Last updated: April 8, 2021. - Fortean Notes

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Last updated: April 8, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1844 to 1845


1844:

1844 / Fatesch, Russia / Stones with hail / Symons Met / See 1809, 1815, 1833, 1844. [II; 705. Schwedoff, Theodore. "On the Origin of Hail." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 17 (November 1882): 146-152, at 151. See: 1809 (I; 256); 1815, (I; 517); and, 1833, (I; 1761).]


1844 / q's / q's in Europe and adjac. parts of Africa and Asia / C.R. 20-1444. [II; 706. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les années 1843 et 1844." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1444-1452.]


1844 / Island of Oesel, in the Baltic / Sounds from a cemetery vault that frightened horses tethered nearby, so that several died, Coffins here disturbed. / See Dale Owen's Footfalls. [A; 170. Owen, Robert Dale, 1801-1877. Footfalls on the Boundary of Another World. Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott, 1889, 260-272. Oesel is now known as the Saaremaa, the largest island of Estonia.]


[1844. Wrong date. See: 1844 Oct 8, (II; 713).]


1844 (Jan) / Cerro Cosina, Guanaxuato, Mexico. / Metite / (F). [II; 707. Fletcher, 101. This is the Cerro Cosina meteorite.]


1844 Jan / Corrientes, Brazil / Metite / BA 1860, [II; 708. Greg, 81.]


1844 Jan 1 / [LT, 6-c / Feb 9-5-e / Etna. [II; 709. "The Eruption of Mount Etna." London Times, January 1, 1844, p. 6 c. 3. "Mount Etna." London Times, February 9, 1844, p. 5 c. 5.]


1844 Jan 13, 15 / Feb 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 18, 19, 26 / March 2, 15, 16 / q's / Ragussa / See 1843, Sept 16. [II; 710. Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe pendant et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, pendant les années 1843 et 1844." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1444-1452, at 1445-1447. See: 1843 Sept 16, (II; 669).]


1844 Jan 14 / 12:30 p.m. and 1:05  / Comrie, qs and very loud sound / at Aberfeldy, ab 1:30 and 2:30 p.m. / LTJan 27-3-d. [II; 711. "Earthquake in Perthshire." London Times, January 27, 1844, p. 3 c. 4.]


1844 Jan 14 / Meteor, St Lucia / (19, 30, 31, and Feb 3 / q. / Dominica) / Niles Nat. Register, March 16. [II; 712. "Earthquake." Niles' Weekly Register, 66 (March 16, 1844): 48.]


1844 Jan 16 / [LT], 5-f / Spon Comb. [A; 171. "Spontaneous Combustion." London Times, January 16, 1844, p. 5 c. 6.]


1844 Jan. 20 / Naples / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 714. Greg, 81.]


1844 Jan 28 / bet 2 and 7 p.m. / Quakes in Trenton and other places in N. Jersey. In one place a crack in the earth several hundred yards long. / Niles Nat. Reg., Feb. 3. [II; 715. "Earthquake." Niles' Weekly Register, 65 (February 3, 1844): 368.]


1844 Feb. 8 / Parma / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 716. Greg, 81.]


1844 Feb 17 / ab. 7 p.m. / Meteor at Paris / N.M. / C.R. 20-522. [II; 717. "M. Boutigny écrit relativement...." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 522.]


1844 Feb. 18 / Parma / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 718. Greg, 81.]


1844 Feb. 20 / noon / BA 60 / Hanover / in snowstorm, detonationbut no meteor seen. [II; 719. Greg, 81. "Possibly a clap of thunder only."]


1844 March 25 / [LT], 7-d / Ghost at Ramsey. [A; 172. "A Ghost Story." London Times, March 25, 1844 p. 7 c. 4.]


1844 Ap. 3 / Siena and Naples / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 720. Greg, 81.]


1844 Ap. 6 / Niles Nat Reg. / Explosive sounds in mountain / No. Car. / that occasionally for 16 years, smoke and glares been seen there / Niles Nat. Register of Ap. 6. [II; 721. "The Burning Mountain." Niles' Weekly Register, 66 (April 6, 1844): 83-84.]


1844 Ap. 6 / [LT], 6-a / Strange story. [A; 173. "A Strange Story." London Times, April 6, 1844, p. 6 c. 1.]


1844 Ap. 11 / Edinburgh / Fireball / N. to S. / BA 60. [II; 722. Greg,  82.]


1844 Ap. 20 / [LT], 5-e / Superstitions. [A; 174. "Singular Superstition." London Times, April 20, 1844, p. 5 c. 5.]


1844 Ap. 26 / Along the river Towy, Carmarthen, dense swarm of black flies, ab a mile in length. See July 16. / "Caused [some] consternation in the minds of the superstitious." Said had occurred in year 1843see LT, May 3-6-f. [II; 723. "Extraordinary Circumstance." London Times, May 3, 1844, p. 6. c. 6. "It is asserted that the same phenomenon occurred last year...."]


1844 Ap 29 / Killeter, Tyrone, Ireland / Met / (F). [II; 724. Fletcher, 101. Greg, 82. This is the Killeter meteorite.]


1844 May 7-20 / 23-29 / and in June / Rains and probably the severest floods of eastern Kansas / M.W.R.34-579. [II; 725. Jennings, T.B. "Notes on the Climate of Kansas." Monthly Weather Review, 34 (no. 12; December 1906): 579- 580, at 579.]


1844 May 11 / Hamburg / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 726. Greg, 82.]


1844 May 12 / Milan / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 727. Greg, 82.]


1844 May 12 / Persia / great q. / III / BA 11. [II; 728. A class III earthquake. Milne, 707.]


1844 May 31 / Oc. Moonthe well known appearance of 2 seeming moons / Y.B. '45-280. [II; 729. "Total Eclipse of the Moon." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1845, 280.]


1844 June 3-4 / Fr / Poitiers / q / BA '11. [II; 730. A class I earthquake. Milne, 707.]


1844 June 11 / 6 a.m. / Near Schemakha, Russia, near Black Sea, volcano burst out of a mountain, cast out burning naptha, also muddy water for 3/4 hour. / Athenaeum 1845-229. [II; 731. "Volcanic Eruption." Athenaeum, 1844, (no. 905; March 1): 229. Schemakha, Russia, is now identified as Shamakhi, Azerbaijan; and, this was probably an eruption of a mud volcano.]


1844 June 12 / 7:30 p.m. / Yaxley, Huntingdonshire / severe qL.T. 18-6-e. / 33 1 / 26. [II; 732. "Earthquake in Huntingdonshire." London Times, June 18, 1844, p. 6 c. 5.]


1844 June 24 / (N) / Appearance near sun / C.R. 18/1168. [II; 733. "Phénomène atmosphérique observé par MM. Arago et Leugier." Comptes Rendus, (1844): 1168-1169.]


[1844 June 24 /] 1843 June 24 / Living / Severe th. storm / Liverpool / fall of pebbles and small eels / BA 45/21 / See Literary Gazette, 1843-420. [II; 634. Edmonds, Richard. "On Remarkable Lunar Periodicities in Earthquakes, extraordinary Oscillations of the Sea, and great Atmospherical Changes." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1845, Notices and Abstracts, 20-22. "June 23.An unusually severe and protracted thunderstorm this evening throughout Cornwall and in Dumfries-shire, and on the following morning at Boston and Liverpool, at which latter place 'pebbles and small eels descended in the streets.'" "Rain of Eels and Pebbles." Literary Gazette, 1844 (June 29, 1844): 420. "The Liverpool Courier states that, during the heavy rain which fell there on Monday, various-coloured pebbles and small eels descended, and were picked up in the streets." "Shower of Pebbles and Eels." London Morning Chronicle, June 27, 1844, p. 5 c. 2. "The eels were about two inches and a half in length."]


1844 June 24 / Frgs / Leeds Mercury, June 29 / afternoon / At Selby, during th storm, little frgs fell in and around Selby. People caught some in their hats. They were very lively. [II; 734. "Shower of Frogs at Selby." Leeds Mercury, June 29, 1844, p. 5 c. 3.]


1844 June / Zoologist 1/2/677 / Selby / Shower frogs / Wm. Andrews, Book of Oddities, p. 30 / between Donc[aster and York] / N.Q. 8/6/104 / bet. Doncaster and York. [II; 735. Newman, Edward. "Anecdote of a Shower of Frogs at Selby." Zoologist, 2 (1844): 677-678. "Shower of Frogs at Selby." Leeds Mercury, June 29, 1844, p. 5 c. 3. Andrews, William. The Book of Oddities. London: Simpkin, Marshall, 1882, 30-31. Wallace, R. Hedger. "A Shower of Frogs." Notes and Queries, s. 8 v. 6 (August 11, 1894): 104-105.]


1844 June 24 / In Leeds Mercury, June 29, reports from York, Leeds, Huddersfield, Doncaster, and other places of terrific th. storm, afternoon of this day. Large pieces of ice fell at Doncaster. Lightning struck in many places. At. Leeds, there was heavy rain in some parts of town and no rain in others. [II; 736.1, 736.2. "Destructive Thunder Storm." Leeds Mercury, June 29, 1844, p. 5 c. 3. "The crops of corn, of various descriptions, in the neighbourhood of Hatfield, Woodhouse, have sustained much injury by the falling of hail-stones, or rather large pieces of ice."]


