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Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1871


1871:


1871  Body of Mrs. W. I. Peters / Frankfort, Ind. / See Dec 2, 1888. [A; 648. See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1871 / South Bend, Ind. / Body of Anna Rees / See Aug 11, 1872. [A; 649. See: 1872 Aug 11, (A; 776).]


1871 / The body in the Philadelphia burial ground / See Oct 27, 1872. [A; 650. See: 1872 Oct 27, (A; 789).]


1871 / Bewitched man named Weedstrand / Meadsville, Pa. / See July 29, 1875. [A; 651. See: 1875 July 29, (B; 61).]


1871 / Ellen Sudworth, near Leigh, England / Faster/ See Ap., 1876. [A; 652. See: 1876 April, (B; 91).]


1871 / H.H. / Gardner, Kansas. / See March 7, 1874. [A; 653. See: 1874 March 7, (A; 909).]


1871 / Sounds and ghosts in a house in Deerfield, Portage Co, Ohio / See Dec. 13, 1873. [A; 654. See: 1873 Dec 13, (A; 870).]


1871 / Sleeper Susan C. Godsey—see Oct 27, 1873. / near Hickman, Ky / or moved to Tenn. [A; 655. See: 1873 Oct 27, (A; 861).]


1871 / A. W. Underwood / Negro boy / Paw Paw / fire breath / See May 1, 1880. [A; 656. See: 1880 May 1, (B; 289), and, 1882 Dec 1, (B; 408).]


1871 Jan about / Berkeley Square mystery. / Denials in N and Q 6-2 and 3 / and etc? [A; 657. Denials of the haunting and any aftermath include those by a former servant, a physician at St. George's Hospital, and by Rhoda Broughton, (at page 151), who wrote the "true story." "The Mystery of Berkeley Square." Notes and Queries, s. 6 v. 2 (November 27, 1880): 435; (December 4, 1880): 452; (December 11, 1880): 471-472; (December 25, 1880): 514-516; v. 3 (January 8, 1881): 29-30; (January 15, 1881): 53-54; and, (February 19, 1881): 151-152. "You are mistaken in supposing that my story has anything to do with the so-called Berkeley Square Mystery. Its incidents happened, as I was told by my informant, in the country, and I clothed it in fictitious characters and transposed it to London, which I have since regretted, as so many people have thence assumed that it must refer to the house in Berkeley Square." "The Truth, The Whole Truth and Nothing but the Truth." Temple Bar, 22 (February 1868): 340-348. Broughton, Rhoda. "The Truth, The Whole Truth and Nothing but the Truth." Tales for Christmas Eve. Leipzig: Bernard Tauchnitz, 1872, 9-38. London: Richard Bentley, 1873, 3-32.]


1871 to 1886 // No sound-phe of Italy noted in Bol. Sis Soc Ital, vol. 7. [IV; 285.16.]


1871 // spring /// Roda, Huesca, Spain / (F). [IV; 285.17. Fletcher, 104. This is the Roda meteorite.]


1871 / Body of Mrs. W. I. Peters / Frankfort, Ind. / See Dec. 22, 1888. [A; 648. See: (1888 Dec 22.)]


1871 Jan / (Servant tied) / Spiritual Magazine of, copied from Cincinnati Gazette—in home of a farmer, Andrew Streit, near Cumminsville—servant found, one morning, in the kitchen, bound and gagged. Said that a man had appeared and so treated her. While Streit family discussing the matter, house struck by a volley of stones. Other volleys and no one seen. Streit went to Cumminsville and appealed to the police. A Lieutenant and 6 men went to his house. Stones arrived and the men searched but found nobody. The girl seemed so clearly connected in some way that she was sent to her home in C-ville, an Irish laborer accompanying her. As told by him, when in open country, with no means of anybody hiding, stones rattled around them. After the girl left, no more phe in the farmhouse. [A; 658.1 to 658.4. "Stone-Throwing Extraordinary." Spiritual Magazine, n.s., 6 (January 1871): 44-45. (Cincinnati Gazette, Dec 1870 to Jan 1871???)]


1871 Jan / Great q. / Mexico (Taba) / BA '11. [IV; 285.18. Milne, 722.]


1871 Jan /Destructive eruption of Colorucco Volc, Mexico. Nature 3-394. [IV; 285.19. "Notes." Nature, 3 (March 16, 1871): 393-395, at 394. The Ceboruco volcano.]


1871 Jan / Berkshire / "Invaders" / Jour Met Soc., 1887/305. [IV; 285.20. "Note on a Manifestation of Electricity at Ringstead Bay, on the Coast of Dorset." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 13 (1887): 305. Bonney, Alfred. "Note on an Appearance of Luminous Bubbles in the Atmosphere." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 13 (1887): 306-310, at 306.]


1871 Jan / Remenham, Berkshire / Air bubbles / Nature 36/215. [IV; 285.21. "Societies and Academies." Nature, 36 (June 30, 1889): 214-216, at 215. Bonney, Alfred. "Note on an Appearance of Luminous Bubbles in the Atmosphere." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 13 (1887): 306-310, at 306.]


1871 Jan 1 / 8:30 p.m. / Great meteor / N. Zealand / Trans. N.Z. Inst 4/354. [IV; 285.22. Hector, James. "Notice of a Meteor observed all over New Zealand." Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 4 (1871): 354-355.]


1871 Jan 4 / Hawkesbury, Ontario / shock / A. J. Sci 3/15/322. [IV; 285.23. "The Earthquake of November 4, 1877." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 321-324, at 322.]


1871 Jan 5 / 9:30 p.m. / Adelaide, great slow meteor north to S.S.E. At Hooking 400 miles N. of Adelaide, seemingly same meteor burst with loud report and earth shook. / Nature 4-345. [IV; 285.24. Finniss, M.M. "Meteorology in South Australia." Nature, 4 (August 31, 1871): 345.]


1871 Jan 10 to 12 / Great flames from Vesuvius / LT 26-4-f. [IV; 285.25. "Mount Vesuvius." London Times, January 26, 1871, p. 4 c. 6.]


1871 Jan 10 / See Jan 12. [IV; 285.26. See: 1871 Jan  to 12, (IV; 285.25).]


1871 Jan 18 / Faces / N.Y. Times, 4-4 / Sandusky—picture of a young woman, who was alive, appearing on window glass. That not long before, in Cincinnati, picture of a woman who had died, was so appearing. [A; 659. "A Ghostly Revival." New York Times, January 18, 1871, p. 4.c. 4.]


1871 Jan 24 / Polt and voice / men seen / Interview with Mr Thrasher, dated Jan 24, copied from Richmond Dispatch, in N.Y. Times, Feb 2-6-1—First—he saw 2 persons running from his barn and found that about a peck of corn had been taken from the crib and piled on the ground. Others saw the 2 men running away. Next evening window sash was found taken from the kitchen and utensils scattered about—and 2 men were seen running away. He was away next evening. When returned, his children reported that 2 men had been there disturbing things. Then the neighbors with guns guarded the house. A man was seen and fired at, but he escaped. A visit next evening, and kitchen window was broken, but there were no tracks in the snow. Mr. Thrasher moved everything out of the kitchen. No more objects moved about, except once. But then began violent rappings on the back door, usually from 3 in afternoon till 8 in the evening. Every thinkable stratagem was used but nobody could be caught. The rappings went on. They were violent. People in the streets looked at the house while so resounding and saw no one. "The little girl who lives in the house," not said whether a daughter or servant. was suspected by some persons as having some relation to the phenomenon, once threw a rock out a window and a voice was heard. "Do not hit me!" The girl had talks with the spirit, such as, "What have you against Mr. Thrasher and his wife?" This seen indicate was not a daughter of Mr and Mrs T. The voice, or being, said that it had nothing against either Mr or Mrs T. The girl said: "Do you [not] know that I am charged with doing this?" "Yes! But they are very much mistaken, and it is not done with yet." The children had conversations with the being, but it would not talk with Mr and Mrs T. One of the boys, one evening crept away with a gun to take a shot at where the ghost was supposed to be, but the ghost told of knowing this and retired. [A; 660.1 to 660.9. "A Talking Ghost in Virginia." New York Times, February 2, 1871, p. 6 c. 1-2. "Letter from Lexington." Richmond Daily Dispatch, (Virginia), January 27, 1871, p. 3 c. 1-2.]


1871 (Jan 24) / Buchannan ghost still. / See Nov. 20. [A; 661. See: 1870 ab. Nov. 20, (A; 644).]


1871 Jan 26-27 / night / Severe shocks / Accra / 3rd within 5 months / L.T., March 13-10-c. [IV; 286. "West Coast of Africa." London Times, March 13, 1871, p. 10 c. 3.]


1871 Jan 27 / 9 p.m. / Walroa, N. Zealand / N to S / great met lighting up everything as if by daylight. / Otago Witness, Feb 18-15-1. [IV; 287. "The Walroa correspondent of the Southern Cross contributes the following...." Otago Witness, February 18, 1871, p. 15 c. 1.]


1871 Jan. 27 / Disap balloon from siege of Paris. [IV; 288. A balloon which ascended on January 27, 1871, was lost at sea, ("perdu en mer"), last seen at Arcachon, (Gironde). Les Ballons Sortis Pendant le Siege de Paris, 1870-1871. Paris: Grandjean & Gascard, n.d.]


1871 Jan 28 / [LT], 5-e / 12-5-c // q's / Peru and Chile. [IV; 289. "The West India and Pacific Mails." London Times, January 28, 1871, p. 5 c. 5. (London Sunday Times, February 12, 1871, p. 5 c. 3.)]


1871 Jan 31 / q / Bombay / Nature 3-394. [IV; 290. "Notes." Nature, 3 (March 16, 1871): 393-395, at 394.]


1871 Jan. 31 / Pniel, Cape Colony / th storm of violence such as not known for 30 years / Cape Argus, Feb 18. [IV; 291. "The Diamond-Fields." Cape Argus, February 18, 1871, p. 2 c. 6 & p. 3 c. 1.]


1871 Feb / Peru / Stones and hail / 1833//. [IV; 293. See: 1833, (I; 1761).]


1871 / Metites and hail / 1815//. [IV; 294. See: 1815, (I; 517).]


1871 Feb / (+) / Ice, aerolite and hail / Oct 20, 1824. [IV; 295. See: 1833 July 4, (I; 1148).]


1871 Feb. 7 / evening / At sea off coast of Minatitlan, Mexico—2 shocks / N.Y. Times, March 2-1-2. [IV; 292. "Mexico." New York Times, March 2, 1871, p. 1 c. 2.]


1871 Feb 9, 11 / Strong shocks / Chile / Both times came freshets from the mountains. / Nature 3-472. [IV; 297. "Notes." Nature, 3 (April 13, 1871): 471-473, at 472.]


1871 Feb 11 / [Rel. Ph. J.]—6-4 / Buchanan—the same—in Rel. Ph. J. [A; 662. "Ghostly Exploits." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 9 (no. 21; February 11, 1871): 6, (c. 4). (Richmond Whig, 1871. @ microfilm.)]


1871 Feb 12 / Meteor and fish of Peru / At Puno, in Peru, several shocks on 22nd. On 5th, 6th, 7th—strange whirlpool found in sea off coast of Peru. / (Nature 4-169). [IV; 296. "Notes." Nature, 4 (June 29, 1871): 167-170, at 169 "Then it was noticed that as the day grew on the currents seemed to flow in from all directions, forming numerous whirlpools, while alarm for the shiping was caused by the increasing strength of the west wind."]


1871 Feb. 12 / At Pichicani, met and fishes. "Similar events have happened near Huacichullo and Atucachi, causing great fright to the people. I suppose this alludes only to meteors. / Brazil and River Plate Mail, Ap. 22. [IV; 298. (Brazil and River Plate Mail, April 22, 1871.)]


1871 Feb 12 / Peru / aerolite and fishes / story in N.Y. Times, Ap. 13-1-3. [IV; 299. "The Floods in Peru." New York Times, April 13, 1871, p. 1 c. 3.]


1871 Feb-March / Rainy season in Peru but floods this year such as not occurred in 30 years. / N.Y. Times, Ap. 13-1-3. [IV; 300. "The Floods in Peru." New York Times, April 13, 1871, p. 1 c. 3.]


1871 Feb. 12 / Aurora in Italy / C.R. 72-374. [IV; 301. Denza. "Sur l'aurore boréale observée en Italie le 12 fevrier 1871." Comptes Rendus, 72 (1871): 374-376.]


1871 Feb 12 / (It) / Aurora in Italy / CR 72-374. [IV; 306. Denza. "Sur l'aurore boréale observée en Italie le 12 fevrier 1871." Comptes Rendus, 72 (1871): 374-376.]


1871 Feb 12 / N.Y. Times, 3-5 / Moon halo. [IV; 305. "Those Rings Round the Moon." New York Times, February 12, 1871, p. 3 c. 5.]


1871 Feb 13 / 9:04 p.m. / Great met / Cornwall, across S. England / met train 10 minutes / BA 71-32. [IV; 302. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 32-33.]


1871 Feb. 13 / Few minutes after 9 p.m.—great met at Worcester / L.T. 15-9-f. [IV; 303."Remarkable Meteor." London Times, February 15, 1871, p. 9 c. 6.]


[1871 Feb 13 /] 1871 Feb 24 / Cornwall / met same as 1870, Feb 24 / E Mec 12-540, 570. [IV; 320. "Meteor." English Mechanic, 12 (no. 309; February 24, 1871): 540. "Extracts from Correspondence." English Mechanic, 12 (no. 310; March 3, 1871): 570, cv. "Meteor." See: 1870 Feb 13, (IV; 108).]


1871 Feb 13 / 9 p.m. / Met W of Eng / as if from Orion / The Western Chronicle of Science 1-47 / P.P. 1432. [IV; 304. (Western Chronicle of Science, 1-47. Check P.P. 1432 as British Library shelfmark.)]


1871 Feb 13 / 9:04 p.m. / Met in Orion / no parallax? / BA 71-33. [IV; 307. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 32-33.]


1871 Feb 15/ [LT], 4-b / Super in Berkshire. [A; 663. "Superstition in Berkshire." London Times, February 15, 1871, p. 4 c. 2.]


[1871 Feb 16 /] 1871 Feb 18 / Shocks severe N.W. of Mandalay, Burmah / Nature 5-7. [IV; 308. Halsted, Charles. "Earthquake in Burmah." Nature, 5 (November 2, 1871): 7.]


[1871 Feb 17. Wrong date. See: 1871 Feb 27, (IV; 323).]


[1871 Feb 18. Wrong date. See: 1870 Feb 18, (I; 314).]


1871 Feb 19 / Violent shocks / Hawaii / N.Y. Times, March 14-1-6. Began at Honolulu at 10:07 p.m. [IV; 315. "The Sandwich Islands Earthquakes—Rocks Hurled from the Cliffs, nd Valleys Filled with Debris." New York Times, March 14, 1871, p. 1 c. 6.]


1871 Feb. 19 / Severe q / Hawaii / Ac to several persons, a flash of light was seen on a hill at moment before the q. / A. J. Sci 3/1/470. [IV; 309. Alexander, W.D. "On the Earthquake at Oahu, Hawaiian Islands, on Feb. 18." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 1 (1871): 469-471. "Several persons of undoubted veracity insist that they saw a flash of light on Punchbowl hill the moment before the earthquake commenced."]


1871 Feb 19 / q / Hawaii / Column in N.Y. Times, March 21-1-7. [IV; 310. "The Hawaiian Earthquake." New York Times, March 21, 1871, p. 1 c. 7.]


1871 Feb. 19 / Shocks / Hawaii, beginning 10:07 p.m. / Y. B. 71-218. [IV; 311. "Earthquake in Hawaii." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1872, 218-219.]


1871 Feb 22 / There was a strong shock in Peru. / Dec. 21, 1870 / LT, Jan 28, 1871 / N.M. [IV; 312. "The West India and Pacific Mails." London Times, January 28, 1871, p. 5 c. 5. "A strong shock of earthquake was felt on the 21st of December, at Arequipa." Fort was associating the earthquake of December. 21, 1870, with the phenomena on February 22, 1871.]


