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Last updated: April 8, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1888


1888:


1888 / Wild Men / See case, Oct 22, 1888. / Nov. 27. [B; 828. See: 1888 Oct 22, (B; 958), and, 1888 Nov. 27, (B; 977).]


1888 / Body of Mrs. W.I. Peters / Frankfort, Ind. / See Dec. 22, 1888. [B; 829. See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1888 / Tingwick, Mass / Josephine Bedard / Fasting girl / See Ap. 20, 1889. [B; 830. See: 1889 Ap. 20, (B; 1024).]


1888 / Ghost lights / See March, 1891. [B; 831. See: 1891 March, month of, (B; 1130).]


1888 / Wem / near scene of recent murders / The Cornishman, Feb. 16 / The dead body of Mrs. Sarah Powell, missing from home of her brother John, a farmer of Wem, was found Feb 11 in a pit near the farm. [B; 832. "Another Shropshire Mystery." Cornishman, February 16, 1888, p. 7 c. 5.]


1888 / B.M. / Chicago / May 14—beetles, S. Car and Pa / 21—Ohio aurora / 24—birds unknown, Chicago / 27—SS in air, S Car / 28—obj fell, Cleveland. [VI; 1213. See: 1888 May 14, (VI; 1327); 1888 May 21, (VI; 1331); 1888 May 24, (VI; 1335); 1888 May 27, (VI; 1336); and, ([1888 May] 28—obj fell, Cleveland.).]


1888 Jan / Feb—Columns / June Toronto Globe / N.G. [VI; 1214.]


1888 Jan-March / Gen notes / N.Y. Times. [VI; 1215.]


1888 / San Fran. / Have Jan. / Nothing in it. [VI; 1216.]


1888 Jan / Nothing in Toronto Globe. [VI; 1218.]


1888 Jan / CaseThomas Beary / Trib Index. [B; 833. (New York Tribune Index.)]


1888 / Asiatic prairie hens appeared in Europenot seen again till 1907. / Sci Amer 100-348. [VI; 1220. “Sun Spots and Animals.” Scientific American, n.s., 100 (May 8, 1909): 348.]


1888 Jan / and Dec., 1887 / These animal stories seem related to escaped animals from Barnum fire ab Nov., 1887. [B; 834. "Barnum Burned Out." New York Sun, November 21, 1887, p. 1 c. 7 & p. 2 c. 1. (Refs???)]


1888 Jan / Liverpool hotel polt / In Med and D.B. of Jan. 27, said that bedclothes upon 2 of the maids violently removed, also sheets under them. [B; 835. (Medium and Daybreak, January 27, 1888; not online.)]


[1888 Jan 1. Wrong date. See: 1888 Jan 5, (VI; 1217).]


1888 Jan 1, ab / Mrs. John Herbert, Joliet, Illwent into trance. / See Oct. 25, 1888. [B; 836. See: 1888 Oct 25, (B; 962).]


1888 Jan 1, ab / (Wem) / Myst murders at Wem / See Feb. 16. / Wem polt / Nov., 1883. [B; 837. See: 1883 Nov 1, (B; 557); 1883 Nov., (B; 558).; and, 1888, (B; 832).]


1888 Jan 1 / N.Y. Trib of, 11-4 / In the Rock Street Rectory, Fall River, Mass, myst sounds and lamps myst lighted. / See Dec 22. [B; 838. "Mysterious Midnight Voices." New York Tribune, January 1, 1888, p. 11 c. 4. See: 1887 Dec 22, (B; 824).]


1888 Jan 1 / St Louis Glob-Dem of / That at Beatrice, Neb., a haunted housesounds like spoons and knives falling on the floorlocked and bolted doors flying open and shutting with a bang. Recalled that the owner's wife had said that if he ever married again she would haunt him. She died several years before, and he had married again. [B; 839.1, 839.2. “A Haunted House.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 1, 1888, p. 9 c. 7.]


1888 Jan 2 / morning / Sharp shock / Mexico / L.T. 3-6-c. [VI; 1225. “Earthquake in Mexico.” London Times, January 3, 1888, p. 6 c. 3.]


1888 Jan 3 / Christiania, Norway / Snow from a clear sky / Pop Sci News 22-116. [VI; 1222. (Popular Science News, 22-116.)]


1888 / Add to the mastodon / That another found in Indiana embedded in wet peat, near Covington. Marrow still in the larger bones. The diggers used it to grease their boots. / Sc Am 44-360. [VI; 1223. “The Mastodon in Recent Times.” Scientific American, n.s., 44 (June 4, 1881): 360.]


1888 / 1st week in Jan / In a “terrible storm” fiery mass seen to fall from sky (Middleburg, Florida). Searching party organized. At last it transpired that three Negroes found it. It had been broken into several fragments by striking a light-wood stump the largest piece buried out of sight. The other pieces were still hot, and the darkies refused to handle them. / N.Y. Times, Jan 8-4-7. [VI; 1224.1, 1224.2. “A Meteoric Stone Found.” New York Times, January 8, 1888, p. 4 c. 7.]


1888 Jan 3 / [LT], 6-c / q's / Mexico / 13-5-b Algeria / 13-5-e; 14-7-e; Feb [2-]5-f; [Jan] 12-5-eCanada, America / 27-13-cCent. Africa / [Jan] 24-5-dMass. [VI; 1225. “Earthquake in Mexico.” London Times, January 3, 1888, p. 6 c. 3. “Earthquake in Canada.” London Times, January 12, 1888, p. 5 c. 5. “Algeria and Tunis.” London Times, January 13, 1888, p. 5 c. 2-3. “Earthquake Shocks in America.” London Times, January 13, 1888, p. 5 c. 5. “Earthquake Shocks in the United States.” London Times, January 14, 1888, p. 7 c. 5. “Shocks of Earthquake in Massachusetts.” London Times, January 24, 1888, p. 5 c. 4. “Earthquakes in Central Africa.” London Times, January 27, 1888, p. 13 c. 3. “Earthquakes in the United States.” London Times, February 2, 1888, p. 5 c. 6.]


[1888 Jan 5 /] Feb 2 / Feb 29 / Mar. 1 / Ap. 4 / May 20 / July 3 / Oct 22 / June 19, 1889 / qs at Invergarry / Geol Mag., 1891-365 / See 1890. [VI; 1217. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1889.” Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 8 (1891): 57-67, 306-316, 364-372, at 365. See: (1890).]


1888 Jan 5 / wld men / G-Dem of / Wild men of Connecticutwild girl near Madison; was seen oncenear Willimanticnear Mystic, one who wore a bearskinout at a man who knocked him down with a club, after which not seen. / Ext.a wild man with a lantern digging holes in ground at Massapoag. Same phe reported from Block Islandboth respects alike. [B; 840.1, 840.2. “Wild People.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 5, 1888, p. 3 c. 5.]


1888 Jan 5 / St L. G.D. of / That upon a farm at Zollarsville, near Washington, Pa, smoke was seen issuing from the ground and that on 4th, hot pieces of clay were thrown upward. [VI; 1219. “An Incipient Volcano.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 5, 1888, p. 3 c. 7. “The citizens of Zollarsville and vicinity are considerably exercised over a discovery on the farm of Simon Bone. Smoke was noticed several days ago issuing from the ground, and in order to ascertain its origin, a number of neighbors assisted in making excavations. When only a few feet down the ground became so hot that the men had to quit digging. It is stated that to-day hot pieces of clay were thrown up and that the smoke has become very dense.”]


1888 / ab Jan 1 / Smoke issuing from ground near Zollarsville, Pa. / St L. Glb-Dem 5-3-7. [VI; 1221. “An Incipient Volcano.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 5, 1888, p. 3 c. 7.]


1888 Jan. 5 / night / A shower of ashes in parts of Elverum, Central Norway. Supposed must have been an eruption in Iceland. / Nature 37/421. [VI; 1227. “Notes.” Nature, 37 (March 1, 1888): 421-423, at 421. The Grímsvötn volcano.]

1888 Jan 7 / G-Dem of / Near Mexico, Mo., slaughter by an animal that had been seen in the dark several times, said been a panther. [B; 841. (St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 7, 1888; not found here.)]


1888 Jan. 8 / 4 p.m. / Porsgrund, S.E. Norway / met size of moon moving toward Taurus / Nature 37-329. [VI; 1228. “Notes.” Nature, 37 (February 2, 1888): 327-330, at 329.]


1888 Jan 8 / Shock / Algeria / Sci News, N.S., 1-102. [VI; 1229. “Earthquakes." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (February 3, 1888): 102.]


1888 Jan 9 / NY Times, 5-4 / Wild man in woods near Centre Creek near Middletown, Conn. "No one can get near him, for, when approached, he runs like a wild deer. He is evidently insane." [B; 842. “A Lunatic in the Woods.” New York Times, January 9, 1888, p. 5 c. 4.]


1888 Jan 10 / q. / Trinidad, W. Indies ./ BA 1911-55. [VI; 1230. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 55. ]


1888 Jan 10 / Island of Grenada / Sound like distant thunderslight shock, then a violent shock—succeeding days more shocks. / L.T., Feb. 10-13-f / Also Barbadoes, Trinidad and Venezuela. / L.T., Feb 23-6-f. [VI; 1231. “Earthquake in the West Indies.” London Times, February 10, 1888, p. 13 c. 6. “Earthquakes in the West Indies.” London Times, February 23, 1888, p. 6 c. 6.]


1888 Jan 10 / Violent q. / Grenada, W. Indies / repeated and strong on 15th. / Sci News, N.S., 1-152. [VI; 1232. “Earthquake in the West Indies." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (February 17, 1888): 152.]


1888 Jan 11 / 4:50 a.m. / q / Ottawa / NY Times 12-1-4. [VI; 1233. “Safe for Sixteen Years.” New York Times, January 12, 1888, p. 1 c. 4.]


1888 Jan 12 / [LT], 6-e / 24-4-b / Solar phe. [VI; 1234. Tyndall, John. “A Rare Solar Phenomenon.” London Times, January 12, 1888, p. 6 c. 5. Rice, Thomas Spring. “White Rainbows.” London Times, January 24, 1888, p. 4 c. 2. Tyndall observed a fog-bow, (Ulloa's ring), for the second time in several years, (on January 9, 1888), on Hind Head, Haslemere, England. Rice, (the second Baron Monteagle), asked for an explanation of the phenomenon, having observed it over the Shannon River, in County Limerick, on December 22, 1887.]


1888 Jan 12, 15 / q. / Charleston / B.S.A. 4/152. [VI; 1235. Taber, Stephen. "Seismic Activity in the Atlantic Coastal Plain near Charleston, South Carolina." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 4 (1914): 108-160, at 152.]


1888 Jan 12 / 9:55 a.m. / Shock / N and S Car / 9:32Georgia / N.Y. Times, 13-1-4. [VI; 1236. “Startled by an Earthquake.” New York Times, January 13, 1888, p. 1 c. 4.]


1888 / (?) / Carus-Wlike quartz / Canada. ** [VI; 1237. Symons, George James. "The Non-existence of Thunderbolts." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society of London, 14 (1888): 208-212, at 210. "Alleged Thunderbolts." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society of London, 14 (1888): 239. Carus-Wilson, Cecil. "Thunderbolts." Knowledge, o.s., 8 (October 9, 1885): 320. Carus-Wilson states, (in 1885), that the Casterton thunderbolt fell “some time ago,” (thus, years before 1888), and describes it as “composed of a hard ferruginous quartzite,” (whereas Symons identifies it as “a large nodular concretion of red sandstone.” “Canada” is not mentioned in these articles.]


1888 Jan 12 / Trib, 1-2 / q / Canada. [VI; 1238. "Earthquake in Canada." New York Tribune, January 12, 1888, p. 1 c. 2.]


1888 Jan 13 / S. Wales D News of, copied in Med and D.B. of 20thin house of Rev. W.J. Davies, Lower House, near Trevecca, in Brecknockshire. Each night objects leave places and hop about. Coal from buckets near fireplace thrown all about. / (Voices heard in upstairs rooms.) [B; 843.1, 843.2. (Medium and Daybreak, January 20, 1888.) “Spiritual Manifestations Extraordinary.” South Wales Daily News, (Cardiff), January 13, 1888, p. 3 c. 5.]


1888 Jan 13 / 11:10 p.m. / Faint shock, Örebro, Central Swedenp. 399 / 15th, ab midnight, shock near Trysil Church, in Central Norwayp. 421 / Nature, vol 37. [VI; 1239. “Notes.” Nature, 37 (February 23, 1888): 397-400, at 399. “Notes.” Nature, 37 (March 1, 1888): 421-423, at 421.]


[1888 Jan 13-14] / NY Times 14-1-4. / [fragment]. [VI; 1245.2. “Fiercely Burning Flames.” New York Times, January 14, 1888, p. 1 c. 4.]


1888 Jan 14 / Danbury Stones / See June 30, 1886. / See July 1, 1888. [B; 844. See: 1886 June 30, (B; 697), and, (1888 July 1).]


1888 Jan 14 / Sounds / Danbury / See in New Haven, Sept 8, 1877. / See July, 1886. [B; 845. See: 1877 Sept 8 and 9, (IV; 2205), and, 1886 June 30, (B; 698).]


1888 Jan 14 / See Reading, Jan 1, 1898. [B; 846. See: 1898 Jan 1, (C; 370).]


1888 Jan 14 / Incendiary fires at DanburySee July 1, 1888. [B; 847. See: 1888 July 1, etc., (B: 924 & 925).]


1888 Jan 14 / Danbury Sounds / G. Dem offrom N.Y. Sun, ab 9th / That at Danbury since 1st of the year, "This town is much exercised over the strange rattling and shaking of doors, windows and blinds, and even, in some instances, the crockery on the shelves." To a N.Y. Sun reporter, one of the residents said that upon taking hold of a shaking window he had felt an electric shock. Said was no trembling of the ground. / See Reading case, Jan 1, 1898. [B; 848.1, 848.2. "Are There Ghosts in Danbury?" St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 14, 1888, p. 16 c. 1. "Are There Ghosts in Danbury?" New York Sun, January 9, 1888, p. 5 c. 7. See: 1898 Jan 1, (C; 370).]


1888 Jan 15 / Sun, 3-6 / Unknown wild animal heard howling near Norwich, Conn. [B; 849. "It Howls At Night." New York Sun, January 15, 1888, p. 3 c. 6.]


1888 Jan 16 / Sun, 4-7 / Westminster, Md. / “The other morning” ab. 6 o'clockthick yellow cloud settled over the town and then remarkable electric displays. [VI; 1240. "Sunbeams." New York Sun, January 16, 1888, p. 4 c. 7.]


1888 Jan 19 / London Echo of / Polt house in Beatrice, Neb. Sounds like knives and spoons falling to floor. Locked and bolted doors flying open. / Med and D.B., Jan 27. [B; 850. (Medium and Daybreak, January 27, 1888.) (London Echo, January 19, 1888.) “Notes on News.” Sportsman, (London), January 24, 1888, p. 2 c. 1.]


1888 Jan 19 / Penzance / The Cornishman, published in Penzance / In part of Bread street, near a spiritualist's meeting room, butcher shop of Mr. J.H. Beare. On night of 11th, though doors of stable not unlocked, horses heard moving about as if terrified. Men watched next night and saw the bolted doors fly open. Next day fires started up under carts. Story written flippantly attributed to practical jokes by persons unknown. / See Jan 27. [B; 851.1, 851.2, 851.3. "Ghost, Burglar, or Mischievious Fun." Cornishman, January 19, 1888, p. 4 c. 3-4. See: 1888 Jan 27, (B; 855).]