1844 June 27 / Floods / High mark reached, St. Louis / not exceeded at least to June 8, 1903 / See Trib of. [II; 737. "The Mississippi River...." New York Tribune, June 27, 1844, p. 4 c. 3. "The water, yesterday, had reached within a few inches of the highest point attained this spring, and nearly to the hight attained in the freshets of 1823 and '26."]


1844 July 10 / Hamburg / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 738. Greg, 82.]


1844 July 16 (/) / Flies / See Ap. 26. / LT, 20th, from Kelso Mail—that on Tuesday morning, between 5 and 6, at Berwick, a thick mist was seen. A shower of rain fell and the constituents of this mist were seen to be "a body of flies so numerous as actually to blacken the flags where they lay, and so small individually as to admit of examination only by a microscope.["] [II; 739.1, 739.2. "Berwick." London Times, July 20, 1844, p. 6 c. 6.]


1844 July 17 / [LT], 8-e / Sea Story. [A; 175. "A Strange Story." London Times, July 17, 1844, p. 8 c. 5.]


1844 July 20 / Large meteor exploded. / Nuremberg and Parma / BA 47-15. [II; 740. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


1844 July 20 / 9 p.m. / det met / Italy / Germany / Belgium / BA 60-82. [II; 741. Greg, 82.]


1844 July 23 / Venus Inf Conjunction Sun. [II; 742. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1844, 541.]


1844 Aug / Times Index for ladybirds. [II; 743. No articles regarding ladybirds were found in Palmer's Index to the Times Newspaper for 1844.]


1844 Aug 9, 10 / Many mets / Belgium / BA 47-15. [II; 744. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16.]


1844 Aug 16 / Darmstadt and Frankfurt / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 745. Greg, 82.]


1844 Aug / lb's / Brighton / D. News, Aug 16, 1847. [II; 746. "Extraordinary Flight of Insects." London Daily News, August 16, 1847, p. 3 c. 5. See: 1847 Aug 13, (II; 197). There is no reference to ladybirds in this article for 1844, however Fort may have been searching for similar phenomena in other years.]


1844 Aug 29-30 / night / Demerara / q. / N.Y. Herald, Oct 25-1-6 / Ab. 3:30, morning of 30th, the q, which was disastrous. Had been preceded by a violent th. storm. [II; 747. "The Earthquake at Demerara." New York Herald, October 25, 1844, p. 1 c. 6. Demerara was the former Dutch colony that is now part of Guyana.]


1844 Aug 30 / Tobago and Dominica shaken. / NY Herald, Nov 5-2-4. [II; 748. "Tobago and Dominica." New York Herald, November 5, 1844, p. 2 c. 4.]


1844 Sept. 4 / Bombay / very large meteor / E to W / BA 60. [II; 749. Greg, 82.]


1844 Sept 5 / Overall, Silesia / very large fireball / E to W / BA 60. [II; 750. Greg, 82-83.]


1844 Sept 4 / from Aug. 25, 1843, to / 37 shocks at Comrie noted / B Assoc 1844/86 / That scarce a day without hearing either the rumbling in the earth or the "moaning in the air". Statement of Lady Moncrieff, of Comrie. [II; 751.Milne, David. "Report of the Committee for registering Earthquake Shocks in Scotland." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1844, 85-90. "I met yesterday and today a very intelligent person (Lady Moncrieff) who felt both of these shocks. The first she felt in Comrie House, situated within three-quarters of a mile of the hill, from which all the shocks in Perthshire appear to emanate. The noise and concussion produced by this shock alarmed her so much that she fell from her seat on the floor, and it was a few seconds before she recovered. She was residing in Comrie House for some months last autumn, and she states that scarcely a day passed without her hearing either the rumbling noise in the earth or the moaning in the air, produced by this mysterious agent, the nature of which we are so anxious to discover."]


1844 Sept 10, 20 / Fireball / Belgium / BA 60. [II; 752. Greg, 82-83.]


1844 Sept 10 / Ab. 9 p.m., in the Vosges, great meteor. / C.R. 19-1035. [II; 753. Nickles. "Observation d'un bolide dans la soirée du 10 septembre." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1035-1036.]


1844 Sept 10 / evening / Bolide / Belgium / C.R. 19-1036. [II; 754. Nickles. "Observation d'un bolide dans la soirée du 10 septembre." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1035-1036.]


1844 Sept 15 / 4:30 p.m. / Witrtemburg / det met / BA 60-100 / in sunshine. [II; 755. Greg, 101.]


1844 Sept 19 / night. / Livingston Co., N.Y. / Sound like that of an explosion and reverbrations almost a minute and q. / Niles Nat Reg., Sept 28. [II; 756. "Earthquakes." Niles' Weekly Register, 66 (September 28, 1844): 63.]


1844 Sept 19 and Oct 22 / 33 days apart / Shocks / Rochester, N.Y. / Timbs '54/268. [II; 757. "Earthquakes in 1853." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1854, 267-271, at 268.]


1844 Sept 19 / Whirlwind near Toulouse / C.R. 19/851. [II; 758. Chambon. "Mémoire sur les principaux ravages d'une trombe dans une commune des environs de Toulouse (Escalquens), le 19 septembre 1844." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 851-853.]


1844 Sept 19 . Morning Chronicle of / Incendiary fires in Suffolk. [A; 176. "Incendiarism is reviving again in Suffolk...." London Morning Chronicle, September 19, 1844, p. 2. c. 4.]


1844 Sept 24 / Fireball / S. Italy / BA '60. [II; 759. Greg, 82.]


1844 Sept 30 / Lombardy / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 760. Greg, 82.]


1844 Oct. 2 / Cuba / Met. explosion / BA 60. [II; 761. Greg, 82.]


1844 Oct. 4 / Like a signal light / D-275 / See 42. [II; 762. The note copies information from page 275 of The Book of the Damned. "Astronomical puzzle." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1843, 278-279.]


1844 Oct 4 and 5 / Destructive Hurricane / Cuba / N.Y. Herald 22-3-6. [II; 764. "Severe Gale at Havana." New York Herald, October 22, 1844, p. 3 c. 6.]


1844 Oct 6 and 8 / Destructive gales / America / N.Y. Herald, Oct 22-2-4. [II; 765. "Hurricanes in October." New York Herald, October 22, 1844, p. 2 c. 4.]


1844 Oct 6 / III / q / China / BA 11. [II; 766. A class III earthquake. Milne, 707.]


[1844 Oct 8 /] 1844 / Gelat / D-49. [II; 713. The note copies information from pages 49 and 50 of The Book of the Damned. Powell, Baden. "Report on observations of luminous meteors, 1854-55." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1855, Reports on the State of Science, 79-100, at 94. "1844, Oct. 8th, near Coblentz, a German gentleman (a friend of Mr. Greg's), accompanied by another person, late in the evening, after dark, walking in a dry ploughed field, saw a luminous body descend straight down close to them (not 20 yards off), and heard it distinctly strike the ground with a noise; they marked the spot, and returning early the next morning as nearly as possible where it seemed to fall, they found a gelatinous mass of a greyish colour so viscid as 'to tremble all over' when poked with a stick. It had no appearance of being organic. They, however, took no further care to preserve it."]


1844 Oct 8 / Gelat / Germany / (20) / D-49. [II; 766. The note copies information from pages 49 and 50 of The Book of the Damned. See: 1844 Oct 8, (II; 713).]


1844 Oct 8 / 7:30 pm / Vals, near Puy / bolide larger than Jupiter / C.R. 19-1036 / Slowly S.S.W. to N.N.E. [II; 767. Faton. "Observation d'une bolide, faite à Vals, près le Puy, le 8 octobre 1844." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1036. Greg, 82.]


1844 Oct 9 / Rhone rising. Heavy falls of rain. / Bridges swept away. Communication interrupted. / J. des Deb, Oct. 19-2-1. [II; 768. "Par suite des grandes pluies de ces derniers jours...." Journal des Debats, October 19, 1844, p. 2 c. 1.]


1844 Oct 10-13 / Floods at Nimes / J des Deb, Oct. 18. [II; 769. "On écrit de Nimes, le 13 octobre." Journal des Débats, October 18, 1844, p. 2 c. 3.]


1844 Oct / Plan / Only that happen to have the Australian note / and merely very odd. [II; 770.]


1844 Oct 10 / Bonn / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 771. Greg, 82.]


1844 Oct 12-14, etc.to about 20th / (Australia) / Reported from Bathurst, N.S. Wales, torrential rains / swollen riversbridges swept away. / Sydney Morning Herald 22-3-1/ Herald 28thon 17th, a sudden rush of waters down the Lachlan river, carried away a police barracksswept thousands of sheep with it. / At Gundagai, a most awful visitation from the 10th. / Herald, 29th. [II; 772.1, 772.2. "Bathurst." Sydney Morning Herald, October 22, 1844, p. 3 c. 1-2. "Bathurst." Sydney Morning Herald, October 28, 1844, p. 3 c. 1. "Gundagai." Sydney Morning Herald, October 29, 1844, p. 4 c. 3-5.]


1844 Oct 13 / 3 sharp shocks / Piedmont, Italy / N.Y. Herald, Nov 24-1-2. [II; 773. "The Piedmontese Gazette of the 15th...." New York Herald, November 24, 1844, p. 1 c. 2.]