1871 Feb. 22 / No Buenos Ayres Standard. [IV; 313.]


1871 Feb 22 / q and deluge / Chile / See Aug 16, 1906. [IV; 316. See: (1906 Aug 16).]


1871 Feb. 22 / Shocks / Peru / repeated 2 a.m., morning of 23rd / no damage / N.Y. Times, Ap. 13-1-3. [IV; 317. "The Floods in Peru." New York Times, April 13, 1871, p. 1 c. 3.]


1871 Feb. 22 / Santa Fe, New Mexico / Telegraph wires heavily charged with electricity. NY Times, Ap. 3-1-6. [IV; 318. "Electrical Phenomena." New York Times, April 13, 1871, p. 1 c. 6.]


1871 Feb 22, 23, 25 / (q and rains) / Peru and Chili / Heavy rains—several towns inundated. / Ponton, Earthquakes, p. 141. Look up. [IV; 319. Ponton, Mungo. Earthquakes and Volcanoes. Revised ed. London: T. Nelson, 1872, 325-326. (Ponton, Mungo. Earthquakes and Volcanoes, p. 141; probably 1876 or 1888 editions, not online.)]


[1871 Feb 24. Wrong date. See: 1871 Feb 13, (IV; 320).]


1871 Feb 25 / Severe q / Chile / Nature 4-150. [IV; 321. "Notes." Nature, 4 (June 22, 1871): 148-150, at 150.]


1871 Feb 27 / date of flood in Cape Argus, March 7 / Called a waterspout, but from 9 p.m. till 3 next morning. Unable to make coffins for all the victims. / Fall of the water so people could not hear one another speak. // C Argus, March 18 / Flood, Victoria West. An hour's ride from village a flood fell at 8 .m. Before, fell immense hailstones. 25 homes smashed and 53 bodies "recovered" up to March 1st. [IV; 322.1, 322.2, 322.3. "The town was thrown into a state of excitement...." Cape Argus, March 7, 1871, p. 2 c. 3-4. (Cape Argus, March 18, 1871; not on microfilm copy.)]


[1871 Feb 27 /] 1871 Feb 17 / = 27 // Cl brst / Victoria West, South Africa. A flood supposed by bursting of a waterspout. 30 houses swept away and 100 lives lost. / British Colonist (Halifax), May 23, 1871. [IV; 323. "The town was thrown into a state of excitement...." Cape Argus, March 7, 1871, p. 2 c. 3-4. (Halifax British Colonist, May 23, 1871.)]


1871 March / BO / Human Nature of, copied from the N.Y. World / Corn that was passing from a locked crib in a barn owned by the Rev G.C. Thrasher, to places outside the barn, at Buchanan, Va. Also stories of apparitions seen. [A; 664. "Another Ghost Story." Human Nature, 5 (no. 3; March 1871): 141-142. (New York World, 1871; microfilm @ NYPL.) See: 1871 Feb 11, (A; 662).]


1871 March, April / Revival in Banffshire / Medium and Daybreak, Ap. 14, p. 119. [A; 665. "Religious Excitement in Banffshire." Medium and Daybreak, 2 (no. 54;  April 14, 1871): 119. "Great Revival Movement in Banffshire." Fife Herald, February 23, 1871, p. 2 c. 1. ]


1871 March / (E) / Peak of Tacora, Peru, witnessed from Tacna, was the center of a remarkable electric storm. / Montreal Herald, May 24. [IV; 324. "On February 22, several shocks...." Montreal Herald, May 24, 1871, p. 2 c. 3. "On February 22, several shocks of earthquake were felt at Puno in Peru, and on March 6, a slight earthquake of thirty seconds after rain. In March a most remarkable electric storm was witnessed at Tacna in Peru. For a few hours the snowy peak of Tacora seemed the centre of conflagration of lightning, nor the thunder less terrific."]


1871 March / q—elec / One night shocks at Tacna, or Tacua, Peru. The next day for several hours the Peak of Tacora was "the centre of a conflagration of lightning". / Nature 3-512. [IV; 325. "Notes." Nature, 3 (April 27, 1871): 511-513, at 512.]


1871 March / At Arequipa, rains such as had not fallen in years, Town of Supe inundated and destroyed. / B and R. P. M., May 8. Also Lambeyeque, town of ab 8,000 inhabitants, overwhelmed and only one building left standing. / At Payta, a deluge swept over cliffs 210 feet high in a vast new cataract. [IV; 326.1, 326.2. (Brazil and River Plate Mail, May 8, 1871.)]


1871 March, early / Heavy rains at Payta, Peru—never known there before / B and R. P. M, Ap. 22. [IV; 327. (Brazil and River Plate Mail, April 22, 1871.)]


1871 March / Phe, peak of Tacna. Night before, 2 slight shocks of earthquake. Brazil and River Plate Mail, Ap. 22. [IV; 328. (Brazil and River Plate Mail, April 22, 1871.)]


1871 March 1 / ab. // Great meteor / E to W. / Taranaki, N.Z. / Otago Witness 4-14-4. [IV; 329. "The meteor...." Otago Witness, March 4, 1871, p. 14 c. 4. "The meteor mentioned in a late Taranaki telegram as having been seen there a few days ago, is described by the Taranaki Herald as having a red and fiery look, and a tail of some length. Its course was from east to west."]


1871 March 2 / q / Georgia / 5th—N. Hampshire / L.T. 23-5-d. [IV; 330. "Earthquakes in America." London Times, March 23, 1871, p. 5 c. 4. "American papers record shocks of earthquake on the 2d of March at Eureka, Humboldt County, and at Macon, Georgia; and in New Hampshire on the 5th of March."]


1871 March 3 and 14 / Volc eruption in Sangir islands / Weston Mercury (Weston-super-Mare), Aug 19-2-4. [IV; 331. (Weston Mercury, August 19, 1871, p. 2 c. 4; not @ BNA.) The Ruang volcano.]


1871 March 3 / Volc, Sangir Islands, and great wave that swept away hundreds of persons / Bristol Mercury, Aug. 19, 1871. [IV; 332. "A Volcanic Calamity." Bristol Mercury, August 19, 1871, p. 6 c. 7. The Ruang volcano.]


[1871 March 5 /] 1871 / ab July 15 // See NY Herald, Aug 15, for tidal wave of this date. [IV; 452. "Frightful Calamity." New York Herald, August 15, 1871, p. 5 c. 1. "A wave forty yards in height issued with lightning speed, and swept all the human beings, houses, cattle and horses from the surface of the island." The lava dome collapse of the Ruang volcano produced this tidal wave on March 5, 1871.]


1871 March 4, 6 / Shocks / U.S. Columbia / B and R. P. Mail, May 8. [IV; 333. (Brazil and River Plate Mail, May 8, 1871.)]


1871 March 8 and 9 / Inundations from great rains in Peru. / Brazil and River Plate Mail, Ap. 22. [IV; 334. (Brazil and River Plate Mail, April 22, 1871.)]


1871 March 11 / Times, 4-4 / Editorial allusion to the mysterious stabber of Williamsburg. / Can't find in index of 1871. / See 1870. [A; 666. "A Generous Ghost." New York Times, March 11, 1871, p. 4 c. 4. "The Brooklyn Stabber." New York Times, February 2, 1871, p. 4 c. 6. "That Vampire Again." New York Times, February 21, 1871, p. 5 c. 6.]


1871 March 11 / N.Y. Times, 4-4 / Ghost appearing to a girl aged 13, a pupil of the Brinckley Female College, Memphis Tenn—also seen by others. Seemed be a girl aged about 8—very thin. "Virtually a skeleton in appearance and seemingly translucent." Said its name was Lizzie Davison. Story goes on, but of reputed communications by a spiritualist's medium. [A; 667.1, 667.2. "A Generous Ghost." New York Times, March 11, 1871, p. 4 c. 4. ]


1871 March 17 / qs / Symons Met Mag 6/38 // 6 p.m., Ulverstone / 7, Coniston / 10:54 and 11:04, 11:05, Manchester / others, 11:10, 11:15 - 11:30 / Liverpool, Scarborough, etc. [IV; 335. "Earthquake on March 17th." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 6 (April 1871): 37-40, at 38.]


[1871] // BM / Times, March, 1871 / 20-12-a / 21-5-f / 23-6-c / 24-12-c // phe on 22nd, too? [IV; 336. "Earthquake in the North of England." London Times, March 20, 1871, p. 12 c. 1. "The Earthquake." London Times, March 21, 1871, p. 5 c. 6. "Earthquakes." London Times, March 23, 1871, p. 6 c. 3. "Another Shock of Earthquake." London Times, March 24, 1871, p. 12 c. 3. "There were also observed pale flashes of lightning, which were succeededby dull, slow reverberations, as if proceeding from distant thunder-claps."]


1871 March 17 / Same met? Reported from Saint-Seine (Cote-d'Or), 11:15 p.m. / C.R. 72-383. Also ab this time from Paris and Rennes / p. 384 / At Rennes, a train for ¼ hour. [IV; 337. "M. Delauney communique à 'l'Academie les deux Lettres...." Comptes Rendus, 72 (1871): 383-384. "M. Le Secrétaire Perpétuel, à la suite de ces Communications...." Comptes Rendus, 72 (1871): 384.]


1871 March 17 / At Saints, from 10:40 p.m., met. train ½ hour. / C.R. 72-328. p. 383 / At Nerac, seen ab an hour. [IV; 338. "Apparition d'un météore lumineux dans la soirée du vendredi 17 mars." Comptes Rendus, 72 (1871): 328. "M. Delauney communique à 'l'Academie les deux Lettres...." Comptes Rendus, 72 (1871): 383-384. At Nerac, the phosphorescent train was visible for three-quarters of an hour.]


1871 March 17 / The met of Tours of 11:45 was seen at Moncalieri on 18th at 12:20 a.m. / C.R. 73-241. [IV; 339. Deville, Charles Sainte-Claire. "Sur un bolide observé en Italie dans la nuit du 17 au 18 mars 1871...." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 241.]


1871 March 17 / 8 p.m. / At Tours, met moving like that of 11:45. C.R. 72-789. [IV; 340. Briffault, A. "Sur un bolide observée à Tours, le 17 mars 1871." Comptes Rendus, 72 (1871): 788-789. ]


1871 March 17 / 11:45 p.m. / At Tours, from north horizon, a train for 25 minutes. C.R. 72-788. [IV; 341. Briffault, A. "Sur un bolide observée à Tours, le 17 mars 1871." Comptes Rendus, 72 (1871): 788-789.]


1871 March 17 / Meteor was seen also at Chichester, Eng, and long duration noted. / B Assoc 1871/35 / Meteor / Times. Times, 21-10-f. [IV; 342. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 34-35. "A Meteor." London Times, March 21, 1871, p. 10 c. 6. The meteor changed from a "brilliant emerald" to a "bright gold colour," before disappearing, and left behind "a trail of light visible for three or four minutes."]


1871 March 17 / 10:30 p.m. / Magnificent meteor at Chichester / L.T. 21-10-f. [IV; 343. "A Meteor." London Times, March 21, 1871, p. 10 c. 6.]


1871 March 17 / After the shock in Yorkshire, rise of temperature / L.T. 21-5-f. [IV; 344. "The Earthquake." London Times, March 21, 1871, p. 5 c. 6. "There was a sudden and great rise in the barometer immediately after the shock. The atmosphere instantly became very mild and has so continued."]


1871 (?) / March 17 // q's / England / See 1843, March 17, LT Index. [IV; 345. "Earthquake in the North of England." London Times, March 20, 1871, p. 12 c. 1. "The Earthquake." London Times, March 21, 1871, p. 5 c. 6. "Earthquakes." London Times, March 23, 1871, p. 6 c. 3. "Another Shock of Earthquake." London Times, March 24, 1871, p. 12 c. 3. See: 1843 March 17, (II: 598 to 601).]


1871 March 17 / Considerable q. / N of England // Times, 20-12-a / 21-5-f / 23-6-c / 24-12-c // 6-7 p.m. (between) and 11:05 // (on 22 / sounds of distant thunder recurring after "pale flashes of lightning".) "The sound seemed to come from a number of guns at a distance." [IV; 346.1, 346.2. "Earthquake in the North of England." London Times, March 20, 1871, p. 12 c. 1. "The Earthquake." London Times, March 21, 1871, p. 5 c. 6. "Earthquakes." London Times, March 23, 1871, p. 6 c. 3. "Another Shock of Earthquake." London Times, March 24, 1871, p. 12 c. 3.]


1871 March 17 / ab. 11 o'clock or 10:40 / Saintes / obj watched 20 seconds before exploded / C.R. 72/328 / train an hour. Nature 3/460 / Les Mondes 24-190. [IV; 347. "Apparition d'un météore lumineux dans la soirée du vendredi 17 mars." Comptes Rendus, 72 (1871): 328. "Societies and Academies." Nature, 3 (April 3, 1871): 457-460, at 460. "Météore ou bolide lumineux du 17 mars." Les Mondes, 24 (1871): 190.]


1871 March 17-18 / or on 18th // 12:20 / Met Italy / same as Tours? / CR 73-241 / also p. 359. [IV; 348. Deville, Charles Sainte-Claire. "Sur un bolide observé en Italie dans la nuit du 17 au 18 mars 1871...." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 241. Beaumont, Élie de. "Remarques au sujet du bolide observé dans la nuit du 17 au 18 mars 1871." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 359-360.]


1871 March 17 / At time of q, powerful elec current in tel. cables / Nature 3/492. [IV; 349. "Subterranean Electrical Disturbances." Nature, 3 (April 20, 1871): 492.]


1879 March 18 / 12:20 a.m. / Piedmont / met "apparent diameter of full moon "/ BA 71-36 / See March 24. [IV; 350. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 36-37.]


1871 March 19 / Op Mars / (A1). [IV; 351.]


1871 March 22 / Shocks reported, 10:30 p.m., in north Wales. Ac to a cor to Times, Ap 5-9-f, a war-ship bet Orme's Head and Liverpool firing broadsides at this time. [IV; 352. "The Late Earthquake." London Times, April 5, 1871, p. 9 c. 6.]


1871 March 22 / 10:30 p.m. / q. reported in N. Wales / Cor to L.T., Ap. 5, wrote that at that time at sea off coast of Wales, H.M.S. Resistance had fired broadsides. In the Times, the q had been described as a "wave of subterranean disturbance". [IV; 353. Allnatt, Richard Hopkins. "The Weather of March, 1871." London Times, April 3, 1871, p. 10 c. 6. "The Late Earthquake." London Times, April 5, 1871, p. 9 c. 6.]


1871 March 23 / Aurora / S. Australia / Nature 4-345. [IV; 354. Finniss, M.M. "Meteorology in South Australia." Nature, 4 (August 31, 1871): 345.]


1871 March 24, etc. / Ac to "Maine Farmer", copied in Religio-Ph. J., May 4, 1872—Mr. Nathan M. Woodman, fell through the scuttle in his store in Commercial street, Portland, Maine, and injured so that it was thought he could not recover. The story was told by spiritualists who were at the bedside that spirits told them the man should get up and something raised him and dressed him. A bitter medicine magically appeared before him. He was taken up and moved about in the air. [A; 668.1, 668.2. "Remarkable Manifestations." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 12 (no. 7; May 4, 1872): 1, (c. 3-5). (Maine Farmer, 1871-1872.@ Proquest ) "A Marvellous Cure." Human Nature, 6 (no. 2; February 1872): 84-86.]


1871 March 24 / (Suc) / 4:25 a.m. / Volpeglino and other places, Piedmont / violent det. met / BA 1871/36 / See Ap 12. [IV; 355. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 36-37. See: 1871 Ap, 12, (IV: 369 & 371).]


1871 March 24 / 2 a.m. / Urbano, Piedmont / det. met and persistent streak / BA 71-36 / See Ap 11, 12. [IV; 356. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 36-37. See: 1871 Ap. 11, (IV: 366 & 370), and, 1871 Ap. 12, (IV; 369).]


1871 March 24 / 4:25 a.m. / Piedmont/ Violent det. met. / BA 71-36. [IV; 357. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 36-37.]


1871 // Ab. March 25, when a great met seen, sounds like gun fire heard ab. 60 miles east of Adelaide, S. Australia. Nature 4-345. [IV; 358. Finniss, M.M. "Meteorology in South Australia." Nature, 4 (August 31, 1871): 345.]


