Meteorites of North America, to January 1, 1909. Memoirs of the National Academy of Science, 13 (1915): 1-513, at 329-330. "The area over which this explosion was heard was probably not less than 150 miles in diameter."]


[1860 May 1 /] 1860 Ap. 21 / New Concord, Ohio / metite / Sc Am, NS, 2-235. [II; 2438. Siegfried, W.D. "A Meteoric Mystery." Scientific American, n.s, 2 (May 19, 1860): 325. The New Concord meteorite.]


1860 May 1 / 12:45 p.m. / Metite, New Concord, Ohio. Detonations heard S.E. Ohio and N.W. Virginia. [II; 2443. Farrington, Oliver Cummings. "Catalogue of the Meteorites of North America, to January 1, 1909. Memoirs of the National Academy of Science, 13 (1915): 1-513, at 329-342.]


1860 May 6 / 9 p.m. / Wolverhampton / "A most brilliant meteor." / W. Chronicle, May 9. [II; 2444. "Appearance of a Meteor." Wolverhampton Chronicle and Staffordshire Advertiser, May 9, 1860, p. 4 c. 5.]


1860 May 7 / Violent eruption, volc Rotlugia, Iceland / La Sci Pour Tous-5-295. [II; 2445. "Éruption du Volcan Rotlugia en Islande." La Science Pour Tous, 5 (no. 37; August 16, 1860): 295-296. The Katla volcano.]


1860 May 8 / A Vulcan. N.Y. Times, July 6, 1873. [II; 2446. "The Planet Vulcan." New York Times, July 6, 1873, p. 6 c. 5. "The first observation was made May 8, 1860, at noon, while taking the the time with a Dent's dipleidescope, with telescope attached. The planet or object appeared like a minute and well-defined black spot on the surface of the sun. As the instrument was fixed and had a range of only 9', it could not be observed for a longer time."A dipleidescope is a device utilizing two reflections of the Sun, which, when the images overlap, can help determines the local noon time.]


1860 May 8 / "Vulcan" / NY State / New. [II; 2447.]


1860 May and June / Dhumsalla / Comb. / 128. [II; 2448.]


1860 May 8-27 / Eruption of Katla, Iceland / Rept. Smith. Inst 1885/510. [II; 2449. "Volcanic Eruptions and Earthquakes in Iceland within Historic Times." Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian, 1885, 495-541, at 510. The Katla volcano.]


1860 May 9 / Eruption / Iceland / C.R. 41-69 / B As. '60/86. [II; 2450. Pjetursson. "Sur une nouvelle éruption d'un volcan islaidais." Comptes Rendus, 51 (1860): 67-68. Lindsay, William Lauder. "On the Eruption in May 1860, of the Kötlŭgjá Volcano in Iceland." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1860, Notices and Abstracts, 86-87. The Katla volcano.]


1860 May 12 / Flames of eruption of volc Kotlugja, Iceland this day visible at Reykjavic, 80 miles away / BA 1860-86. [II; 2451. Lindsay, William Lauder. "On the Eruption in May 1860, of the Kötlŭgjá Volcano in Iceland." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1860, Notices and Abstracts, 86-87. Pabst notes: "See note at April 20, 1872, per TT, The Fortean, #32, p. 78, c. 1." See: 1872 Ap. 20, (IV; 771.2). " Kötlŭgjá" is anothe name for the Katla volcano, and "Reykjavic" is another name for Reykjavík.]


1860 May 16 / Turkey / q. / I / BA '11. [II; 2452. A class I earthquake. Milne, 715.]


1860 May 19 / (bld) / Indian Field of / That ac to the North West Gazette of the 12th, "a shower of blood" had fallen in the Jellasore district, over an expanse of about 50 beegahs. [II; 2453. (Indian Field, May 19, 1860; on microfilm.) (North West Gazette, May 12, 1860).]


1860 / bld / Allens Indian Mail, Aug 27that the blood fell at Futteghur. [II; 2454. (Allens Indian Mail, August 27, 1860).]


1860 May 21 / Nova / by Auwers / New star of 7th mag in the cluster 80 Messier in Scorpio. On the 28th in England, by Pogson. By June 16, diminished to 10.5 mag. / Observatory 9-172. [II; 2455. "The New Star in the Nebula in Andromeda." Observatory, 9 (1886): 172.]


1860 May 21 / Scorpio nova described by Auwers / by Pogson, May 28 / Observatory, 9-172. [II; 2456.  "The New Star in the Nebula in Andromeda." Observatory, 9 (1886): 172.]


1860 May 21 / before / See Times. / great th. storms / Yorkshire. [II; 2457. "Thunderstorms." London Times, May 19, 1860, p. 12 c. 1.]


1860 May 21 / Nova Scorpii / in a nebula in S Nova / by Auwers / almost 7th mag / by June 10th, down to almost vanishing point. Nature 33-466. [II; 2458. "Nova Andromedæ of 1885, and Nova Scorpii of 1860." Nature, 33 (March 18, 1886): 466.]


1860 May 22 / 10:27 p.m. / Met / Paris / C,R, 50-997. [II; 2459. Laussedat, A. "Bolide observé à Paris dans la soirée du 22 mai 1860." Comptes Rendus, 50 (1860): 997-998, (illustration).]