1844 Oct 14 / B.D.-176 / Eguilles / huge "hailstone" / One weighed 10 pounds. / LT, Nov 1-3-f / at Cette, ac to Flammarion / See Oct. 20. [II; 774. The note copies information from page 176 of The Book of the Damned. Flammarion, Camille. The Atmosphere. London: S. Low, Marston, Low, & Searle, 1873, 445. "...there fell hailstones weighing 11 lbs...." "Brobdignagian Hail-Stones." London Times, November 1, 1844, p. 3 c. 6. "Hail-stones of an incredible size fell in the little district of Eguilles, one of which weighed as many as ten pounds...." See: 1844 Oct 20, (II; 781), and, 1844 Oct 22, (A; 183).]


1844 Oct 15 / 1:12 a.m. / Great meteor, Londonthrough Pegasus toward Lyra / LT, Oct 16-5-d. [II; 775. Cundell, George Smith. “Remarkable Meteor.” London Times, October 16, 1844, p. 5 c. 4.]


1844 Oct 15 to Nov / In Italy. In Tuscany the most disastrous floods since the year 1740. 2 weeks continuous rain. / LT, Nov. 15-5-d. [II; 776. "A letter from Florence...." London Times, November 15, 1844, p. 5 c. 4. The letter was dated the "4th inst." and says the rains were "continuous for the last fortnight," (without any specific dates mentioned).]


1844 Oct 18 / night / Tremendous hurricane, Rochester and Buffalo. Most violent ever known there. Many lives lost in Buffalo. / N.Y. Herald 22-3-4. [II; 777. "Terrible Calamity." New York Herald, October 22, 1844, p. 3 c. 4.]


1844 Oct 18 / qrain / q. / Peru / 10:30 p.m. / From time of first shock till sunrise, heavy rain fell. / B.A. 50-82. [II; 778. Hamilton, Mathie. "Brief Notices of Earthquakes in South America in 1844, 1845, 1846 and 1847." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, Notices and Abstracts, 82-83.]


1844 Oct 18 / Argentine / III / q. / BA '11. [II; 779. A class III earthquake. Milne, 707.]


1844 Oct 20 / 20 inches of rain at South Head, N.S. Wales / Sydney Morning Herald, Feb 26, 1873. [II; 780. "The Late Heavy Rains." Sydney Morning Herald, February 26, 1873, p. 5 c. 2-4.]


1844 Oct 20 / Series / Storm at Aixin the little district of Eguilles, nearby masses of ice had fallen, one of them weighing 10 pounds. / L.T., Nov 1-3-f. [II; 781. "Brobdignagian Hail-Stones." London Times, November 1, 1844, p. 3 c. 6.]


1844 Oct 20 / 12 N; 38 W. / "Thousands if not millions of grasshoppers." They were like the grasshoppers of the U.S. but "of a deeper red". 700 miles from land. Supposed carried by a hurricane. / N.Y. Herald, Nov 29-2-3. [II; 782. "Curious Phenomena at Sea." New York Herald, November 29, 1844, p. 2 c. 3.]


1844 Oct 20 / Another vessel 400 miles from this vessel was shaken. / N.Y. Herald, Nov 17-2-4. [II; 783. "Earthquake at Sea." New York Herald, November 17, 1844, p. 2 c. 4.]


1844 Oct 20 / At St Croix, severe shock, cracking walls of the sugar houses. / N.Y. Herald, Nov 9-2-2. [II; 784. "Earthquake at St. Croix." New York Herald, November 9, 1844, p. 2. c. 2.]


1844 Oct 20 / Off West Indian island of Saba, severe shock to a vessel / N.Y. Herald, Nov 9-2-4. [II; 785. "Seaquake." New York Herald, November 9, 1844, p. 2 c. 4.]


1844 Oct. 20 / N.Y. Herald, Nov 20-1-4 / Millerism survives. / In middle of November, the selectmen of Meredith, New Hampshire, to the Judge of Probate for guardians to be appointed to take care of businesses and farms of 10 Millerites who were still preparing. Selectmen of other towns acted similarly. [II; 786.1, 786.2. "Millerism." New York Herald, November 20, 1844, p. 1 c. 4.]


1844 Oct 21 / Metite of Layssac / N.M. / C.R. 19-1181. [II; 787. "Le Secrétaire écrira, au nom de l'Academie, à M. Boisse...." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1181. See: 1844 Nov. 20, (II; 800, 801).]


1844 Oct. 21 / (See July 4, '48.) / Favars, Aveyron, France / Met / (F) / See before. [II; 788. Fletcher, 101. This is the Favars meteorite. See: 1844 Nov. 20, (II; 800, 801), and, 1848 July 4, (II; 1223).]


1844 Oct 21 / 6:45 a.m. / Laysac, France / said doubt whether the stone found was meteoric / doubtful where it was / at the time of listing / BA 60-82. [II; 789. Greg, 82-83. See: 1844 Nov. 20, (II; 800, 801).]


1844 Oct 22 / N.Y. Herald, Oct 24-1-4 / Secretary of the Treasury acknowledges receipt of $5.00 from a Millerite whose conscience been troubling him. / Camps of them in Pa. In one several children died of exposure. [A; 177. "Millerism." New York Herald, October 22, 1844, p. 1 c. 4. (The report of children dying of exposure is not in this article.)]


1844 Oct 22 / N.Y. Herald, Oct 17-2-1 / "The last day is positively set down for the 22nd of this month, although possibly it may be on the 23rd" ac to the Millerites. / Hosts on their knees in chapels of N.Y. City. Mostly females. One of meetings man entered and was rough about taking his wife out of it to go home and return to the cookinghad[n't] had a home-cooked meal for 10 days. Some Millerites interferred and he threatened to lick all Millerites. / 20-2-4. [A; 178.1, 178.2. "Millerism and Mormonism." New York Herald, October 17, 1844, p. 2 c. 2. "The Millerites are now determined to have an end to the world at once, and from a number of documents issued by these amiable fanatics, which we have received, it seems that the 'last day' is positively set down for the twenty-second of this month, although possibly it may be on the twenty-third." "MillerismMadnessMisery." New York Herald, October 20, 1844, p. 2 c. 4. The home-cooked meal story may be Fort's interpretation of the husband's protest that his wife had been attending prayer meetings and had not been at home to care for their infant children and her housework.]


1844 Oct 22 / 8 a.m. / Q. in Western part of the state of N.Y. on day some of the Millerites expecting he end of the world, though others expected on 23rd. / Niles Nat Reg., Nov.2. [A; 179. "An Earthquake..." Niles' Weekly Register, 67 (November 2, 1844): 144.]


[1844 Oct 22] / Thought effects? / Q. in Western New York Oct 22, 1844, the day some of the Millerites were expecting the end of the world, though others expected on Oct 23. / Niles Nat. Register, Nov 2, 1844. [A; 180. "An Earthquake..." Niles' Weekly Register, 67 (November 2, 1844): 144.]


1844 Oct 22 / Considering the phe, the Millerites had reason for thinking that though the world did not come to an end, there were great disturbances in the period. [A; 181.]


1844 Oct 22 / Whirlwind ravaged village of Cette. / C.R. 19-1181 / See Jan 16, 1845. [A; 182. "L'Academie a décidé qu'il serait fait une enquête...." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1181. See: 1845 Jan. 16, (II; 812).]


1844 Oct 22 / (Series) / 4 p.m. / Cette / L.T. 30-4-1 / Said that an electric waterspout fell upon the town. A violent explosion was heard, and for two minutes there were crashing sounds in the air. Water fell from the sky and smashed in roofs. A dozen boats were sunk in the canal. The wind was violent. A house four stories high was crushed to the earth. [A; 183.1, 183.2, 183.3. "A Waterspout." London Times, October 30, 1844, p. 4 c. 1. Peltier. "Sur la nature électrique des trombes." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1210-1212.]


1844 Oct 22 / Still the floods in France. [A; 184.]


1844 Oct 22 / Millerite delusion survive in Providence, R.I. The leaders had resumed advertising meetings. / N.Y. Herald, Nov 17-1-4. [A; 185. "More Millerism." New York Herald, November 17, 1844, p. 1 c. 4.]


1844 Oct 22 / Whirlwind at Cette. 200 buildings damaged. / N.Y. Herald, Nov 24-1-4. [A; 186. "France." New York Herald, November 24, 1844, p. 1 c. 4.]


1844 Oct. 24 / See Oct 24, 1844. Read Times. No Eguilles. [A; 187. See: 1844 Oct 20, (II; 781).]


1844 Oct 24 / 8 a.m. / Shock at Batavia, NY, and other towns. / N.Y. Herald 27-1-3. [A; 188. "Earthquake." New York Herald, October 27, 1844, p. 1 c. 3.]


1844 Oct. 25 / Jackson Co., Mo. / 6:30 p.m. / Tornado. / Finley's Rept. [A; 189. Finley, 3.]


1844 Oct 25 / "Awful tornado Western Missouri. Loss of life and destruction of property. / NY Herald, Nov 12-1-3. [A; 190. "Tremendous Hurricane in Western Missouri." New York Herald, November 12, 1844, p. 1 c. 3.]


1844 Oct 25 / [LT]. 5-b / Sup. at Paisley. [A; 191. "A case was brought before Mr. Sheriff Campbell...." London Times, October 25, 1844, p. 5 c. 2.]