1871 March 25 / Chile / 2 of the strongest shocks in 20 years / N.Y. Times, May 15-1-3 / 1st was 11:05 a.m. then ab noon. [IV; 359. "Matters in Chili." New York Times, May 15, 1871, p. 1 c. 3.]


[1871 April /] 1871 April / August-Sept [1869] // Plato / intermittent variations / sometimes neighboring spot affected alike / sometimes variations different / sometimes opposite / Outbreaks in 1869 appear to focus in seven spots on floor of P. Then in 70—2 times—in different groups. / 37 spots observed by Birt and others—and up to April, 1871—1600 observations recorded and then graphs drawn and in these graphs, which probably still exist, someone may read language. For ½ dozen specimens, see E Mec, 13/55—altogether Mr Birt's suggestion that the spots would not be so differently—and seemingly independently affected by sunlight—he suggests volcanic action. [IV; 500.1, 500.2, 500.3. "Evidences of Recent Changes in the Moon's Surface." English Mechanic, 13 (no. 315; April 7, 1871): 55, (illustrations, with five graphs).]


1871 Ap 1 / Bewitched / See June. [A; 669. See: 1871 June, (A: 679, 680).]


1871 Ap. 1 / Men attack / See 2 cases, Nov., 1870. [A; 670. See: (1870 Nov, ???).]


1871 [Ap 1] / Ap 1, 1871, number of Religio Phil Jour, continued from preceding number, which is not avalable in the N.Y. Public Library—Brinkley College ghost, a page interview by a Memphis reporter with the girl, Clara Robertson—Thirteen years old—described more of a mummified, but "transparent", figure than a skeleton, hair loose and flowing, stockings and rest of clothes mildewed—a description of a long-buried body. It wrote out its name as Lizzie Davison and afterward corrected it to Lizzie Davie. Several appearances to her. Clara telling that each time she was less terrified—Told her that Mrs. Brinkley had no right to the College property, and that Clara should have it, or the thing would haunt the place so nobody could live there. This was a meeting in the College garden. The spectre said that there was something under a stump in the garden that would be of value to Clara and vanished. It seems that her father had dug there and had found a jar, of which Clara said that she knew nothing. According to instructions, the jar was not to be opened for 60 days. Wrong! She with men to help her, dug and she found the jar and fainted. The reporter after telling of the interview—writes that there was a Lizzie Davie who, at age 6 or 7, died at Brinkley College some time in the year 1861, and as told by persons who were at the funeral, wore a party dress like the one Clara described. The college was then the home of Mr. Davie. There had been a chancery suit relating to the grounds on which the building stood. // Ap 15-5-2, story from the Memphis Avalanche / Mr J.R. Robinson, servant had run into his house telling that he was lying dead in the yard. Members of his family ran out and found him lying insensible. It was half an hour before he revived. On his head was a cut extending about 4 inches from the left eye along the forehead. There were marks on his neck as if he had been choked. He told that four men had demanded possession of the jar and under their threats he told where has hidden in a shed. Two held him and two went and got the jar. Then one knocked him unconscious. [A; 671.1 to 671.10. "An Exciting Story." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 10 (no. 1; March 25, 1871): 1 & 8, and, (no. 2; April 1, 1871): 6. "Another and Thrilling Chapter of the Brinkley College Ghost Sensation." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 10 (no. 4; April 15, 1871): 5, (c. 2-3). Robertson, J.R. The Brinkley Female College Ghost Story. Memphis, TN: R.C. Floyd, 1871. The ghost of "Lizzie Davie" appeared to Clara Robertson on several occasions, (beginning February 21, 1871), and wasn't seen by her companions); Lizzie's ghost complained "she was the last of her people, and that the property belonged to her," (not the Brinkley Female College, a private school for fifty girls); since Clara had spoken to Lizzie, the ghost wanted to give the house and property to Clara; Clara was instructed to dig up a jar, (buried under a tree stump), containing "several thousand dollars in coin, a quantity of jewelry, including valuable diamonds, and title papers of the estate"; but, she was also instructed not to open the jar for sixty days. A hole was dug by workmen, on March 5; no jar was found. The ghost told Clara to find it; Clara didn't; so, her father, (lawyer J.R. Robinson), continued the digging and uncovered a glass jar, containing a few bags and a yellowed envelope, on the evening of March 6. Considerable excitement was generated by the ghost story and the alleged treasures in the jar, which was to be opened before an audience at Greenlaw's Opera House, (tickets to be sold for a dollar, with half of the proceeds to go to Clara). On the evening of March 28, Clara's father was threatened by "ruffians" into revealing the jar's hiding place in an outhouse. It was stolen, and he was assaulted. Thus, Clara never got the treasure nor the property; the Brinkley Female College closed down in 1872, owing to the ghost story; and, apart from the thieving ruffians, the people who profited most from this "exciting" story were the spiritualists and those selling newspapers and pamphlets. Clara's father sold one of those pamphlets, (for 30 cents); but, he did not explain how, legally, the ghost of a long-dead child could bestow her family's property upon another (unrelated) child who only recovers a title deed, (especially, when "Lizzie" Davie's existence wasn't documented except by the claims that she was buried in clothing, identical to what Clara said the ghost had worn). Clara describes "Lizzie," (at page 25), thus: "Like a skeleton, all bone and sinew, covered with a skin, through which I could see, it being very transparent. It was a frightful looking object. Its teeth protruded from the fleshless mouth and its eyes deep set, almost in the back of the head. The hair and eyes were deep black, the hair loose and flowing. The face was ugly, but at the same time it had a pale and sorrowful look," and, "It was dressed in very light or faded pink, like tarletan, and the dress was trimmed with dingy white rouching. It wore also pink or red slippers or shoes, I am not sure which. The stockings looked moulded and mildewed, as did also the dress, on which there were heavy spots of mould and greenish slime. The shoes or slippers were also much moulded." Several "facts" are noted, (at page 32): "There was a Lizzie Davie, and she died at Brinkley College some time in 1860"; "She is described by persons who remembered her well as a child of remmarkable intelligence, beauty precociousness, and she had black flowing hair and black eyes"; and, "Persons who were at her funeral says she was laid out and buried in a dress of pink; with white trimming, and pink slippers. They remember this from the singularity of the dress, it being the custom almost universally to shroud children in white. She was about six or eight years of age, and is well remembered for her beauty, brightness and goodness. It is remembered by old and reliable citizens that there was a chancery suit about the ground on which Brinkley College stands, and that there was much scandal at the time, The college was built by Mr. Davie for a residence about 1855. The Chancery suit, as can be remembered, concerned the ground only." Hulan, Richard H., and, Robert C. Giebner. Brinkley Female College (Ghost House)...Written Historical and Descriptive Data. HABS No. TN-189. Washington, D.C.: Historic American Buildings Survey, National Parks Service, Department of the Interior, 1985. The Register of Deeds of Shelby County traces the ownership of this property, thus: a deed, (dated June 4, 1856), for the land, was recorded on June 19, 1858, transferring it from Willoughby Williams to W.J. Davie, and, another deed, (dated September 11, 1866), was recorded on October 13, 1866, transferring the property from W.J. Davie to Robert C. Brinkley. The building was dismantled in 1972. No one has apparently tried to explain who would have buried the glass jar and its valuable contents nor why it was not retrieved before the property was sold in 1866. Yale Class of 1845. Record of the Class of 1845 of Yale College.... New York: Jenkins & Thomas, 1881, 56-59. Winston Jones Davie, who had been the president of the Southern Bank of Tennessee, (from 1854 until it failed during the Civil War, when he "lost all"), lived to 1887; he had two sons, Iredell Frances Davie, (1846-1907), George Montgomery Davie, (1848-1900), and a daughter, Ann E. Davie, (born 1850), by his first wife, Sarah Ann Philips, (who died on June 2, 1859); and, he remarried, on February 14, 1861, to Addie Kalfus, and had another son, Southern Kalfus Davie, (1862-1896). After the Civil War, Winston Jones Davie moved to Kentucky, and served as its Commissioner of Agriculture, during Governor James B. McCreary's first term. All of his other children by his first wife "died young." "Spirits on the Rampage." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 10 (no. 11; June 3, 1871): 6, (c. 1-4). Clara , "the little heroine of the Brinkley College ghost sensation,"continued to see "Lizzie," (who wasn't the "last of her people"); and, Clara became a spiritualist medium, conducting seances, at Memphis. "Lizzie looks well now...nothing like a skeleton as when I first saw her, nor looking sad. Why, she looks real fat, and I am not a bit afraid of her." "Do you see other spirits?" "Oh, yes, I see a great many."]


1871 Ap. 2 / Drought / California / 7:47 p.m., San Francisco, sharp shock / NY Times 3-1-5. / Details / Ap. 13-2-1. [IV; 360. "The Pacific Coast." New York Times, April 3, 1871, p. 1 c. 5. "Recent Earthquake Shocks in San Francisco." New York Times, April 13, 1871, p. 2 c. 1-2.]


1871 Ap 4 / Sidmouth / sun pillar / Symons' Met 37/33. [IV; 361. Hutchinson, Peter Orlando. "Solar Halos." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 6 (July 1871): 96, (and, illustration opposite p. 85). "The Sun Pillar of March 6th." Symons' Meteorological Magazine, 37 (April 1902): 33-34, at 33.]


1871 Ap 8 / [LT, 5-f / Atmospheric. [IV; 362. "Atmospheric Disturbance." London Times, April 8, 1871, p. 5 c. 6.]


1871 Ap 9, 18, 23 / Auroras / Italy / CR 73-54. [IV; 363. Denza. "Sur les aurores boréales des 9, 18 et 23 avril, vues en Italie." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 54-57.]


1871 Ap. 9 / at Angers, France / sky colored aurora and thin white rays / C.R. 72/787 / See Aug, 1872. [IV; 364. Creux, A. "Sur l'aurore boréales du 9 avril 1871, observée à Angers." Comptes Rendus, 72 (1871): 787. See: 1872 Aug 8, (IV; 901).]


[1871 Ap. 9-10] / 1871 Ap. 10 / Great aurora / Eng. / Nature 3/487 / Times, Ap 11-5-d / 12-10-e. [IV; 365. "The Aurora Borealis." Nature, 3 (April 20, 1871): 486-487. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, April 11, 1871, p. 5. c. 4. Allnatt, R.H. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, April 12, 1871, p. 10 c. 5.]


1871 Ap 11 / —9:46 p.m. / Det—12—8:15 p.m. / 22—10:37 p.m.—met // Piedmont / BA 1871-36 / See March 24. [IV; 366. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 36-37. See: 1871 March 24, (IV; 355 to 357).]


1871 Ap. 11 / qs / Peru and Burmah / Nature 4-169. [IV; 367. "Notes." Nature, 4 (June 29, 1871): 167-170, at 169.]


1871 Ap. 11 / Bathang, province of Szchuen, China, great q. / Nature 4-145. [IV; 368. "Fearful Earthquake in China." Nature, 4 (June 22, 1871): 145. Bathang, in Szchuen, is now identified as Batang, in Sichuan.]


1871 Ap. 11 / 9:46 p.m. / Piedmont / Brilliant met. / BA 71-36. [IV; 370. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 36-37.]


1871 Ap. 12 / (½) / (Suc.) / 9:46 p.m. / Volpeglino, Piedmont / BA 1871/36 / See March 24—Aurora or both. [IV; 369. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 36-37. There were no references in these reports to an aurora, but detonations were reported on March 24, at Volpeglino, and on April 12, at Piedmont. See: 1871 March 24, (IV; 355 to 357).]


1871 Ap. 12 / 8:15 p.m. / "Very large and brilliant meteor, Piedmont. / BA 71-36. / "Burst, with a detonation, which was heard in houses with closed doors." [IV; 371. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 36-37.]


1871 Ap 13 / NY Times, 2-1 / q / San Francisco. [IV; 372. "Recent Earthquake Shocks in San Francisco." New York Times, April 13, 1871, p. 2 c. 1-2.]


1871 Ap. 14 / 11:39 p.m. / Met. size of Jupiter. / Naples / BA 71-36. [IV; 373. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 36-37.]


1871 Ap. 15 / few minutes before 8 p.m. / (q.) / coast of Argyle / LT, Ap. 18-5-f. [IV; 374. "Earthquake in the West of Scotland." London Times, April 18, 1871, p. 5 c. 6.]


1871 / middle of April // Turpentine flavor in hail / Mississippi / (D-63). ** [IV; 375. The note copies information from page 63 of The Book of the Damned. "Remarkable Hailstorm." Scientific American, n.s., 24 (May 20, 1871): 322. "A case for the savans and scientific investigators...." Memphis Daily Appeal, April 21, 1871, p. 2 c. 1. This hail fell at Forest and at Jackson, Missisippi. At Jackson, the hail was described as "larger than hen's eggs, several, by actual measurement, being eight inches in circumference, some flavored with turpentine, some of them containing sand, others porous and of an orange or globular shape with each end depressed." "Mississippi." Memphis Daily Appeal, April 16, 1871, p. 1 c. 2. The hailstorm was probably that of the night of April 14-15, 1871. See: 1856 June 9, (II; 1934).]


1871 Ap. 20 / afternoon / Iredel Co., N.C. / Tornado. / Finley's Rept. [IV; 376. Finley, 4.]


1871 / Ap 22 etc / gelat. larvae  Bath, England. [A; 672.]


1871 / Ap 22 etc / gelat. larvae Bath, England. [IV; 398.1. Missing from file. Pabst: "Void—See A-672." See: 1871 / Ap 22 etc, (A; 672).]


[1871 Ap 22] / 1871 Ap 23 / Bath Express, Ap. 29th—"From a glutenous drop—for as such they first introduced themselves, they changed into a worm-like chrysalis, about an inch in length." [IV; 378.1. (Bath Express, April 29, 1871; not @ BNA.) "Storm of Insects." Bell's Weekly Messenger, April 24, 1871 p. 8 c. 5. "Early on Saturday morning a storm of insects fell in the neighbourhood of the Midland Railway station at Bath, and a large number remained on the platform and were examined by scientific men during the day. The insects descended in a form of a glutinous drop, about the size of a large pea, and many of them soon developed into a worm-like chrysalis, about an inch on length." "Storm of Insects." London Times, April 24, 1871, p. 7 c. 6. "Proceedings of the Entomological Society." Zoologist, s. 2, 6 (July 1871): 2685-92, at 2686-2687, cv. "Exhibitions, &c." Saturday morning would be April 22, (not April 23).]


[1871 Ap. 22] / 1871 Ap. 23 / These are Ap. 22. / Different account in Weston Mercury, Ap. 29. / "Dark, dull, purple drops of a gelatinous substance, each being about the size of a pea." "Some of them were preserved by Mr. Butler, of the Midland tavern, James-street, and in a short time several developed into a kind of worm, about an inch in length, transparent, and composed of rings. [IV; 380.1, 380.2. (Weston Mercury, April 29, 1871; not @ BNA.)]


1871 Ap. 22 / N / Cor to Entomologist 5-312—said that five or six hours after the fall single (he italicizes) worms ab. ½ inch long isued from some of the globules. / Must have been 2 kinds. This cor sent Mr Neuman samples of the remaining kind. In one of them Mr. N. found eleven vermiform larvae, in a mass 2/5 inch longest diameter. His words are that a similar larvae was figured in Réaumur's Memoir, vol. 4, plate 4, figs. 11 and 12, and in vol. 5, pl. 5. // 180 / 405 / 36 / 341 / 360 / 398 //  However, he says, that it was observed by him for the first time. [IV; 381.1 to 381.4. "Shower of Insects at Bath." Entomologist, 5 (June 1871): 312-314. This article clarifies that the first fall occurred on Saturday, (April 22), "between 5 and 6 A.M." with "another downfall, nearly in the same place and under precisely similar circumstances," on Sunday, (April 23). Newman believed these insects to be larvae of Chironomus plumosus. "I feel very confident it is either that or a nearly allied species." "These little creatures seemed firm, leathery and colourless, with the exception of a medio-dorsal stripe of a decided red colour, which passed from one extremity to the other, and tinged the whole body with pink." Chironomus plumosus, also known as the buzzer midge, has larvae known as bloodworms, because of their bright red color. Egg masses are laid in water, and larvae live within silken tubes. Réaumur, René Antoine Ferchault de. Memoires Pour Servir à L'Histoire des Insectes. Paris: Imprimerie Royal, v. 4 (1738), 77 & plate 4, and, v. 5 (1740), 51-52 & plate 5.]