1888 Jan 20 / It Sounds / Catania / 1:55 and 3 p.m. / loud rombi / See 1816. [VI; 1241. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 40. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1888 Jan 20 / (+) / 12:15 a.m. / Wheeling, W. Va / object like a comet for ten minutes / NY Times 29-12-7 / but did not change position. “In size and general appearance it was about like the great comet which illuminated the eastern sky a few years ago.” [VI; 1242. “A Strange Light in the Heavens.” New York Times, January 29, 1888, p. 12 c. 7.]


1888 Jan 21 / Stones and spooks / St Louis Globe-Dem, from the Cincinnati Enquirerthat night of 21st at Spring City, Tennessee, Mr. Joe McPherson, U.S. Deputy Collector, was aroused by the sound of heavy stones thrown against his house. He saw two figures in front of his house, throwing stones, and ordered them away. They would not leave and he fired at them, but without effect. Finally they did leave. But they returned the next night and the night after that. They were fired at. Then a crowd gathered and watched and fired without effect. [B; 852.1, 852.2, 852.3. (St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 21, 1888; not found.) (Cincinnati Enquirer, ca. January, 21, 1888; not found.) “Very Substantial Ghosts.” Philadelphia Times, February 5, 1888, p. 5 c. 2.]


1888 Jan 22 / Sun, 10-5 / Cincinnati Enquirer / Unknown animal heard screaming or barking near Decatur, Ind, in December, '87 . Then a dog found all torn up, presumably by it. The thing appeared in Monroe township and people thought might be a lynx. [B; 853. "Scared by a Big Animal." New York Sun, January 22, 1888, p. 10 c. 5. “Probably a Wild Cat.” Cincinnati Enquirer, January 14, 1888, p. 5 c. 5.]


1888 Jan 22 / Sun, 10-5 / Paducah News / Strange animal slain near Paducah. Seemed to have no body at all. Seemed all head and tailhead like a young kitten's except for size of eyes. No visible legs or wings. [B; 854. "A Freak in Fur." New York Sun, January 22, 1888, p. 10 c. 5. (Paducah News, ca. January 22, 1888; not @ Newspapers.com)]


1888 Jan. 23 / 3 shocks / Newburyport, Mass. / Nature 37-300. [VI; 1243. “Notes.” Nature, 37 (January 26, 1888): 299-301, at 300.]


1888 Jan 23 / mirage / 9:45 to 10:45 a.m. / Fort Maginnis, Mont. / Mason Lake and its surroundings, 40 miles away, plainly seen. / MWR '88-16. [VI; 1244. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 16 (no. 1; January 1888): 16. See: 1887 Dec 6th, (VI; 1201).]


1888 / Italian series of rombi / (+) / (Sounds) / from Jan 20 to say Jan 23, 1890 / It Sounds. That some were in sky, see Nov 18, 1889; Dec 8, '89; Oct 22, '90; Jan 17, '93. / (Then 1897 a great day. Also Feb 20, '97-Feb 17, 1901.) [VI; 1245.1. See: 1889 Nov. 18, (VI; 1911); 1889 Dec 8, (VI: 1929 & 1930); 1890 Oct 22, (VII; 28); 1893 Jan 17, (VII; 830); 1897 Jan. 7 to 16, (VII; 1667); 1897 Jan. 13, (VII; 1669); 1897 Feb. 8, (VII; 1683); 1897 Feb 20, (VII; 1691); 1897 July 2, (VIII; 53); 1897 Sept 11, (VIII; 91);  1897 Sept 30, (VIII; 106); 1897 Oct 28, (VIII; 116); 1897 Dec. 27, (VIII; 153); 1898 Feb 3, (VIII; 179); 1899 Ap. 18, (VIII; 425); 1900 Feb. 7, (VIII; 580); 1900 Aug 13, (VIII: 644 & 645); 1900 Nov 2, (VIII; 670); and, 1901 Feb 17, (VIII; 709).]


1888 Jan 25 / (met ship) / 6 a.m. / Atlantic Ocean / Rept. Capt. Bristow of the steamship “Persian Monarch” / Electric mass. Meteor fell from sky, exploded so close to ship that sparks fell on deck. Gale at the timeno thunder nor lightning before or after. / Am. Met. Jour 4/488. [VI; 1246. “Meteor Reports.” American Meteorological Journal, 4 (February 1888): 487-488.]


1888 Jan 27 / Med and Daybreak of / Stable of Mr. J.H. Beare, butcher market, Jew Terrace, Penzance. Tons of hay taken from the loft. Locked doors opened. A new bolt removed. / See Jan 19. [B; 855. (Medium and Daybreak, January 27, 1888; not online.) “Strange Proceedings at Penzance.” Royal Cornwall Gazette, (Truro), January 20, 1888, p. 6 c. 6. See: 1888 Jan 19, (B: 850 & 851).]


1888 Jan 27 / aphasia / Rev Dr. Edward F. Miles, pastor of the Church of the Reformation, New York City, upon Dec 30, disappearedfound self in a hospital, Memphis, Tenn. [B; 856. "Tattooed With Crucifixes." New York Sun, January 3, 1888, p. 1 c. 6. "Missing Pastor Miles Safe." New York Sun, January 28, 1888, p. 3 c. 1.]


1888 Jan 27 / Stones in a house and polt / St Louis Globe-Democrat of, page 7 / That at the home of P.C. Martin of Caldwell Co., N. Carolina, stones had been falling since November, “in the house”that by various persons they had been seen to fall, weighing from 1 to 10 pounds. "They fall apparently from the ceiling and do not indent the floor as they would do if dropped from that height." Said that sometimes they seemed to project themselves from "the side of the room". The family moved a quarter of a mile to a new house. The stones fell there. "Sometimes they fall outside and appear to come from a clear sky. Said there were other phe. "Tin wash bowls move off a bench, on which they are usually kept, and fly up as high as the top of the door, then go over across the room and fall on the bed." [B; 857.1, 857.2, 857.3, 857.4. “Strange Manifestations.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 27, 1888, p. 7 c. 5.]


1888 Jan 27 / ab 12 at night / Whirl at Jarrow. Carriage with 3 men pounced upon and overthrown. / Sci. News, N.S., 1/127 / Scientific News. [VI; 1247. “An Extraordinary Whirlwind." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (February 10, 1888): 127-128.]


[1888 Jan 27 /] 1888 Feb 28 (?) / Whirl at Jarrow / An Reg 1888/6. [VI; 1274. (Annual Register, 1888-6.) "Gale & Snowstorm." Newcastle Evening Chronicle, January 28, 1888, p. 3 c. 1. "There was a heavy fall of snow in Jarrow and district last night, and now the aspect is wintry indeed. The mow was blown about in gusts that at times were almost blinding, but the temporary violence of the storm may be more readily guessed by the relation of an incident which occurred at midnight, and which resembles more the sensational tales of hurricanes that obtain in America than anything to which we are accustomed in the North of England. A trap, containing two young men named George Atkinson and James Teasdale and the driver, was being driven up Grange Road, when Atkinson saw the snow circling round in a strangely fantastic fashion, and shouted to the driver to stop the horse. Before that could be done, however, the conveyance was caught in what the occupants believe to have been a whirlwind. The horse and trap were lifted from the ground, carried a short distance, and thrown down again. Mr. Atkinson, who is a butcher in the Market Square, Jarrow, told our representative, this morning, that he was lifted out of the trap and carried straight down the street a distance of 150 yards, before touching the ground, and was then deposited on his back, his leg coming in contact with the corner of a house, and being badly hurt. Teasdale was lifted by the wind from the trap and thrown against some iron rails near a shop window farther down the street. He did not sustain any injury beyond a slight shock, and clung tenaciously to the rails until the blast swept by. The driver was carried into Gray Street, where he was thrown against the door of a house, his mouth coming forcibly in contact with the woodwork. In Terry Street the seat of the trap was discovered 40 or 50 yards from where the accident occurred, while the sheet was found right down Buddle Street about 250 yards from the trap. Atkinson lost his hat and muffler. A number of people collected, and the horse, which had been thrown across the shafts of the trap, was lifted up, and had almost to be carried to the stable. It feared that the animal will be of little use, having received a severe shaking, in addition to other injuries. The trap was little the worse for the mishap. At the same time, and close to the scene of the accident, a large window in the shop of Mr. Dandy, grocer, Grange Road, was blown in, and a chimney at the Prince of Wales' Hotel was blown down."]


1888 Jan 28 / U.S. / Total eclipse of moon. [VI; 1248. Eclipse of the Moon. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1888, 466.]


1888 Jan. 28 / Total eclipse moon / C. [VI; 1249. Eclipse of the Moon. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1888, 466.]


1888 Jan 29 / [Sun], 10-5 / In the snow, tracks of "an enlarged panther with webbed feet, in Pike Co., Pa. On Jan 19, an animal appeared in a barnyard near the Shohola Creek, and devoured a heifer. It was tracked for miles but not found. Bones of two deer, presumably devoured by it, were found in the woods. Said that two residents came upon itnot describedand it killed their dogs. Someone quoted (Milford Despatch) that probably a big panther and compact paws made a webbed mark. / (On this page of Sun a bear story, but "the panther" is mentioned in it.) [B; 858.1, 858.2, 858.3. "Undoubtedly a Panther." New York Sun, January 29, 1888, p. 10 c. 5-6.]


1888 Jan 29-30 / Series / St Louis G-Dem, Jan. 31 / Early the 29th, it was thought that there had been an explosion at the torpedo station, at Newport, Rhode Island, but that this found not true. About midnight a loud rumbling sound was heard, and houses shook and dishes in closets rattled. “One lady, whose face as she lay in bed was toward the window, says she saw a flash, and is of the opinion that the commotion was caused by the bursting of a meteor. [VI; 1250.1, 1250.2. “An Alleged Earthquake.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 31, 1888, p. 2 c. 6.]


1888 Jan 30 / 12:40 a.m. / Dynamite explosion in Newport, R.I., harborreported from several towns in mass as a q. / Sun 31-1-4. [VI; 1251. (New York Sun, January 31, 1888, p. 1 c. 4; not online.)]


1888 Jan 30 / 1:30 a.m. / Shockas if from an explosion or like rumble of railroad train. / NY Times, Feb 5-10-7 / Rockville, Md. [VI; 1252. “A Little Earth Shake in Maryland.” New York Times, February 5, 1888, p. 10 c. 7.]


1888 Jan 30 / Phil P. Ledg. of / Mirage at Gray, Mainehorizon N to Ehuge pines never seen before—trees with tops flattened and joining like a bridge—a hill with a strip of timber on it. [VI; 1253. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 30, 1888; not found in Maine newspapers.)]


1888 Jan. 31 / early morn. / Distinct shock near Birmingham / L.T., Feb. 3-8-a. [VI; 1254. “Earthquakes in Great Britain.” London Times, February 3, 1888, p. 8 c. 1.]


1888 Feb / Mrs John Herbert, Joliet, Ill, went into a trance for 9 months. / See Oct. 25. [B; 859. See: 1888 Oct 25, (B; 962).]


1888 Feb. / near Corfu (N.Y.) (?) / Lum. objs. / See Lum Objs. [B; 860. See: (Lum. Objs.)]


1888 Feb 1, etc. / Ghst in Shrewsbury. There was a stranger in town. He was accused and beaten. / L.T., Feb 7-12-b. [B; 861. “Capturing a Ghost.” London Times, February 7, 1888, p. 12 c. 2.]


1888 Feb. 2 / Sharp shock, large part of Scotland. On Jan 31, at Birmingham. / Nature 37-350. [VI; 1255. “Notes.” Nature, 37 (February 9, 1888): 349-353, at 350.]


1888 Feb. 2 / q. / Comrie, etc. / Sci News, N.S. / 1-152. [VI; 1260. “Earthquake in Scotland." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (February 17, 1888): 152.]


1888 Feb 3 / [LT], 8-a / q / Gt. Britain / Scotland / 9-4-b. [VI; 1261. “Earthquakes in Great Britain.” London Times, February 3, 1888, p. 8 c. 1.]


1888 Feb 5 / night / Fall of a brilliant detonating meteor in Pamlico Sound, near Raleigh, Nor. Car. / St Louis Globe Dem. 7-6-4 / See Feb 7. [VI; 1256. “Fall of a Meteor.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 7, 1888, p. 6 c. 4. See: (Feb 7).]


1888 Feb 5 / Northwestern Karpathians / Red snow / Met Zeit 5-122. [VI; 1262. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 5 (1888): 105-124, at 122-123.]


1888 Feb. 7 / L.T., 12-b / At Shrewsbury a ghost captureda Welsh farmer who had moved there shortly before. [B; 862. “Capturing a Ghost.” London Times, February 7, 1888, p. 12 c. 2.]


1888 Feb 7 / St. Louis G-D of / Dispatch from Raleigh, Nor Car., that all the wells near Glenwood, Johnston Co., were bubbling violently. It began 10 days before. / See Feb 5. [VI; 1257. “Boiling Wells in North Carolina.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 7, 1888, p. 6 c. 4. See: (Feb 7).]


1888 Feb 10 / NY Times, 5-7 / Whole family in West Gardiner, Me, with the delusion that there were monkeys about. [B; 863. “A Family's Strange Delusion.” New York Times, February 10, 1888, p. 4 c. 7. "Lots of Monkeys." Portland Daily Press, (Maine), February 14, 1888, p. 1 c. 6. Thomas Stevens and wife sent to insane asylum, two teenage daughters to an orphanage.]


1888 Feb. 10 / 12:40 a.m. / Venersborg, Sweden / S. to N. / brilliant meteor / Nature 37-445. [VI; 1263. “Notes.” Nature, 37 (March 8, 1888): 442-445, at 445.]


1888 Feb 13 / P Led. of / At Elizabeth City, N.C., det. met a few nights before. [VI; 1258. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 13, 1888.)]


1888 Feb. 1 / thst. / (I) Buxton / See Aug., 1887. / (N). [VI; 1259. See: (Aug., 1887).]


1888 Feb 13 / Thunder heard (Kent?) 44 miles away. / Jour Roy Met soc 14/222. [VI; 1264. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. “Lightning in Snowstorms." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society of London, 14 (1888): 222-225, at 222-223.]


1888 Feb. 13 / Hawkhurst, Kent, evening, 6:37flash of light and detonation like of a meteor. / Jour  Roy Met Soc 14/223. [VI; 1265. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. “Lightning in Snowstorms." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society of London, 14 (1888): 222-225, at 222-223.]


1888 Feb. 13 / At Arundel and near Midhurst, bet 6:30 and 6:45 p.m., similar phe. / Jour Roy, page 224. [VI; 1266. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. “Lightning in Snowstorms." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society of London, 14 (1888): 222-225, at 224.]


1888 Feb. 14 / St. Louis Globe-Democrat, 17-2-5 / night / Akron, Ohio, explosive sounds heard, and strong shocks. At Sandy Hill, 4 miles east, fissures found in the ground. Been similar 30 years before and in 1882 and 1887 fissures from one center. [VI; 1267. “A Strange Phenomenon.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 17, 1888, p. 2 c. 5.]