1844 Oct 27 / det / C.R. 19-1036 / 9:40 p.m. / Parcé-sur-Sarthe / Meteor seemed equal to the moon. / east to west / detonation like gunfire ab 4 minutes later / See Nov. 20. / also Angers / BA '60. [A; 192. Giraud. "Observation d'une bolide, faite à Parcé-sur-Sarthe, le 27 octobre 1844." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1036-1037. Petit, Frédéric. "Sur le bolide du 27 octobre 1844, et sur une conséquence remarquable qui paraît résulter de son apparition." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1103-1114. Petit calculates that this bolide was an "intra-stellar body," according to Greg, (tho Greg does define it as interstellar, moving between different stars with one being our Sun). Greg, 82-83. With Petit's extremely precise measurements, (for example, Petit produces the exact distance between the bolide and the meridian at Paris, when it was seen by Giraud, as 467,292 meters), Greg cautions: "Observations on meteor movements must always be too imperfect to be relied upon in these kind of calculations." For Petit's "Moon," see: 1846 March 21, (II; 935)]


[1844 Oct 27 /] 1844 Nov 27 / Parce-sur-Sarthe / BA 60 / E. to W. / Meteor size of moon. Loud detonations. [II; 803. Greg, 82-83.]


1844 Oct 29 / Jour des Deb. / Valley and fields of Southern France turned into lakes. Increasing inundations. [A; 193. "On lit dans le Sémaphore de Marseille du 25 octobre," and, "On lit dans le Courrier du Gard du 25 octobre." Journal des Débats, October 29, 1844, p. 2 c. 4. "On lit dans la Sentinelle des Pyrénées du 26 octobre," and, "On écrit de Toulouse, le 26 octobre." Journal des Débats, October 30, 1844, p. 2 c. 1.]


1844 Oct 31 / Flows / Nor Car / See 1829. [II; 790. See: 1829 May 8, (I: 1464, 1465, & 1469), and.  1903 June 20, (VIII; 1905).]


(1844-45) / winter / Carbonaceous / [Elizabethtown,] Essex Co., N.Y. / Am. J. Sci 2-28-276. * [II; 791. Shepard, Charles Upham. "On a Shooting Meteor, seen to fall at Charleston, South Carolina, on the evening of November 16th, 1857...." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 28 (1859): 270-276, at 276.]


1844 Nov. 1 / Phosphorescent rain / Paris. **  [II; 792. Duplessy. "Sur une pluie phosphorescente observée à Paris le 1er novembre 1844." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1038-1039.]


1844 Nov. 2, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 / Meteors / Bombay / BA 60. [II; 793. Greg, 82.]


1844 Nov 13, 14 / Watchers for meteors disappointed. / N.Y. Herald 19-1-5. Applied by petition. [II; 794. "There were a great many disappointed watchers for the 'star shower,' on Wednesday night...." New York Herald, November 19, 1844, p. 1 c. 5. (No mention of a petition in this article.)]


1844 Nov 15 / Off coast of Long Island, submarine eruption suspected. Sea covered with dead fish. / N.Y. Herald, 23-1-6. [II; 795. "Remarkable Circumstance." New York Herald, November 23, 1844, p. 1 c. 6. "In returning along the South shore of Long Island, their attention was attracted to the beach, being literally strewed with the bodies of dead fish, just washed up by the sea. Black fish, cunners, lobsters, and crabs, and many other species which inhabot our shores at this season lay promiscuously on the sand."]


1844 Nov 20 / Laysac, etc. / 3 a.m. / N.E. to S.W. / Another met 1/2 diameter of moon. / BA 60-82. [II; 796. Greg, 82-83.]


1844 Nov 20 / 2 a.m. / Met reported from Laysac. Also, in depts of Tarn, l'Aveyron, and Lozère. / C.R. 20-887 / And tremendous detonation. An hour later it was followed by another, which was almost half the size of the moon, but with no explosive sound. [II; 797.1, 797.2. Boisse. "Sur deux météores observés aux environs de Layssac, l'un, dans la nuit du 19 au 20 novembre 1844; l'autre, le 16 janvier 1845." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 887-891.]


[II; 798. Pabst: "Voiddue to T.T. typo / The Fortean, #20, p. 310, c. 1."  Thayer apparently assigned "798" to the second part of Note "II; 797."]


1844 Nov 20 / Meteor / 2 a.m. / E. to W. / "Great and numerous detonations"Laysac, Aveyron, etc. / BA 60. [II; 799. Greg, 82-83.]


1844 Nov 20 / Laysac, Aveyron, etc. / E. to W. / 2 a.m. / Met brighter than moon. Great and numerous detonations. / BA '60-82. [II; 800. Greg, 82-83.]


1844 Nov. 20 / Great det met. Later another. / See C.R. / Laysac, France / BA 60-82 / See Oct 21, 27. [II; 801. Greg, 82. Another bolide, at 3 A.M., was about half the diameter of the moon. Boisse. "Sur deux météores observés aux environs de Layssac, l'un, dans la nuit du 19 au 20 novembre 1844; l'autre, le 16 janvier 1845." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 887-891. Greg, 82-83. See: 1844 Oct 21, (II; 787, 788, 789), and, 1844 Oct 27, (A; 192).]


1844 Nov. 20, etc. / Nothing in Sydney Morning Herald. [II; 802.]


1844 Nov 21, etc. / Stones / Ac to the Ross-shire Advertiser, in L.T., Dec 14-6-e / This night two large stones were thrown through window in ground floor of the parochial school house of Cline. A reward of 20 guineas was offered for information. In newspaper account it is said been revenge by somebody. But night of Dec. 1 stones smashed windows in a house at Rogart. On night of 5th a girl at Dunrobin was struck on head by stone said been thrown by someone unseen in the dark. / (In Sutherlandshire.) [A; 194.1, 194.2. "Outrages in Sutherlandshire." London Times, December 14, 1844, p. 6 c. 5.]


[1844 Nov 27. Wrong date. See: 1844 Oct 27, (II; 803).]


1844 Dec 6 / toward Midi / At Havre. A violent explosion in a chimney. There was no known cause of it. / J. des Debats 9-1-4. [II; 804. "On écrit du Havre, le 7 décembre." Journal des Débats, December 9, 1844, p. 1 c. 4.]


1844 Dec. 8 / Paris, etc. / met train / zenith to horizon / N.W. to S.E. / BA 60-82. [II; 805. Greg, 82.]


1844 Dec 9 / 5:20 p.m. / Meteor at Paris / C.R. 19/1320. [II; 806. "M. Virlet-D'Aoust écrit relativement à un météore lumineux...." Comptes Rendus, 19 (1844): 1320-1321.]


1844 Dec 9 / Hamburg / Large met / BA 69-282. [II; 807. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 282.]


1844 Dec 12 / 12:50 a.m. / Limoux / an enormous meteor / C.R. 20-320. [II; 808. "Sur un aérolithe observé à Limoux, le 12 décembre 1844." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 320-322. Greg, 82. Greg gives the date as December 11.]


1844 Dec 14 / [LT], 3-e / Singular Oc. at Exeter. [A; 195. "Singular Occurrence." London Times, December 14, 1844, p. 3 c. 5.]


1844 Dec 29 / Aurora / C.R. 20/106. [II; 809. "Extrait d'une Lettre de M. Coulvier-Gravier...." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 106.]


1845:


1845 or 46 / Hay objects by Herschel. [II; 810.]


[1845. Wrong date. See: 1841, (II; 811).]


1845 Jan. 16 / See Nov. 20. / 10 a.m. / Not seen at Layssac, but 10 a.m. detonation heard. And at Cette, met seen in full sunlight. /C.R. 20-890 / BA 60-82. [II; 812. Boisse. "Sur deux météores observés aux environs de Layssac, l'un, dans la nuit du 19 au 20 novembre 1844; l'autre, le 16 janvier 1845." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 887-891, at 890. Greg, 82.]


1845 Jan 16 / Laysac and Cette / 10 a.m. / "Fine bolide; daylight; great explosion and noise." / BA '60-82. [II; 813. Greg, 82.]


[1845 Jan 20 /] 1845 Jan 26 / Grüneberg, Silesia / N.W. to S.E. / remarkable meteor / BA 60. [II; 815. Greg, 82.]


1845 Jan. 25 / 3 p.m. / (Fr) / Louans (Indre et Loir) / stonefall / C.R. 92/984. [II; 814. Daubrée, Gabriel-Auguste. "Météorite tombée à Louans (Indre-et-Loire) le 25 janvier 1845 et dont la chute est restée inédire." Comptes Rendus, 92 (1881): 984-985.]


[1845 Jan 26. Wrong date. See: 1845 Jan 20, (II; 815).]


1845 Jan 27 / Hamburg / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 816. Greg, 82.]


1845 Jan 29 / [LT]. 4-a / Ghost in daylight / East Lothian. [A; 196. "A Ghost in Daylight." London Times, January 29, 1845, p. 4 c. 1.]


1845 Jan. 31 / Nottingham / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 817. Greg, 82.]


1845 Feb / Remarkable snowfalls / Vosges / Compt Rendus 20-1305. [II; 818. "Extrait d'une Lettre de M. Ed. Collord à M. Élie de Beaumont." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1305-1307.]


1845 Feb 10 / Sutton, Macclesfield / flash of lightning down a chimney / foggyno storm / L.T. 17-5-a. [II; 819. "Mysterious Occurrence." London Times, February 17, 1845, p. 5 c. 1.]