1871 Ap. 22-23 / In Entomologist 5-312, published a letter from a resident of Bath. He says that upon 23rd more fell "nearly in the same place." He forwards one of the glutinous globules to Edward Newman, Editor of The Entomologist, who describes it as a mass ab 2/5 inch in diameter. He found in the interior eleven vermiform larvae, each rather less than a fifth of an inch in length. He says that it was a larvae then observed by him for the first time. Consequently he can not say but thinks it is the larva of the little gnat known as Chironomus plumosus. / P. 323, Prof Westwood quoted—probably Branchypus stagnalis. / P. 348—Rev. L. Jenyns—Vibrio undula. [IV; 382.1, 382.2, 382.3. "Shower of Insects at Bath." Entomologist, 5 (June 1871): 312-314. "Shower of Insects at Bath." Entomologist, 5 (June 1871): 323. John Obadiah Westwood thought the creatures were probably Branchypus stagnalis, (a species of Anostraca, or fairy shrimp). "Shower of Insects at Bath." Entomologist, 5 (June 1871): 349-350. "A boy at the station first noticed them (i.e. the above spherical masses) falling on his coat, &c., as the rain came on, and shortly after, as the rain fell more heavily, the platform, so much as was not under shelter,—so I was told,—was covered with them. A few had been observed during a storm some days previous to the fall of which the above is an account." Leonard Jenyns identifies them as infusoria "or some very closely-allied species, (and "an exact representation of the appearance of the congregated masses of worms as presented in this instance" is found in Müller's Animalcula Infusoria, (p. 46, tab. vi. fig. 4-6, 1785). Newman rejects Jenyn's solution and sticks to his own opinion. Müller, Otto Frederik. Animalcula Infusoria Fluviatilia et Marina. Copenhagen: Nicolai Mölleri, 1786, 46-48 & Tab. VI, figure 4 to 6. Three prominent naturalists identified the same organisms as infusoria, insects, and crustaceans, which were seen to fall upon the same railway platform, at Bath, on three different occasions, (on April 22, 22, and 29), allegedly transported there by unseen waterspouts.]


1871 Ap. / Larvae / See June 24, 1911. [IV; 383. See: (1911 June 24).]


1871 Ap. 22 / early morning / Described as a "storm of insects" near Midland Station, in Bath and Cheltenham Gazette, Ap. 26. A large number remaining on the platform during the day. "The insects descended in the form of a glutinous drop the size of a large pea. Many of them soon developed into a worm-like crysalis, about an inch in length. [IV; 384.1, 384.2. (Bath and Cheltenham Gazettte, April 26, 1871; on microfilm at the Somerset Archives.)]


1871 Ap. 22 / "In the course of a short time developed from an almost globular into a worm-like form. / Keenes' Bath Journal, May 6. [IV; 385. (Bath Journal, 1871; not @ BNA.) "Storms of Insects." Bell's Weekly Messenger, April 24, 1871 p. 8 c. 5. "The insects descended in a form of a glutinous drop, about the size of a large pea, and many of them soon developed into a worm-like chrysalis, about an inch on length."]


1871 Ap 22 / BO / In Proc Ent Soc London 1871/xxii, Rev. L. Jenyns describes those that were seen by him as minute Infusoria in spherical masses size of marbles. Said that some days before, a few had been seen during a storm. [IV; 386. "5 June, 1871." Proceedings of the Entomological Society of London,  (1861-1874): xxii-xxix, at xxii-xxiii.]


1871 Ap 22, 28 / Symons Met. 6-59—ac to a newspaper clipping—barrel-shaped organisms about an inch and a half long had fallen in glatinous patches. Then ac to one cor they were pupae of common gnats raised in whirl. [IV; 387. "The Wonderful Shower at Bath." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 6 (May 1871): 59-61, at 59-60, cv. C.S. Barter. Clement Smith Barter, was a surgeon, who also took rainfall measurements at The Paragon, in Bath, until 1873.]


1871 Ap. 22 / 10:37 p.m. / Piedmont / met size of Jupiter / streak 3 minutes / B.A. 71-36. [IV; 388. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 36-37.]


1871 April 22 / Infusoria balls / Bath, Eng / (D-48). [IV; 389. The note copies information from page 48 to 49 of The Book of the Damned. "5 June, 1871." Proceedings of the Entomological Society of London,  (1861-1874): xxii-xxix, at xxii-xxiii. "Proceedings of the Entomological Society." Zoologist, s. 2, 6 (July 1871): 2685-92, at 2686-2687, cv. "Exhibitions, &c."]


1871 Ap 22 / Bath Express, May 6—that some of the objects been examined by Mr. Philip Braham, who had pronouncd them larvae of the gnat. / Get name of snat. / Mr. P.B. of the Microscopic Club. [IV; 390. "The Recent Fall of Insects." Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette, May 4, 1871 p. 7 c. 4. "On Saturday week a singular phenomenon occurred near the Midland Station in the shape of the descent of a body of insectile creatures, which in the course of a short time developed from an almost globular to a wormlike form. Many of the specimens were collected Mr. Butler, a resident in the neighbourhood, and Mr. Philip Braham, member of the Microscopic Club, writes to us:—'Having had my attention called by Mr. Butler to the specimens that fell on Saturday, I have carefully examined them, and find that they are the larvæ of the gnat, which, by the high wind prevailing on Saturday, must have been lifted from the surface of the adjoining river and deposited on the platform.'"]


1871 Ap. 23 / Second fall / Another fall of worm like things, about an inch and a half long. "Scientific men pronounce them to be marine insects, probably caught up into the clouds by a waterspout in the Bristol Channel." Sci Gos, 1871-165. [IV; 378.2. Macmillan, W. "Shower of Insects." Science Gossip, 7 (no. 79; 1871): 165.]


1871 Ap. 23 / Seemingly alluding to the heavy fall of Ap. 23, Rev. L. Jenyns, of Bath, quoted in The Entomologist 5-349, that several days before a few had fallen. [IV; 391. "Shower of Insects at Bath." Entomologist, 5 (June 1871): 349-350.]


[IV; 392. Combined with IV-381.]


1871 Ap. 23 / Comparison between three stages of the insect, as figured from drawings at Bath (Sci Gos, 1871-229) and three stages in Réaumur's Memoirs, vol. 5, plate 5. Stage I—similar. Stage II—not at all alike, except as to worm-like bides. Stage III. / Stage III—matured insects very much unlike— /// Reaumur—wide, feathered antennae / Sci Gos—narrow antennae// wings—Reaumur—spotted wings—Sci Gos—clear // abdomen—Reaumur—3⅓ longer than thorax / abdomen—Sc Gos—about 2 times as long as thorax // Reaumur is gnat-like / Bath not gnat-like // R—abdomen = 1⅓ as long as a wing / (Bath—wings longer than abdomen) /// (Figures in vol 4 only small arts. One is a fig of matured insect.) / (These are the small larvae and not the ones an inch or more long.) / (Newman compared only larvae with Reaumur's stage one and was right in saying similar.) [IV; 393.1 to 393.4. Gibbs, W.B. "Insects at Bath." Science Gossip, 7 (no. 82; 1871): 229, (illustrations). Réaumur, René Antoine Ferchault de. Memoires Pour Servir à L'Histoire des Insectes. Paris: Imprimerie Royal, v. 4 (1738), 77 & plate 4, (figure 8), and, v. 5 (1740), 51-52 & plate 5.]


1871 Ap. 23 / In Sci. Gos. 1871-229, copies of drawings of them. Not said whether life-sized. The larvae are several inches long. [IV; 394. Gibbs, W.B. "Insects at Bath." Science Gossip, 7 (no. 82; 1871): 229, (illustrations). The sketches from photographs resemble the Chironomus plumosus, as a larva and as an adult.]


1871Ap. 22 / "Early on Saturday morning a storm of insects fell in the neighbourhood of the Midland railway station at Bath. The insects descended in the form of glutinous drops, about the size of a large pea, and soon developed into a worm-like chrysalis, about an inch in length." / Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, 30-11-5. [IV; 395.1, 395.2. "Town and Country Talk." Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, April 30, 1871, p. 11 c. 5.]


1871 Ap 24 / [LT], 7-f / Story of insects at Bath. [IV; 396. "Storm of Insects." London Times, April 24, 1871, p. 7 c. 6.]


1871 Ap. 26 / N.Y. Times, 4-3 / Wild man reported in Tennessee. 7 feet high and covered with hair. Not much more. [A; 673. "What Is It?" New York Times, April 26, 1871, p. 4 c. 4-5.]


1871 April 28 / Second fall at Bath. / See Dec 22, '70. / disagreeing opinions as to what they were / Sci Gos. 1871-165. [IV; 397. Macmillan, W. "Shower of Insects." Science Gossip, 7 (no. 79; 1871): 165. See: 1870 Dec 22, (IV; 285.12).]


1871 Ap. 29 / In Symons' Met, 6-59, John Arnold, F.M.S., writes from the Meteorological Observatory that in a tremendous th. storm (29) a gelatinous substance that floated in water had fallen. [IV; 377. "The Wonderful Shower at Bath." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 6 (May 1871): 59-61, at 59.]


1871 Ap. 29 / (23?) // (I think this was 23rd.) / night / Violent storm at Bath and fall of a third (?) kind of larvae. / (Dorset Co. Chronicle, May 4, 1871) / Myriads of small Annelidae enclosed in patches of gelatinous substance—like those of the 23rd, or as said here, of the previous Sunday. Under a powerful lens, seen to have barrel-shaped bodies, locust-shaped heads bearing long antennae, and with pectoral and caudal fin-like feet. Said presumed to be marine insects. "They an inch and a half long. Does "they" mean the gelatinous globule? [IV; 379.1, 379.2, 379.3. (Dorset County Chronicle, April 29, 1871; not @ BNA.) "Extraordinary Storm at Bath." London Evening Standard, May 1, 1871, p. 6 c. 3. "The storm was accompanied by a similar phenomenon to that of the previous Sunday, myriads of small annelidæ, enclosed in patches of gelatinous substance, falling with the rain and covering the ground. These have been microscopically examined, and show, under a powerful lens, animals with barrel-formed bodies, the motion of the viscera in which is perfectly visible, with locust-shaped heads bearing long antennæ, and with pectoral and caudal fin-like fet. They are each an inch and a half long, and may be seen by the curious at Mr. R. Butler's, the Derby and Midland Tavern, where scientific men, on inspecting them, pronounce them to be marine insects, probably caught up into the clouds by a waterspout in the Bristol Channel." The rain "on Saturday night" would have been April 29, with "the previous Sunday" being April 23.]


1871 April 29 / (P) / Gelatinous matter / Meteorological Observatory, Aldershot Camp. / Sym. Met 6/59. [IV; 398. "The Wonderful Shower at Bath." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 6 (May 1871): 59-61, at 59. This fall of a "gelatinous substance" in the rain gauge at the Meteorological Observatory, at Aldershot Camp, coincided with the third fall at the Midland Railway Station, at Bath. See: 1871 Ap. 22-23, (IV; 382); 1871 Ap. 29, (IV: 377 & 379).]


1871 May 1 / 9:45 p.m. / Aurora. / bands of light / Trans N.Z. Inst. 1902-406. [IV; 399. Skey, Henry. "Notes on the Aurora in the Southern Hemisphere." Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 35 (1902): 405-408, at 406.]


1871 May 1 / For some time been q's then a new volc mountain appeared on island off coast of Mindanao, Philippines. / L.T., 1875, Ap. 30-4-e. [IV; 400. "Her Majesty's Ship Challenger." London Times, April 30, 1871, p. 4 c. 4-5. The Camiguin volcano had erupted in 1827 and 1862.]


1871 May 1 / Details / eruption island of Camiguin, Philippines / Nature 5-84. [IV; 401. Wood, William W. "New Volcano in the Philippines." Nature, 5 (November 30, 1871): 84. The Camiguin volcano.]


1871 May 1 / ab. 5 p.m. / Island of Camiguin, Philippines, fire burst from earth and a new volcano appeared. / Nature 4-375. [IV; 414. "Notes." Nature, 4 (September 7, 1871): 373-375, at 375. The Camiguin volcano.]


1871 May 1 / 7:30 p.m., at Panama—whole sky, particularly in east, of a rosy (tinge Ap 31)—same at 2:30, morning of May 1, and a brilliant meteor with a train of sparks visible ab 2 (sic) minutes. / Nature 4-150. (See May 15.) [IV; 402.1, 402.2. "Notes." Nature, 4 (June 22, 1871): 148-150, at 149-150. See: (May 15; no note for this date in 1871).]


1871 May 4 / [LT], 11-a / Lunar phe. [IV; 404. Burder, George F. "Lunar Phenomenon." London Times, May 4, 1871, p. 11 c. 1.]


1871 May 6 / Grave / Religio-Phil-J., 1-4, from the Kansas City (Mo.) Times—About 4 months before Lizzie Mavis, an inmate of a house of prostitution, in K. City, kept by Mollie Hipp, had died. Repeatedly Mollie Hipp dreamed of the dead girl coming to her, telling that her body had been taken from her grave. After considerable trouble M. Hipp received permission to have the grave opened. The body was gone. [A; 674.1. 674.2. "Ghouls at Work." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 10 (no. 7; May 6, 1871); 1, (c. 4-5).]


1871 May 6 and 7 / Remarkable sunspots / Tuam, England / Nature 4-102. [IV; 405. Birmingham, John. "Remarkable Sun-spots." Nature, 4 (June 8, 1871): 102.]


1871 May 8 / Ventnor / by G. Guyon / Astro. Reg., 9/142 / Telescope focused for Mercury—bright bodies—more than a dozen—across field. His impression was that were seeds, but with a telescope so focused anything seen at all distinctly must have been far away. [IV; 406. Guyon, G. "Luminous Bodies Seen by Day." Astronomical Register, 9 (June 1871): 142.]


1871 // spring of /// Roda, Huesca, Spain / metite / BA 75-249. [IV; 407. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1874-75." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1875, 199-359, at 249-250. Fletcher, 104. This is the Roda meteorite.]


1871 May 20 / Georgia / Augusta 8 a.m. / slight shock and sound like thunder / N.Y. Times 24-2-4. [IV;  408. "Earthquakes." New York Times, May 24, 1871, p. 2 c. 4.]


1871 May 21 / bet 12  midnight and 1 a.m. / Shock, western N.Y. State / N.Y. Times 24-2-4 / and Canada. [IV; 409. "Earthquakes." New York Times, May 24, 1871, p. 2 c. 4.]


1871 May 21 / ab 1 a.m. / At Quebec, the q during a raging th. storm. But at Kleinberg, "The night was starlit and perfectly calm." The q was felt in Buffalo. / Quebec Daily Mercury, 22nd. [IV; 410. "The Earthquake on Sunday." Quebec Mercury, May 22, 1871, p. 2 c. 1. "Earthquake." Quebec Mercury, May 22, 1871, p. 2 c. 4. A series of tremors occurred, with a "slight shock" at Buffalo, "at about one o'clock," with two other shocks at Quebec, at 1:50 and 3:20 A.M.]


1871 May 21 / Ac to Mont Herald of 23rd, the shocks at Quebec were at 2:10 and 3:20 a.m. [IV; 411. "The Earthquake." Montreal Herald, May 23, 1871, p. 2 c. 2. "One at 10 minutes to 2, and the other at 20 minutes past 3"; thus, at 1:50, (not "2:10"), and 3:20 A.M.]


1871 May 21 / at Montreal (Mont Herald, 23rd) / One shock at 1 a.m. and other ab. noon. Slight—did not affect the seismograph at the Observatory. [IV; 412. "The Earthquake." Montreal Herald, May 23, 1871, p. 1 c. 8. "At Les Eboulemens we learn that the shocks have been almost continuous for months past, and that considerable damage has been done to houses." Landslides following the earthquake of February 5, 1663, gave the community Les Éboulements, Quebec, its name; and, the Mont des Éboulements is at the centre of the Charlevoix crater, which was formed by a large meteoric impact about 350 million years ago. Les Éboulement is about 20 kilometres east of Baie-Saint-Paul. See: 1870 Oct 20, (IV; 257).]