[1888 Feb 14 /] 1888 March 3 / G-Dem of / Ac to Baltimore Americanin a farm house 8 miles from Pocomoke, Md.two stoves that moved about, fell, righted themselves. Said stoves shut up tight, but fire flying from them. [B; 875. “Are There Spooks in the Stoves?” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, March 3, 1888, p. 12 c. 2-3. (Baltimore American, ca. March 3, 1888.) "Stoves That Can Walk." St. Paul Daily Globe, (Minnesota), March 11, 1888, p. 18 c. 6-7. "Greenbackville." Peninsula Enterprise, (Accomac, Virginia), February 25, 1888, p. 3 c. 2. "The residence of one Mr. Jno. Jones, of Worcester county, Md., some six or seven miles from here, has been visited within the last few days by thousands of excited people anxious to witness the antics of two stoves in Mr. Jones' house...." "On Tuesday of last week the stove in the sitting room became frantic, as it werejumping from the floor, turning over and breaking one foot. A remarkable fact in connection with them though, is that the stoves will not perform the usual antics in the presence of visitors, but on leaving the room you can bear the stove rattle and can see on returning that its position is changed. A gentleman of this town informed the writer that he marked a place on the floor with chalk and left tbe room to find its position changed on his return. The family of Mr. Jones consists of himself, his mother and a small girl, and it is said the stoves perform most in the presence of the old lady. The matter so far has not been explained."]


1888 Feb 18 / G-Dem. of, 12-4, from N.Y. Sun / Ghost at City Island / something “white and tall,” rolling along above the ground. [B; 864. “Terrified by a Tall Ghost.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 18, 1888, p. 12 c. 4-5.]


1888 Feb 18 / G. Dem of, 12-3, from San Fran. Examiner / Town of Gilroya Mrs Liebolt had died Dec 9, 1887. Then strange sound. Lamps lighted and at the same time window shades going down. Furniture over-turned in locked rooms. Her husband said he saw her ghost. [B; 865. “Gilroy's Lively Ghost.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 18, 1888, p. 12 c. 3. “A Gilroy Ghost.” San Francisco Examiner, February 5, 1888, p. 4 c. 6.]


1888 Feb. 19 / 9 p.m. / Storm destroys Lafayette, Ky, and damage at Mason's Landing, Ky. / G-Dem 22-1-4. [VI; 1268. “Mason Landing (Ky.) Damaged,”and, |Lafayette (Ky.) Destroyed.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 22, 1888, p. 1 c. 4-5.]


1888 Feb. 19 / 2 p.m. / Tornado cloud moving Northeasterly directiondamage at Houston, Mo. / G Dem 22-1-5. [VI; 1269. “Heard from at Houston, Mo.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 22, 1888, p. 1 c. 5.]


1888 Feb. 19 / Sunspots / St Louis G Dem 21-3-2 / “Rochester, N.Y., Feb. 20:The recurrence of the solar disturbances which first appeared on December 3 and 4, is reported by H.C. Maine. The group of spots had fairly come into view by the sun's rotary, when the tornado at Mt. Vernon, Ill., occurred on Sunday afternoon. Considerable magnetic disturbance was observed here to-day.” [VI; 1270.1, 1270.2. “Scientific Observations.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 21, 1888, p. 3 c. 2.]


1888 Feb 19 / Cyclone details / St Louis G-Dem 20page 1 / The Vernon, Ill, Cyclone. / 4:45 p.m. / “It had been thundering and raining for some time, when suddenly a low, rumbling sound was heard and a black cloud that seemed to touch the earth, swept over the city, and it became very dark.” Hundreds of houses blown down and many persons crushed in the ruins. It had been hailing during the afternoon. “All over in a minute.” Witnesses describe the long continuing ordinary showersuddenly roofs in the air. The Court House spreading out flat. A volley of trunks from the railroad station. / 3 minutes later the sun was shining. / A mile from the town no evidence of the cyclone. Funnel-shaped cloud rising and falling like a balloon. / Piedmont, Moat 2 p.m. a “fierce black cloud appeared in the southwest.” Then a cyclone with a swath ab 200 yards wide. / Rainno wind at Salem, Ill. / More stormy weather at Cairo and Centralia. The roof of the Court house wound around a telegraph pole. / Funnel-shaped cloud at Cutler, Ill, ab 4 p.m. in n. easterly direction. Some damage. [VI; 1271.1 to 1271.5. “Death on the Wind's Wing.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 20, 1888, p. 1 c. 4-7 & p. 2 c. 1-2.]


1888 Feb 21 / det met / 9:30 / Monmouth (where?) N.J.? / “terrific meteoric explosion / Sun 23-1-7. [VI; 1272. "A Meteor Visits Monmouth." New York Sun, February 23, 1888, p. 1 c. 7. Monmouth, New Jersey.]


1888 Feb 23 / ghst and railroad / ab 9 p.m. / At town 8 miles north of Indianapolis an apparition in the form of a woman gliding along a railroad track. Something of the kind had been seen several times before. At this point, in Jan., 1884, a wreck in which 6 men were killed. / Sun, 1888, Feb. 29-4-7. [B; 866.1, 866.2. “A Gliding Ghost.” New York Sun, February 29, 1888, p. 4 c. 7. “A Ghost at Broad Ripple.” Indianapolis News, February 24, 1888, p. 1 c. 5. “Good Ghost Story.” Indianapolis News, February 25, 1888, p. 1 c. 4. “Through a Bridge.” Indianapolis News, January 31, 1884, p. 1 c. 5-6. A bridge crossing the White River, at Broad Ripple, Indiana, (which was being repaired), collapsed under a passenger train, in the morning of January 31, 1884. Four railroad employees, two passengers, and the superintendent of the bridge repairs were killed.]


1888 Feb. 23 / See March 15. [B; 867. See: 1888 March 15, (B; 887).]


1888 Feb 23 / Look up. See where this wreck was. [B; 868. “A Gliding Ghost.” New York Sun, February 29, 1888, p. 4 c. 7. See: 1888 Feb 23, (B; 866).]


1888 Feb. 24 / At Liége and 29th at Brussels, rain from almost clear sky. / Ciel et Terre 9-37. [VI; 1273. “Pluie ou neige par ciel serein.” Ciel et Terre, 9 (1888-1889): 37-40.]


1888 Feb. 26 / G-Dem of / Dispatch from Bement, Ill. Stories from swampland about 6 miles north of B of "alleged screeches" from a supposed wildcat. Finally a coon was tracked down and that said been it. / Bement. [B; 869. (St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 26, 1888; not found here.)]


[1888 Feb 28 (?). Wrong date. See: 1888 Jan 27, (VI; 1274).]


1888 Feb. 29 / Stones-Psycho / Ac to Pondicherry correspondence to the Madras Mail, copied in St. L. Glb Dem, May 19-12-1on 29th, in a school near the Government House in the Rue du Government, several teachers were surprised to see pieces of  brick falling in the room in which they were sitting. There was investigation; the police were called, the Deputy Mayor came and watched and saw the fall of pieces of [brick] continuing. Upon 2nd of March, 20 city officials assembled to clear up the mystery and to allay public excitement. They searched for means by which anything could have entered and then discussed, and while discussing, half a brickbat fell. The meeting broke up, but the phe continued"brickbats and portions of masonry continue to fly about the room". / But nowa clergyman recommended that in the room should be placed a brick with a white cross upon it. This was done"presently a brick of corresponding size, but bearing a black cross, dropped on the top of the first brick. / The phe continued. [B; 870.1 to 870.5. “A Mystery at Pondicherry.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 19, 1888, p. 12 c. 1. (Madras Mail, ca. May 19, 1888.)]


1888 Feb. 29 / B S / Madras Mail, March 12-5-2, tells of similar phe at Guntur, in the year 1883the occupants of a native house complained to the police that they were very much troubled by falling stones inside this house. The assistant superintendent of Police went with some Constables to the place. Some were stationed outside, some inside. A pebble fell at the superintendent's feet. Said was a pebble unlike others fro vicinity of the house. The mystery could not be solved and the house was abandoned. [B; 871.1, 871.2, 871.3. (Madras Mail, March 12, 1888, p. 5 c. 2.)]


1888 Feb. 29 / In Madras Mail, March 5. [B; 872. (Madras Mail, March 5, 1888.)]


1888 Feb-March / This June 13, 1885 / Pondicherry phe / told in Light, Ap 14, 1888. [B; 873. "A Mystery at Pondicheery." Light, 8 (no. 380; April 14, 1888): 176. (Allahabad Pioneer, March 10, 1888.)]


1888 March / Face on glass / Eaton, Ohio. / See Dec 29, 1888. [B; 874. See: 1888 Dec 29, (B; 997).]


1888 March 2 / Great meteor, ab 5:30 a.m., Vicenza, Novara and Trentino. / At 7.45 p.m., one at Florence, passing about 5 degrees below Sirius. / Cosmos, N.S., 9/423. [VI; 1275. Denza, Francesco. “Météores lumineux." Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 9 (March 17, 1888): 423.]


[1888 March 3. Wrong date. See: 1888 Feb 14, (B; 875).]


1888 March 3 / Period luminous objs near Batavia, Corfu, Indian Falls, N.Y. / See under "Owls". [B; 876. See: Invaders / 1888 / March 3, (SF-IV: 40).]


1888 Mar 4 / Thick shadow seen / Proc. S.P.R. 10/313. [B; 877. "Report on the Census of Hallucinations." Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, 10 (1894): 25-422, at 313-315. "I sat reading with my back turned to the candle near me, so that the light fell on my book. Suddenly the light disappeared, so that I could not go on reading. I looked round quickly, and saw a dark shadow pass between me and the candles. The shadow was so thick as to seem almost like a substance, but I did not see any shape. We both exclaimed, ' I thought both the candles were going out,' and F. said, 'It seemed to me to come from the door.' When the shadow had passed, the candles were perfectly clear and steady; the old nurse was stooping low over the fire, on the same side of the room as we were. She was in great trouble about a sick brother, and when we spoke to her did not seem to have noticed anything or heard us talk." Her sick brother died that same night. "The shadow was extremely distinct, about the thickness of a man's body, height not noticed . It passed from the direction of the door, past Miss T., and Miss Wilson saw it just as it passed between herself and the candle, and then disappeared behind her. She is very positive that it could not have been due to any wind or mere flickering of the candle. It was a solid-seeming mass of almost black shadow."]


1888 March 6 / Halluc / St L. G-Dem-15-6-6 / That afternoon of 6th in Washington Street, Portland, Ore3 persons watching the Williamette River supposed they saw waves disturb it and then rise and engulf housesthen vanishing. [B; 878. “A Vision of Horror.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, March 15, 1888, p. 6 c. 6.]


1888 March 6 / Yarn / P.L. of / That the Savannah News responsible for the following: That on Tuesday, 6 miles NW of Covington, fell a sign, "W.T. Wilson, Boot and Shoe Maker" painted on itsupposed from the Mt Vernon cyclone. [B; 879. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 6, 1888.)]


[1888 March 6. Wrong date. See: 1889 March 6, VI; 1276).]


1888 March 6 / Saint-Baudile (Tarn) / black snow / Le Cosmos, March, 1888, p. 423. [VI; 1277. Pezous. “Neige noire." Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 9 (March 17, 1888): 423.]


1888 March 6 / or about. / Black snow / Mont-de Bauvoisin (Isèse) / L'Astro 7-155. [VI; 1278. “Même sujet.” Astronomie, 7 (1888): 155.]


[1888 March 6. See: 1892 Feb 1, (VII; 352).]


1888 March 6 / The Mayon Volcano in the Philippines / Phil. Pub Ledger, May 9-3-9. [VI; 1279. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 9, 1888, p. 3 c. 9.) The Mayon volcano.]


1888 March 8 / 6 p.m. / q. / Penn / Science 13-268. [VI; 1280. Kershner, Jefferson E. “An Earthquake in Pennsylvania.” Science, s. 1 v. 13 (April 5, 1889): 268.]


1888 March 10 / Mirage shipice / G-Dem of, from the Two Rivers Chroniclethat been reported that a large schooner had been seen upon Lake Michigan. All sails straining though no wind. Said that no such vessel in the lake, and could not with so little wind have sailed through the ice fields. [B; 880.1, 880.2. “A Phantom Ship on Lake Michigan.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, March 10, 1888, p. 12 c. 1. “Additional Local Notes.” Neenah Daily Times, February 10, 1888, p. 1 c. 6. “That phantom ship reported as having been seen on Lake Michigan turns out to have consisted only of the young man who constantly sings white wings, that never grow weary. In this case they became awful weary and flopped away up the lake into the blizzard regions carrying the dude.”]


1888 March 11 / See Aug. 3, 1889. [B; 881. See: 1889 Aug 3, (B; 1036).]


1888 March 11 / Emma Toms / Trance / Attica, N.Y. / See Ap. 21. [B; 882. See: 1888 Ap. 21, (B; 901).]


1888 March 11 / The blizzard. [VI; 1281. (Refs.???)]


1888 March 11 / It Sounds / Aquila / 3:55 p.m. / rombi / See 1816. [VI; 1282. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 40. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1888 March 11 / Wheel / In the St. Louis Globe Democrat, Oct 7-23-5, 1888, said the following account had been forwarded by G.R. Berwick, second officer of the British steamer Strathleven, to the Hydrographic Office in New York City.March 11, Lat 4-59 N and Long 106-26 E. (China Sea) 9:45 p.m. / Beams of light passing over the vessel from the east. Then another lot from the west. The easterly lot shifted its center northward or southward. At 10:12, the appearances changed and there were 3 centers, 2 eastward and one to the westbeams, revolving one way then the other way. They passed at a rate of 75 a minute, then sometimes slower. At 10:30 p.m., the steamer passed through a large patch of what appeared to be greasy water surrounded by luminous circles and then was seen a large luminous patch that was swelling and contracting violently. Officer says that upon the upper bridge he seemed to be above the beams and could see them pass over dark parts of the ship. [VI; 1283.1 to 1283.5. “Wonders of the Sea.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 7, 1888, p. 23 c. 5.]


1888 March 12 / (+) / Sun, 4-7 / At Two Rivers, Wis, "the other evening"The river covered with thick ice.a large schooner sailing up the river. [B; 883. "Sunbeams." New York Sun, March 12, 1888, p. 4 c. 7. See: 1888 March 10, (B; 880).]


1888 March 13-15 / q's / Celebes / only March q's / BA '11. [VI; 1284. A class I earthquake. Milne, 734.]


1888 March 13 / Coast New Guinea / Sea Wave / Nature 39-303 / On coast of Australia and SA [South America], bet March 14 and 17, sea disturbances. [VI; 1285. Wharton, William James Lloyd.“Volcanic Sea Wave.” Nature, 39 (January 24, 1889): 303-304. The Ritter Island volcano.]


1888 March 14 / choking spook / Glob Dem of, 9-1 / In St. Louisghost of a negro that choked another negro, branding his throat and face with the grasp. / See 15-12-1. / The negro, Frank Hall, with a distinct print of thumb and fingers blistered on his skin, was in the police court, charged with vagrancy. Said that he was undoubtedly branded, but that someone was exhibiting him and that for exhibition purposes he may have permitted himself to be branded. [B; 884.1, 884.2. “Branded by a Ghost.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, March 14, 1888, p. 9 c. 1-2. “Scarred by a Spook.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, March 15, 1888, p. 12 c. 1. “The marks on the negro's face are as distinctly burned as if he had been branded with a red-hot iron, and the young man is very sheepish about the matter. Dick Deadeye and Hall were deadly enemies when Dick was alive, and a bad quarrel arose between the two men at craps. That is why the living man has such a terror of the terrestrial ramblings of the dusky departed. It is believed that another negro perpetrated this cruelty on Hall to secure him as a freak for a show. He was being exhibited when found, the regular admission fee being 25c, while those who had only 5c or 10c were not turned away.”]