1860 May 27 or 30 / q. / Italy / BA '11. [II; 2460. A class I earthquake. Milne, 715.]


1860 June / Nothing in Wolverhampton Chronicle, Ap 18-June 13. [II; 2461. Fort apparently searched for reports of the fall of black stones at Wolverhampton during a thunderstorm, but before the correct date. See: 1860 June 19, (II; 2475).]


1860 June / Wolverhampton / nothing in Birm. D. Post, May-June. [II; 2462. See: 1860 June 19, (II; 2475).]


1860 June / Birm / See Aug 13. [II; 2463. See: 1860 Aug 13, (III; 30).]


1860 June [20] / See '58. / pebbles in storm / Wolverhampton / D-168 / N. / Proc. Roy. / A paper. [II; 2464. The note copies information from page 168 of The Book of the Damned. "Phénomène Météorologique." La Science Pour Tous, 5 (no. 33; July 19, 1860): 264. ("A Shower of Stones." Wolverhampton Advertiser and Spirit of the Times, June 23, 1860, p. 582 c. 2; not @ BNA.) "Singular Phenomenon.Shower of Meteoric Stones." Liverpool Daily Post, June 25, 1860, p. 3 c. 6. (Proc. Roy,???).]


1860 June 2-12 / (F[r]) / q / Nice / C.R. 50 / 596, 899, 901 / 51 / 67 / 52 / 252 / 53 / 638 / 54 / 511, 1198. [II; 2465. Prost, O. "Sur les trépidations du sol dans une partie de la ville de Nice." Comptes Rendus, 50 (1860): 596-598. Prost, O. "Sur quelques nouvelles secousses de tremblement de terre ressenties à Nice." Comptes Rendus, 50 (1860): 901. Prost, O. "Nouvelles secousses de tremblement de terre à Nice." Comptes Rendus, 51 (1860): 67. Prost, O. "Trépidations du sol observées à Nice dans le deuxième semestre de 1860." Comptes Rendus, 52 (1861): 252-253. Prost, O. "Trépidations du sol à Nice." Comptes Rendus, 53 (1861): 638-640. Prost, O. "Trépidations du sol à Nice pendant l'éruption du Vésuve." Comptes Rendus, 54 (1862): 511-512. Prost, O. "Trépidations du sol à Nice." Comptes Rendus, 54 (1862): 1198.]


1860 June 3 / afternoon / Comanche, Iowa / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 2466. Finley, 4.]


1860 June 3 / evening / Kansas and Iowa / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 2467. Finley, 4.]


1860 June 7 / Asia Minor / q / I / BA '11. [II; 2468. A class I earthquake. Milne, 715.]


1860 June 8 or 9 / (th stone) / Raphoe, Donegal, Ireland / Sandstone in hailstorm / Phil Mag 4/22/107. [II; 2469. Greg, Rupert Philips. "On New Falls of Meteoric Stones." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 22 (August, 1859): 107-108. "Another meteoric stone in all probablity fell last year on the 8th or 9th of June, about two miles from Raphoe in Co, Donegal, Ireland, on the farm of Dr. McClintock of Raphoe, about 2 P.M. It was about the size of a hen's egg, and fell during a storm of thunder, lightning, and hail. It resembled a friable sandstone; but it does not appear there was either any black crust to it, or that there was any fire-ball seen at the time."]


1860 June 8 or 9 / Th stone / Ac to Londonderry Sentinel of Jun 15, 1860 / (Year Book of Facts 1862-139) / During a th storm at Raphoe, Donegal. Stone like friable sandstone. [II; 2470. "New Falls of Meteoric Stones." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1862, 138-139. "Curious Phenomenon." Londonderry Sentinel, June 15, 1860, p. 2 c. 6. "Curious Phenomenon."Saunders's News-Letter, June 16, 1860, p. 3 c. 3.]


1860 June 16 / Aerolite same date / See June 16, 1861. [II; 2471. The Kusiali meteorite fell on June 16, 1860, according to Thomas Oldham. Maskelyne, Nevil Story, and, Lang, Viktor von. "Mineralogical Notes." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 28 (January & June, 1864): 145-150, at 148-149. "The fall took place a few minutes before 5 o'clock A.M., on the 16th of June 1860."]


[1860 June 16 /] 1861 June 16 / (not It) / Aerolite same date / June 16, 1860. [III; 111. See: 1860 June 16, (II; 2471).]


1860 June 16 / Kusiali, N. W. Provs., India / (F). [II; 2472. Fletcher, 102. This is the Kusiali meteorite.]


1860 June 16 / Kusiali, India / 5 a.m. / Fall of stones / BA 67-418. Also here listed stonefall at Kusiali, for Jan 16. Mistake? [II; 2473. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 418. Kusiali is listed for both January 16 and June 16, in this catalog. See: 1860 June 16, (II; 2471).]


1860 June 18 / Amesbury, Mass / and Prospect, N.Y. / sulphur or pollen / Sc Am 2/3/46, 97. [II; 2474. "Notes and Queries." Scientific American, n.s., 3 (August 11, 1860): 45-46, at 46, c.v. "T.F.C., of Mass." "Sulphur in Rain." Scientific American, n.s., 3 (August 11, 1860): 97.]