1871 May 21-22 / Series / Morning of 21st, q in Ontario. / Toronto Globe, 23rd. There was a sound like rushing wind or of an express train. At. Montreal, after the q, the thermometer went up to 80 degrees, the next day being dark and gloomy as if there had been an eclipse of the sun. [IV; 413.1, 413.2. "The Earthquake." Toronto Globe, May 23, 1871, p. 1 c. 8. "...a darkness similar to partial eclipse of the sun prevailed over the city."]


1871 May 21, etc. / Nothing in St. John Daily Telegraph. [IV; 415.]


1871 May 21 / q / Rochester and Buffalo / In Georgia and Quebec, Ottawa and other places in Canada / Nature 4-169. [IV; 416. "Notes." Nature, 4 (June 29, 1871): 167-170, at 169.]


1871 May 21 / Nothing / British Colonist (Halifax). [IV; 417.]


1871 May 22 / q / India / Nature 4-212. [IV; 418. "Notes." Nature, 4 (July 13, 1871): 210-212, at 212.]


1871 May 22 / 1:50 a.m. / Quebec to W. Ontario / q. / A.J. Sci 3/15/322. [IV; 419. "The Earthquake of November 4, 1877." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 15 (1878): 321-324, at 322.]


1871 May 21 / N.Y. Times, May 28-8-4 / Metite / Maine. / Searsmont, Waldo Co., Me. (F). [IV; 420. Fletcher, 104. "Fall of an Aerolite in Maine." New York Times, May 28, 1871, p. 8 c. 4. This is the Searsmont meteorite.]


[1871 May 21 /] 1871 May 25 / metite / Searsmont, Maine / details in A.J. Sci 3/2/133 / ab. 8 a.m. / explosion like discharge of gun. [IV; 421. Shepard, Charles Upham. "Notice of the Meteoric Stone of Searsmont, Maine." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 2 (1871): 133-136. This is the Searsmont meteorite.]


1871 May 24 / [N.Y. Times], 4-3 / Editorial in N.Y. Times / Family of a miller named Hoffman, in Wooster, Ohio. Almost continual noises and furniture thrown about. Food disappear and found stuck up the chimney and other annoying pranks. Visitors thronging to the house. Women had their dresses rent in the presence of watchers. Hoffman had wife and daughters. Daughters aroused from sleep with feeling of pinpricks. Hoffman's clothes torn and hair pulled. [A; 675.1, 675.2. "The Hoffman Ghosts." New York Times, May 24, 1871, p. 4 c. 3-4.]


1871 / Polt in home of David Hoffman, Wooster, Ohio / Rel.-Ph. J., Dec 29-1-4, 1877. [A; 676. Hardinge-Britten, Emma. "The Polter Gheist or The Ghost That Throws." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 23 (no. 17; December 29, 1877); 1, (c. 1-5, at 4). "Diabolism in Wayne County, Ohio—A Family Bewitched." Evening Argus, (Rock Island, Illinois), May 3, 1871, p. 2 c. 1. The Wooster Republican during this time period is no longer extant.]


[1871 May 25. Wrong date. See: 1871 May 21, (IV; 421).]


1871 May 31 / Chili / event of rare occurence / heavy fall of rain, desert of Atacama / Nature 4-418 / See May 15. [IV; 422. "Notes." Nature, 4 (September 21, 1871): 416-419, at 418. (See: May 15.)]


1871 June / See June 19, 1881. [A; 677. See: (1881 June 19).]


1871 June / Faces / Human Nature of—copied from Chicago Times—excitement in the town of Milan, Ohio. On window panes, appearances as if of water mixed with tar, or crude oil. gradually, day by day, turning to likenesses of human faces. Names given of Mr. Horner and Deacon Ashley as residents of 2 of the houses. [A; 678.1, 678.2. "Mysterious Photographs on Window Panes." Human Nature, 5 (no. 6; June 1871): 328-329. (Chicago Times, 1871.)]


1871 June / Rel-Phil Jour., July 15-1-1—ab. 5 mile s.e. of Du Quoin, Ill., ac to Du Quoin Trib of June 29th—home of Mr. James Williams. His two daughters, one aged 16 and one aged 18, were bewitched. Every evening, at twilight, they climbed, with wonderful agility, up to the roof of the house, dancing, climbing, holding onto the eaves by their teeth. The elder said she could see the woman who was bewitching them, but whenever she tried to tell who she was, the appearance choked her, and threw her into spasms. The reporter came upon them surrounded by a crowd. They were running around, hunting for pins and flies to eat. Reporter said hard to believe, but there were men in the crowd who threw pins on the ground and the senseless creatures ate them and then vomited them. "They are crazy at night, and sensible in the day." // Quoin. [A; 679.1 to 679.5. "What Is It?" Religio-Philosophical Journal, 10 (no. 17; July 15, 1871): 1, (c. 1-2). White, Daniel. "Witchcraft in Modern Egypt." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 10 (no. 21; August 12, 1871): 3, (c. 1). (Du Quoin Tribune, June 29, 1871; microfilm at Abraham Presidential Library, Springfield, IL.)]


1871 June / In Religio, July 15, more about the bewitched girls, taking from The Peoples (Freemont, Ill.) / About same story—that they had been seen not climbing but jumping from the ground to the roof of a large barn, about 30 feet from ground. [A; 680. "Singular Human Phenomenon." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 10 (no. 17; July 15, 1871): 4, (c. 5). (No "Freemont" nor "The Peoples" newspaper found in Illinois, near Du Quoin.)]


1871 Ap. 1 about, etc. / L.T., July 20-7-e / 2 young women of Frankfort, Ill / news published in papers June 19 / At sunset run to housetops and dance with extreme skill in balancing and scream. [A; 681. "Witch Revival." London Times, July 20, 1871, p. 7 c. 5. See: 1871 June, (A; 679).]


1871 June 3 / BO / Alleged teleportation of Mrs Guppy from Highbury to Lamb's Conduit Street. [A; 682. Holms, Archibald Campbell. The Facts of Psychic Science and Philosophy. Jamaica, N.Y. : Occult Press, 1927, 359.]


1871 June 6 / Norton Villa, near Worcester / (Nature 4-161) / Ordinary rain. Suddenly dark at 7 p.m. and a rain like ink poured for ¼ hour. Next day fleece of sheep dyed black. [IV; 423. Lees, Edwin. "Black Rain." Nature, 4 (June 29, 1871): 161. "Mr. Walker's residence is about three miles south-east of Worcester, and he says, that after three or four hours of common rain on Tuesday June 6, it became suddenly dark about seven o'clock, P.M., and shortly after a rain like ink poured down for a quarter of an hour, after which light returned upon the scene. The following morning the sheep at Woodhall (an adjacent farm) appeared as if their fleeces had been dyed black; also the dog and a grey pony that Mr. Walker had out in a field close by appeared as it they had been rolling in soot or in a coal hole. The black matter brought down with the rain was of an adhesive nature, and at Littleworth, within a

mile of Norton, where this rain fell into some tubs, it was observed to be as black as ink. This black rain was particularly remarked, as clear ordinary rain had been falling for some hours on the day mentioned, but had ceased an hour previously to the commencement of this black downfall." "A Shower of Black Rain." Worcestershire Chronicle, June 14, 1871, p. 4 c. 3-4.]


1871 / ab. June 7 // q on coast of Asia Minor opposite Island of Rhodes. Town of Marmaritza destroyed / Nature 4-169. [IV; 424. "Notes." Nature, 4 (June 29, 1871): 167-170, at 169.]


1871 June 8 / Severe shock / Wagga-Wagga, Australia / Nature 4-350. [IV; 425. "Notes." Nature, 4 (August 31, 1871): 348-350, at 350.]


1871 June 10 / Religio Phil Jour, 5 columns copied from the Memphis Avalanche letters to the Editor. / Mr Robertson had a little son who was subject to spasms. Statement by Dr. H.J. Shaw as to Robertson's wound and bruises—Statement by Policeman McElroy that on the night of March 28th when Robertson was wounded, he saw in the back yard the tracks of three men who had come into the yard from outside and had returned. [A; 683.1, 683.2. "Brinkley College Ghost Story." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 10 (no. 12; June 10, 1871): 2 (c. 1-5), and, 3, (c. 1-2). See: 1871 Ap. 1, (A; 671).]


1871 June 11 / 3's / 6:30 p.m. / North of England / q. at St. Bees at 5:10 3 distinct shocks / Roper, List of Earthquakes, p. 39. [IV; 426. (Roper. 39.)]


1871 June 14 / ab. 9:15 p.m. / Remarkable meteor / L.I. Sound / A.J. Sci 3/2/63. [IV; 427. Thurston, R.H. "A Remarkable Meteor." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 2 (1871): 63-64.]


1871 June 14 / Laborel, Drôme, France / (F) / See Sept. 1875. [IV; 428. Fletcher, 104. This is the Laborel meteorite. See: 1875 Sept, (IV; 1728).]


1871 June 14 / ab. 8 p.m. / Ulverscroft Abbey / An immense column of most brilliant rose-colored light in south, reflected in north. After it, violent thunderstorms. / LT, June 19-11-f. [IV; 429. Booth-Grey, George Harry. "Meteoric Display." London Times, June 19, 1871, p. 11 c. 6.]


1871 June 14 / 10 p.m. / Severe shock / Nicaragua / Western Chronicle of Science 1-177. [IV; 430. (Western Chronicle of Science, 1-177.)]


1871 June 16 / In a storm, 3 waterspouts at Constantinople / Nature 4-212. [IV; 431. "Notes." Nature, 4 (July 13, 1871): 210-212, at 212.]


1871 June 18 / 10 p.m. / Around N.Y. City, Brooklyn, Staten Island, Hoboken, shocks and rumbling sound. There was a storm on Long Island Sound at the time. / N.Y. Times 20-5-5. [IV-432. "A Small Earthquake in this Vicinity." New York Times, June 20, 1871, p. 5 c. 5.]


1871 June 19 / 10 p.m. / Severe shock / Brooklyn and Staten Island / Nature 4-230. [IV; 433. "Notes." Nature, 4 (July 20, 1871): 228-230, at 230.]


1871 June 19 / [LT], 11-f / Meteoric display. [IV; 434. Booth-Grey, George Harry. "Meteoric Display." London Times, June 19, 1871, p. 11 c. 6.]


1871 June 20 / [LT], 5-f / Something like a whirlwind. [IV; 435. "Something Like a Whirlwind." London Times, June 20, 1871, p. 5 c. 6.]


1871 June 20 / Tacna / 7 p.m. / strong shock / Nature 4-418. [IV; 436. "Notes." Nature, 4 (September 21, 1871): 416-419, at 418.]


1871 June 21 / bet 1 and 2 a.m. / Calistoga, Cal / sharp shock / N.Y. Times 30-2-2. [IV; 437. "Personal, Political, and General." New York Times, June 30, 1871, p. 2 c. 2-3.]


1871 June 23 / evening / Terrific th. storm, Chicago. Winds and floods, / Damage $50,000. / N.Y. Times 25-4-1. [IV; 438. "General." New York Times, June 25, 1871, p. 4 c. 1-2.]


1871 June 26 / 7:50 p.m. / Chiriqui, Panama / rather severe shock / Nature 4-350. [IV; 440. "Notes." Nature, 4 (August 31, 1871): 348-350, at 350.]


1871 June 27 / In La Sci Pour Tous, 17-103, not said where but a rain of dust listed among rains of dust in Europe. [IV; 441 (La Science Pour Tous, 17-103.)]


1871 June 28 / Cloud-ball tornado / Ulster Co., N.Y. / San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, July 11. [IV; 442. (San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, July 11, 1871.)]


1871 June 28 / q. / Philippines / BA, '11. [IV; 443. Milne, 722.]


1871 June 27 / Rain sand / Italy / Les Mondes 27/541. [IV; 444. "Dans une seconde note...." Les Mondes, 27 (1872): 541.]


1871 July / Polt phe / Rel-Ph. Jour, Aug 19, p. 1 / At Germantown, Ohio, home of Benjamin Stiver. Medium was boy Pontius (Stiver?) aged 9. (Stiver's nephew). [A; 684. "As to a Ghost." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 10 (no. 21; August 12, 1871): 1, (c. 1-5), and , (no. 22; August 19, 1871): 1, (c. 1-5). The boy's name is given as "Charles Pontius."]


1871 July / Large flights of the butterfly Urania leilus w to east in Panama / Nature 4-494. [IV; 445. "Notes." Nature, 4 (October 19, 1871): 492-494, at 494.]


1871 July 5 / Destructive typhoon / Hiogo, Japan / Nature 5-14. [IV; 446. "Notes." Nature, 5 (November 2, 1871): 13-14, at 14.]


1871 July 9 / Waterspout / Cork harbor / Nature 4-325. [IV; 447. "Notes." Nature, 4 (August 24, 1871): 325-326, at 325. "A Waterspout off Cork Harbour." London Standard, July 12, 1871, p. 5 c. 4.]


1871 July 9 / Tornado / Dayton, Ohio. [IV; 448. "Terrible Tornado in Ohio." New York Herald, July 11, 1871, p. 11 c. 3.]


1871 July 11 / Strong shock / Valparaiso / Nature 4-454. [IV; 449. "Notes." Nature, 4 (October 5, 1871): 452-454, at 454.]


1871 July 13 / Shock / Boston, Mass / Nature 4-326. [IV; 450. "Notes." Nature, 4 (August 24, 1871): 325-326, at 326.]


1871 July 13 / 10:34 p.m. / at Moncalieri / Meteor from Camelopardis. Ab size of moon. / See 15th. [IV; 451. Denza. "Bolides observés en Italie pendant le mois de juillet." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 394-397, at 395. See: 1871 July 15, (IV; 453).]


[1871 / ab July 15. Wrong date. See: 1871 March 5, (IV; 452).]


1871 July 15 / Of 778 mets from July 6 to 21st at Moncalieri, 210 night of 15th. / C.R. 73-394. [IV; 453. Denza. "Bolides observés en Italie pendant le mois de juillet." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 394-397, at 394.]


1871 July 15 / 11:12 p.m. / Great meteor from Pegasus—at Paris / C.R. 73-222 and 240. [IV; 454. Chapelas. "Le bolide du 15 juillet." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 222. "Observation du bolide du juillet faite près de La Guerche (Cher)...." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 240-241.]


1871 July 14-15 / (It) / Moncalieri / aurora / CR 73/241. [IV; 455. Deville, Charles Sainte-Claire. "Sur un bolide observé en Italie dans la nuit du 17 au 18 mars 1871...." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 241.]


1871 July 15 / 3:20 a.m. / At Moncalieri, Italy, met size of Jupiter, from Cygnus. / See (2). / C.R. 73-394 / Greatest meteor seen in seven years observation at Moncalieri. Ab 11:33 p.m., a loud sound from it was heard. [IV; 456. Denza. "Bolides observés en Italie pendant le mois de juillet." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 394-397.]


1871 July 17 / Intensely black spot on sun at sunset, Halifax, England. / Nature 4-224. [IV; 457. Perkins, Thomas. "Sun-Spot." Nature, 4 (July 20, 1871): 224.]


1871 July 19 / det met / bet 8 and 9 p.m. / Fireball and detonation like gunfire / Wilmington, N. Car. / A.J. Sci 3/2/227. [IV; 458. Martin, E.S. "On a Meteor seen at Wilmington, N.C., July 19." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 2 (1871): 227.]


1871 July 20 / 11 p.m. / Santiago de Chile / severe shock / Nature 4-454. [IV; 459. "Notes." Nature, 4 (October 5, 1871): 452-454, at 454.]


1871 July 20 / [LT], 7-e / Witchcraft in America. [A; 686. "Witch Revival." London Times, July 20, 1871, p. 7 c. 5. See: 1871 June, (A; 679).]


1871 July 23 / NY Times, 6-7 / q / N England. [IV; 460. "The New-England Earthquake—Shaking of the Hub and Its Surroundings." New York Times, July 23, 1871, p. 6 c. 7.]