1888 March 15 / [LT], 5-f / Myst epidemic in Glasgow. [B; 885. “Epidemic in an Industrial School.” London Times, March 15, 1888, p. 5 c. 6.]


1888 March 15 / See Feb. 23. [B; 886. See: 1888 Feb 23, (B: 866, 867, & 868).]


1888 March 15 / P Ledger of / Ghost near Indianapolis / Sometimes on the river. [B; 887. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 15, 1888.) See: 1888 Feb. 23, (B; 866).]


1888 March 15 / Nightlights in a clear sky / La Nature, March 1888 / at Moulins (Allier). [VI; 1286. (La Nature, March, 1888???)]


1888 March 16 / Sun, 4-7 / 4 Fishermen at Knoxville, Tenn, reported that while crossing the Tennessee, a fish like a serpent, 10 feet long, capsized and smashed their boat. [B; 888. "Sunbeams." New York Sun, March 16, 1888, p. 4 c. 7.]


1888 March 16 / (about) / At Lusley Brook, near Oldhama butterfly in a “blinding snowstorm”. Not said what species“The wings are said to be beautifully variegated.” In a warm room it revived. / Nature 37-492. [VI; 1287. “Notes.” Nature, 37 (March 22, 1888): 492-495, at 492. (Oldham Evening Express, March 16, 1888; not at BNA; nothing elsewhere with more info).]


1888 March 16 / (+) / 3's / It Sounds / Aquila / 2:15 a.m. / 2:30 / 2:45 / Sound / See 1816. [VI; 1288. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 40. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1888 March 17 / Incendiarism doubtfully attributed / Sun, 1888, March 17-1-5. [B; 889. "Is She a Fire Bug?" New York Sun, March 17, 1888, p. 1. c. 5.]


1888 March 17 / Invader / G-Dem of, 13-4, from the Newnan (Ga.) Heraldthat Mr. T.N. Bingham, of Puckett Station, had upon Thursday night (15th or 8th) seen, while walking down the railroad track, a light that he thought was the headlight of an engine. It approached and receded several times and then went floating off above the tree tops, reflections from it visible long after it had become lost to view in the woods. [B; 890.1, 890.2. “A Frisky Will o' the Wisp.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, March 17, 1888, p. 13 c. 4-5. “A Frisky Will o' the Wisp?” Newnan Herald and Advertiser, (Georgia), March 9, 1888, p. 8 c. 4. The light was observed on the night of March 1, 1888; and, Puckett Station is now identified as Moreland, Georgia.]


1888 March 17 / Showers of blackish mud in Naples. Ac to Prof Palmierivery simplesaid from Africa. / Sci News, 1-39. [VI; 1289. “A Shower of Mud." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (April 27, 1888): 391.]


1888 March 17 / (P) / Rain of mud / blackish / Naples / Sci. News, N.S., 1/391. [VI; 1290. “A Shower of Mud." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (April 27, 1888): 391.]


1888 March 17 / Heavy rain and q. / Madagascar / Cosmos, N.S., 13-114 / See Feb 7, 1887. [VI; 1291. Camboué, Paul. “À Madagascar.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (May 4, 1889): 113-114. See: 1887 Feb. 7, (VI; 1000).]


[1888 March 18. Wrong date. See: 1889 March 18, (VI; 1292).]


1888 March 21 / Jupiter / Stationary. [VI; 1293. Jupiter stationary. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1888, 466.]


1888 March 22 / ab. 6 a.m. / Providence, R.I. / Large, meteor thought to have dropped into the city. / NY Times 25-14-3. [VI; 1294. “Hunting for a Meteorite.” New York Times, March 25, 1888, p. 14 c. 3.]


1888 March 23 / [LT], 4-e / (?). [VI; 1295. “Ulloa's Bow.” London Times, March 23, 1888, p. 4 c. 5. A fog-bow, (Ulloa's ring), was observed in Guatemala about two years earlier. See: 1888 Jan 12, (VI; 1234).]


1888 March 24 / Constantinople / Luminous obj watched for 20 minutes traversing the sky. / L'Astro 1888-193. [VI; 1296. Duprat, Charles. “Bradyte ou bolide lent.” Astronomie, 7 (1888): 193-194. “Il s'avançair lentement vers l'Est, parcourant environ 3° par minute, et il resta visible pendant plus de vingt minutes. Cette visibilité est, si je ne me trompe, une des plus longues qui aient été observées. Sa grosseur était égale au tiers de la surface apparente de la Lune, et la trainée lumineuse avait près de 30° de longueur.” The bolide was observed at Constantine, Algeria, (not at Constantinople).]


1888 March 27 / Sound / Norway / “On the night of March 27, a rumbling sound like that of a distant earthquake was heard at Aaseral, in Southern Norway, but no shock was felt. It could not have been thunder, as the weather was clear and intensely cold.” / Nature 38-16. [VI; 1297.1, 1297.2. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (May 3, 1888): 16-18, at 16.]


1888 March 31 / Severe shock / 10 p.m. / island of Lemnos / Levant Herald, Ap. 4. [VI; 1298. (Levant Herald, April 4, 1888.)]


1888 March 31 / ab. 10 p.m. / See Ap. 2. / Splendid meteor / Asker, Nerice, Sweden / Nature 37-614 / See Jan 5, 8, 13, 15. / Ap 17, 18. [VI; 1299. “Notes.” Nature, 37 (April 26, 1888): 614-616, at 614. See: 1888 Jan. 5, (VI; 1227. ); 1888 Jan. 8, (VI; 1228); 1888 Jan 13, (VI; 1239); 1888 Ap. 2, (VI; 1300); 1888 Ap. 17, (VI; 1312); and, 1888 Ap. 18, (VI; 1313).]


1888 Ap. 2 / West coast of Norwayshocks and loud “subterranean” rumblings. At one place, detonation heard, but no shock felt. / Nature 38-42 / (See Norway Series, 1886.) [VI; 1300. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (May 10, 1888): 41-43, at 42. See: (Norway series, 1886).]


1888 April / (+) / Began phe in house of a farmer named Bedenfield Spencer, near Centreville, Md. Strange footprints seenof a man wearing one rubber boot. Forces shaking the house and pushing people. / Glb Dem, 1889Jan 3. [B; 891.1, 891.2. “Shot for a Witch.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 3, 1889, p. 8 c. 5.]


1888 April / Animal / Sheep-killing in N.J. / See May 10. [B; 892. See: 1888 (April), (B; 893).]


1888 (April) / San Fran. Chronicle of May 10-1-2 / That a month before, near Rahway, N.J., upon the farm of a farmer named Bentwick, 2 sheep were killed at night, their throats cut in no such way as a dog likely to do. Next night 2 more killed same way. Next night 2 men hired to guard the sheep. That night nothing on this farm but the next day came news of a farmer 15 miles away who had so lost sheep. Then not one night without loss on some farm of sheep. One night, 1st week in May, the farmer's niece, Miss Grace Bentwick, asleep by a fire, was awakened by the Siberian mastiff, or by its way of regarding, watching her to be sure she slept. She rose. The dog with signs of fury sprang toward her. She dropped into her chair and feigned sleep. Then the dog moved toward the door, looking back every step. By raising a bolt he opened the window and sprang out. Story is that late that night the dog returned and again came to the girl, who was sleeping by the fire; having gone there with a book to read. Blood found near where he stood. Next morning learned 2 more sheep killed. The blood found. Dog sprang at the girl. Bentwick shot it. [B; 893.1, 893.2, 893.3. “A Singular Story.” San Francisco Chronicle, May 10, 1888, p. 1 c. 2.]


1888 Ap. 5 / Local shock / San Fran Chronicle of 8th, quoting N.Y. World. / In Newberry Co., S. Car., after a heavy rain, the house occupied by M.P. Wise, after a rumbling sound began to rock, throwing pots off stove. No shock felt in a nearby house but persons a mile away had heard the sound and felt a slight motion. [VI; 1301.1, 1301.2. “A Supposed Earthquake.” San Francisco Chronicle, April 8, 1888, p. 9 c. 5.)


1888 Ap. 7 / G. Dem of / A ghost waving a lantern in the Ill. Cent. Railroad near Galena, Ill., near a place where a brakeman was killed the summer before. [B; 894. “A Ghostly Brakeman,” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 7, 1888, p. 12 c. 1.]


1888 Ap. 7 / Polts / St Louis G D of / Recent manifestations on an old house in Bonham, Texas, abandoned because of phe. Windows and door opening and shutting violently. Whole house shaking sometimes. No spooks seen. [B; 895. “A Haunted House in Texas.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 7, 1888, p. 12 c. 5.]


1888 Ap 7 / Religio-Phil. Jour, 6-5 / That “lately” at noon, at Orlando, Florida, a brilliant meteor at noon. [VI; 1302. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 7; April 7, 1888): 6, (c. 5).]


1888 Ap. 7 / Religio-Philosophical Journal of / near Cairo, Georgia / Swellings of the earth. For distance of 20 yards, tracks of the S. F and W Railway raised a foot. [VI; 1303. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 7; April 7, 1888): 6, (c. 5).]


1888 Ap 7 / 10:30 p.m. / (It) / Sounds / Aquila / See 1816. [VI; 1304. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 40. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1888 Ap 9 / 3 a.m. / Ap 12, etc.8 a.m. / (obj?) / Comet seen by 2 sea captains, Atlantic Ocean. / Look up. / Science 11-252. [VI; 1305. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 11 (May 25, 1888): 251-252. Comet C/1888 D1.]


1888 Ap. 10 / Op. Mars / (Al). [VI; 1306. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1888, 466.]


1888 Ap. 10 / Ice and Waterspout / Lat 41 N / Long 47 W. / Capt McKay of the s.s. Pavonia saw a gigantic waterspout shaped like an hour glass. It broke, and pieces of ice 4 to 6 inches in diameter fell upon the ship. / Nature 38-204. [VI; 1307. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (June 28, 1888): 203-206, 204-205. The S.S. Pavonia was a Cunard Line mail ship sailing between Liverpool and Boston.]


1888 Ap. 10 / Sci News, N.S., 1-584in N. Atlantic, 40° 59' N and 47° 30' Wa large waterspout and several small ones travelling ab 30 miles an hour. Near a vessel, the British steamship Pavonia, the spout broke and a deluge of water and pieces of ice fell on the deck. Ice 4 to 6 inches in diameter and ac to the captain looked “as if chopped off a large block”. The next day, about 250 miles N.E. of this position, another was seenfrom another vessel. [VI; 1308.1, 1308.2, 1308.3. “Waterspouts." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (June 22, 1888): 584.]


1888 Ap. 11 / (q) / Shocks in n. Wales, especially at Llangollen / Times, Ap. 13. [VI; 1309. “Earthquake in Wales.” London Times, April 13, 1888, p. 5 c. 4.]


1888 Ap 12 / [source unidentified], 4-7 / (Frgs) / The only one-frog and grown-frog story I saw (and only one so early in year). That “the other day, at Milledgeville, Ga, in a heavy th storm, “a tremendously big frog came down with the rain and struck the sidewalk with a thud. He lay motionless for a moment, then flopped over on his feet, and then with mighty bounds jumped into a store and upon the show-cases.” [VI; 1310.1, 1310.2. “Georgia and Florida.” Savannah Morning News, March 24, 1888, p. 6 c. 1-4. “At Milledgeville Tuesday [March 20] during a heavy thunder storm a bull-frog of enormous size was seen to fall, seemingly from the clouds, and strike the sidewalk in front of Haygood & Caraker's store. It remained motionless for a moment and then, with a couple of leaps, bounced upon the showcase in the store, and danced over counters, showcases, etc., to the great consternation of all who saw its antics.”]


[1888 April ] / Ilyald / persons murdering astronomers / Sun, Ap 16, 1888. [VI; 1311. (New York Sun, April 16, 1888; not found here.)]


1888 Ap. 14 / San Fran Chronicle, 1-3 / Emma Toms, a young woman of Attica, Wyoming Co., N.Y., been lying in a trance since March 11. [B; 896. “A Strange Case.” San Francisco Chronicle, April 14, 1888, p. 1 c. 3-4.]


1888 Ap. 15 / Spook / G-Dem of / Spook at Columbus, N.J. First manifestation when Mrs. Garrett Post was startled by something unseen tugging at her shawl. Then others said saw a form like a headless human being. Ghost said then to have ridden up and down the tracks on a hand-car. [B; 897.1, 897.2. “A Headless Spook.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 15, 1888, p. 5 c. 3.]


1888 Ap. 17 / Örebro, Sweden / bright, horizontal flash of lightning and no reportfollowed by an unsteady aurora / Nature 38/16. [VI; 1312. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (May 3, 1888): 16-18, at 16.]


1888 Ap. 18 / morning / Vexio, South of Sweden / Shock followed by subterranean detonations. / Nature 38-42. [VI; 1313. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (May 10, 1888): 41-43, at 42. Vexiö is now identified as Växjö, Sweden.]


1888 Ap. 20 / G Dem, 5-4 / Wild man / Gadsen Co, Florida. [B; 898. “An Alleged Wild Man.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 20, 1888, p. 5 c. 4.]