1845 Feb 17 / Paris / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 820. Greg, 82.]


[1845 Feb 19 /] 1843 Feb 19 / See if this some other date. This ver. / C.R. 22-709 / That in New Grenada (I think U.S. Columbia), done the valley of Lagunella, swept a flood of mud. / (See if 1828.) / Supposed from the Ruiz Volcano. With it enormous blocks of ice from the mountains. Broke down and covered trees with mud. Many inhabitants perished. / See if 1845. [II; 558.1, 558.2. Acosta, Joaquin. "Relation de l'éruption boueuse sortie du volcan de Ruis et de la catastrophe de Lagunilla dans la république de la Nouvelle-Grenade." Comptes Rendus, 22 (1846): 709-710. The Nevado del Ruiz volcano.]


1845 Feb. 19/ Q and down the plain of the river Lagunilla (U.S. Columbia) poured a torrent of liquid clay, overwhelming villages. / Timbs' '46-271 / See if 1843. [II; 821."Houses and People Destroyed by Mud." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 271.The Nevado del Ruiz volcano.]


1845 Feb 21 / [LT]. 6-f / Remarkable Fatality. [A; 197. "Remarkable Fatality." London Times, February 21, 1845, p. 6 c. 6.]


1845 March 9 / Cambridge / unusual sunspot / LT, March 11-7-b. [II; 822. Ellis, Theodore F. "Astronomical Phenomenon." London Times, March 11, 1845, p. 7 c. 2.]


1845 March 9 / q in Scotland / q in Mexico / "A most singular appearance of the sun" noticed at Cambridge. / Timbs' Year Book 1846-132. [II; 823. "Lunar Periodicities." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 130-132, at 132. "Astronomical Phenomenon." Literary Gazette, 1845 (March 22, 1845): 186. Ellis, Theodore F. "Astronomical Phenomenon." London Times, March 11, 1845, p. 7 c. 2.]


1845 March 10 / Hamburg / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 824. Greg, 82.]


1845 March 26 / Huntingdon / ab. 9 p.m. / q and sound - phe at first thought from an explosion / LT, Ap 3-6-d. [II; 825. "Earthquake at Huntingdon." London Times, April 3, 1845, p. 6 c. 4.]


1845 March 29 / London / "Curious stationary meteor." / B.A. 60. [II; 826. Greg, 82.]


1845 Mar 29 (?) / (3) / Athenaeum, Ap. 5, 1845 / Cor writes that saw in a part of the sky familiar to himobj in telescope looked like four stars with a nebula in the center. In about 2 minutes it disappeared or faded away. [II; 827. Goddard, J.T. "Curious Meteor." Athenaeum, 1845 (no. 910; April 5): 339.]


1845 March (?) / Cor saw comet similar to a small nebulabrought his telescope to bear upon it. Looked like four stars with an orange-colored mist in the center. It moved away and disappeared two minutes after he had begun telescopic examination. / Athenaeum / See Goddard. / Mag. of Sci 8/12. [II; 828.1, 828.2. Goddard, J.T. "Curious Meteor." Athenaeum, 1845 (no. 910; April 5): 339. Goddard, J.T. "Curious Meteor." Magazine of Science, 7 (1846): 13; (a copy of the Athenaeum article).]


1845 Ap. 7 / Mexico / great q / [BA] '11. [II; 829. A class III earthquake. Milne, 707.]


1845 Ap 19-25 / q / India / I / Cutch / Lakhpat / BA '11 / See June 19. [ II; 830. A class I earthquake. Milne, 707.]


[1845 Apr 24. Meteor. Highfield House. "Large as moon." Lowe, 136.]


1845 May 1 / 8:29 p.m. / Bolide at Dijon / C.R., 20-1452. [II; 831. Perrey, Alexis. "Note sur un bolide aperçu le 1er mai 1845." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1452. Greg, 82.]


1845 May 6 / Morning, before sunrise, appearance from tail of a comet, reported from Princeton College. / Niles Nat. Register, May 10. [II; 832. "Astronomical." Niles' Weekly Register, 68 (May 10, 1845): 160.]


1845 May 8 / "Vulcan" by Houzeau at Brussels. / C.R. 83-719. [II; 833. LeVerrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. "Examen des observations qu'on a présentées, à diverses époques, comme pouvant appartenir aux passages d'une planète intra-mercurielle devant le disque du Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 83 (September 18, 1876): 583-589, 621-624, 647-650, 719-723, at 719. See: 1832 May 5, (I; 1695).]


[1845 May 8 /] 1845 / Brussels / (3) / Houzeau / A Vulcan / Cosmos, N S, 42/467 / (no more). [II; 881. "L'histoire de Vulcain." Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 42 (April 22, 1905): 466-467. “Observations Diverses de 1837 à 1849.” Annales de l'Observatoire Royal de Bruxelles, 12 (1857): 19-27, at 23. See: 1832 May 5, (I; 1695).]


1845 May 8 / Trans Merc. [II; 834. Transit of Mercury. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1845; 542, 545 & 547.]


1845 May 11, 12, 13 / S / D-209 / (N) / bodies / Naples / 114 / Capocci. [II; 835. The note copies information from page 209 of The Book of the Damned. Waldner, Henry. "On Luminous Matter in the Atmosphere." Nature, 5 (February 15, 1872): 304-305, at 304. The observation by Capocci and others were made from May 11 to 13, 1845, and were believed by Dawes to be seeds. Webb, Thomas William. Celestial Objects for Common Telescopes. 4th ed. London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1881, 45. Lowe, 138. LeVerrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. "Examen des observations qu'on a présentées, à diverses époques, comme pouvant appartenir aux passages d'une planète intra-mercurielle devant le disque du Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 83 (September 18, 1876): 583-9, 621-4, 647-50, 719-23, at 622. "Schreiben de Herrn Professors A. Erman an den Herausgeber."" Astronomische Nachrichten, 23 (1845): 355-360. Heis, Eduard. "Ueber Erscheinungen in der Atmosphäre nach Observationen von H. Waldner." Wochenschrift für Astronomie, Meteorologie und Geographie, n.s. v. 12 (1869): 95-96, 100-103.]


1845 May 17 / Lightning strikes two sisters5 miles apart. / LT, May 20/8/a. [A; 198. "Singular Occurrence." London Times, May 20, 1845, p. 8 c. 1.]


1845 June 13 / Remarkable hail / Liège / Bull. Ac. Sci Brux 12-pt. 2-14. [II; 836. Leclercq, D. "Sur une grêle extraordinaire, observée à Liége le 13 juin 1845." Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, 12 pt. 2 (1845): 14-15.]


1845 June 13 / 10:30 p.m. / Meteor in Seine-et-Oise / C.R. 20-1799. [II; 837. "Météorologie." Comptes Rendus, 20 (1845): 1799-1800.]


1845 June 13 / Villeneuve, St. Georges / Met = Moon / slow / N.N.E. to S.S.W. / BA 60. [II; 838. Greg, 82.]


(1845) June 18 / S / Malta, etc. / 141 / (D-261). [II; 839. The note copies information from page 261 of The Book of the Damned. Fort wrote that the Victoria was about "900 miles east of Adalia"; however, its position would be "west" of Adalia, (now identified as Antalya, Turkey). "Meteorological Phenomena." London Times, August 18, 1845 p. 6 c. 6. "(From the Malta Mail.)" "We mentioned in our paper of the 27th of June, that the brig Victoria, on her voyage from Newcastle to Malta, had met with an extraordinary occurrence at 9:30 p.m. on the 18th of the same month, when in latitude 36° 40' 56", and longitude 13° 44' 36". The circumstances were as follows:Being becalmed at the time and without any appearance of bad weather, her top-gallant and royal masts suddenly went over the side, as though carried away by a sudden squall. Two hours after it came on to blow very hard from southward and eastward, and whilst the hands were aloft, taking a reef in the topsails, it suddenly again fell calm, and they complained of an overpowering stench of sulphur and an unbearable heat. At this moment three luminous bodies were seen to issue from the sea, at about the distance of half a mile from the vessel, which remained visible for about 10 minutes; soon after it came on to blow hard from the S.E., and the vessel then run into a current of air the very reverse to that just experienced." "We have now been favoured with a letter from Ainab, on Mount Lebanon, mentioning, that on the very same day, at about half an hour after sunset (which brings it to very nearly the same time), the heavens presented a most extraordinary and beautiful though awful spectacle; a fiery meteor, composed of two luminous bodies, each presenting an appearance of being at least five time larger than the moon, with streamers or appendages to each joining the two, and looking precisely like large flags blown out by a gentle breeze, appeared in the west, remaining visible for an hour, taking an easterly course, and gradually disappeared. The appendages appeared to shine from the reflected light of main bodies, which it was painful to look at for any time." "The moon had risen about half an hour before, and there was scarcely any wind." Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1848, 1-11, at 2 and 5. "Eighteenth Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science." Athenæum, 1848 (no. 1086; August 18): 831-846, at 833. "Luminous Meteors." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1849, 273-274. Lowe, 136. Greg, 83. Greg notes: "Sir W.S. Harris considers this was an electrical phenomenon." Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 30-31. Frederick Howlett's observations of a "meteor that resembled a bright but permanent flash of lightning," (including "a dull heavy report like that of a distant piece of ordnance"), near Adalia, on this date, were appended to Glaisher's report. Howlett, (not Hawlett), was a "most persevering observer" of sunspots, and this "meteor" was also seen at Philadelphia, (Alaşehir, Turkey).]