1871 July / Meteors / Italy / C.R. 73-394. [IV; 461. Denza. "Bolides observés en Italie pendant le mois de juillet." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 394-397.]


1871 July 25-27 / Falling floods, Island of St Helena. 500 of the inhabitants "washed out of their homesteads". / Cardiff Times, Aug 26. [IV; 462. "Disastrous Floods at St. Helena." Cardiff Times, August 26, 1871, p. 7 c. 7.]


1871 July 29 / q's / Italy / at Montescudaio. Guardistallo, Bibbona, in Pisa / BA '11. [IV; 463. Milne, 722.]


1871 July 29 / Aug 3 // Phe / Bull Astro, nos. 17-41, in 1871 / See M. Chacornac. / Venus / unknown luminous body near—7th mag and [note cut off] field as the [note cut off]t, upon Aug 13, 1892, Barnard at [note cut off]. [IV; 464. (Bull. Astro, 1871, nos. 17-41.) Barnard, E.E. "An unexplained observation." Astronomische Nachrichten, 172 (no. 4106; 1906): 25-26, (with illustration).]


1871 July 30 / Whirlwind / Chilton, Bucks. / L.T. 8-7-f. [IV; 465. "A Whirlwind." London Times, August 8, 1871, p. 7 c. 6.]


1871 Aug 1 / obj / At Marseilles, by Coggia—appeared at 10:43 p.m. and moved slowly eastward until 10.52m, 30s, it stopped. Moved north and at 10.59m, 30s, again stopped. Turned then, as at first, toward the East. At 11.3m, 20s, fell toward the horizon. / described as a magnificent red object / See Radcliffe obj in the 60s. CR 73/398 / D-275. [IV; 466.1, 466.2. The note copies information from page 275 of The Book of the Damned. Coggia, Jérôme Eugène. "Observation d'un bolide, faite à l'Observatoire de Marseille le 1er août." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 397-398. See: 1868 June 8, (III: 1384 & 1385).]


1871 Aug 4 / NY Times, 4-7 / Stiver's Ghst / Ohio / (Ed). [A; 685. "Minor Topics." New York Times, August 4, 1871, p. 4 c. 6-7. "An Ohio Ghost Story." Elk County Advocate, (Ridgway, Pennsylvania), August 17, 1871, p. 1 c. 4-5.]


1871 Aug 5 / San Francisco Ev. Bulletin / Millions of dead fish in Seneca Lake, N.Y. [IV; 467. (San Francisco Evening Bulletin, August 5, 1871.)]


1871 Aug 7 / Eruption, volc Ternate, (Java). Had not ended Aug 24. / Nature 5-225. [IV; 468. Meyer, Adolf Bernard "Earthquakes in Celebes." Nature, 5 (January 18, 1872): 225.]


1871 Aug 9 / Luminous radiations in the Milky Way / L.T., Aug 14-8-c. [IV; 469. Wright, Henry. "The Star-Shower of the 10th of August." London Times, August 14, 1871, p. 8 c. 3.]


1871 Aug 10 / Aurora at time of mets reported dif parts of England / BA 72-84. [IV; 470. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, and Charles Brooke. "Report...on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1871-72." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1872, 57-118, at 85. "On the 10th there was a tolerably distinct aurora borealis, one streamer of which extended from the north to a spot apparently a considerable distance beyond Arcturus."]


1871 Aug (10) / LT, Aug 14-8-c / Perseids of the 10th. [IV; 471. Wright, Henry. "The Star-Shower of the 10th of August." London Times, August 14, 1871, p. 8 c. 3.]


1871 Aug 10 / See Aug 12. / Cor writes in Times of 14-8-c that meteors of 10th very short compared with those of Nov., 1866 (Leonids). / (met paths). [IV; 472. Wright, Henry. "The Star-Shower of the 10th of August." London Times, August 14, 1871, p. 8 c. 3.]


[1871 Aug 11] / 1871 Aug 13, about / Great explosion at Stowmarket / LT / index. [IV; 473. "Fatal Explosion." London Times, August 12, 1871, p. 5 c. 2. "The Explosion at Stowmarket." London Times, August 14, 1871, p. 11 c. 1.]


1871 Aug 13 / BO / Told in Western Mail (Cardiff). Says that in a terrific th storm fell frogs, many of which were of a rather large size, strewing some of the roads. And that a chimney stack had been struck by a meteoric stone. / Mail—15th—that at Pontypridd, during storm of 13th, lightning supposed to have made a hole in the ground. The hole was probed and up was brought a ball of black, brittle substance, in the center of which was a stone. / Aug 17—Said that at Mountain Ash, Aug 16, in terrific th storm a met. stone had struck a chimney. So lightning? / Cor frogs and met. th, Aug 13, 1871. [IV; 475.1, 475.2, 475.3. "A very violent thunderstorm...." Cardiff Western Mail, August 14, 1871, p. 2 c. 4. "A very violent thunderstorm broke over South Wales yesterday afternoon. Up to the time of going to press no information had reached us of any serious damage having been done. In Cardiff a singular phenomenon was observed. Over a large area there fell a shower of live frogs, many of which were of considerable size." "Terrific Thunderstorm in South Wales." Cardiff Western Mail, August 14, 1871, p. 2 c. 5. "An extraordinary feature characterized the storm of yesterday. During the course of the afternoon there fell a shower of frogs, many of which were of a rather large size, and, which, in considerable numbers strewed some of the roads when the rain had ceased." "The Storm of Sunday." Cardiff Western Mail, August 15, 1871, p. 3 c. 3. "At about four o'clock on Sunday morning a most frightful thunderstorm burst over this locality. At Hendreserythan House, the residence of Mr. Williams, the family were alarmed by the thunder, one peal of which sounded like the crash of a heavy body of stone falling from the heavens to the earth. The noise appeared to come from behind the house, and shortly afterwards the gardener's attention was arrested by a strong sulphurous smell in the shrubbery, and upon looking around he saw a hayrick in flames. Instanty all the buckets and appliances for carrying water were brought into requisition, and the flames were soon extinguished. Yesterday morning, upon probing the hole the fluid had made, a man brough up a round ball of a black, brittle substance, and in the centre of which was a stone. The ball was deposited about two feet down the rick, and is supposed to be what is commonly called a thunderbolt. Mr. Williams writes to say he would be very glad to submit the substance to any man of science who would be able to say whether it be a vulgar error or not to call it by such a name."]


1871 Aug 13 / At Cardiff, Wales, "shower of green frogs and fall of a meteoric stone. / Land and Water, Aug 19, p. 112. [IV; 476. (Land and Water, August 19, 1871, p. 112.)]


1871 Aug 13 / Met. stone / See Aug 18. [IV; 477. See: 1871 Aug 18, (IV; 474).]


1871 Aug 13 / In th storm a hay rick was set on fire by a meteoric stone, which was found by the owner of the rick, Mr. Williams, of Hendrescrythan House, / Cardiff Times, Aug 19. [IV; 478. "Severe Thunderstorm." Cardiff Times, August 19, 1871, p. 6 c. 3. See: 1871 Aug 13, (IV; 479).]


1871 Aug 13 / "In the course of the afternoon a shower of small frogs fell over Canton, and a meteoric stone also struck the chmney stack of Sergeant Thornton's house at the same place. / Cardiff Times, Aug. 19. [IV; 479. "Severe Thunderstorm." Cardiff Times, August 19, 1871, p. 6 c. 3. "In the course of the afternoon a shower of small frogs fell over Canton and a meteoric stone also struck the chimneystack of Sergeant Thornton's house at the same place. The stack was demolished, and some of the bricks smashed the windows of the Canton Market Hotel opposite, but in both houses the inmates were uninjured—though the escape was somewhat a narrow one. At Newport there was a heavy hail storm, and at Pontypridd a hayrick was set on fire by another meteoric stone, which was afterwards found in the rick by the owner, Mr. Williams of Hendrescrythan House. The storm was preceded in this town by intense heat, particularly on the Friday and Saturday."]


1871 Aug 15 / Boy myst shot / Bristol. [A; 687.]


1871 Aug 17 / Waushara (Wis) Argus of, copied in Rel-Ph. J., Sept. 9—home of Mr. Willis, near Pine Lakes, Waushara Co., Wis. A member of the family aged about 15, about Aug 1, was picking berries, when stones fell about her from various directions, several striking her but not injuring her. Not said a member of family but oddly worded. "An inmate of the family." So likely a servant. A day or so later Mr Willis saw large stones appear in the kitchen. This was 9 a.m. At 5 p.m. other stones arrived, doing no damage, striking persons harmlessly. Men with guns were stationed around the house but the stones cotinued in ensuing days. [A; 688.1, 688.2, 688.3. "Remarkable Phenomena." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 10 (no. 25; September 9, 1871): 1, (c. 3-4). (Waushara Argus, Aug-Sept., 1871.)]


1871 Aug 18 / In violent th. storm, a large meteoric stone was seen to fall near Kendal. / See Aug 13. / L.T. 22-11-e. [IV; 474. "Violent Thunderstorm." London Times, August 22, 1871, p. 11 c. 5. See: 1871 Aug 13, (IV; 475).]


1871 Aug 19 / This series relates back to Bath (?) occurrence early in year. [A; 689. See: (1871 Ap. 22-29; fall of gelatinous substances, at Bathrailway station. List. Fix.).]


1871 Aug 19 / letter in of Weston Mercury—from Louisa Bennet, of Glentower. / That on Aug 7, snake appeared in front of her house—it was ab. ¾ yard long. Was killed by some young man. On 12th, her cat came into the house with a locust, about three inches long. [A; 690. (Weston Mercury, August 19, 1871; not at BNA.) "District News." Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette, August 24, 1871, p. 3 c. 5. "At Weston-super-Mare, last week, a snake three-quarters of a yard long and a locust three inches long were captured." "The City Markets and Tolls." Gloucester Journal, August 19, 1871, p. 5 c. 6. "Specimens of the migratory locust (Locusta migratorius) have this week been taken near this city. These insects only appear in very hot seasons."]


1871 Aug 20 / 9:20 p.m. / Sharp shock / Jamaica / Nature 4-387. [IV; 480. Thomson, Robert. "Earthquake in Jamaica." Nature, 4 (September 14, 1871): 387.]


1871 Aug 21 / Hurricane and earthquakes / St Thomas, W. Indies / Cardiff Times, Sept. 2. / 150 persons killed or wounded. [IV; 481. "Fearful Hurricane in the West Indies." Cardiff Times. September 2, 1871, p. 8 c. 6.]


1871 Aug 21 / Violent hurricane and q. shocks / St. Thomas, B.W.I. / Nature 4-375. [IV; 482. "Notes." Nature, 4 (September 7, 1871): 373-375, at 375.]


1871 Aug. 21 / bet. 3 and 4 a.m. / "Waterspout" burst over village of Ollon, Switzerland. Great damage. / Nature 4-375. [IV; 483. "Notes." Nature, 4 (September 7, 1871): 373-375, at 375.]


1871 Aug 21 / Severe shock / Callao / Nature 4-494. [ IV; 484. "Notes." Nature, 4 (October 19, 1871): 492-494, at 494.]


1871 Aug 21 / 9 p.m. / Limerick / large meteors / 1 from Polaris / BA 72-70. [IV; 485. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, and Charles Brooke. "Report...on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1871-72." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1872, 57-118, at 70.]


1871 Aug 21 / West Indies / St Thomas / great q / [BA] '11. [IV; 486. Milne, 722.]


1871 Aug 23 / San Francisco Ev. Bulletin of / Ghost of a woman haunting a jail in Hartford, Conn. [A; 691. (San Francisco Evening Bulletin, August 23, 1871.)]


1871 Aug 24-25 / Aurora, Queenstown, Ireland. Midnight maximum and center was under Eta Ursa. / LT 28-10-f. [IV; 487. Tupman, George Lyon. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, August 28, 1871, p. 10 c. 6.]


1871 Aug 26 / Shock slight at Teignmouth / 4:25 a.m. / See May 3, '09. [IV; 488. (Parfitt, Edward. "On Earthquakes in Devonshire." Report and Transactions of the Devonshire Association, 16 (1884): 641-661, at ). See: 1809 May 3, (I; 265).]


1871 Aug 27 / N.Y. Times, 5-6 / Ghosts at Oakland, Cal. [A; 692. "Ghosts on the Pacific." New York Times, August 27, 1871, p. 5 c. 6.]


1871 Aug 28 / About 500 bodies in 40 minutes seen by M. Trouvelot, some round,some triangular, some of complex forms, passing over the sun. / CR—101-154 / Then no more till Sept. 1. [IV; 489. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Observation d'un essaim de corpuscules noirs passant devant le Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 101 (1885): 154-156.]


1871 Aug 28 / 3:45 a.m, / again midnight, 28-29 / Shocks at Worthing. / LT-30-9-d / said by cor 31-9-f that had been practice at Seaford Beach by Coast Guards—that he had seen the flash and heard the booming of guns upon one of the occasions. [IV; 490. Stevenson, Nathaniel. "An Earthquake." London Times, August 30, 1871, p. 9 c. 4. "The Alleged Earthquake." London Times, August 31, 1871, p. 9 c. 6. "Similar sensations were felt here, and at first attributed to the same cause, but were afterwards found to proceed from the crew of Coast Guardsmen out for their annual practice in one of Her Majesty's ironclads."]


1871 Aug 28 / 3:45 a.m. / q / Worthing / a Coast Guard turnout drill / Nature 4-386. [IV; 491. Pankhurst, E.A. "The Earthquake at Worthing." Nature, 4 (September 14, 1871): 385-386.]


1871 Aug 28 / 3:45 a.m. / Shock at Worthing / (See Sept?) / L.T. 30-9-d. [IV; 492. Stevenson, Nathaniel. "An Earthquake." London Times, August 30, 1871, p. 9 c. 4.]


1871 Aug 28, 29 / (Look up.) / q (?) at Worthing / How far from Brighton? / Nature 4/349, 385. / Said been some firing at Brighton. [IV; 493. "Notes." Nature, 4 (August 31, 1871): 348-350, at 350. Pankhurst, E.A. "The Earthquake at Worthing." Nature, 4 (September 14, 1871): 385-386.]


1871 Aug 29 / (also on Sept. 1) / About 500? passed in 40 minutes. In the years following, T. often observed the sun but never saw a similar spectacle. [IV; 494. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Observation d'un essaim de corpuscules noirs passant devant le Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 101 (1885): 154-156.]


1871 Aug 28 / Trouvelot bodies best in C.R. 101/154. [IV; 495. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Observation d'un essaim de corpuscules noirs passant devant le Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 101 (1885): 154-156.]


1871 Aug 29 / (Augs) / (pub) / by Trouvelot—not published by him until 1885 / L'Année Sci 29/8 / great number ob obs, small and some so large as to look like small sunspots—They stopped at times and then moved on with great rapidity. Most of them spherical but a great variety of forms. One of them fell toward the earth—it balanced itself from side to side or like a disk falling in water. [IV; 496.1, 496.2. "Passage d'un essaim de corpuscles noirs devant le soleil." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 29 (1885): 8-10.]


1871 Aug 31 / Cut / 9h-45m, p.m. / Brilliant mets that issue "apparently from close behind from the center of the moon's side". / Kent and Herefordshire / BA 1872/69, 71. /// 162 / 256. [IV; 497. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, and Charles Brooke. "Report...on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1871-72." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1872, 57-118, at 70-74, (illustrations).]


1871 September / Religio-Phil J., March 6, 1872, p. 1 / Baldwin City, Kansas; 15 miles south of Lawrence / Rappings that kept up at least until March, 1872. [A; 693. Donaldson, H.A. "Haunted House in Kansas." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 11 (no. 26; March 16, 1872): 1, (c. 5).]