1888 Ap. 20 / Luminous spot / Scientific News of / Cor writes that he had recently read of a strange phe alleged to have been seen in the Atlantic about 100 miles south of the equator. A shaft or pillar of greenish light as if standing out of the ocean. A steamship at full speed took 7 minutes in passing through it. No electric phe mentioned. [VI; 1314.1, 1314.2. “Luminous Phenomenon at Sea." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (April 20, 1888): 382. “I have recently read an account of a strange luminous phenomenon alleged to have been seen somewhere in the Atlantic at about 100 miles to the south of the equator.” “A Strange Sight at Sea.” North-Eastern Daily Gazette, (Daily Gazette for Middlebrough), April 2, 1888, p. 4 c. 3. “The master of a Spanish steamer that arrived the other day at an English port from the East coast of South America has given particulars of a very interesting electrical or luminous appearance that was encountered by him about 100 miles south of the equator. He was in the cabin, be says, when he was awakened by his chief officer, who begged him to step on deck at once to view and pronounce upon a singular light, towards which the steamer was directly heading. The mate added that he had slowed the engines down, as be did not like the idea of running into that strange shining on his own responsibility. The captain mounted to the bridge, and, looking ahead, witnessed a very extraordinary sight. The sea was calm, with a light swell rolling from the east; the time was shortly after midnight; the sky was dark and starless, yet the dusk was clear—that is to say, a ship's lights, for example, would have been visible for a considerable distance. Right on a line with the bows ot the steamer there stood, or seemed to stand, a vast shaft of pale-greenish light, apparently about three-quarters of a mile broad, and, owing to the nearness of the vessel to it, seemingly elevated to the height of about forty-five degrees. In the primitive days of the marine the sailor, terrified by such a sight as this, would have instantly shifted his helm and sailed away from the ghostly luminosity as nimbly, as the wind would suffer him to fly. The Spanish captain, collecting; after a brief glance, the space of brightness, signalled to the engine-room to go full speed ahead, and presently the ship steamed into the glittering volume. It was noticeable that although, when quite close to the body, the vessel continued in blackness, proving, at least to the satisfaction of the Spanish captain, that the light possessed no powers of externally illuminating, the moment the ship had driven into the thick of it everything was as plain aboard her as though she had been bathed in soft waning moonlight. The peculiar hue of the radiance converted the steamer and the men on her decks, who stood staring about them, into objects that would have fascinated the imagination of a Wieland or a Coleridge. Everything was as green as grass; the sailors wore a most bedevilled look, and glanced at one another with the emotions of men who had been suddenly hurried into another world, and who, in their hasty transit, had gathered unrecognisable lineaments and expression. The ship occupied about seven minutes in steaming through this shaft of light. She then emerged into the blackness of the night again, leaving the radiance shining very clearly over her stern, where it gradually narrowed and grew dimmer as it receded, until it died out in the distance. The sea is so full of the unexpected that, strange as the story may seem, it deserves to be believed, if for that reason only. Happily for the veracity of the Spanish captain, his assurances are to be confirmed by the experiences of others. A similar phenomenon, for example, was witnessed by General Sabine and Captain James Ross in their first expedition to the North. The ship was in the Greenland seas when an extraordinary appearance, closely resembling that observed by the Spanish captain, was witnessed over the bows. Directly in the course of the vessel there rested a stationary light on the water. The ship was suffered to proceed, and when she had entered the light she was entirely illuminated; the most elevated parts of the masts and sails, it is said, and the minutest portions of her rigging being visible. The extent of this shining atmosphere was about 450 yards; the light was steady throughout. In this case, however, it is shown that the lustrous appearance was curved as though it were a portion of the leg of a rainbow. There was something possibly of an auroral character in the apparition. It was thus described at least by General Sabine, who writes of it as a luminous arch, and says it was formed partly of a uniform yellowish light and partly of vertical or nearly vertical streamers proceeding out of the luminous arch upwards. But one must not look for anything auroral a hundred miles south of the Equator. It is probable that the glittering body which the Spanish steamer entered was phosphorescent mist.” The luminous phenomenon observed by John Ross and Edward Sabine, in the autumn of 1819, was said to have been communicated to Arago by Thomas Romney Robinson. Arago, François. “Sur le Tonnerre." Annuaire pour l'an 1838, présenté au Roi, par le Bureau des Longitudes, (1838): 221-618, at 372-373. Becquerel, Antoine César. Traité Expérimental de l'Électricité et du Magnétisme.... Paris: Firmin Didot Frères, 1840, v. 6, 144-145. Sabine's wife did not include this observation in her English translation of François Arago's Meteorological Essays, (London: Longman, Brown, Green & Longmans, 1855), nor is it mentioned by John Ross, (not James Ross), in his account of the expedition, A Voyage of Discovery..., (London: John Murray, 1819). Lardner, Dionysius. A Manual of Electricity, Magnetism, and Meteorology. London: Longman, Brown, Green & Longmans, 1841-1844, v. 2, 189-190. Phipson, Thomas Lamb. Phosphorescence or, The Emission of Light by Minerals, Plants, and Animals. London: L. Reeve, 1870, 57-59, (illustrated as the frontispiece). Phipson adds: “The following is however that of General Sabine himself, which he has kindly given me in a letter:—'Before the ship entered into the Auroral light, the Aurora as seen from the ship appeared as an arch, formed partly of an uniform yellowish lights and partly of vertical or nearly vertical streamers proceeding out of the luminous arch upwards. The centre of the arch was not far distant from the zenith, and the legs descended towards east and west points. We were opposite to one of the legs, and sailing towards it till we entered it. We were sensible of having entered it, by no longer seeing it as a distant appearance, and by the moment of our entrance into it being marked by a generally diffused light, enabling those on deck to see distinctly men on the fore-topsail yard, who we could not see previously.' The ship was sailing southward, and entered the western leg of the luminous arch."]


1888 Ap. 21 / Ghst / G. Dem, 12-1, from Indianapolis Journal / Told by Taylor Reagen, of Plainfield, Ind, that while he and his wife were driving from Mooresville, they saw an object in the fields like a white calf keeping pace with their horse. But it seemed to move with no motion of its legs. They stopped and it stopped. They on and it on. Mr. R, investigated next day, learning that no farmer along his route owned such an animal. [B; 899.1, 899.2. “Race with a Spectral Calf.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 21, 1888, p. 12 c. 1-2. “A Ghost that Takes the Shape of a Calf.” Indianapolis Journal, April 13, 1888, p. 3 c. 1.]


1888 Ap. 21 / Fires / Religio-Phil Jour, 5-2 / Home of Louis Hildebrand, Freeport, Ill. He and his family kept busy putting out fires starting in house. "The strangest feature about it all is that the flames never broke out at night nor unless someone was near enough to be on time to put them out." [B; 900.1, 900.2. "It is said that the modest dwelling of Louis Hildebrand...." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 9; April 21, 1888): 5, (c. 2). "Haunted by a Fire Demon." Watertown Republican, (Wisconsin), April 4, 1888, p. 2 c. 1.]


1888 Ap. 21 / Trance / Religio-Phil Jour., 5-2 / Village of Attica, N.Y., near BuffaloEmma Toms, young womanhad been asleep more than a monthstarted March 11, but this was after an interval of 8 days from former sleep. These 8 days awake, but took only about a glassful of milk. [B; 901.1, 901.2. "The village of Attica...." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 9; April 21, 1888): 5, (c. 2).]


1888 Ap. 21 / See Aug 3, 1889. / Sleeper / See Ap. 28. [B; 902. See: 1888 Ap. 28, (B; 905), and, 1889 Aug 3, (B; 1042).]


1888 Ap. 21 / G-D., 12-4 / Ghost in Chicago, ac to Chic. Tribune. [B; 903. “Terrified by a Spook.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 21, 1888, p. 12 c. 4-5. “The Law Avenue Ghost.” Chicago Tribune, April 16, 1888, p. 1 c. 5.]


1888 Ap. 21 / (Ghost) / G. Dem of, 12-1, from the Albany Journal / That in the house, 29 Porteus Street, Little Falls, N.Y., had lived two families, One Carney and the other Moynahan, both having been driven out by sound like a dry cough, opening and slamming doors and windows. [B; 904.1, 904.2. “Driven Out by a Ghost.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 21, 1888, p. 12 c. 1. (Albany Journal, ca. April, 1888.) "A Spook That Coughs." Waterbury Evening Democrat, April 14, 1888, p. 1 c. 3. "Little Falls, N.Y. , April 14.For several weeks a ghost rumor has been flying about town. The spook is located in the dwelling at 29 Partens street. James Carney lives on the first floor and Mrs. Moynahan and her two children on the floor above. They have lived in the house several months." "About three weeks ago they were startled by ghostly noises during the night. They heard in one of the rooms the sound of a hacking cough, which would be repeated at frequent intervals until the dawn of morning. Doors would be opened and shut by some unseen agency. If a door was closed it would spring open almost instantly, and if opened it would close with a slam, and yet no hand touched it." "Mr. Carney is a contractor for mason work, and is a man of fair intelligence and not easily frightened, but the coughing of that ghost made his hair rise on end and his knees quake. The sound of coughing came from under the bed in one of his rooms, but when they moved the bed and looked under it they could discover nothing as to the cause of the coughing. Doors that were carefully fastened at night were found unfastened in the morning." "The Carney and Moynahan families became demoralized. On Monday night last the ghosts made such a racket that both families took refuge in one room. They heard with blanched faces the doors slammed to and opened by some invisible agency, while the coughing was more violent than ever. There were seven persons huddled together in the room, but the ghost did not seem at all disturbed by their presence. On the following day they vacated the premises, and nothing will induce them to enter them again."]


1888 April 21 / Plock, Poland / Mongolian sand grouse / Nature 38/53, 77, etc. / After that, many Poland, Prussia, Saxon, Silesia. Had been a similar invasion in May 21 of 1863. / Flight of 40 seen in Herts, England, May 20. / Norway, May 12, crops filled with tiny unknown seeds, p. 132. [VI; 1315. Meyer, A.B. “On the Reappearance of Pallas's Sand Grouse (Syrrhaptes paradoxus) in Europe.” Nature, 38 (May 17, 1888): 53-54. “On the Reappearance of Pallas's Sand Grouse (Syrrhaptes paradoxus) in Europe.” Nature, 38 (May 24, 1888): 77. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (May 31, 1888): 112-114, at 112. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (June 7, 1888): 132-136, at 132.]


1888 Ap. 21 / 7:30 p.m. / Greene, Chenango Co., N.Y. / large met / Sci Amer 58/293. [VI; 1316. “A Meteor.” Scientific American, n.s., 58 (May 12, 1888): 293.]


1888 Ap. 28 / Trance / Religio-Phil., Jour, 4-5 / Here name of sleeper of Attica is Emma Althouseawoke Ap. 20 after a sleep of 33 days. Upon awakening told of the death of her grandfather, at Mumford, Ky. He had died durng the sleep. / See Ap. 21. [B; 905. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 10; April 28, 1888): 4, (c. 5). See: 1888 Ap. 21, (B; 901).]


1888 / April 28, '88, to March 11, '89 / Period covered by a Report upon Barisal Guns—Proc Asiatic Soc Bengal 1889/199. [VI; 1317. "Report on Barisal Guns...." Proceedings of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1889 (August): 198-209.]


1888 Ap 29 / G-Dem of, 21-7 / Spook seen in different parts of Holmesburg, Pa., near Philadelphia. White obj like a man but 10 feet high. [B; 906. “A Giant Spook.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 29, 1888, p. 21 c. 7.]


1888 April 29 / Heard at Moyapore. Considered “due to thunder in the distance”. There had been a storm. / See Ap. 28. [VI; 1318. "Report on Barisal Guns...." Proceedings of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1889 (August): 198-209, at 200. See: 1888 / April 28, '88, to March 11, '89, (VI; 1317).]


1888 May 2 / Wld Animal / Phil Ledger of / "An animal different from any ever before seen in that part of the country has been destroying sheep, calves and swine in Barstow Co., Georgia. Its victims were found dead, with a wound in the throat, resembling the stab of a stiletto. A farmer who surprised the beast in the act of trying to kill a sleeping calf, says the creature resembled a coyote in its movements. It was of a dark copper color, with a 'possum-shaped head and small bead-like eyes, the tail bushy and erect and the body long and smooth. Men have banded together and searched for it day and night, but have been unable to capture it. On one occasion a pack of hounds pursued it, when suddenly the leading dog came whining back with a stream of blood oozing from the throat and in half an hour died. [B; 907.1 to 907.4. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 2, 1888.) “A Georgia Mystery.” Butte Miner, April 17, 1888, p. 1 c. 6. The “Barstow” and “Barlow” county names probably refer to Bartow county, in Georgia; however, no articles concerning this animal were found in a search of Georgia newspapers, nor in the Atlanta Constitution, (April 15 to 18, 1888).]


1888 May 3 / G. Dem of, 6-7 / Dispatch from San Francisco. That there was "a dark mystery" connected with the sinking of the Queen of the Pacific at San Luis Obispo. Divers had found one of the coal ports open. The mate testified that upon leaving San Francisco he had screwed the nut tight upon this, and that in 12 hours they could not have loosened. It is said that spiritualists had predicted that the ship would sink. Said that this had been noised around so in San Fran that the passenger agent of the vessel had known of cases of persons who would not sail on the Q.P. So said that suspected that a spirutalist had sailed and had opened the door to make good the prediction. [B; 908.1 to 904.4. “Queen of the Pacific.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 3, 1888, p. 6 c. 7.]


1888 May 4 / Light-obj. / New Zealand / (D 275). [VI; 1319. The note copies information from page 275 of The Book of the Damned. "Notes." Nature, 42 (August 21, 1890): 401-403, at 403. White, Taylor. “Description of a Meteor, of 4th May, 1888.” Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 22 (1889): 105-108.]


[1888 May 5. Frankfort, Kansas. Fort repeatedly refers to a note on this date, starting in 1872. Not found in Series B. No other references to Frankfort, Kansas, found. Nothing found in the Frankfort Bee nor in the Frankfort Sentinel, (May 4 or 11, 1888).]


1888 May 7 / [LT], 8-b / Etna. [VI; 1320. “Mount Etna in Eruption.” London Times, May 7, 1888, p. 8 c. 2.]


1888 May 12 / G. Dem of, 12-1from Cin. Enquirer / That great excitement in the neighborhood of Irwin Creek, Meigs Co., Ohio. In the home of William Marshall, Mrs Marshall standing at a window saw outside the figure of a man who seemed to attempt to strike her. No one there. Then other members of the family saw the figure and all recognized in it an enemy, who had threatened the life of William Marshall. Then polt phenoise, bricks, down chimneysdoors slamming ad firebrands thrown about. Then monstrous figures were seen: a huge snow-white horse bearing a fiery-red riderthen “a huge white bird, with monstrous outstretched wings” moving outside the house and screaming hideously. It is said that neighbors heard the sounds and supposed that they came from some large wild animal. [B; 909.1 to 909.4. “Ghostly Phantoms.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 12, 1888, p. 12 c. 1. “Ghostly Phantoms.” Cincinnati Enquirer, May 6, 1888, p. 20 c. 1-2.]


1888 May 12 / See other Wild Animals "heard" / earlier in year. [B; 910. See: (Wild Animals).]


1888 May 14 / 10 p.m. / Brilliant meteor / Kalmar, Sweden / Nature 38-158. [VI; 1321. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (June 14, 1888): 158-161, at 158.]


1888 May 17 / Cyclone at Madeira and then fell a waterspout of salt water that did enormous damage. / Sci News, N.S., 1-607. [VI; 1322. “A Cyclone at Madeira." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (June 29, 1888): 607.]


1888 May 19 / R-Phil Jour., 6-5 / Scioto Co., Ohio / Strange animal preying on cats. [B; 911. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 13;  May 19, 1888): 6, (c. 5). "A strange animal, described as being too large for a catamount and too small for a panther, which has been preying upon the cats in Scioto County, Ohio, has now made its appearance in the county seat. Dr. Bing, of Portsmouth, was awakened the other night by the barking of a dog, and looking out of the window, saw the strange creature sitting on the porch not four feet away. The Doctor turned on the light and the animal hastily departed."]


1888 May 19 / At sunset Moscow for ab. 8 minutes in a purple light. / L.T. 21-6-e. [VI; 1323. “Atmospheric Phenomenon.” London Times, May 21, 1888, p. 6 c. 5.]


[The following four notes were clipped together by Fort. VI: 1324 to 1327.]


1888 (May 19) / BO / Ninety Six, S.C. / In N.Y. Herald, Oct. 12, 1886, an account of mysterious explosive sounds that been heard at this place since Jan., 1885. [VI; 1324. “Trembling Earth.” New York Herald, October 12, 1886, p. 4 c. 5.]