[1845 June 19 /] 1845 July 12 / Athenaeum of In Lake Wogsdamm, near Darmstadt, during a thunderstorm, an island rose int he lake. No q felt. It rose as great discharge of lightning upon the lake. [II; 844. "Our Weekly Gossip." Athenæum, 1845 (no. 924; July 12): 692-693, at 692. "From Darmstadt, we have accounts of a remarkable phenomenon which has been witnessed in the neighbourhood of that capital during a thunderstorm,and attributed, by these accounts, to the thunder itself. About five in the evening, it is stated, the electric fluid discharged itself, with a loud and long rumbling sound, on the vast Lake of Wogsdamm, near the city; and on the instant, there arose, in the midst of the waters a small reedy island, having nearly the form of a five-rayed star, and a diameter, at the widest part, of about twenty-two paces. No shock of earthquake was felt. The examination of the islet has shown that it adheres solidly to the bottom of the lake. The inhabitants of Darmstadt were pouring out to look at it." Perrey, Alexis. "Liste des Tremblements de Terre." Mémoires de lʹAcadémie des sciences, arts et belles-lettres de Dijon, 46 (1845-1846): 393-479, at 405. Perrey gives the date as June 19, 1845, at 5 P.M., and desComptes Rendusibes Wogsdamm as a large pond. As Darmstadt isn't located on a river or next to any large lakes, this may have simply been a large pond along the road leading to Mainz, on the outskirts of Darmstadt, in 1845.]


[1845 June 19 /] 1845 (July) / (q and rain) / Near Darmstadt, Lake of Wogsdamm, a th. storm ab 5 p.m. an electrical discharge, loud, long, rumbling sound and small island rose in the lake. This a phe of q'sbut no quake was felt. / Timbs 1846/282. [II; 845. "Storms." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 282. The Year-Book only paraphrases the account given in the Athenaeum. See: 1845 June 19, (II; 844).]


1845 June 19 / II / q / India / Lakhpat / BA 11 / See Ap 19. [II; 840. A class II earthquake. Milne, 708. See: 1845 Ap 19-25, (II; 830).]


1845 June 21 / 3 days after the B.D. object / at Erzeroum, Asia Minor / A heavy snowstorm, which lasted 3 days. "The greatest consternation prevailed among the inhabitants, who thought the world was coming to an end." BA 61. [II; 841. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 31.]


[1845 (July). Wrong date. See: 1845 June 19, (II; 844).]


1845 July 10-11 / q. / Italy (Basilicata) / BA '11. [II; 842. A class I earthquake. Milne, 708.]


1845 July 12 / Ac to American astronomer Mitcheldark spot in polar white patch of Mars for several hours. / N.Y. Times, 1877, Nov. 25-4-4. [II; 843. "Visible Changes in Planets." New York Times, November 25, 1877, p. 4 c. 4.]


[1845 July 12 /] 1845 July 25 / Dark spot in polar snow of Mars / Cornhill Mag. 1877 / or NY Times, Nov 25/4/4. 1877. [II; 851. "A Mighty Sea-Wave." Cornhill Magazine, 36 (November, 1877): 601-612, at 612. "For instance, the American astronomer Mitchel says that on the night of July 12, 1845, the bright polar snows of Mars exhibited an appearance never noticed at any preceding or succeeding observation. In the very centre of the white surface appeared a dark spot, which retained its position during several hours. On the following evening not a trace of the spot could be seen." "Visible Changes in Planets." New York Times, November 25, 1877, p. 4 c. 4. Ormsby MacKnight Mitchel made his observation at the Cincinnati Observatory. The "Mountains of Mitchel" remain a mystery, where frozen carbon-dioxide, (not water ice), evaporates at different rates during the southern spring, with some darker areas of frost disappearing rapidly and with a brighter frost that persists longer when the polar ice cap recedes. Ormsby and other past astronomers thought of Martian ice and snow melting into its seas, whereas the gaseous release of carbon-dioxide frosts substantially increases the Martian atmosphere, (without any surface water involved in the formation and sublimation of the polar ice caps on Mars). In some areas, surface frost could form directly upon the ground, while other areas could involve precipitation during storms. Colaprete, Anthony, et al. "Albedo of the south pole on Mars determined by topographic forcing of atmosphere dynamics." Nature, 435 (May 12, 2005): 184-188. "In particular, the presence of a perennial cardon dioxide ice cap, the formation of a vast area of black 'slab ice' known as the Cryptic region and the asymmetric springtime retreat of the cap have eluded explanation."]


[1845 July 12. Wrong date. See: 1845 June 19, (II; 844).]


1845 July 14 / Le Teilleul, Manche, France / Met / (F). [II; 846. Fletcher, 101. This is the Le Teilleul meteorite.]


1845 July 14 / Met / London / BA 60. [II; 847. Greg, 83.]


1845 July 16 / Belgium / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 848. Greg, 83.]


1845 July 23 / Barrisal, India / shocks / Athenaeum 1845-1109. [II; 849. "Earthquakes." Athenaeum, 1845 (no. 942; November 15): 1109. "...at Barrisal several distinct shocks had been felt on the 23rd of July."]


1845 July 25 / 9 p.m. / Between Prato and Florencedescribed by Prof. Cocchi. An enormous igneous body rushing northward overhead, terrifying horses. "Many times larger than the moon." / BA 61-37. [II; 850. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 37.]


[1845 July 25. Wrong date. See: 1845 July 12, (II; 851).]


1845 Aug 6 / India / Assam / q / I / BA '11. [II; 852. A class I earthquake. Milne, 708.]


1845 Aug 7 / Hail at Metz / Mem. Ac. Metz 27/116. [II; 853. Lucy, Ad. "Note sur des Grêlons Tombés à Metz." Mémoires de l'Académie Royale de Metz. 27 (1845-1846): 116, (with illustrations). "Le 7 aout 1845, à deux heures trente minutes du soir, il est tombé sur la ville de Metz une grêle dont le grêlons affectaient des formes aussi bizarres que variées. Ceux que j'ai recueillis intacts sur le gazon de mon jardin, présentaient généralment l'aspect d'une sphère déprimée avec des excroissances sur les dépressions; d'autres avaient la forme de poires, de gourdes, de massues, de balles qui porteraient sur toute leur circonférence la bavure résultante d'un moule mal joint."]


1845 Aug 10 / London and Oxford / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 854. Greg, 83.]


1845 Aug 12 / [LT], 4-f / Meteor / London. [II; 855. "Splendid Meteor." London Times, August 12, 1845, p. 4 c. 6.]


[1845 Aug 18 /] 1845 Aug 20 / Op Mars / (Al). [II; 860. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1845, 548.]


1845 Aug 18 / [LT], 6-f / Meteorological phe. [II; 856. "Meteorological Phenomena." London Times, August 18, 1845 p. 6 c. 6. See: (1845) June 18, (II; 839).]


1845 Aug 19 / (Cu[t] / near Rouen / Whirlwindflashes of lightning from it. Said that it burned objects caught in it. / Timbs Year Book 1846/278. [II; 857. "Whirlwinds." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 278-279.]


1845 Aug 19 / Leaves of trees and flowers in gardens in suburbs of Paris withered in electric storm. / C.R. 21/535. [II; 858. Cornay. "Sur quelques effets de l'ouragan du 19 août 1845, observés dans les environs de Paris." Comptes Rendus, 21 (1845): 534-535.]


1845 Aug 19 / Year Book of Facts, 1846, quoting M. Arago's account to the French Academy / At Rouen, a whirlwind. Effects called electricin the destroyed buildings the bricks were burning hot and many articles were charred. Said the fire or the electricity of it was so brilliant that visible a great distance. However, a French  scientist, M. Pouillet, said that the phe was not electric. It is said that insurance companies desiring that opinion had recourse to him. [II; 859.1, 859.2. "Whirlwinds." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 278-279.]


[1845 Aug 20. Wrong date. See: 1845 Aug 18, (II; 860).]


1845 Aug 21 / 8 p.m. / Comrie / Remarkable shadow of a monument in story of Comrie / Athenaeum 1845-858. [II; 861. "Remarkable Aerial Phenomena Observed at Comrie, Perthshire." Athenæum, 1845 (no. 931; August 30): 858. "Immediately to the north of the village of Comrie there is a bold hill, called Dunmore, with a pillar of seventy or eighty feet in height built on its summit in memory of the late Lord Melville. The perfect image of this well-known hill and obelisk, as exact at least as the shadow usually representsthe substance, was observed distinctly projected on the noerthern sky, at least two miles beyond the original, which, owing to an intervening eminence, was itself not in view at all from the station. The image was that which the hill and monument present as viewed from the village, that is, from the south. Instead of being a shadow on a cloud, it seemed to be the shape of the thing represented moulded out of the cloud itself, and thus stuck up against the northern sky. The edges of the figure representing those of the pillar, though of course less substantial-looking than their granite originals, seemed as erect and well defined as the masonry itself, and so also where the harder features of the hill formed parts of the profile; while those portions in the original covered with wood had in the figure a serrated fringe, exactly as these portions themselves would show if looked at between the eye and sky. The figure continued visible, after it was first noticed (how long before it is of course impossible to say), for about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and was, during that time, seen and minutely examined by three individuals, so that there could be no illusion in the case.... On this occasion, the sun had been down for some time, and the moon had only lately risen, and was peeping through some holes in a thick screen of clouds that skirted the eastern horizon, and of course far from the line of the Dunmore and image, so that neither of these luminaries had any direct hand in the sketch."]