1860 June 19 / La Sci Pour Tous, June 19, 1860 / That ac to Wolverhampton Advertiser, a great quantity of little black stones had fallen in a violent storm at Wolverhampton. [II; 2475. "Phénomène Météorologique." La Science Pour Tous, 5 (no. 33; July 19, 1860): 264. "A Shower of Stones." Wolverhampton Advertiser and Spirit of the Times, June 23, 1860, p. 582 c. 2. "Singular Phenomenon.Shower of Meteoric Stones." Liverpool Daily Post, June 25, 1860, p. 3 c. 6. “Fall of Aerolites.” Wolverhampton Chronicle and Staffordshire Advertiser, June 27, 1860, p. 4 c. 5. "Wednesday evening" would be June 20, 1860.]

.

1860 June 19 / B. stones / Wolverhampton / There is no La Sci Pour Tous of June 19. Nearest is 21st. [II; 2476. "Phénomène Météorologique." La Science Pour Tous, 5 (no. 33; July 19, 1860): 264.]


1860 June 20 / Comet seen on Atlantic. / ab. 51 N and 21 W. / ab. 11 p.m., ships time, 7 or 8 degrees above horizon / nucleus and tail distinctly visible / L.T. 27-10-f. Night of 24-25, 10:45 p.m., as seen at Wareham nucleus almost as brilliant as B. Aurigae / appeared to be a little above a line drawn through A and B Aurigae; west of B rather more than the distance between A and B. [II; 2477.1, 2477.2. Caswell, Alexis. "The Comet." London Times,  June 27, 1860, p. 10 c. 6. Richards, R.E. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, June 27, 1860, p. 10 c. 6. Comet C/1860 M1.]


1860 June 21 / 10:15comet seen in Cornwall / 1 degree west of north [magnetic] / ab 20 degrees above horizon, at 2 a.m./ very brilliant in northeast. altitude about 45 degrees / Times, 25-10-f. June 23, 11:30 p.m., seen through break in clouds, at Shrewsbury / Times26-12-f. / At midnight it was ab. 4 degrees above horizon and ab. 4 degrees west of north. [II; 2477.3, 2477.4. Also, as 2477.a.1 and 2477.a.2. "A New Comet." London Times, June 25, 1860, p. 10 c. 6. Mansel, S.P. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, June 26, 1860, p. 12 c. 6.]


[Pabst's Notes in Pursuit finish here, with |"1860 June 21."]


1860 June 25 / 6 p.m. / Cor. J. M. Hawksworth writes in L.T. 27-10-f, from Barnsbury that he saw the comet while sun shiningN.W. by W., ab. 15 degrees N of the sun. / Times 28-7-a, Thomas Crumpten writes that Mr. H. must have seen Venusthe comet not visible to N eye before sunset. [II; 2477.5, 2477.6. Also, as 2477.b.1 and 2477.b.2. Crumpen, Thomas. "The New Comet." London Times, June 28,  1860, p. 7 c. 1. Venus was in the location described by Hawksworth, (with Jupiter and Mercury a bit closer to the Sun, but not as brilliant as Venus).]


[1860 June 30. This is how in Eng[land] the comet path supposed to be. [illustration sketched on reverse side of the note, copied in The Fortean, p. 110. (Copied from MNRAS, Obs, etc. Find original illustration. Not in MNRAS. Fix.)]


1860 June 21-24 / q / Cent. Amer / II / BA '11. [II; 2478. A class II earthquake. Milne, 715.]


1860 June 21 / Dragonflies near Ghent. Migration SW to N.E. against wind. / Ent Mo. Mag 2/11/223. [II; 2479. "Abstract of an Article by Mons. A. Lancaster on Migrations of Libellula Quadrimaculata in Belgium in June, 1900." Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 36 (s. 2 v. 11; October 1900): 222-226, at 223.]


1860 June 25 / about / (Auriga) / Comet visible a few night in A / An. Reg 1860/124. [II; 2480. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 102 (1860): pt. 2, 1-209, at 124, cv. "A Comet."]


1860 June 24 / (Fish / India) / Sky bright and clear, and a strong wind blowing. Shower of fish in district of Bonda. Some were sent to Allahabad. "They were about two inches in length, resembling the stickleback, but without the prongs in the dorsal fin. / Allen's Indian Mail, Aug 22. [II; 2481. "Shower of Fish." Allen's Indian Mail, 18 (August 22, 1860) 620. "The North-West Gazette relates a fall on the 24th of June, when the sky was bright and clear and a strong wind blowing, of a shower of fish to the south-west across the Jumna, in the district of Bonda. Six seers of them were picked up in one place, and a portion of them sent to Allahabad. They were about two inches in length, resembling the stickleback, but without the prongs in the dorsal fin."]


1860 June 29 / Comet seen at Brudeen, India / Indian Field, July 7. [II; 2482. (Indian Field, July 7, 1860; not @ BNA.)]


1860 June 26-29 / Rapidly changing sunspots / La Sci Pour Tous 5-248. [II; 2483. "Taches du Soleil." La Science Pour Tous, 5 (no. 31; July 3, 1860): 248, (misprinted in the journal as "348").]