1888 May 19 / (+) / (Strange insects) / Glb Dem of, 1-7 / Atlanta, Ga, May 18 / “A few nights ago the inhabitants of Ninety Six and those of the surrounding country for several miles were aroused from sleep. It was about 10 o'clock that a loud roaring was heard that the people believed was an approaching tornado. A short while later the noise became more distinct and the air was filled with a moving black mass that fell in showers of bugs, covering the ground in many places an inch thick. Large pine fires were built, in which many of the bugs were destroyed. Every night since, at exactly the same hour, there is a similar occurrence. Prof. Bowdahulen, a scientist of note, has visited the place so as to witness the phenomenon. He has examined the bugs and asserts that he has never found them before in the country. They are of a species that is peculiar to the southern part of Africa, and a few years ago rained down on the people of that section every night for six months in the year. The bug “is about the size of a June bug, black and rough, with long pointed, gauzy wings. It is harmless  and dies soon after touching the ground.” [VI; 1325.1 to 1325.6. “Shower of Bugs.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 19, 1888, p. 1 c. 7. (“Bugs by the Million.” San Francisco Examiner, May 19, 1888, p. 1 c. 7.) (Vandahulen is the name given in the Charlotte Chronicle, May 24, 1888, p. 2 c. 3, article.) ]


1888 June 14 / Cincinnati Weekly Times, 12-2 / “A tornado that left bugs an inch deep all over the face of the earth is the latest wonder. It came near Ninety Six in South Carolina, and the insects were of unknown species. [VI; 1326. (Cincinnati Weekly Times, June 14, 1888, p. 12 c. 2.) See: 1888 May 19, (VI; 1326).]


1888 May 14 / (evening) / Williamsport, Pa. / Shower of black beetles. “Millions of the bugs swarmed through the streets. Such at least is the story. / Cincinnati Weekly Times17-10-5 / See May 14, 1877. [VI; 1327. (Cincinnati Weekly Times, May 17, 1888, p. 10 c. 5.)]


1888 May 20 / Polt? / Sidney N.Y. / Utica Herald / NY Sun 24-4-6 / Home of Conductor Samuel Young, of D. and H. Canal Co., on Cartwright Aveearly morning. Sound of falling object awakened household. Pictures were falling from parlor wall. Cords seemed been cut with a knife. "Yet the house was securely locked and a search failed to reveal any person about the premises who might have committed this malicious act." [B; 912.1, 912.2. "What Made the Pictures Fall?" New York Sun, May 24, 1888, p. 4 c. 6. (Utica Morning Herald, ca. May 21, 1888.; on microfilm.)]


1888 May 20 / A beam with aurora / Readville, Mass / Blue Hills Observatory / Science 18-305. [VI; 1328. Ferguson, Sterling Price. “Auroral Phenomena.” Science, s. 1 v. 18 (November 27, 1891): 305.]


1888 May 21 / Animal-Ky. / Phil P.L. of . "An animal having a head and forefeet like a squirrel's and hind feet like a coon's has been killed near Augusta, Ky. Several hunters of that section when shown the carcass declared that they had not seen one like it before." [B; 913.1, 913.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 21, 1888.) ("Singularities." Omaha Daily Bee, May 27, 1888, pt. 2, p. 13 c. 6-7.)]


1888 May 21 / [LT], 6-e / Atmospheric phe. [VI; 1329. “Atmospheric Phenomenon.” London Times, May 21, 1888, p. 6 c. 5.]


1888 May 21 / Jupiter / Opposition. [VI; 1330. Opposition of Jupiter. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1888, 466.]


1888 May 21 / 11 p.m. / Consternation in Findlay, Ohio / Early in the evening flashes of light from northern horizon, the rays of light concentrating into appearance like a giant hand, “as distinct as if painted on the black background of the sky,” the first finger pointing down at the city. Great excitement in the city until the spectacle slowly faded away. / NY Times 23-3-3. [VI; 1331.1, 1331.2. “A Strange Phenomenon.” New York Times, May 23, 1888, p. 3 c. 3.]


1888 May 22 / First photo. record of the star that blazed out as Nova Aquilae, III, in June, 1918. [VI; 1332. Pickering, Edward Charles. "Illustrations of Nova Aquilae, No. 3, 184300." Harvard College Observatory Circular, 210 (1918): 1-2.]


1888 / Track / SanJan. + May / TorontoJan; June / St Louiswhole year / BostonAug / N. Orleansyear. [VI; 1333.]


1888 May 24, ab / Begin shocks in S. Car / See June 3. [VI; 1334. See: 1888 June 3, (VI; 1341).]


1888 May 24 / unknown birds / Phil P.L. of / Birds unknown to local ornithologists had appeared in Chicago (ac to Inter-Ocean). “They are the size of a canary bird and somewhat resemble it in shape but are of a brilliant and varied (!) plumage. Some are black, with scarlet breast and wings. Others are green and purple with yellow markings.” Said that before the storm similar birds been seen in Wisconsin. [VI; 1335.1, 1335.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 24, 1888.) “Strangers from the South.” Chicago Inter Ocean, May 16, 1888, p. 7 c. 2. “They are the size of a canary and somewhat resemble it in shape, but are of brilliant and varied plumage. Some are black, with scarlet breast and wings; others are green and purple, with yellow markings.”]


1888 May 27 / (+) / (SS in air) / See June. / Evening before sunset three girls in Darlington Co., S.C., saw a huge serpent in the air above them flying with no visible means of propulsion. / NY Times 30-3-5 / See June 3. / “The flying serpent was also seen by a number of people in other parts of the country early in the afternoon of the same day and by those it is represented as emitting a hissing noise which could be distinctly heard.” [VI; 1336.1, 1336.2, 1336.3. “A Flying Serpent.” New York Times, May 30, 1888, p. 3 c. 5. See: 1888 June 3, (VI; 1341).]


1888 May 27 / evening / “A terrible windstorm in eastern Ohio. / Cincinnati Weekly Times, June 7-6-1. [VI; 1337. (Cincinnati Weekly Times, June 7, 1881, p. 6 c. 1.)]


1888 May 29 / Fires / St L G. DemJune 23-12-4 / In the home of Mr. Good, of Millville, York Co., N. Brunswick, a fire. As soon as put out another sprang up. Then others. The account is up to June 5thfire after fire, then the barn was destroyed. "The fires are the talk of the whole neighborhood, and nobody seems able to explain their cause. So far as it can be learned Mr. Good's property was not insured, and the fires are not believed to be the work of human hands or caused by accident." [B; 914.1, 914.2. “Mysterious Fires.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 23, 1888, p. 12 c. 4.]


1888 May 29 / Flames / N. Brunswick / See Aug 7, 1887. [B; 915. See: 1887 Aug, (B; 805); 1887 Aug 6-7, (B; 807); and, 1887 Aug 7, (B: 808 & 809).]


1888 / ab June 1 / Fires / N.B. / In Toronto Globe 6-1-5 / Same. [B; 916. (Toronto Globe, June 6, 1888, p. 1 c. 5.)]


1888 / ab. June 1 / Polt-Vamp / St Louis G-Dem 23-12-4from New York World, ab June 9 / A house in Augusta, Maine. Occupied by Mr Charles O. Stone and his wifeMr. Stone died March, 1887. Soon after that Mrs Stone lost vitality and became deranged and was sent to a hospital. / Mr. David Merrill moved in. He heard knocks and saw a human figure several timesrappings on head-board of a bed. Ab 1st of June, '88, Mrs Stone died in the hospital. [B; 917.1, 917.2. “A Haunted House in Augusta, Me.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 23, 1888, p. 12 c. 4. "A Haunted-House Story." Savannah Morning News, June 11, 1888, p. 2 c. 1. Another tenant family, subsequent to Merrill, also reported poltergeist phenomena. (New York World, ca. June 8, 1888.)]


1888 June 1 / Lightning / Yarn / Toronto Globe, 6-1 / Farmer of Liberty Co, Georgia, struck by lightning 4 years before. Since then upon approach of a storm he becomes highly charged and emits sparks. Flies which alight upon him drop dead. [B; 918. (Toronto Globe, June 1, 1888, p. 6 c. 1.)]


1888 June 1 and 27 / Moorhead, Minn. / mirage / MWR '88-150. [VI; 1338. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 16 (no. 6; June 1888): 149-150, at 150.]


1888 June 2 / [LT], 8-e / Eccentricities of lightning. [VI; 1339. Tomlinson, Charles. “Vagaries of Lightning.” London Times, June 2, 1888, p. 8 c. 5.]


1888 June 2 / late afternoon / Milton, N. Carolina / devastating cyclone 25 miles long, 500 yards wide / hail size of guina hens' eggs / N.Y. Trib 5-2-6. [VI; 1340. "Cyclone in North Carolina." New York Tribune, June 5, 1888, p. 2 c. 6.]


1888 June 3 / Wld Man like K. Hauser / St L G-d. of, 19-4 / "A Georgia MysteryStrange Man Found in the Mountains”—said that in mountains half a mile from Hamilton depredations attributed to sheep-dogs, but May 29th a goat was carried off and followed by its bleatings and found been carried off by a naked wild man, with a thick stubby growth of hair all over his body. He showed fight but was knocked down and tied and taken to the Sheriff at Hamilton. Full black beard to his waist—he was more than 6 feet in height. "He has keen black eyes that seem unaccustomed to the light of day." [B; 919.1, 919.2, 919.3. “A Georgia Mystery.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 3, 1888, p. 19 c. 4. "A Wild Man of the Mountain." Richland Beacon, (Rayville, Louisiana), June 23, 1888, p. 2 c. 5.]


1888 June 3 / NY Times, 3-1-6 / That for past 10 nights there had been slight shocks in Columbia, SC, and also in Darlington Co. / See May 27. [VI; 1341. “Continuous Earth Shocks.” New York Times, June 3, 1888, p. 1 c. 6. See: 1888 May 27, (VI; 1336).]


1888 June 3 / 9 to 9:30 p.m. / Hartford, Conn / bright auroral arch and streamers. No sunspots seen that day; none next day. / Sid Mess 7-313. [VI; 1342. "Brilliant Aurora." Sidereal Messenger, 7 (August 1888): 313.]


1888 June 6 / See June 23. / Dover / great swarm of dragon-flies / Ent. Mo. Mag 25-324. [VI; 1343. Hall, C.G. "Migratory swarm of Libellula quadrimaculata at Dover." Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 25 (July 1889): 324. See: 1888 June 23, (VI; 1358).]


1888 June 7 / 7:24 a.m. / Island of Hernö, in the Baltic / shock and a detonation like that of heavy artillery / Nature 38-204. [VI; 1344. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (June 28, 1888): 203-206, at 204.]


1888 June 9 / Pub Ledger of / Shower of beetles near Bodie, Cal. / So many shut out the light. Said a stage stopped by the crushed insects. [VI; 1345. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, June 9, 1888.)]


1888 June 9 / Cl. burst at Langtoft, E. Lancashire / See July 3, 1892. [VI; 1346. See: 1892 July 3, (VII; 562).]


1888 June 9 / Langtoft / See July 3, 1892. [VI; 1347. See: 1892 July 3, (VII; 562).]


1888 June 9 / W.S. / salt / Symons' Met 23-84 / At Langtoft, 8 miles N of Driffield, deluge from what looked like a dense cloud of smoke from the sea. Said that Rev. T.D. Speck, Vicar of Langtoft, tasted some of the water and found it salty. / ab. noon / Ab. same time, another near Towthorpe, 7 miles S.W. of Langtoft. [VI; 1348.1, 1348.2. "Waterspouts in the East Riding of Yorkshire." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 23 (July 1888): 84-86. The waterspout burst close to the village, resulting in "a dark brown wall" of water flooding the village and washing away acres of crops; and, where it fell, "three huge holes seven feet deep" were found. "Much land was completely bared to the rock and will be a great loss to the occupiers."]


1888 June 9 / Fish / 2:30 p.m. / Lake Chetek, near Chippewa Falls, Wis. / Waterspout. Said that through glasses fishes seen going in. / Sun 17-3-3. [VI; 1351. "Fishes Mounting Skyward." New York Sun, June 17, 1888, p. 3 c. 3. "It Scared the Spectators." St. Paul Daily Globe, (Minnesota), June 10, 1888, p. 1 c. 1.]


1888 June 10 / 10:45 p.m. / Met as if from Alpha Aquila / Emmitsburg, Maryland / M.W.R. 88-149. [VI; 1352. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 16 (no. 6; June 1888): 149-150, at 149.]


1888 June 11 / House in Chicago, in which Wm Barrett was murdered. Ghost appeared. Tenant, James Pope, died after seeing ghost—ac to N.Y. World, copied in Religio-Ph. Jour, June 23-4-5. [B; 920. "A dispatch from Chicago to the New York World...." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 18; June 23, 1888): 5, (c. 1). "A bartender named James Pope lived in the same house with Barrett. June 11th, he died yesterday under somewhat peculiar circumstances. Three nights after the murder, it is said that he ran screaming into his sisters' room in a great fright and fell into a swoon. When he recovered he said that the ghost of the murdered man had stood by the head of the bed and awakened him. His sisters tried to convince him that he had been dreaming, but he insisted that he had seen a real spirit. The next night the scene was repeated, and for several nights thereafter. The young man began to grow thin and pale under the worry and excitement. The sisters say they sat up with him one night and heard the groanings and rappings which their brother had described." "A Ghost Stood by Him." Punxsutawney Spirit, June 20, 1888, p. 1 c. 4. Barrett was a Pinkerton detective and was murdered on May 22, 1887; his wife and brother-in-law were arrested; and, one of Pope's sisters was said to have been "detected sending an anonymous note" to the police declaring that Barrett's wife and her brother were the murderers.]


1888 June 12 / [LT], 10-f / 14-12-c / Waterspout / Yorkshire. [VI; 1349. “Waterspout in Yorkshire.” London Times, June 12, 1888, p. 10 c. 6. “Waterspout in Yorkshire.” London Times, June 14, 1888, p. 12 c. 3.]


1888 June (?) / Driffield / Cl brst / See May 20, 1910. [VI; 1350. See: 1888 June 9, (VI; 1348), and, 1910 May 20, (IX; 1650).]


1888 June 13 / snowstorm / Cornwall / Rollo Russell, “Hail”, p. 28. [VI; 1353. Russell, Francis Albert Rollo. On Hail. London: Edward Stanford, 1893, 28. "Hail and Thunderstorm in Cornwall." Western Morning News, (Plymouth), June 14, 1888, p. 5 c. 6. "In the neighbourhood of Callington the hailstones were so large, and fell with such force, that twigs were cut clean off the trees."]


1888 June 16 / Began rains in Mexico, described in N.Y. Trib, 27-1-4, as unprecedented. Ab 700 lives lost. / Trib 28-1-1 / 1500 lives lost. [VI; 1354. "Death By Rain and Flood." New York Tribune, June 27, 1888, p. 1 c. 4. "Fifteen Hundred People Drowned." New York Tribune, June 28, 1888, p. 1 c. 1.]


1888 June 21 / [LT], 5-e / 22-5-f / 25-7-b / 27-12-a / Floods / Mexico. [VI; 1355. “Mexico.” London Times, June 21, 1888, p. 5 c. 5. “The Floods in Mexico.” London Times, June 22, 1888, p. 5 c. 6. “Mexico.” London Times, June 25, 1888, p. 7 c. 2. “The Floods in Mexico.” London Times, June 27, 1888, p. 12 c. 1.]


1888 June 19-20 / Torrents of rain and worst floods in history of Mexico. / Glb-Dem 22-5-2 / At Leon, 1000 bodies “recovered”. Fall of water over entire Republic. [VI; 1356. “Terrible Floods in Mexico.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 22, 1888, p. 5 c. 2.]


1888 June 21 / Cincinnati Weekly Times, 5-5 / Myriads of grasshoppers in Southern Indiana. [VI; 1357. (Cincinnati Weekly Times, June 21, 1888, p. 5 c. 5.)]