1871 ab Sept 1 / N.Y. Times, Feb 8-4-4, 1872 / House in Alleghany, Pa. / "A prominent public official" went to live in a house there. He had been in possession only a few hours when raps were heard. Heard footsteps, heard a voice. In bed, a cold hand was placed on his face. He was pelted and patted. His wife and women visitors were violently treated. After 5 months he had to get out. [A; 695.1, 695.2. "More of the Marvelous." New York Times, February 8, 1872, p. 4 c. 4. The editorial mocks the excitement but only glances over the story, (which appears in the following Democratic Press article). "A Haunted House. Memphis Daily Appeal, January 29, 1872, p. 1 c. 2. "Great excitement exists in Alleghany City over the discovery of a haunted house on Esplanade street. The house until lately was occupied by the chief of police of that city. He and other men of undoubted veracity testify in most positive terms to the nightly visitation of spirits." "A Haunted House in Allegheny City." Democratic Press, (Ravenna, Ohio), February 22, 1872, p. 1 c. 4-5.]


1871 Sept 1 / Augs / More bodies seen by Trouvelot / C.R. 101-154. [IV; 498. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Observation d'un essaim de corpuscules noirs passant devant le Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 101 (1885): 154-156.]


1871 Sept. 1 / to 78 / Serial bolide / Eng / Observatory 2/271. [IV; 499. Denning, William Frederick. "Meteor Notes for December." Observatory, 2 (1878): 270-271. "Sept. 1, 1869, at the Radcliffe Observatory, Oxford, six small meteors were visible (11h 38m to 12h), 'shooting from points between α Lyræ and α Ophiuchi towards the latter star.' Sept. 1 1871, two fireballs were seen in England. Sept. 2, 1872, a 'magnificent bolide' observed by Serpieri at Urbino, Italy. Sept. 1, 1874, the largest fireball seen in England during the year. Sept. 2, 1875, large and brilliant meteor observed at London. Sept. 1, 1877 and 1878, large meteors seen at Bristol. These facts amply prove the date is one of more than ordinary note, and with the view to determine the chief radiant-point a projection of the meteor-paths recorded on this night by many observers has just been completed."]


[1871 April / August-Sept. Wrong date. See: 1871 April, (IV; 500).]


1871 Sept / In Sci Gos., Jan., 1872, cor writes that still the mystery of the Crowned Tapayaxin, found at Weston-super-Mare, had not been cleared up. [A; 694. Sharp, Irwin. "A Strange Reptile." Science Gossip, 8 (no. 85; January, 1872): 23. "You may incline to notice a curious creature lately found in a garden in this town. It is a specimen of the Crowned Tapayaxin (Phrynosoma Blainvillii), common in America, and often made a pet of in California. It is between a lizard and an iguana, and is, including the tail, about five inches in length. It is covered all over with triangular spines, and has two long horns at the back of the head. The tail, which is not a long one, is bordered on both sides with spines, and the entire animal is plated with armour, like the Armadillo. The feet are very delicate and beautiful, terminated with long, sharp, and elegantly curved claws. When in its native state it can run with considerable rapidity, but in confinement it remains almost stationary, even when touched. It feeds on insects, and is said to be very partial to red ants. How it came into this locality is at present a mystery, and how long it has been there is also unknown." Blainville's horned lizard has been called a "horny toad," but is a lizard.]


1871 Sept 2 / Animal / Bath Express of / Found near Trinity Church, Weston-super-Mare, in a garden, Californian Crowned Tapayaxin—ab 5 inches long. / (I think a horned toad.) / tapayaxin / A creature between a lizard and an iguana—covered with armor-plates like of the armadillo, and rows of spikes. Back of head two long black horns. No clew to its presence in Weston. [A; 696.1, 696.2. (Bath Express, September 2, 1871.) "A few days ago a very curious animal was found...." Bristol Mercury, September 2, 1871, p. 6 c. 4. "A few days ago a very curious animal was found in a garden at Weston-super-Mare. It is a creature between a lizard and an iguana, and on reference to Wood's Natural History, vol. 3rd, it was found to be the Crowned tapayaxin (Phrynosoma Blainvillii). It is a native of America, and is very common in California. where it is sometimes kept as a pet, and can easily be trained to feed out of the hand of its owner. The great peculiarity of the animal is that it is completely covered with armour plates like the armadillo, and has rows of spines in different parts of the body. At the back of the head are two long black horns, and over the back are a number of triangiular spines. Its length, including the tail (which is fringed on both sides with spines), is about five inches. At present there is no clue by which to account for its presence in Weston, as it is exclusively an American animal."]


1871 Sept 2 / Weston Mercury of [Sept 2] told of the horned toad (?). [A; 697. (Weston Mercury, September 2, 1871; not @ BNA.)]


1871 Sept. 2 / Violent typhoon, Hongkong. / Nature 5-89. [IV; 501. "Notes." Nature, 5 (November 30, 1871): 88-90, at 89.]


1871 Sept 4 / 9:30 p.m. / Ross, Herefordshire / met 5 or 6 x Venus / and Durham / BA 78-276 // first seen near Polaris / 72-74. [IV; 502. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, and Charles Brooke. "Report...on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1871-72." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1872, 57-118, at 74, (illustration). Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the Year 1877-78." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1878, 258-377, at 276-277.]


1871 Sept 6 / (birds) / night, till 11 p.m. / Over Norwich. Had been storm. Cloud, still black and lightning very vivid—sounds said been migrating birds "flying round and round and calling incessantly. / Zoologist 2-7-2979. [IV; 503. "Nocturnal Flight of Birds." Zoologist, s. 2 v. 7 (1872): 2978-2979.]


1871 Sept. 6 / shortly after sunset / Wanstead Flats / A luminous, isolated cloud that glowed at intervals of from 3 to 15 seconds. / Flashes of lightning shot from it for ½ hour. Then it disappeared. / Then sheet lightning from clouds hugging the horizon. / LT, Sep 8. [IV; 504.1, 504.2. "A Meteoric Phenomenon." London Times, September 8, 1871, p. 9. c. 4.]


1871 Sept 6 / Near Mobile, Alabama, many swarms of yellow butterflies, all flying east / Nature 4-487. [IV; 505. "Flight of Butterflies." Nature, 4 (October 19, 1871): 487.]


1871 Sept 6 / Eruption, Mauna Loa, Hawaii / Nature 5-14. [IV; 506. "Notes." Nature, 5 (November 2, 1871): 13-14, at 14.]


1871 Sept 7 / bet 12:30 and 2 p.m. / Details, the sun explosion / Nature 4-488. [IV; 507. Young, Charles Augustus. "An Explosion (?) on the Sun." Nature, 4 (October 19, 1871): 488-489.]


1871 Sept 7 / Outburst on sun and aurora in the evening / Boston Jour of Chemistry 6/49. [IV; 508. Young, Charles Augustus. "An Explosion on the Sun." Boston Journal of Chemistry, 6 (November, 1871): 49.]


1871 Sept 7 / Aurora / Houlgate, near Dives / CR 73/684. [IV; 509. Salices. "Sur un phénomène météorologiqe, observé à Houlgate (près Dives), le 7 septembre 1871." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 684-685.]


1871 Sept 7 / bet 12:30 and 2 p.m. / Prof. Young's account of explosion on sun / A.J. Sci 3/2/468. [IV; 510. Young, Charles Augustus. "An Explosion on the Sun." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 2 (1871): 468-470, (illustrations).]


1871 Sept 7 / Great eruption on sun. / Jour. B.A.A. 18-326 / List of 26 to 1908. [IV; 511. Buss, A.A. "List of 25 exceptional Eruptive Prominences." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 18 (1908): 326.]


1871 Sept 7 / evening / Aurora / America / Flammarion, Pop. Astro, p. 273. [IV; 512. Flammarion, Camille. Popular Astronomy: A General Description of the Heavens. New York: D. Appleton, 1894, 273.]


1871 Sep 7 / Seven luminous bands in sky / France / C.R. 73/684. [IV; 513. Salices. "Sur un phénomène météorologiqe, observé à Houlgate (près Dives), le 7 septembre 1871." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 684-685.]


1871 Sept. 8 / 11:14 p.m. / Large met / Alexandria, Egypt / A.J. Sci 3/2/475. [IV; 514. Kennon, Beverly. "On a Meteor seen at Alexandria, Egypt." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 2 (1871): 474-475.]


1871 Sept 12 / Fr / Bourgogne / q / C.R. 73/731. [IV; 515. "M. Le Verrier a l'honneur de placer sous les yeux de l'Académie...." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 730-732.]


1871 Sept 14 / BO / Nature of—copied from the Swiss Times, story of disappearances of bathers in the Lake of Wallenstadt, attributed to enormous fishes there. [A; 698. "Notes." Nature, 4 (September 14, 1871): 394-395, at 395.]


1871 Sept 15 / Fast / Medium and Daybreak, from Preston Herald / For 16 months a fasting girl at Walton. She took a little food at times. / See D. News, Friday before, Sept 29. [A; 699. "The Lancashire Fasting Girl." Medium and Daybreak, 2 (no. 76; September 15, 1871): 306-307. "It would seem from their statements that within the sixteen months the girl has not only had her lips moistened, but that she has drunk a pint and even a quart of water at a time; that mixed with some of this was a quantity of old cheese dissolved with boiling water, alternated with black currant preserve." "Although the Lancashire Witches of tradition have disappeared...." London Daily News, September 16, 1871, p. 4 c. 6 & p. 5 c. 1. (Preston Herald, 1871; not @ BNA. Several newspaper accounts, including Preston Chronicle, September 9 1871, p. 6.)]


1871 Sept 15 / [LT], 4-f / Mock sun. [IV; 516. Warneford, W.J.J. "A Mock Sun." London Times, September 15, 1871, p. 4 c. 6.]


1871 Sept 15 / River Gumti rose suddenly and destroyed the city of Jounpur, India. / an Francisco Ev. Bulletin, Nov. 17. [IV; 517. (San Francisco Evening Bulletin, November 17, 1871.)]


1871 Sept 22 / Medium and Daybreak / A cash box said been stolen by spirits from a store in Suffolk Street, Birmingham. Ed writes that he was intimately acquainted with the persons concerned. [A; 700. "A Cash-Box Taken by the Spirits." Medium and Daybreak, 2 (no. 77;  September 22, 1871): 314. The cash-box was found on several occasions outside of a cupboard, where it was kept overnight. Nothing was missing; but, as an experiment was conducted in which the cash-box was sealed away, to prevent any tampering with it, yet it was again gone from the cupboard, only to be found on a nearby shelf. A letter hidden in a desk's secret drawer was also missed, only to be discovered inside the cash-box when it was found opened and outside if its cupboard.]


1871 autumn / Faces / Home of Amos McDaniels, ab. 5 miles from Mount Nebo, Ohio. Spirit face upon a window. / Religio-Ph. J, March 23, 1872, p. 2, faces and figures of men and women were appearing on windows of the poorhouse. [A; 701. Barnes, Chauncey. "Likenesses on Glass." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 12 (no. 1; March 23, 1872); 2, (c. 2).]


1871 Sept. 25 / Inferior conjunction Venus-Sun / (Al). [IV; 518.]


1871 Oct / Polts / Religio-Ph. J of Sept 14, 1872, copying from Revue Spirite, March, 1872—a farmhouse at Cabanac, Dept of Haute Garonne, France. Stones flying about. Noted one of the stones fell gradually and with slight slant. Tenants moved to another farmhouse—Stones again and one of them struck repeatedly, presumably by a club that appeared and fell. In bed one of them struck with a chair. Two female servants were severely pinched. [A; 702.1, 702.2. (Religio-Philosophical Journal, September 14, 1872; issue missing @ IAPSOP.) (Revue Spirite, March, 1872.)]


1871 Oct / (Cut) / Cor E.M. Tydeman writes in E.M., 14-97, upon "remarkable phenomenon"—"a number of dense dark cloudy-looking spots of considerable size in the region of  Copernicus, Menelaus, and the Apennines." [IV; 519. Tydeman, Edmund M.T. "Sun Spots on the Moon." English Mechanic, 14 (no. 342; October 13, 1871): 97.]


1871 Oct 4 / [LT, 11-e / Lunar rainbow. [IV; 521. "A Lunar Rainbow." London Times, October 4, 1871, p. 11 c. 5.]


1871 Oct. 5 / Destructive q., interior of Peru / San Francisco Ev. Bulletin, Nov. 16. [IV; 522. (San Francisco Evening Bulletin, November 16, 1871.)]


1871 Oct 5 or 6 / Rumors would be a tidal wave then on US Atlantic coast. / N.Y. Times, Sept 26-8-3. [IV; 523. "The Tidal Wave Hoax." New York Times, September 26, 1871, p. 8 c. 3.]


1871 Oct 7, etc. / Stones at house at Cabanac (Cadours), Spiritual Magazine 7-221. [A; 703. "Stones Thrown by Unseen Agents." Spiritual Magazine, n.s., 7 (May 1872): 221-223.]


1871 Oct 8-10 / Chicago fire / Oct, 4 days later, dust in Azores. [IV; 524. "Atmospheric Dust." Monthly Microscopical Journal: Transactions of the Royal Microscopical Society..., 14 (September 1, 1875): 141.]


1871 Oct 8 / 1 a.m. / Disatrous q. near Iquique and felt there / Nature 5-192. [IV; 526. "Notes." Nature, 5 (January 4, 1872): 190-192, at 192.]


1871 Oct 8 / Violent shock / Constantinople / Nature 4-494. [IV; 527. "Notes." Nature, 4 (October 19, 1871): 492-494, at 494.]


[1871 Oct 9 /] 1871 Oct 8 / N.Y.T., 6-1 / q / N.J. [IV; 520. "Another Earthquake." New York Times, October 10, 1871, p. 8 c. 2. Fort copied the date and location for the next item, after this one, from the New York Times Index. See: 1871 Oct 9, (IV; 525).]


1871 Oct 9 / q. / N.J. and Pa / 9:40 a.m. / A.J. Sci 3/2/388. [IV; 525. Taylor, W.C. "Earthquake in New Jersey, Delaware, and Pennsylvania." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 2 (1871): 388.]


1871 Oct 13 / moon / E Mec of—that time of preceding full moon, spots as if of dense smoke in the region of Copernicus, Menelaus, and the Appennines, ac to a col. / E Mec 14-97. [IV; 528. Tydeman, Edmund M.T. "Sun Spots on the Moon." English Mechanic, 14 (no. 342; October 13, 1871): 97. See: 1871 Oct, (IV; 519).]


1871 Oct 14 / [LT], 10-f / Met. [IV; 529. Wood, William. "A Meteor." London Times, October 14, 1871, p. 10 c. 6.]


1871 Oct 14 / [LT]. 10-f / Sun spot. [IV; 530. Elger, Thomas Gwyn Empy. "A Sun-Spot." London Times, October 14, 1871, p. 10 c. 6.]


1871 Oct 19 / Meteor trajectory— / [illustration] / C Rendus 73/1014. [IV; 531. Chapelas. "Sur un météore remarquable, observé dans la nuit du 19 octobre 1871." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 1014-1015, (illustration).]


1871 Oct 20 / It Sounds / Velletri / Explosive sound / See 1816. [IV; 532. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 40. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1871 Oct 21 / night / Remarkable meteor near Madras / Nature 5-171. [IV; 533. "Notes." Nature, 5 (December 28, 1871): 169-171, at 171.]


1871 Oct. 22 / (Argentine) / Town of Oran, province of Salta, destroyed by q. / near Montevideo / Nature 5/349. [IV; 534. "Notes." Nature, 5 (February 29, 1872): 347-349, at 349.]


1871 Oct 24, 25 / Aurora / meteor / Aurora / Paris / C.R. 71-584. / During it, 50 mets were watched. Their courses agreed with a resultant of 2 forces acting upon the aurora. [IV; 535. Chapelas. "Aurore Boréale des 24 et 25 octobre." Comptes Rendus, 71 (1870): 584-587, at 585.]


1871 Oct 24 and 25 / Again aurora / Timbs 1872-237 / See same date 1870. [IV; 536. "Aurora Borealis and Solar Spots." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1872, 236-237. See: 1870 Oct 24, 25, (IV; 261).]


1871 Oct 25 / Oran, Argentine, destroyed by a q. / A.J. Sci 3/6/358. [IV; 537. Gould, Benjamin Apthorp. "Letter of Dr. B.A. Gould...." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 6 (1873): 353-360, at 358-359.]


1871 // autumn / See June 6. / Black rain / Midlands / N.Q. 4/9/137. [IV; 538. "Black Rain." Notes and Queries, s. 4 v. 9 (February 17, 1872): 137. See: 1871 June 6, (IV; 423).]