1860 June 26 / afternoon / at Clifton / Mock suns / L.T. 28-7-a. [II; 2484. Burder, William C. "Remarkable Solar Phenomenon." London Times, June 28, 1860, p. 7 c. 1. Mocks suns were observed either "this afternoon," (on June 26), or, on "Monday, June 25"; the published letter gives both dates.]


1860 June 28 / Comet first seen at Darjeeling. / "Homeward Mail," Aug 27 / At 8:30 p.m., and set 8:40 behind distant mts at N.N.W. No tail then visible. To N. eye, larger than Jupiter and almost as bright. In the northwest. [II; 2485. "The Comet." Homeward Mail, August 27, 1860, p. 5 c. 2. "It then had a tail 2½ degrees in length visible to the naked eye."]


1860 June 29 / Lake Winnipeg / evening / Met trail 3/4 hour / Science 1/5. [II; 2486. Belknap, George Eugene. "A Singular Meteoric Phenomenon." Science: An Illustrated Journal, 1 (February 9, 1883): 4-6, at 5-6.]


1860 June 29 / Vampirism upon child (?) / An. Reg. 1860/93. [A; 408. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 102 (1860): pt. 2, 1-209, at 93-106, cv. "The Road Child Murder."]


1860 / summer / First appearance in America of cabbage butterfly Pieris rapaenear Quebec, Canada. Science 21/57. [II; 2487. Webster, F.M. "Some Insect Immigrants in Ohio." Science, s. 1 v. 21 (1893): 57-59, at 57.]


1860 July / India / Dhurmsalla series. [A; 409.]


1860 July / Shower of live fish at Benares, India, unaccompanied by rain. Carribber, "Odd Showers," p. 13. [II; 2488. Gibb, George Duncan. Odd Showers. London: Kerby, 1870, 13.]


1860 July 3 / Snake / South Granville, N.Y. ** [II; 2489. Ruggles, William. "Raining snakes." Scientific American, n.s., 3 (August 11, 1860): 112. "During the very heavy shower of rain which fell here on the evening of July 3d, about sundown, while I was standing upon a flat rock, I heard a peculiar noise at my feet, and, on looking down, I saw a snake lying as if stunned by a fall from an immense height. On commencing an examination, the snake began to show signs of life, which I soon ended by a blow on the head. The animal was about a foot long, and of a gray color."]


1860 July 4, 5, 10 / Exceptional numbers of meteors noted near Santander, Spain / BA 61. [II; 2490. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 3-4.]


1860 / summer / Vulcan / naked eye / As well as Cor. Richard Covington, of Washington, could remember, 16 years later. / Sc. Am 35-340. He wa[s] near Fort Vancouver, Columbia River, Wash. Territory, and a boy called his attention to the sun. He saw "a perfectly rounded, well-defined dark spot" crossing sun. [II; 2491.1, 2491.2. Covington, Richard. "The Supposed Planet Vulcan." Scientific American, n.s., 35 (November 25, 1876): 340. Covington was uncertain as to the date of his observation: "...it was about the year 1860."]


1860 July / India Series / See 1838. [II; 2492.]


1860 July 4 / Comet reported from various parts of India. Said at Delhi was like "a flag of light over the sun" and was an absorbing topic. Reported for 4th, 7th and 10th. Allen's Indian Mail, Aug 22 / described as "tail upward". [II; 2493. "Delhi, July 10." Allen's Indian Mail, 18 (August 22, 1860): 620. "The last item of absorbing and important public intelligence is that the natives have discovered a flag of light over the sun which is supposed to signify all sorts of portents." "Mussoorie, 10th July." Allen's Indian Mail, 18 (August 22, 1860) 620. "Strange that none of your correspondents have noticed the fact of the comet having made its appearance here on the 4th instant. I saw it on the evening of the 7th very distinctly, almost due west, with its tail upwards. Our astronomers appear behindhand in their calculations, if we are to conclude that this is the old comet; it, however, I may add, is very small." "Meteoric Stones in India." Canadian Journal, n.s., 7 (May, 1862): 193-200, at 197. Comet C/1860 M1.]


1860 July 4 / evening / q. and th. storm, Athens. / The Geologist 4-145. [II; 2494. "Foreign Correspondence." Geologist, 4 (1861): 142-145, at 145, c.v. "Earthquakes and their connection with Meteorological Phenomena."]


1860 July 4 / 5 p.m. / Doniphan Co., Kansas / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 2495. Finley, 4.]


1860 July 6 / from 10 to 11 p.m. / 6 small meteors from Polaris toward A[lpha] U[rsae]. Maj. / BA 61-2. [II; 2496. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 2-3. "From Polaris towards α Ursæ Majoris," (Alpha Ursae Majoris, or Dubhe).]


1860 July 6 / Baton Rouge / det meteor / electrical phe / BA 60-96. [II; 2497. Greg, 96.]


1860 July 7-8 / Many meteors and "lightning" / France / BA 61. [II; 2498. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 2-3.]