1845 Aug 21 / Tidal wave / 4 feet high / Halmstadt, Norway / Timbs' '46-279. [II; 862. ("Halmstadt, in Norway...." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 279. "Halmstadt...." Athenæum, 1845 (no. 933; September 13): 910. "Halmstadt, in Norway, was, on the 21st ult., visited by a tremendous hurricane. The sea retired in an unusual manner from the coast, and returned in a few minutes with great violence. The waters of the Nisa rose all of a sudden four feet above their usual height, and then at once receded. A similar phenomenon was witnessed on that coast at the time of the earthquake at Lisbon, in 1755, and of that at Messina, in 1783."]


1845 Aug 23 / [LT]. 5-e / Sup. in Essex. [A; 199. "Superstition in the 19th Century." London Times, August 23, 1845, p. 5 c. 5.]


1845 Aug 22 / 12:30 p.m. / Severe shock / Assam / sound like thunder / later, small shocks / Friend of India, Sept. 11. [II; 863. "Earthquake in Assam." Friend of India, September 11, 1845, p. 584.]


1845 Aug 30 / Bright projection from snow cap of Mars / Cornhill Mag, 1877 / or NY Times, 1877, Nov. 25/4/4. [II; 864. "A Mighty Sea-Wave." Cornhill Magazine, 36 (November, 1877): 601-612, at 612. "Visible Changes in Planets." New York Times, November 25, 1877, p. 4 c. 4. See: 1845 July 12, (II; 851).]


1845 Aug 31 / Grenelle, France / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 865. Greg, 83.]


1845 Sept 1 / Det met / 2:20 a.m. / A. J. Sci., 49-408 / brilliant light and great met / Fayetteville, Nor. Car / tremendous report. [II; 866. "Remarkable Meteor at Fayetteville, N.C." American Journal of Science, 49 (1845): 408.]


1845 / ab. Sept 1 / Sounds / In Climate of N.S. Wales, p. 165, Mr H.C. Russell quotes a correspondent. Near Eyre's Creek, ab 9 a.m., "a report as if of a great gun. Next morning ab. same time again. [II; 867. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. Climate of New South Wales: Descriptive, Historical, and Tabular. Sydney: Charles Potter, 1877, 165. Russell paraphrases from Sturt's "Central Australia." Strut, Charles. Narrative of an Expedition into Central Australia. London: T and W. Boone, 1849, v. 2, 24-25. "When Mr. Browne and I were on our recent journey to the north, after having crossed the Stony Desert, being then between it and Eyre's Creek, about nine o'clock in the morning, we distinctly heard a report as of a great gun discharged, to the westward, at the distance of half a mile. On the following morning, nearly at the same hour, we again heard the sound; but it now came from a greater distance, and consequently was not so clear." See: 1829 Feb 7, (I; 1439), and, 1829 Feb 7, (I; 1372).]


1845 Sept 1 / Insect / N.Y. Herald, Nov 15-1-6 / Near Buffalo, Iowa, an unknown insect appeared—enormous numbers. At first the larvaesome farms covered several inches deep with them. In a few days climbed in crops and turned to small fly about half the size of a housefly and sucked wheat until withered. No one had ever seen such an insect before. [II; 868.1, 868.2. "Destruction of Wheat." New York Herald, November 15, 1845, p. 1 c. 6. Packard, Alpheus Spring, Jr. The Hessian Fly. U.S. Entomological Commission: Bulletin No. 4. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1880. This unknown insect was probably the Hessian fly. "It appeared west of the Alleghanies in 1797, though in what state we are unable to learn, while Virginia was invaded in 1801, and North Carolina about the year 1840. Westward its progress brought it to Ohio in 1840, and three years later it was detected in Michigan. In 1844 it was destructive in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and the eastern border of Iowa, while it was common in the Middle Atlantic States, and became destructive in Northern Georgia in 1843."]


1845 Sept 2 / Sept 20, Athenaeum of, from Edinburgh Advertiserat Orkneygreat fall of black dust supposed from Hecla. Ath., Oct 18, says date was Sept 2. Says had been eruption there. [II; 869. "Supposed Volcanic Eruption." Athenæum, 1845 (no. 934; September 20): 926.]


1845 Sept 2 / noon / Hecla, and on into 1846 / Y.B. 1846/269. [II; 870. "Eruption of Mount Hecla." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1846, 268-269. The Hekla volcano.]


1845 Sept 2 and 3 / Dust / Orkneys / Am J. Sci 2/3/273. [II; 871. "Volcanic Dust of Hecla." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 3 (1847): 272-273.]


1845 Sept 3 / Great fall of dust "resembling Roman cement" all over the Orkneys. / An. and Mag. Nat Hist 16-286 / Attrib not to Hecla but to some other volc that had been threatening eruption in Iceland. / See Oct. 14. [II; 872. Clouston, C. "Shower of Dust at Orkney." Annals and Magazine of Natural History, 16 (October 1845): 286. See: 1845 Oct. 14, (II; 889).]


1845 Sept 6 / Rhine / Fireball ./ BA 60. [II; 873. Greg, 83.]


1845 Sept 7 / Calcutta / Fireball / BA 60 / N. to S. [II; 874. Greg, 83.]


1845 Sept 7 / Violent shock / Calcutta / Athenaeum 1845-1109. [II; 875. "Earthquakes." Athenaeum, 1845 (no. 942; November 15): 1109.]


1845 Sept 8 / btw 2 and 3 a.m. / island of Grenada / a shock / on same day a heavy th. storm / N.Y. Herald, Oct 5-1-5. [II; 876. "Grenada." New York Herald, October 5, 1845, p. 1 c. 5.]


1845 Sept 15 / date of Hecla's first outburst, in Athenaeum, Nov 1, p. 1060. [II; 877. "Mount Hecla." Athenæum, 1845 (no. 940; November 1): 1060. The volcano Hecla began its eruption on September 2, 1845, (which lasted until the following April). See: 1845 Sept 2, (II; 870). The Hekla volcano.]


1845 Sept 16 / (+) / [LT]. 4-f / Supposed volcano in Orkney / See Oct. 14. [II; 878. "Supposed Volcanic Eruption." London Times, September 16, 1845, p. 4 c. 6. See: 1845 Oct. 14, (II; 889).]


1845 Sept 20 / Jefferson Co., N.Y. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [II; 879. Finley, 3.]


1845 Oct / (Nova) / Scarlet star in Orion found / An Sci Disc 1851/376 / (Cut). [II; 880. "Extracts from the Proceedings of the London Astrononomical Society." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1851, 376-377. John Russell Hind said, " In October, 1845, I found a highly colored crimson, or even scarlet, star in Orion, far the most deeply colored object I have yet seen. Its mean place for 1850 is, R.A. 4h. 52m. 45s., N.P.D.=-15° 2'."  Hind's discovery was not a nova in the Orion constellation; for, R Leporis, (otherwise known as Hind's Crimson Star), is a carbon star and a long-period variable star in the constellation of Lepus.]


1845 / Hecla / Le Moniteur / p. 2558 / P.P. 9431. [II; 882. (Le Moniteur, 1845, p. 2558 ) "P.P. 9431" was the shelfmark for Le Moniteur at the Library of the British Museum.]


1845 / autumn / b. rain / Just before the disease in potatoes broke out, a black rain fell, and people attributed the disease to it. / Gardeners' Chronicle, June 1, 1850 / Was this Ireland? / See preceding Hecla. [II; 883. "In the autumn of 1845...." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1850 no. 22 (June 1): 339. "In the autumn of 1845, just before the prevalence of the disease in Potatoes, a shower of inky black rain fell in a wild and scantily inhabited district with which we are acquainted, and was believed to be the agent which carried the Potato murrain through the land. Unfortunaely none of the fluid was preserved, or some easier solution of the mystery might possibly have been detected." "A yellow rain fell on the 17th of last April, at 11 o'clock A.M., at the Mumbles, near Swansea, the sky being at the time bright and free from clouds. The spots of rain when fresh were of an ochre yellow, and the colour remained for many days, notwithstanding heavy rains, where the spots had fallen."]


1845 Oct / qs in Smyrna and great damage from torrential rains / Atheaeum 1845-1109. [II; 884. "Smyrna and some other parts of the East...."  Athenæum, 1845 (no. 942; November 15): 1109.]


1845 Oct 3-Dec 14 / N.Y. Herald / Have. [II; 885.]


1845 Oct / Great drought / Arkansas / N.Y. Herald 31-1-5. [II; 886. "Varieties." New York Herald, October 31, 1845, p. 1 c. 5.]