1888 June 23 / from 6 to 8 p.m. / A great flight of (dragon-fly) Libellula quadrimaculata on Essex coast. / Ent Mo. Mag. 25-921+ / See June 6. [VI; 1358. Pender, S. "Migratory swarm of Libellula quadrimaculata off the Essex coast." Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 25 (September 1888): 93. See: 1888 June 6, (VI; 1343).]


1888 June 25, etc. / Fires in Anderson, S. Car Mrs. M.E. Keese arrested and charged with fire-mania, but the Pinkerton detective on case also arrested and charged with subornation of witnesses. / G. Dem. 28-2-3. [B; 921. “A Sensational Case.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 28, 1888, p. 2 c. 3.]


1888 June 26 / met group / Pub.Ledg. of / At Columbus, Ohio, the other night a bright meteor drawing after it “a train of 23 clearly defined stars. [VI; 1359. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, June 26, 1888.)]


1888 / ab June 26 / reported from Rochester, Minn, metite—sample investigated by George F Kunz—says piece of red hematite and could not have fallen from sky. / Science 12-48. [VI; 1360. Kunz, George Frederick. “A Pseudometeorite.” Science, s. 1 v. 12 (July 27, 1888): 48.]


1888 June 26 / Heaviest rain recorded in N. Orleans. / (D. Picayune, 27th) / 4 inches in 2½ hours. [VI; 1361. “The Rain Storm Yesterday” New Orleans Picayune, June 27, 1888, p. 4 c. 4.]


1888 June 27 / Meteor fall N.Y. City? / Cincinnati Weekly Times, July 5-3-5 / or elec. bolt—daytime. [VI; 1362. (Cincinnati Weekly Times, July 5, 1888, p. 3 c. 5.)]


1888 June 29 / Report, not official, that 10¾ inches of rain fell in 36 hours ending on 26th. / N.Y. Tribune, 1889, June 3-6-3. [VI; 1363. (New York Tribune, June 3 (???), 1888, p. 6 c. 3.)]


1888 June 30 / Rel-Phil Jour, 6-5 / “The other night” great swarms of lightning bugs flying north, over Portland, Me. [VI; 1364. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 19; June 30, 1888) 6, (c. 5). "Items of Interest." Savannah Morning News, June 11, 1888, p. 4 c. 6.]


1888 / summer / Obj like of Aug 5, 1891 / Shieldsville, Minn. [B; 922. See: 1891 Aug 5, (B; 1148).]


1888 / summer / Abundance in England of P. gamma and V. cardui / Entomologist 25-162. [VI; 1366. Sykes, Henry D. "Entomological Notes, Captures, &c." Entomologist, 25 (July 1892): 162-163.]


1888 / summer / Fall fishes streets Tuscarora, Nevada / See Aug., 1891. [VI; 1367. See: 1891 Aug., (VII; 141).]


1888 / summer / Fall fishes / Elko Co., Nevada / See letter, Aug., 1891. [VI; 1368. See: 1891 Aug., (VII; 141).]


1888 July 1 / and time to time later / A wild woman—seen gathering berries near Little Indian, Ill. / Glb-Dem 25-1-7. [B; 923. “A Wild Woman.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, July 25, 1888, p. 1 c. 7.]


1888 July 1, etc. / Danbury / See Jan 14, 1888. [B; 924. See: 1888 Jan 14, (B; 848).]


1888 July 1, etc. / Incendiary fires / Danbury, Conn. / Pub Ledg, July 10. [B; 925. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, July 10, 1888.)]


1888 / ab July 1 / Ext. rainfalls in Mexico. [VI; 1365. (Refs.???)]


1888 July 2 and 30 / Frogs / Pa. [B; 926. See: 1888 July 9, (VI; 1401). (Refs.???)]


1888 July 2 / 2:30 p.m./ Appleton, Wis / Great met visible—[for half a] minute, rivaled sun. / Sc Am 59/53. [VI; 1369. “A Remarkable Meteor.” Scientific American, n.s., 59 (July 28, 1888): 53.]


1888 July 3. / Religio-Phil Jour / Middleton, Md. / slight shock and explosive sound. [VI; 1370. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 23; July 28, 1888): 6, (c. 5).]


1888 July 5 / Cloudbursts / Iowa / Cyclone, Iowa, Ill, (Mo.), Pa. / N.J., NY, great storms. [VI; 1371. “Destructive Storms.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, July 6, 1888, p. 3 c. 3-4.]


1888 July 5 / Storms / Iowa, Ill, N.Y., N.J., Pa, Mo, Texas / St Louis Globe Democrat, 6th. [VI; 1372. “Destructive Storms.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, July 6, 1888, p. 3 c. 3-4.]


1888 July 5 / (frgs) / (Toads) / Scranton, Pa / Greatest elec storm in 25 years. In its tracks were found myriads of little toads. / NY Times, 9-5-3. [VI; 1373. “A Great Storm at Scranton.” New York Sun, July 9, 1888, p. 5 c. 3.]


1888 July 5 / afternoon / Blount Co., Ala / 2 severe shocks just before a severe th. storm / St Louis Glb-Dem 7-3-5. [VI; 1374. “An Earthquake in Alabama.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, July 7, 1888, p. 3 c. 5.]


1888 July 6 / Water-worn pebbles / Palestine, Texas. / D-168. ** [VI; 1375. The note copies information from page 168 of The Book of the Damned. (Monthly Weather Review, 16 (July 1888): 173, c.v. "Texas." Correct quotes: "The ground for about half an acre was partly covered with pebbles, the formation of which is not found in this section, Mr. Lacy's family saw the pebbles fall during the rain, and therefore, there can be no doubt about it." And, "The specimens...resemble in appearance those generally found at the bottom of a brook, or on the sea-shore.")]


[1888 July 9 /] 1888 July 30 / (Liv) / Myriads of little toads fell at Beaver Falls, Pa. / Religio-Phil Jour, Aug 4-6-5. [VI; 1401. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 24; August 4, 1888): 6, (c. 5). "Toads at Beaver Falls." Butler Citizen, (Pennsylvania), July 13, 1888, p. 2 c. 6. "Beaver Falls, July 9.—The rainy weather has caused millions of little toads to put in an appearance at the east side of the town near the Beaver river. They are about the size of grain of coffee, and as lively as crickets. This morning they covered the track of the Pittsburg & Lake Erie railroad several inches thick, and a passenger train slid away past the station before it could be brought to a standstill, owing to the rails being made slippery by the crushed bodies of the little reptiles. The track had to be cleaned and sanded before the train could start again." The early accounts make no mention of a fall of toads, (only their appearance during rainy weather. "Myriads of toads about the size of a grain of coffee fell at Beaver Falls, Pa., on Monday...." Waco Evening News, July 28, 1888, p. 2 c. 1.]


1888 July 10 / [LT], 11-c / Atmospheric phe. [VI; 1376. “Atmospheric Phenomenon.” London Times, July 10, 1888, p. 11 c. 3. From Dover and Folkestone, a mirage of a lighthouse in Calais and Napoleon's column in Boulogne-sur-Mer, (Colonne de la Grande Armée), were observed with the naked eye from a distance of about 30 miles.]


1888 July 10 / Pub. Ledg of / Luminous obj at Augusta, Ga, few nights before. Said been Chinese lantern tied to a kite. [VI; 1377. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, July 10, 1888.) “Worldlings.” New York Evening World, June 23, 1888, p. 2 c. 2. “A Chinese lantern tied to a kite that was poised in midair caused a sensation among the negroes of Augusta, Ga., a few nights ago. The uncanny light dancing in the heavens terrified them, and their cries and prayers are said to have been wo[e]ful to hear.”]


1888 July 10 / Swarms of fish flies swooped upon Cleveland, Ohio. / P. Ledg, July 13 / Covered sidewalks. Extinguished electric lights. Swept into gutters. [VI; 1378. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, July 13, 1888.) “A Plague of Fish Flies.” Allentown Morning Call, (Pennsylvania), July 15, 1888, p. 4 c. 3.]


1888 July 14 / G. Dem of / Ghost 15 feet high reported from Stoneham, Pa. [B; 927. “A Spectral 15-Foot Terror.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, July 14, 1888, p. 12 c. 1-2. “State and Elsewhere.” Meadville Evening Republican, (Pennsylvania), July 5, 1888, p. 2 c. 3. “The residents of Stoneham, Warren County, Pa., are greatly agitated over the appearance of a spectre.”]


1888 July 14 / Honduras / I / q and storm / BA 11. [VI; 1379. A class I earthquake. Milne, 734.]


1888 July 14 / Chico / Butte Co, Cal / evening / Great metite fell. Said to have struck a tree. / Pub. Ledger, Aug. 1. [VI; 1380. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 1, 1888.) “Gridley Items.” Marysville Evening Democrat, (California), July 13, 1888, p. 3 c. 4. “About 8 o'clock Saturday evening a huge meteor fell into Feather river a mile or so below the bridge. The report of the seething mass when it struck the water and apparently burst into pieces was distinctly heard in this city, a distance of over four miles, and many thought the boiler of an engine had exploded near by. Parties who have visited the scene tell us a cottonwood tree over three feet in diameter was literally riddled into splinters, having evidently been struck by the satellite in its descent.”]


1888 July 14 / Religio-Phil. Jour, 6-5 / In column of Miscellaneous News—volumes of smoke from summit of St. Helen's, Oregon. [VI; 1381. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 21; July 14, 1888): 6, (c. 5). The St. Helens volcano.]


1888 July 15 / Eruption of Bandai-San / See Trans Seis Soc Japan, vol. 13/part II. [VI; 1382. Sekiya, Seikei, and, Kikuchi, Yasushi. “The Eruption of Bandai-san.” Seismological Journal of Japan, 13 pt. 2 (1890): 139-222. The Bandaisan volcano.]


1888 July 15 / volc details / Vegetation all around withered like St. Pierre. / A sea of mud that had been stopped by a forest—banked with green. Beneath the sea 20 villages. From this deluge of scalding mud no one had escaped. / 39-280 / Forest on another mountain knocked flat by the wind-shock. / See Nature 38-303. [VI; 1383.1, 1383.2. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (July 26, 1888): 301-304, at 303. “The Earthquake at Ban-Dai-San, Japan.” Nature, 39 (January 17, 1889): 279-280. The Bandaisan volcano.]


1888 July 15 / Bandai-san / A.J. Sci 3-38-247 / no lava. [VI; 1384. “Eruption of Baldai-san, in northern Japan, on July 15, 1888.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 38 (1889): 247-249. The Bandaisan volcano.]


1888 July 15 / Hudiksvall on Baltic / Many persons saw mirage. A tempestuous sea and a vessel on it and a small boat leaving the vessel. / Cosmos, NS, XI/336 / L'Astro 1888/392. [VI; 1385. “Mirages?" Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 11 (October 27, 1888): 336-338, at 336. “Mirages?” Astronomie, 7 (1888): 392-393. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (July 26, 1888): 301-304, at 304. Hudiksvall, Sweden.]


1888 July 15, night of  / moon / Southern extremity of the Alps; dark part of the disk not far from the terminator—Prof Holden, of Lick Ob, saw an illumination that was extraordinarily and incredibly bright—10 times as bright as surrounding parts of moon—“brightest object I have ever seen in the sky”—yet he says it was only reflected sunlight. / Observatory XI/334 / near obj of July 15, 1843 / See May, '87. [VI; 1386.1, 1386.2. Holden, Edward Singleton. "Regarding Sir William Herschel's Observations of Volcanoes in the Moon." Observatory, 11 (1888): 334-335. See: 1887 May 1, (VI; 1051).]


1888 July 15 / 38/303  Nature / Volcanic explosion in the Bandai-San region, northern Japan. / (q) / Nature 38-466 / See 39-279. [VI; 1387. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (July 26, 1888): 301-304, at 303. “The Japanese Volcanic Eruption.” Nature, 38 (September 13, 1888): 466-467. “The Earthquake at Ban-Dai-San, Japan.” Nature, 39 (January 17, 1889): 279-280. The Bandaisan volcano.]


1888 July 16 / "The Cornishman" (Penzance), July 19. / At Betty-adit, near Camborne, an old woman and a child reported that they had seen someone drowning in a pond. Not report, but their shrieks brought a crowd. Pond dragged—no body found. [B; 928. “Local News.” Cornishman, July 19, 1888, p. 7 c. 4.]


1888 July 17 / fish / St. Augustine, Fla. / Waterspout rushed from the ocean upon the town. Several cart-loads of fish in the streets. / Pub.Ledger, 20th. [VI; 1388. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, July 20, 1888.)]


1888 July 17 / shortly after midnight / Norway / July 28 / ab. 3 a.m. / Sweden / qs and loud detonations / Nature 38-421. [VI; 1389. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (August 30, 1888): 421-423, at 421.]


1888 July 19 / [LT], 5-d, etc. / Volc / Japan. [VI; 1390. “Volcanic Eruption in Japan.” London Times, July 19, 1888, p. 5 c. 4. “The Volcanic Eruption in Japan.” London Times, July 21, 1888, p. 6 c. 1. “It is impossible to gather from the meagre details given in a Reuter telegram published in The Times of Thursday where the frightful volcanic eruption took place. There is no town called 'Makamats,' and Takamatsu, which the reading suggested, is not in a volcanic district.” The Bandaisan volcano.]


1888 July 19 / Q / Dumfrieshire / Symons Met Mag 23/123. [VI; 1391. Dudgeon, Pat. "The Earthquake in Dumfriesshire on July 19th." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 23 (September 1888): 123-124.]


1888 July 20 / [LT], 11-f / q / Scotland. [VI; 1392. “Earthquake in Scotland.” London Times, July 20, 1888, p. 11 c. 6.]


1888 July 21 / Glb-Dem of, 1-6 / Ghst / Belleville, N.J. / For a month / ab. 6 or 7 feet high, in white. Walking along on remaining walls of ruins of a factory.  "The story of this ghost-like visitor runs in this startling vein. On the road to Montgomery near the bridge, stand the [re]mains of an old calico factory. Trees surround the place, and it is very lonesome. Nothing but the bare walls ot the building are left standing. These are three stories high aud very irregular." "Peter Dieghan, of Mill street, and a friend were passing the building on Wednesday night, at a late hour, and when they saw what appeared to be the head and shoulders of a man looking out from one of the upper windows of the ruined mill. In a moment the object disappeared and in a short time they saw the head and shoulders and finally the rest of the body rise until the full length appeared and rested on the top of the narrow wall. The object then began to walk around the building with deliberate tread, and with as much apparent ease as though it had several feet of surface to walk upon instead of only one. The two men stood breathless, expecting every moment to see the thing lose its balance and come crashing to the earth. On it kept, however, never making a mis[s]tep." "When the men recovered from their surprise they determined to investigate the mystery, and pushed their way through the heavy underbrush and entered the ruins. They made a thorough search of the place, but could not find the object." "The supposed spook generally makes its appearance between 11 and 12 o'clock at night, and keeps up its perambulations regardless of those who may be watching it from the road. As soon, however, as anyone attempts to enter the mill the object suddenly disappears, and no one has been able to discover in what direction it goes. It appears to be about six or seven feet high, and is invariably clad in a long flowing mantel of white. Occasioually it utters a low sepulchral sound not unlike the moan of a mortal in distress, and again it shrieks loudly at sight of some passer-by. No stairway leads to where it has been seen, and uo ladder that would reach the top of the wall could be found in the entire county. And how the ghost manages to preserve its equilibrium while walking around upou the high walls, which are not more than a foot thick, is another wonder which the Belleville people say no mortal can explain."]