1860 July 11 / [LT], 12-d / Singular Phe. [II; 2499. "Singular Phenomenon." London Times, July 11, 1860, p. 12 c. 4. A variety of mirages of a warship were observed at Portobello, on July 8, 1860.]


1860 July 13 / 10:10 p.m. / Spain / met from Vega / BA 61-4. [II; 2500. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44 at 4-5.]


1860 July 14 / 1849 = great year, mets India. [II; 2501.]


1860 July 14 / Dhurmsala, Punjab, India / (F). [II; 2502. Fletcher, 102. This is the Dhurmsala meteorite.]


1860 July 14 / 2 p.m. / In Allen's Indian Mail, Sept 13, the phe at Dhurmsala described as "another aerolite". Said that there had been several preceding falls of meteoric stones and that there had been earthquakes. [II; 2503. (Allen's Indian Mail, Sept 13, 1860; not @ BNA.)]


[End of Series II. Beginning of Series III.]


1860 July 14 / July 28 is the date given by cor in the L.T., Dec 26, 1860. He spells it Dharam Sal (Kangra). Lat 32,5; Long 76,18. He is Syed Abdoolah, Prof of Hindustani, University College, London, and he wrote to a friend in D.H. / who sent him particulars on the 28th of July, bet. 2 and 3 p.m. To him the "fearful shocks" seemed subterranean rumbling "from the bowels of the earth". Then the stones, many of them like cannon balls. [III; 1.1, 1.2. Abdoolah, Syed. "Remarkable Phenomenon in India." London Times, December 26, 1860, p. 7 c. 2.]


1860 July 14 / Comet, June 28, July 4 / Fish, June 24 / (Bld, May 19) / See aeroliteJune 16, March 28. / (See Commissioner's report.) [III; 2. "Meteoric Stones in India." Canadian Journal, n.s., 7 (May, 1862): 193-200, at 197-198. See: 1860 June 16, (II: 2471 & 2473); and, 1860 July, (II; 2488; and, III; 11).]


1860 July 14 / For India Series 1865 / See Jan 19, Feb 9, May 23, Aug 25, Sept 21. [III; 3.]


1860 July 14 / Corrected date Dhurmsala /  BA 67-418. [III; 4. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 418.]


[1860 July 15 /] 1850 July 15 / 11 p.m. / Fireball size of moon / Banff, Scotland / BA 67-418. [II; 1422. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 418.]


1860 July 17 / Op. Mars (Al). [III; 5. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1860, 510.]


1860 July 18 / Solar eclipse. A. J. Sci. 2/33/145. [III; 6. "The Solar Eclipse of July 18, 1860." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 33 (1862): 145-146.]


1860 July 18 / Moon / by Bout and Mannheim in Algeria during the eclipse of the moon a brilliant point of light one saw it withthe other without a telescope. Suggested that hole in moon in sunlight through / An Sci Disc '62 / 388 / Loomis Treatise on Astro., p. 174. [III; 7. "Hole in the Moon." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1862, 388. "M. Mannheim states, however, that he saw the brilliant point so unmistakably as to leave no doubt of its being a reality. Its place on the lunar disc has not yet been determined; but, should it prove to have been always seen at the same place, the only explanation possible would be that the moon is pierced with a hole." Loomis, Elias. A Treatise on Astronomy. New York: Harper, 1866, 174. "The bright point gradually increased, until it blended with the light of the sun's disc as it emerged from behind the moon."]


1860 July 18 / [Venus] Inf [conjunction] [Sun] (Al). [III; 8. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1860, 510. Astronomical symbols used by Fort.]


1860 July 18 / Eclipse of sun / Leisure Hour 9-648. [III; 9. "Total Eclipse, July 18, 1860." Leisure Hour, 9 (1860): 648-650.]


1860 July 19 / q. / Italy / Treviso / BA '11. [III; 10. A class I earthquake. Milne, 715.]


1860 July / Canadian Journal, 7-194copy of the letter from the Deputy Commissioner of Dhurmsalla to the Secretary to Government, Punjab. July 14bet 2 and 2:30 p.m., the aerolites / new comet at the time / lights like fire balloons in the evening / waterspout at Bhurtpore and aerolite said to have fallen / like an aurra at Delhi on the 13th / fishBenares / BloodFurruckabad and at Meerut / Dark spot on sun. and early in month, unnatural yellow darkness and violent wind / and a q. [III; 11.1, 11.2, 11.3. "Meteoric Stones in India." Canadian Journal, n.s., 7 (1862): 193-200, at 194-198.]


1860 July / Dhurmsalla / q / See Ap. 4, 1905. [III; 12. See: 1905 Ap. 4, (VIII: 2240 & 2244).]


1860 July 20 / Great met from Lake Michigan to Atlantic and Maine to Va / A. J. Sci 2/30/293. [III; 13. Lyman, C.S. "The Meteor of July 20th, 1860." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 30 (1860): 293-295.]


1860 July 20 / For 2 or 3 preceding nights had been brilliant auroral flashes in northern sky. / L.T., Aug 6-12-f. [III; 14. "Extraordinary Meteor." London Times, August 6, 1860, p. 12 c. 6.]