1871 Nov 2, 9, 10 / It / Aurora / Piedmont / Geneva, the 15th / CR 73/1236. 1340. [IV; 540. "M. Le Verrier, en présentant à l'Academie...." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 1236. "M. De Fonvielle transmet à l'Academie...." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 1340.]


1871 Nov 11 / NY Times, 2-1 / Ghst of Russian Hill. [A; 704. "The Ghost of Russian Hill." New York Times, November 3, 1871, p. 2 c. 1-4. "The Ghost of Russian Hill." Argosy, 12 (November 1871): 391-400. This ghost story was originally published in a literary magazine known for its sensational fiction.]


1871 Nov. 4 / [LT], 10-e / Intra-Mercurial planets. [IV; 539. Scott, Benjamin. "Intra-Mercurial Planets." London Times, November 4, 1871, p. 10 c. 5. See: 1847, last of June, (II; 1119).]


1871 Nov 9 / New York Mass, Conn. / extraordinary auroral glare / evening / NY Times 10-1-7. [IV; 541. "Brilliant Display of Aurora Borealis." New York Times, November 10, 1871, p. 1 c. 7.]


1871 Nov 9 and 10 / Aurora / several pages, Nature. [IV; 542. "The Aurora Borealis of Nov. 9 and 10." Nature, 5 (November 16, 1871): 43-45. "The Aurora Borealis of Nov. 9 and 10." Nature, 5 (November 23, 1871): 61. "Societies and Academies." Nature, 5 (December 21, 1871) 154-156, at 155. Barker, George Frederic. "Note on the Spectrum of the Aurora." Nature, 5 (December 28, 1871): 172-173.]


1871 Nov. 9 / Aurora in England / C.R. 73/1152 / at Brest—1232. [IV; 543. "M. Ch. Sainte-Claire Deville communique...." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 1152. Tarry. "Aurore boréale du 9 novembre; observations faites à Brest." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 1232-1236.]


1871 Nov 10 / N.Y. Times, 1-7 / 15-1-3 // Auroras. [IV; 544. "Brilliant Display of Aurora Borealis." New York Times, November 10, 1871, p. 1 c. 7. "Red Auroras." New York Times, November 15, 1871, p. 1 c. 3.]


1871 Nov 11 / [LT], 5-e / Aurora and sunspots. [IV; 545. "Aurora Borealis and Solar Spots." London Times, November 11, 1871, p. 5 c. 5.]


1871 Nov 11 / [LT], 5-e / 13-5-f / 17-12-b // Aurora. [IV; 546. "Aurora Borealis and Solar Spots." London Times, November 11, 1871, p. 5 c. 5. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, November 13, 1871, p. 5 c. 6. "The Weather." London Times, November 17, 1871, p. 12 c. 2.]


1871 Nov. / Leonids / not in C.R. 73/1236. / R. [IV; 547. "M. Le Verrier, en présentant à l'Academie...." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 1236.]


1871 Nov. 13 / morning / Solar halo seen at Durham and Cardiff / Nature 5-103. [IV; 548. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. "Solar Halo." Nature, 5 (November 30, 1871): 81-82. Thompson, George C. "The Solar Halo." Nature, (December 7, 1871): 103.]


1871 Nov 13-14 / New Haven, Conn / 11:20 p.m. to 1:45 a.m. / 98 meteors were seen "though the sky was cloudy." Said not more than 1/10th of them Leonids. / How know if radiant point [etruded?] / Nature, 5-111. [IV; 549. "Notes." Nature, 5 (December 7, 1871): 110-112, at 111.]


[1871 Nov 13. Wrong date. See: 1871 Nov 31, (IV; 550).]


1871 November / Falling stars and auroras / C.R. 73/1236. [IV; 551. "M. Le Verrier, en présentant à l'Academie...." Comptes Rendus, 73 (1871): 1236.]


1871 Nov. 18 / BO / San Francisco Ev. Bulletin of / For two weeks, at a place in Missouri known as Knob Noster, rain had been falling from a cloudless sky upon a space 20 feet in diameter. [IV; 551.1. (San Francisco Evening Bulletin, November 18, 1871.) "St. Louis, November 8." Milford Times, (Michigan), November 11, 1871, p. 3 c. 1. "A letter to the Democrat from Knob Noster, Mo., mentions a singular physical phenomenon occurring there. It says a continued rain has descended for two weeks from a cloudless sky, and confined to a space of only 20 feet in diameter. The phenomenon has been observed by many persons, and the writer asks for a scientific explanation."]


1871 Nov 18 / Rel-Ph J., 1-1 / Mediumship of Morris Keeler, Moravia, N.Y. [A; 705. "Spirits or Impostors?" Religio-Philosophical Journal, 11 (no. 9;  November 18, 1871): 1, (c. 1-5), and, (no. 10; November 25, 1871): 1, (c. 1-5), & 8, (c. 2-3).]


1871 Nov 20 / [LT], 6-c / "Atmospheric discontent." [IV; 552. "The Atmospheric Discontent." London Times, November 20, 1871, p. 6 c. 3. This article reviews the political climate of Europe, (not any phenomena related to the weather).]


1871 Nov. 20 / Flash light across Plato by Birt—like March 27, 1882. / L'Astro 1/302. [IV; 553. Trouvelot, Étienne Léopold. "Observation Curieuse Faite sur la Lune." Astronomie, 1 (1882): 302.]


1871 Nov. 20 / 5:30 / E Mec 14/460 / by Mr. Pratt / a kind of haze, entirely local, around the N.W. foot of the slopes of Plato. [IV; 554. Birt, William Radcliffe. "Lunar Meteorology." English Mechanic, 14 (no. 356; January 19, 1872): 460.]


1871 Nov 21 / [LT], 4-f / Volc. [IV; 555. "A Volcanic Eruption." London Times, November 21, 1871, p. 4 c. 6. The Gamalama volcano was in eruption from August 7 to September 25, 1871.]


1871 Nov 22 / [LT], 5-f / Sup. Ext in Somerset. [A; 706. "Extraordinary Superstition." London Times, November 22, 1871, p. 5 c. 6.]


1871 Nov. 27 / Venus? / Considerable excitement in Rome—crowds staring up at a luminous body in the sky at 9:30 in the morning and remained visible all day—not said whether stationary—ac to the cor to the Times, 14-356. [IV; 556. "The Planet Venus." London Times, December 6, 1871, p. 4 c. 5. The time mentioned in the article was 8:45 a.m., (not 9:30). Venus would have preceded the rising of the Sun and been over the southern horizon at this time, with a visual magnitude of -4.5 and an elongation of +46°.]


[1871 Nov 26 / 26 Dec 1871 / 27 Dec 1871] /1871 Nov. 29 / [LT], 10-c / Dec 29-3-e / 30-9-d // Lunar rainbow. [IV; 557. Winter, George R. "Lunar Rainbow." London Times, November 29, 1871, p. 10 c. 3. Fletcher, W. "A Lunar Rainbow." London Times, December 29. 1871, p. 3 c. 5. "Lunar Rainbow." London Times, December 30, 1871, p. 9 c. 4.]


[1871 Nov 31 /] 1871 Nov 13 / Tooting, near London / met with slight explosion / BA 1872/112. [IV; 550. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, and Charles Brooke. "Report...on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1871-72." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1872, 57-118, at 112-113.]


1871 Dec / Wisconsin phe began. / See Oct 4, 1873. [A; 707. See: 1873 Oct 4, (A; 858).]


1871 Dec / Phe began, Menomonie, Wis. / See Oct 4, 1873. [A; 709. See: 1873 Oct 4, (A; 858).]


1871 December / one day // Barisal Guns in the Sunderbans, Bengal / G.B. Scott. / Nature, 53/197 / Clear, calm day. / "Dull, muffled boom as of distant cannon." Single reports—then two or three in succession. [IV; 558. Scott, G.B. "Barisal Guns." Nature, 53 (January 2, 1896) 197.]


1871 Dec / At end of a violent tempest at Rosano, a great number of small stones fell for ten minutes. / Les Mondes 27-502. [IV; 559. "Pluie de pierres à Rosano." Les Mondes, 27 (1872): 502.]


1871 Dec / Rosano / In a violent storm, stones that fell for 10 minutes. / Les Mondes. 27/502 / Calabria? / E Mec 15/51. [IV; 560. "Pluie de pierres à Rosano." Les Mondes, 27 (1872): 502. "A Shower of Stones." English Mechanic, 15 (March 29, 1872): 51.) "Rosano" was probably Rossano, in Calabria, (Italy); and, the "pluie de pierres" could have been a fall of hail, (the size of a pigeon's egg), which damaged the cornfields.]

  

1871 Dec 2 / [LT], 9-c / Dec 8-11-f // Met. [IV; 561. (London Times, December 2, 1871, p. 9 c. 3; not found.) Lowe, Edward Joseph. "Large Meteor." London Times, December 8, 1871, p. 11 c. 6.]


1871 Dec 6 / 8:15 p.m. / Birmingham / Beeston / met / BA 72-77. [IV; 562. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, and Charles Brooke. "Report...on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1871-72." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1872, 57-118, at 77-78.]


1871 Dec 8 / Mayon volc, Philippines / Ref, Feb 1, 1814. [IV; 563. Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


1871 Dec 8-14 / Great q's / Philippines / Nature 5-422. [IV; 564. Meyer, Adolf Bernard "Earthquakes in the Philippine Islands." Nature, 5 (March 28, 1872): 422.]


1871 Dec 9 / Faces / San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin of, copied in N.Y. Times, Dec 18-2-3—house, 2,119 Mason street, San Francisco, occupied by Mme. Joergens, a French woman whose husband had died in September, 1870, while on a visit to France. On a window pane had appeared a pictured face like her husband's. Neighbors saw likeness. Efforts to erase had been in vain. [A; 710.1, 710.2. (San Francisco Morning Call, December 9, 1871. San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, December 9, 1871.)  "More Spectral Faces in Window-Panes." New York Times, December 18, 1871, p. 2 c. 3. "Spectral Faces." New York Times, April 30, 1871, p. 4 c. 3-4. "Spectral Faces." New York Times, May 10, 1871, p. 4 c. 4-5. "Spirit-Faces in Window Panes." Spiritual Magazine, n.s., 7 (February 1872): 75. "The lady residing there stated to the reporter that she was unable to account for its appearance; that she was no believer in ghosts; and that on Thrusday afternoon, December 7th, while gazing on the picture, she saw another figure. This one appeared to be a little to the right of and behind the one first seen. The outlines of this picture were not so distinct, but she recognized it as that of her deceased husband, who died a year ago in September last. Not wishing to trust to her own eyes in this case, she called her children and several persons, who identified the picture as well as herself. This second picture was only visible for about three hours."]


1871 Dec. 9 / Rel-Ph. J., 3-2 / Pictures appearing on window glass, house in Ross Co., Ohio. Similar phe not long before reported from Milan, Ohio. [A; 711. Burge, William P. "Pictures on Glass." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 11 (no. 12; December 9, 1871): 3, (c. 2). See: 1871 June, (A; 678).]


1871 Dec 10 / (F) / 1:30 p.m. / at Bandong, Java / Metite / See Sept. 19, 1869. / Les Mondes 29-722. [IV; 565. Fletcher, 104. This is the Bandong meteorite. "Sur une météorite tombée dans l'île de Java, près Bandong, le 10 décembre 1871...." Les Mondes, 29 (1872): 722. See: 1869 Sept. 19, (III; 2099).]


1871 Dec. 10 / 1:30 p.m. / Metite near Bandong (Tjabe), Java / C.R. 75-1676. /// O/Stwp / Eng / 8+. [IV; 566. Daubrée. "Sur une météorite tombée dans l'île de Java, près Bandong, le 10 décembre 1871...." Comptes Rendus, 75 (1872): 1676-1678. This is the Bandong meteorite.]


1871 Dec 12 / Cut / Dark body seen in halos of the eclipse of the sun—that may have been a large comet, relieved upon the background of the corona. / Webb, Celest Objs, p. 41. [IV; 567. Webb, Thomas William. Celestial Objects for Common Telescopes. 4th ed. London: Longmans, Green, 1881. 40-41. Ranyard, Arthur Cowper. "On a remarkable Structure visible upon the Photographs of the Solar Eclipse of December 12, 1871." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 34 (June 1874): 365-369, (illustration). "The form of structure is similar to that which has often been observed in the nuclei and the concentric comæ of comets; and it seems not very unreasonable to suppose that this may really be a photograph of a faint though large comet near to perihelion."]


1871 Dec 12 / 10:05 p.m. / Shock / Calcutta, etc. / Nature 5-349. [IV; 568. "Notes." Nature, 5 (February 29, 1872): 347-349, at 349.]


1871 Dec 15 / or middle of Dec // Volc / Albay, Philippines / Nature 5-422. [IV; 569. Meyer, Adolf Bernard. "Earthquakes in the Philippine Islands." Nature, 5 (March 28, 1872): 422.]


1871 Dec 15 / Stones / 2 p.m. / House of a widow and her grandchild, at Ellerton-on-Swale, Yorkshire, ac to Darlington Times, copied in the Spiritual Times, N.S., 7-90, a stone came through a window and followed by volleys till 11 p.m. No place anywhere near where stones could have been thrown from. [A; 712.1, 712.2. "Mysterious Stone Throwing in Yorkshire." Spiritual Magazine, n.s., 7 (February 1872): 90. "A Local Ghost Story." Morpeth Herald, December 30, 1871, p. 5 c. 5. "A strange story comes from Ellerton-on Swale, near Richmond, which, however marvellous, has the evidence of so many persons to it that it cannot be rejected. It is to be hoped that some solution of the affair may be found without being compelled to ascribe the strange proceedings to supernatural agency. It is this. On Friday, the 15th instant, about two in the afternoon, a widow woman who resides a small cottage near the roadside the scattered hamlet, the only inmates of house being herself and grandchild, heard a loud thumping at the back door, and on the child going to the door no one was fonnd there. A few minutes elapsed, when the thumping was repeated, and again no visitor appeared. Shortly afterwards a stone came through the window, to the great a aim of the occupants of the cottage. This was soon followed another, and the missiles then kept following quick succession all the afternoon, and until eleven at night. There is large field at the back the house, the hedge of which is some 200 yards from the cottage, and there is no opportunity for the shelter of any person mischievously disposed at the back in the direction from which the stones came. At the opposite side of the road, to the front of the house, there is stone wall, which forms the boundary of another large field, without any cow byre or other shelter in it, and before long the stones came in the front windows as well as at the back. A watch was set immediately the neighbours came borne from work; but without avail, as the stones continued pour in at the windows all the evening. A cessation took place near midnight, only to be renewed the following morning, and the pelting continned until Satnrday afternoon without any discovery being made as to the cause. The old woman was in the greatest consternation, and evidently ascribed the visitation to the Evil One, not knowing what she had done to deserve such treatment. Strange to say every stone was aimed at the window with such unerring precision that there is scarcely whole pane left in any of them. Some of the stones were larger than man's hand, which entirely does away with the supposition that they have been thrown by a catapult.—Darlington Times." (Darlington Times, December, 1871; not @ BNA.)]


1871 Dec. 20 / 10:28 p.m./ Bolide from Cassiopeia / at Nancy, France / C.R., 74-202. / Like Feb. 20, 1878. [IV; 570. Guyot, P. "Sur un bolide observé à Nancy, le 20 décembre 1871." Comptes Rendus, 74 (1872): 202-203. See: 1878 Feb. 20, (IV; 2333).]


[1871 Dec 21. Wrong date. See: 1870 Dec 21, (IV; 571).]


1871 Dec 22 / Cut / Marked haziness over part of floor of Plato / by Pratt / Rept B. Assoc 72/301. [IV; 572. Webb, T.W., and Robert Harley, and Edward Crossley. "Report of the Committee for discussing Observations of Lunar Objects suspected of Change." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1872, 245-301, at 301.]


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

1871 Dec 30 / Rel-Ph. J., 1-1 / See back. / Moravia, more phe. [A; 708. "Marvels at Moravia." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 11 (no. 15; December 30, 1871): 1, (c. 1-5). See: 1871 Nov 18, (A; 705).]

 
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