1845 Oct 5 / Sounds / N.Y. Herald, 1-5 / In the neighborhood of the Lake Superior copper mines, in the Porcupine Mountains, a hill, near La Point, from which came sounds like discharges of artillery. [II; 887. "Thunder in the Copper Regions." New York Herald, October 5, 1845, p. 1 c. 5. Martin, Morgan Lewis. "Editor's Correspondence." Daily Union, (Washington, D.C.), August 25, 1845, p. 390 c. 4-6. "At times, it is said, a peculiar noise issues from the Porcupine mountains, and from the high hills on the main land, both east and west of La Pointe, some distance off.  It is said to resemble the distant discharge of ordnance, or thunder.  At one time, they said it was so loud and frequent, that they mistook it for signal guns fired from the brig Astor, which they thought might be in distress, and actually sent out a boat in search of her." "These sounds the Indians believe to be the voice of the spirit 'Manitou' who guards the deposites of mineral wealth embowelled beneath the hills, and to whom any attempt made to dig them up, and carry them off, would be highly offensive, and followed by some kind of punishment.  I have never yet heard of an Indian’s leading a white man to a locality of copper, or telling where he has found a piece when picked up!" "Some have supposed that the noise in question arises from volcanic action; but, as no vibration is felt in the earth, and no other proof exists of such being the case, we are led to believe that the noise is produced by the lashing of the waves of the lake after a storm, as they are driven forward into the grottoes, caves, &c. of the tall sandstone cliffs, formed at their bases by the disintegrating effects of water and ice.  Some distance east of La Pointe, about the Little Girl’s Point and Montreal river, as well as west of the same place, some fifteen or twenty miles, high red sandstone cliffs occur. At their bases, near the water’s edge, a great many curiously-shaped caves and grottoes appeared. In places, the sandstone had been so cut away, that only pillars remained standing at some ten or fifteen feet in the lake, from the top of which a high rude arch would extend to the main shore, and beneath which boats could  easily pass. This was particularly the case near where the islands are parted with going west up the southern shore of the lake.  Some caves, with small openings for mouths, run for a long distance back beneath the hills, expanding, likely, into large halls with high vaulted roofs, &c. After a storm, a heavy sea continues to roll into these grottoes and caverns, the waves lashing themselves against their sides and roofsthus producing sounds resembling those heard at La Pointe, &c." "As the weather is generally calm after a storm, before the sea goes down, it is likely at such times these sounds are heard."]


1845 Oct, ab 12th / Destructive floods / Kansas / N.Y. Herald 25-1-2+. [II; 888. "Great Flood." New York Herald, October 25, 1845, p. 1 c. 2.]


1845 Oct. 14 / [LT], 7-e / 17-6-f / Nov. 27-4-e / 6-5-a / Hecla. [II; 889. "Eruption of Mount Hecla." London Times, October 14, 1845, p. 7 c. 5. "Eruption of Hecla." London Times, October 17, 1845, p. 6 c. 6. "Eruption of Mount Hecla." London Times, November 27, 1845, p. 4 c. 5. "The Eruption of Hecla." London Times, December 6, 1845, p. 5 c. 1. The Hekla volcano.]


1845 Oct 18 or 11 / Sudden fall and rise of Lake Ontario / Niles National Register, Oct 25, p. 115. [II; 890. "Singular Phenomenon on Lake Ontario." Niles' Weekly Register, 69 (October 25, 1845): 115.]


1845 Oct 24 / q - III / China / BA '11. [II; 891. A class III earthquake. Milne, 708.]


1845 Oct 24 / Bonn / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 892. Greg, 83.]


1845 Oct 26 / 6 p.m. / q and sound like thunder / Long Island / Conn. / Niles' Nat Reg., Nov. 1. [II; 893.

"An Earthquake was felt at New York...." Niles' Weekly Register, 69 (November 1, 1845): 144.]


1845 Oct 26 / Q violent on Long Island Sound. Rumbling sounds in N.J. / N.Y. Herald, Nov 3-1-6. [II; 894. "The Earthquake in Newark." New York Herald, November 3, 1845, p. 1 c. 6.]


1845 Oct 26 / Q severer in Conn than in N.Y. On 23rd, at Greenfield Hill, Conn., the springs and wells went dry for hour and a half. / N.Y. Herald, 31-1-5. [II; 895. "Varieties." New York Herald, October 31, 1845, p. 1 c. 5.]


1845 Oct 31 / Milan / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 896. Greg, 83.]


1845 Nov, early / Almost incessant rains in Maine. / N.Y Herald 7-1-4. [II; 897. "Storm in Maine." New York Herald, November 7, 1845, p. 1 c. 4.]


1845 Nov, / Hecla increase[d] violence. / Athenaeum 1845-1204. [II; 898. "Mount Hecla." Athenaeum, 1845 (no. 946; December 13): 1204. "According to a letter from Copenhagen, of the 22nd ult., the eruption of Mount Hecla has become very formidable, at the date of the last accounts from Iceland. At a distance of two miles from the crater, the lava torrent was a mile in width, and from forty to fifty feet in depth." The Hekla volcano.]


1845 Nov 2 / Milan / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 899. Greg, 83.]


1845 Nov. 2 / (?) / Comet if intense brightness on western horizon, night / Baltimore / N.Y. Herald 5-4-1 / Attracted considerable attention. [II; 900. "Baltimore, Nov. 4, 1845." New York Herald, November 5, 1845, p. 4. c. 1.]


1845 Nov 2 / Biela's Comet was discovered again at Cambridge Observatory, Dec 1. / Niles National Register 5-19-288. [II; 901. "Biela's Comet was discovered again by C. Challis...." Niles' Weekly Register, 69 (January 3, 1846): 288.]


1845 Nov 4 and Dec 9 / Bombay / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 902. Greg, 83.]


1845 Nov. 20 / Cramaux / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 903. Greg, 83.]


1845 Nov 25 / N.Y. Herald, 1-6 / Unprecedented drought in Virginia. [II; 904. "Varieties." New York Herald, November 25, 1845, p. 1 c. 6.]


1845 Dec 2 / Light at sea / Ryook Phyoo / (D-275). ** [II; 905. The note copies information from page 275 of The Book of the Damned. "Extracts of letters from Captain Williams...." Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 5 (1843-1850): 627. "The appearance in question, seen between five and six o'clock in the evening of the 2nd of December 1845, was that of a large flame far out at sea, flickering several times for fifteen and twenty minutes, and suddenly ceasing. It was conjectured to have been either a large ship on fire, or a volcanic eruption; but no positive data exist for determining the question." "Ryook Phyoo," in British Aracan, is now identified as Kyaukpyu, Myanmar (Burma). No volcanic eruptions are known in this area at this time, and apparently no ships were reported lost.]


1845 Dec 2 / [LT], 3-c Berkshire / 4-5-e, Derbyshire / 26-6-c, Shropshire / 9-3-c / 10-6-d / 13-6-d / Incendiary fires. [A; 200. "Incendiarism in Berkshire." London Times, December 2, 1845, p. 3 c. 3. "Incendiarism in Derbyshire." London Times, December 4, 1845, p. 5 c. 5. "Incendiarism." London Times, December 26, 1845, p. 6 c. 3. "Incendiary Fires." London Times, December 9, 1845, p. 3 c. 3. "Incendiary Fires." London Times, December 10, 1845, p. 6 c. 4. "Incendiary Fires." London Times, December 13, 1845, p. 6 c. 4.]


1845 Dec 3 / Great met / Paris / 6:10 a.m. / BA 60. [II; 906. Greg, 83.]


1845 Dec 3 / Met burst over Mentz with great smoke and noise. / BA 60. [II; 907. Greg, 83.]


1845 Dec 3 / Aurora / Swansea / BA, Vol 18/22. [II; 908. Jenkins, John. "Notices of Auroræ observed at Swansea." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1848, Notices and Abstracts, 22. Lowe reported a meteor, at Highfield House. "Increased in brightness when crossing Aurora." Lowe, 136.]


1845 Dec 19 / Venus and Jupiter close together / Astro Reg 1/189. [II; 909. Chambers, George Frederick. "Planetary Conjunctions." Astronomical Register, 1 (December 1863): 188-189. "On Dec. 19, 1845, Venus and Jupiter appeared in the same field of view." Venus and Saturn, (not Jupiter), were less than a degree apart, on that date.]


1845 Dec 19 / Venus and Saturn in same field of the telescope / Ast. Reg. 7-23. [II; 910. Walker, George James. A List of Anniversaries of Remarkable Astronomical Discoveries and Occurrences.... London: n.p., 1869, 23. Walker's book has been found appended to some of the volumes 6 and  7 of the Astronomical Register.]


1845 Dec 29 / Division of Biela's Comet. [II; 911. Arago, François. "A Popular Treatise in Comets." North British Review, 35 (November 1861): 495-533, at 504. "When this comet returned in 1846, it exhibited phenomena of such a remarkable kind, that no explanation of them has ever been attempted. On the 19th December 1845, Mr Hind observed a sort of protuberance on the north side of it; but this was not seen by M. Encke at Berlin on the 21st. On the 15th January 1846, Professor Challis of Cambridge observed that the comet had separated into two distinct bodies. M. Wichmann observed the same thing at Konigsberg, and Lieut. Maury at Washington. On the 19th of February, M. Struve saw the double comet for the first time, and made an accurate drawing of it, in which the nuclei were separated 6' 7". On the 21st he made another drawing of it, in which the distance of the nuclei had become 6'33". On the 4th of March, the distance was 7' 20", and on the 23d of March, 13' 32"." Comet 3D/Biela.]


1845 Dec last / Devr / rats / L.T., 1846, Jan 3/6/e. [A; 201. "Horrible Circumstance." London Times, January 3, 1846, p. 6 c. 5.]

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