1860 July 20 / Mars / Earth / Ext. met / Michigan to Atlantic / (N)-op / Sci Am. 47/38. Am Jour Sci 2/30/186, 93 / 2/3/89, etc. [III; 15. Greg, 96-97. "A Remarkable Meteor." Scientific American, n.s., 47 (July 15, 1882): 38. Newton, Hubert Anson. "On the Meteor of November 15th, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 30 (1860): 186-193. Lyman, C.S. "The Meteor of July 20th, 1860." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 30 (1860): 293-295. "A meteor rivalling in brilliancy that of July 20th, was extensively observed throughout the Southern United States on the evening of August 2d, between 10 and 11 o'clock, according to the local time." (New York Herald, June 24 or before, 1882, is source of the Sci. Amer. article.) “The Meteor.” Harper's Weekly, 4 (August 4, 1860): 481-482, (illustrations). See: 1860 Aug 2 (III: 13, 21).]


[1860 July 20 /] 1860 July 23 Friday before / Aldeby. Cor. Zoologist during th. storm saw thousands of little toads on a path. Believed fell from sky because some on his arms and in a butterfly net he was carrying / night ab 9:15 / Zoologist 1860-7146. [III; 16. Winter, W. "Toads falling in a Shower of Rain." Zoologist, 18 (1860): 7146.]


1860 July 28 / Ice / Dhurmsalla / D-233. [III; 17. The note copies information from page 233 of The Book of the Damned. "Meteoric Stones in India." Canadian Journal, n.s., 7 (May, 1862): 193-200, at 195. "Some coolies passing close to where one fell, ran to the spot, to pick up the pieces. Before they had held them in their hands half a minute they had to drop them owing to the intensity of the cold which quite benumbed their fingers." Young, Charles Augustus. A Text-book of General Astronomy. Boston: Ginn & Co., 1888, 435. Rev. ed., 1898, 470. "It is recorded that one of the large fragments of the Dhurmsala (India) meteorites, which fell in 1860, was found in moist earth half an hour or so after the fall, coated with ice." Charles Augustus Young. A Text-book of General Astronomy. Boston: Ginn & Co., 1888. Rev. ed., 1900, 470. "The Dharmsala, Dhurmsala, or Dhurmsalla Meteorites." Popular Astronomy, 38 (no. 8; October 1930): 507.]


1860 July 29 / (See BA-'61.) / Little Bridy, Dorset / ["???] A dark substance fell with noise and light on reaching ground. / BA '67/418. [III; 18. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 418. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 4-5.]


1860 July 31 / 3:30 p.m. / Marshall Co., Kansas / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [III; 19. Finley, 4.]


1860 Aug 2 and 9 / The fireballs / U.S. / full dets / A. J. Sci 2/33/339. [III; 20. Newton, Hubert Anson. "An Account of two Meteoric Fireballs...." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 33 (1862): 338-348.]


1860 Aug 2 / Bet 10 and 11 p.m., in Southern States, U.S., a meteor rivalling that of July 20 / A. J. Sci 2/30/295. [III; 21. "The Meteors of August 2d and 6th, 1860." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 30 (1860): 295-296.]

.

1860 Aug 2 / bet 10 and 11 p.m. / Det met / Tenn. / An. Sci. Discov. '61/27. Am. J. Sci 2/3/150 / 2/30/295 / 2nd and 6th. [III; 22. Greg, 96. "Meteors of August 2d and 6th, 1860." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1861, 398. "The Meteors of August 2d and 6th, 1860." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 30 (1860): 295-296. Newton, Hubert Anson. "An Account of two Meteoric Fireballs...." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 33 (1862): 338-348. The references to "An. Sci. Discov. '1861-27" and "Am. J. Sci 2/3/150" are erroneous; and, Thayer noted: "27 may not be right."]


1860 Aug 6 / 7:38 p.m. / 5 minutes after sunset / N.Y. and Pa. / great meteor / BA 63-337. [III; 23. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1862-63." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1863, 209-339, at 337.]


1860 Aug 6 / bet 7:30 and 8 p.m. / New Haven and NY / in the S.W. / great met. / A. J. Sci 2/30/296. [III; 24. Greg, 96. "The Meteors of August 2d and 6th, 1860." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 30 (1860): 295-296.]


1860 Aug 9-12 / Auroras / France / C.R. 51-262. [III; 25. Coulvier-Gravier, Remi Armand. "Observations d'étoiles filantes du 13 juillet au 12 août; apparition des aurores boréales des 9, 10 et 12 août." Comptes Rendus, 51 (1860): 262-264.]


1860 Aug 10-11 / Aurora uncommonly fine at Chicago / A. J. Sci 2/31/136. [III; 26. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Further observations on the Shooting Stars of August 9-10, 1860." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 31 (1861): 136-137.]


1860 Aug 11 / 5 p.m. / Waterspout near Calcutta / Jour. Asiatic Soc Bengal / 29/373. [III; 27. Sherwill, Walter Stanhope. "Notes upon some remarkable Waterspouts seen in Bengal between the years 1852 and 1860." Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, 29 (1860): 366-375, at 373.]


1860 Aug 13 / (Cut) / New York / Venus shining in daytimecrowds lookingSc Am. 2/3/215. [III; 28. "Seeing Stars in the Daytime." Scientific American, n.s., 3 (September 29, 1860): 215.]


1860 Aug 13 / Now see B. Assoc for this. [III; 29.]


1860 Aug 13 / Same story told and no more in Birm D. Post, 14th. [III; 30. "Destructive Storm in Birmingham Yesterday." Birmingham Daily Post, August 14, 1860, p. 4 c. 2-3. "We may mention, as a remarkable phenomenon in connection with the storm, that after it had ceased the pavements throughout the centre of the town were found to be covered with small fragments of a substance resembling finely broken granite stones, varying in size from a pea to a hazel nut, which had evidently descended with the rain. In some places, but particularly in Dale End, High Street, and Carr's Lane, these fragments could be gathered very plentifully. During the continuance of the storm the atmosphere appeared highly charged with electricity; but there was neither thunder nor lightning."]


1860 Aug 13 / The Field Sept. 8 cor writes that after an unusually heavy storm in Birm[ingham] resulting in an inundation small stones found in the streets + were thought to h[a]ve fallen from the sky. He quotes Post. Says that there was remarkably little wind. That the air was charged with electricity but there was neither thunder nor lightning. Acto Post the streets throughout the center of the town was covered with small stones "varying in size from a pea to a hazel nut, which had evidently descended with the rain." So many that they could be gathered plentifully. The cor disbelieves they fell from the sky but sends some of the stones. F.T. Buckland, too, disbelieves + writes "The evidence of this is by no means good." He seems to have had nothing but the cor's story and Post clippings sent by cor. He says they were waterworn quartz pebbles"There are also specimens of a darker kind, apparently hard sandstone." [III: 31.1 to 31.4. Foulkes, W.C. "Sudden Appearance of Stones After a Storm." Field, Sept. 8, 1860, p. 202. "On Monday last there was an unusually heavy fall of rain in Birmingham: a very dense cloud spread itself over the town like a vest pallso dense indeed was the atmosphere that respiration was difficult. The wind was westerly, a little bearing to the south; there was not a breath of air stirring; the rain poured in torrents for upwards of an hour. There was a vast amount of damage done in various parts of the town, the cellars in many places being completely inundated. Towards the end of the storm there was a quantity of small pebbles or concrete deposited on the footways in the principal thoroughfares. I send you a sample taken from the footpaths in the Bull-ring. The general impression is, according to our local papers, that the pebbles fell from the clouds with the rain. I cannot see the possibility of such a phenomenon, as the press is pleased to term it. Should you deem it worthy the notice of any one of your scientific correspondents, perhaps you will send them a sample of the inclosed. I believe the small stones, &c., were washed into the footpaths by the very heavy fall of rain, which was more like the fall of water from a shower-bath than anything I can compare it to. Considering that there was not a breath of air during the whole time, what could have sustained a heavy body like gravel in the air for upwards of an hour? and next, where did the said gravel come from? It must have travelled 200 miles at least; and the cloud that discharged this débris did not travel more than a mile an hour at the time it reached Birmingham; and, again, no glass was broken, nor did any one hear the fall of such pebbles on their skylights. However, I send you a paragraph from the Daily Post:—'We may mention, as a remarkable phenomenon in connection with the storm, that after it had ceased[,] the pavements throughout the centre of the town were found to be covered with small fragments of a substance resembling finely broken granite stone, varying in size from a pea to a hazel-nut, which had evidently descended with the rain. In some places, but particularly in Dale-end, High-street, and Carr's-lane, these fragments could be gathered very plentifully. During the continuance of the storm the atmosphere appeared highly charged with electricity; but there was neither thunder nor lightning.'—W.C. Foulkes (Birmingham, Aug. 16).[The stones forwarded are water-worn pebbles of quartz, such as are found in ordinary gravel. There are also specimens of a darker kind, apparently hard sandstone. Mr Foulkes very properly puts a quœre against the reporter's dictum relative to 'their having very evidently descended with the rain.' The evidence of this is by no means good.F.T. Buckland.]"]


1860 Aug 13 / Description of storm at Birm at 11 a.m., in L.T. 14-10-d / "The rain descended in vast sheets." No stones metioned. / N.M. [III; 32. "Great Storm at Birmingham." London Times, August 14, 1860, p. 10 c. 4.]


1860 Aug 22 / 5:30 p.m. / Trombes at Singapore / C.R. 51-688. [III; 33. Castelnau, Francis de Laporte de. "Trombes multiples près des côtes de Singapore." Comptes Rendus, 51 (1860): 688.]


1860 Sept / Putney, near London / Hay fall in Dr Phipson's garden. / C.R. 52/108. [III; 34. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. "Sur une pluie de foin observée dans les environs de Londres." Comptes Rendus, 52 (1861): 108-109.]


1860 Sept 3 / (Sound) / ab 3:06 p.m. / q / Kent-Sevenoaks / T's Year Book 1861-258 / like "short and subdued clap of thunder"first thought been explosion of a powder mill / sky densely overcast / thunder heard at a distance for 2 hours but no rain fell, but very heavy rain a few miles away. [III; 35.1, 35.2. "Earthquake in Kent." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1861, 258. Rogers, John. "The following notes, on the shocks of an earthquake felt in Kent...." Athenæum, 1860 (no. 1716; September 15): 357. "I have no observation of the barometer for that day, but the sky to the south of this place, which commands a very extensive view, was densely overcast for two hours before and after the shock, and a very singular-looking mass of black vapour filled and obscured the valley. It was not like an ordinary thunderstorm, but formed a sort of wall of dark mist."]


1860 Sept 6 / Metz / Curious cloud / Cosmos 18/259. [III: 36. "Faits météorologiques." Cosmos, 18 (March 8, 1861): 258-260, at 259.]


1860 Sept 18 / "Star" seen midday at Margate. Field Oct 6 p. 282. [III: 37. "Stars at Mid-Day." Field, October 6, 1860, p. 282. "Will any of your readers tell me whether it is common to see stars at mid-day, or whether the doing so admits of a special explanation? I saw at Margate, on the 12th of September, at noon, the moon and a star of the second magnitude. Several others saw the same." See: 1860 Sept, (III; 40).]


1860 Sept. 20 / Chile and Iceland / qs / BA '11. Sim q's Feb 18, 1889. [III; 38. Two class I earthquakes. Milne, 715, 735. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1860 Sept 22 / [LT], 7-a / q. at sea. [III; 39. An article for “Earthquake at Sea” was indicated in Palmer's Index to the Times Newspaper but not found there.]


1860 Sept / Moon and one star visible in daylight / 1860, LT, Sept 28/9/b / meteor / Aug 6/12/f. [III; 40. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, September 28, 1860, p. 9 c. 2. "On Wednesday, September 12, 1860, from 12 mid-day to 2 p.m., the moon and one star (probably Venus) were distinctly visible to the naked eye...." The Sun and Venus would have been less than 10° apart, (with Venus at an apparent magnitude of -4.4 and an elongation of +45°). "Extraordinary Meteor." London Times, August 6, 1860, p. 12 c. 6. See: 1860 July 20, (III; 14).]


1860 Sept 27 / Algeria / q / BA '11. [III; 41. A class II earthquake. Milne, 715.]


1860 Oct / One night in Picardy, a metite fellstrong elec. or phosphorescent light from it. Les Mondes 18-334. [III; 42. "Aérolithe phosphorescent." Les Mondes, 18 (1868): 334-335.]


1860 Oct 17 / q. / Canada and N. U.S. / full dets. / A. J. Sci 2/31/150. [III; 43. "Earthquake." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 31 (1861): 150-151.]


1860 Oct 20 / Many meteors / Nottingham / BA '61. [III; 44. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 6-7. "Many other meteors during the evening."]


1860 Oct 28 / Waterspout / Calcutta / Jour Asiatic Soc Bengal 29-374. BO / Ref wrong / p. 214. [III; 45. Sherwill, Walter Stanhope. "Notes upon some remarkable Waterspouts seen in Bengal between the years 1852 and 1860." Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, 29 (1860): 366-375, at 374-375.]


1860 Nov 7-10-f 19-8-f 19-8-d / one of them is man killed by aerolite / Old month-vol. [III; 46. Pabst notes as "One month-vol." “Fall of an Aerolite.” London Times, November 7, 1860, p. 10 c. 6. “A Chapter of Accidents.” Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 10 (September 29, 1860): 241-242. No details as to the date nor the location of the man killed by an aerolite, in France, are reported in this anecdote. "Spirit Rapping." London Times, November 19, 1860, p. 8 c. 4. "Earthquake at Barbadoes." London Times, November 19, 1860, p. 8 c. 6.]


1860 Nov. 7 / [LT], 10-f / Man killed by aerolite. [MB-I; 1. “Fall of an Aerolite.” London Times, November 7, 1860, p. 10 c. 6. “A Chapter of Accidents.” Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 10 (September 29, 1860): 241-242.]


1860 Nov. 15 / New Jersey / great det met / BA 67/419. [III; 47. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 419.]


1860 Dec 2 / Asia Minor / 3, Armenia and Cent America / BA '11 / q's. Sim q's Feb 18, 1889. [III; 48. Milne, 715, 735. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1860 / ab Dec. 16 / (+) / (It) / Siena / met and q-effects / BA '61 / (16th/ 67/419) / (Successional / See Dec 28.) [III; 49. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 37. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 419.]


1860 Dec. 16, ab. / At Siena, ac to Prof Campani, an enormous meteor, from which was heard "a terrible noise". / BA 61-37. [III; 50.Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 37.]


1860 Dec 28 / (+) / Red / Italy / (Siena) / (16) / D-41. [III; 51. The note copies information from page 41 of The Book of the Damned. "Coloured rain." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1861, 273.]


1860 Dec 31 / red rain / Siena  or enna / Flam Atmos p. 410. [III; 52. Flammarion, Camille. The Atmosphere. London: S. Low, Marston, Low, & Searle, 1873, 458. Flammarion, Camille. James Glaisher, ed. The Atmosphere. New York: Harper, 1874, 410. Siena is the correct spelling, tho Sienna has also been used in some English spellings, such as Glaisher's translation.]

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