1888 July 22 / Met (interesting) / Pola / Met Zeit 1889-31. [VI; 1393. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 6 (1889): 16-40, at 31.]


[1888 July 22 /] 1889 July 22 / 7:58 p.m. / Met / Germany (?) / Met Zeit 6/31, 157. [VI; 1856. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 6 (1889): 16-40, at 31. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 6 (1889): 141-158, at 157.]


1888 July 23 / 9:12 p.m. / by John H. Bateman / E Mec. 47/477 / Brilliant ob[ject] or meteor crossing sky observed for two minutes at Streatham. / 1888 / July 23. [VI; 1394. Bateman, John H. “Meteor.” English Mechanic, 47 (no. 1218; July 27, 1888): 477.]


1888 July 23 / At Stevenage, ab one hour and a half before a violent th. storm, rain from a cloudless sky. It was electrified and fell as luminous particles of milky appearance. / Jour Roy Met Soc 15-123. [VI; 1395. Jones, Samuel. “Rain from a Cloudless Sky.” Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 15 (1889): 123.]


1888 July 23 / Jupiter / Stationary. [VI; 1396. Jupiter stationary. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1888, 467.]


1888 July 23 / Sun and moon above horizon in eclipse? / See C.R. “eclipses” for these phe. [VI; 1397. (Comptes Rendus, ca. 1888; not found here.)]


1888 July 23 / 11:17 p.m. / Brilliant meteor / Småland, Sweden / Nature 38-328. [VI; 1398. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (August 2, 1888): 325-328, at 328.]


1888 July 25 / Especial rapping, home of Peter Bothwick, Greenwich. / See July 25, 1889. [B; 930. See: 1889 July 25, (B; 1033).]


1888 July 28 / Psychological / Glb Dem of, 11-5 / Phe at 7128 Pennsylvania Ave, Carondelet, and neighborhood. Here lived Mr. E.P. Roden and his family. Several evening before, Mr. R saw in a room what he thought to be a snake. He struck it with a poker but strike as he would he could make no impression upon the snake. He struck it with an axe—“I could see the flesh on either side of the ax for a moment, and then the snake, or his ghost, just faded away before my eyes.” Put first that Mr. R was dozing when he felt a stinging sensation in right cheek. Then after axe—"Mr. Roden's cheek swelled shortly after his bite, but his physician, Dr. Sellner, says there were no evidences of a reptile's venom around the wound." By "wound" seems to be meant swelling, because said no puncture of the skin. Mr Roden was a photographer of good reputation, it is said. Several days later Dr Sellner was called to the home of Mrs. Elizabeth Montgomery, who told him that she saw what she supposed was a snake on the cellar steps. She attempted to kill it, but it stood some blows and then disappeared. According to Mrs. M. and other person, traps were laid. Finally a snake was caught in one, but it disappeared. [B; 931.1 to 931.6. “A Carondelet Ghost.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, July 28, 1888, p. 11 c. 5.]


1888 July 3 / Ghst / Carondelet Park, St Louis / St. Louis Globe Democrat of / Appeared and disappeared. Sound as if of beating of wings heard / From Pub. Ledger / Not found G-Dem, July 3. [B; 932. “The Carondelet Ghost.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, July 2, 1888, p. 10 c. 2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, ca. July, 1888.) "A Ghost Story Spoiled." Hot Springs Star, (South Dakota), August 17, 1888, p. 3 c. 5. The sounds ceased when a water pipe burst.)]


1888 July 28 / Religio-Phil Jour, 6-5 / Strange new insect somewhat like ladybug. Millions in Dutchess Co, N.Y. [VI; 1399. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 23; July 28, 1888): 6, (c. 5). "A New Bug Among the Oats." Gilboa Monitor, (New York), July 12, 1888, p. 1 c. 4.]


[1888 July 28 /] 1888 July 31 / Fiery whirl or obj / Globe-Dem, Aug 1-1-4 / Dispatch from Monroe, Ga.that ab 1 p.m. in the southern part of town had been seen a whirling in the clear sky. It approached at a rapid rate, rising and falling, giving out explosive sounds. Said that in passing over sandy flats a pillar of sand rose from the ground. Then flames burst from the top of it. In passing over cotton fields it scorched plants. [VI; 1407.1, 1407.2. “A Mysterious Phenomenon.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, August 1, 1888, p. 1 c. 4-5. "Strange Phenomenon." True Citizen, (Waynesboro, Georgia), August 3, 1888, p. 1 c. 3. "Monroe News." "Saturday evening about one o’clock, a strange phenomenon was witnessed in the southern portion of town. Mr. H.C. Harrison hearing a great roaring in the elements, went out to see what it was. Though the sky was clear and the sun shining in all its splendor, a small funnel shaped cloud was seen approaching from the southwest at a rapid rate, attended with a rumbling sound like thunder. The whirling body would rise and fall, and occasional reports were heard, described as sounding like the explosion of oil barrels on fire. The body passed between Mr. Harrison’s house and the colored Baptist church; crossed the street, then turned in the direction of the old Stillwell place. In crossing a sandy flat a shaft of sand was elevated high in the air, having the appearance of almost a solid pillar. The body afterwards assumed the appearance of fire, and great flaming tongues emerged from the top as from a burning building, emitting heat for some distance, which was felt by those who witnessed the scene. In passing through a cotton patch some leaves were scorched to a crisp and others on the same stalk unharmed. We were shown one stalk that was wrung almost off, and the leaves, blooms and forms looked almost as dry as they do after frost. The body passed into a skirt of pines and disappeared. The sight was witnessed by several—white and colored—some of whom say they never want to witness another such scene." "Strange Phenomenon." Atlanta Constitution, August 1, 1888, p. 2 c. 4.]


1888 July 29[-30] / Objs / Near Vladikavkas, 6 p.m., act to Prof. Müller, of the Russian Lyceum of Tashkend, a friend of his saw 3 luminous objects. The phe lasted 3 minutes. / Sci News, 2-576. [VI; 1400. “Electric Storms." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 2 (December 7, 1888): 576. "Orage électrique." La Nature, 1888 pt. 2 (no. 808; November 24): 415.]


[1888 July 30. Wrong date. See: 1888 July 9, (VI; 1401).]


1888 July 30 / 7:10 p.m. / Detonating meteor / Coonoor, Madras, India / Nature 38-414. [VI; 1402. Hime, H.W.L. “Meteor.” Nature, 38 (August 30, 1888): 414.]


1888 July 31 / Meteor? / Dispatch from Rondout, NY / (Glob Dem 3-3-7) / “Capt Tremper of the steamboat Baldwin reported this afternoon that a meteor crashed through the pilot house of his craft Tuesday night, off Manhattanville. Nobody was hurt.” / Tuesday = July 31. [VI; 1403. “Struck by a Meteor.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, August 3, 1888, p. 3 c. 7. "Captain Tremper...." Coeymans Herald, August 8, 1888 p. 3 c. 5. "Captain Tremper of the steamer James W. Baldwin, which runs between Rondout and New York, says that on Tuesday night last what they took to be a meteor crashed into the pilot house, destroying several dollars worth of glass. They could find no trace of it afterwards."]


[1888 / ab last of July. Wrong date. See: 1884 / mid-July, (VI; 1404).]


1888 July 31 / Similars in Georgia / May 28, 1891 / Jan 5, 1892. [VI; 1405. See: 1891 May 28, (VIII; 107), and, 1892 Jan 5, (VII: 298, 299, & 340).]


1888 July, last / Mayon Volc, Philippines / Scientific News 2-335. [VI; 1406. “Volcanic Eruptions." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 2 (September 28, 1888): 335. The Mayon volcano.]


[1888 July 31. Wrong date. See: 1888 July 28, (VI; 1407).]


1888 July 31 / Brilliant met seen at Linköping, Sweden. It finally burst, the fragments appearing to fall near a railroad yard. / Nature, 38/422 / (1888). [VI; 1408. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (August 30, 1888): 421-423, at 422.]


1888 / about Aug / Fairies / Jour Soc Psychical Research 11-191 / Mr. E. Westlake forwards an account told him by a fisherman, William James Penrose, of Sennen Cove, near Land's End—told by his daughter, aged 25, of her experience of ab 9 years before. She and her sister had gone down to a well and heard sound like the squeaking of mice. She saw three little things like dolls dancing around with hands joined. [B; 933.1, 933.2. "A Traditional Hallucination." Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 11 (February 1904): 191-193. "One evening in August, I think it was in 1888, but am not sure to a year, we wanted some water from the well. It was late and Minnie [an elder sister] was afraid to go by herself, and I went with her to keep her company. It was a splendid night. The moon and stars were shining as bright as conld be: the moon was overhead and one could see the sands and cliffs quite plain. Minnie had got down into the well—the bottom of which was dry on the near sideand was bending down dipping up the water with a cup from the back of the well, which is deeper. I was standing by the side nearest the house with my back to the rock facing the little green of grass, but was looking to the right and watching Minnie in the well. She had been down a minute dipping up the water into the pitcher, when I heard a squeaking like mice." "I looked round, and there on the grass and about five feet in front of me were three little things like dolls, about as high as a chair seat, dancing round and round with hands joined as fast as they could go; they were covering I should say as much ground as a big tray. They were dressed in very thin white stuff like muslin, drawn in at the waist, and thrown all over their heads like a bride's veil, so that I could not see their faces, and coming down over their arms. Their arms were stretched out rather drooping from the shoulder, and their hands were joined. I saw their hands very plainly, but did not distinguish fingers. They were as white as snow, hands and all. They were all alike; I didn't see any difference. They had very small waists, no larger than the neck of

that jug [6½ inches]. Their dresses swelled out at the bottom from the dancing; they were very long, and I don't think I saw their feet, but they appeared to be dancing with a movement as though they were working their legs. They did not glide around. They went round pretty fast, as fast as real people. I've played like it before now. I watched them a minute, not longer; and they went around two or three times at least, as they were going round as fast as they could. They went round in the direction of the hands of a watch; and as gently as possible, with no sound of footsteps or rustling of dresses, but the squeaking noise kept up all the time. It was too pretty a sound for mice, and louder—quite loud—one

could have heard it I should think at a little distance." "Minnie in the well said, 'Oh! what's that? what's that?' (she told me afterwards she had heard the same noise as I had), and I said, 'Look! Look!' and then as if they were frightened, they all ran together as quick as lightning up against the rock and were out of sight in a moment." "I was that frightened, and was as white as a ghost when I came in. We looked at the clock and it was twelve. I have never been there before or since at that time of night. Mr. Webber, a German, was in the house; and Mr. Carter, who told me they were pixies,—fairies, you know. I had never heard or read of any such things before. Mother has since said that things were seen there [at the well] in times gone by, but I did not know of that then." "When I told the story to Dr. Ferrier, who was staying with us, he asked if I had had anything the matter with my head afterwards, but I had not, either then or at any other time. I was 17 or 18 years old, in good health, the same as I am now. I never had a

doctor in my life, or have been laid up for a single day."]


1888 Aug. / Whitechapel / See Times inquest / murder / accidents / inquests. [B; 934. (London Times, ca. August, 1888.)]


[1888 / ab Aug 1. Wrong date. See: 1887 Ap. 7, (VI; 1409).]


1888 Aug 1 / evening / Reading, Pa.—myriads of moths. Fires built and heaps of them burned. Local “savants” said they were cotton moths from the South. Doors and windows had to be closed to keep them out. At Easton, Pa, similar invasion—said been of “butterflies”. Myriads of moths ab  ½ inch long in N.Y. City. / Sci Amer., Aug 18, p. 96. [VI; 1410.1, 1410.2. “Clouds of Moths.” Scientific American, n.s., 59 (August 18, 1888): 96. Latham, Thomas. “Moths Attracted by the Electric Light.” Scientific American, n.s., 59 (August 18, 1888): 96.]


1888 / ab Aug 1 / Reading, Pa / Swarms, said of moth Tortrix fractivittana clem. Clem not in italics. / Insect Life 1-90. [VI; 1411. “Recent Swarmings of Insects.” Insect Life, 1 (September 1888): 90-91. “Clouds of Moths.” Scientific American, n.s., 59 (August 18, 1888): 96. (Reading Evening Telegram, August 2, 1888. Reading Times, August 2, 1888.)]


1888 Aug 1 / night / Reading and Easton, Pa. / said cotton moths from the south. / Sun 3-4-5 / Doors and windows had to be closed to keep them out. Electric light globes next morning contained about 2 quarts each. [VI; 1412. “Clouds of Moths.” New York Sun, August 3, 1888, p. 4 c. 5.]


1888 Aug 2 / moths / Reported in St. Louis Globe-Dem 3-3-7 / Myriads of Cotton Moths reported from Easton and Reading, Pa., supposed come from south but no reports from south. / Said so numerous obscured electric lights of Reading, Doors and windows had to be closed to keep them out. As many in Easton. Some newspaper science in the dispatch from Easton—“These butterflies are the kind that lay moth eggs.” [VI; 1413.1, 1413.2. “Visited By Myriads of Moths.” New York Tribune, August 3, 1888, p. 1 c. 5. “Myriads of Butterflies.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, August 3, 1888, p. 3 c. 7.]


1888 Aug 3 etc / 1st outburst of Vulcano, one of the Lipari Islands / Sci News 2-475 / Value Coual whol psychic org / So [note cut off]. [VI; 1414. Narlian, A.E. “The Late Eruption of Vulcano." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 2 (November 9, 1888): 474-476. The Vulcano volcano.]


1888 Aug 4 / Religio-Phil. Jour, 6-5 / Witchcraft at Macungie, Pa. [B; 935. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 24; August 4, 1888): 6, (c. 5). “A Revival of Witchcraft.” Reading Times, (Pennsylvania), July 13, 1888, p. 4 c. 1.]


1888 Aug 4 / Religio-Phil Jour, 6-5 / Metite reported fallen near Carson, Nevada / “ten tons”. [VI; 1415. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 24; August 4, 1888): 6, (c. 5).]


1888 Aug 4 / Violent explosions at Vulcano / Nature 46-118. [VI; 1416. “The Eruption of Vulcano (August 3, 1888, to March 22, 1890).” Nature, 46 (June 2, 1892): 117-118. The Vulcano volcano.]


1888 Aug 5 / N.Y.T., 1-6 / 6-8-1 / Flood, Storm, Electric Disturbance. [VI; 1417. “August's Wild Outbreak.” New York Times, August 5, 1888, p. 1 c. 6-7. “After the Great Storm.” New York Times, August 6, 1888, p. 8 c. 1-2.]


1888 Aug 6 / [LT], 5-f / English balloon found in France / Powells? [B; 936. “An English Balloon Found in France.” London Times, August 6, 1888, p. 5 c. 6.]


(1888) Aug 6 / [LT], 5-f / Sept 24-12-d / Volc / Lipari Islands. [VI; 1418. “Volcanic Eruption.” London Times, August 6, 1888, p. 5 c. 6. “Volcanic Eruptions.” London Times, September 24, 1888, p. 12 c. 4. The Vulcano and Mayon volcanoes.]


1888 Aug 7 / Aug 31 / Sept. 8 / Sept 30 / Nov 9 / Whitechapel Murders. [B; 937. (Refs.???) Martha Tabram was murdered on August 7, 1888; Mary Ann Nichols was murdered on August 31, 1888; Annie Chapman was murdered on September 8, 1888; Elizabeth Stride and Catherine Eddowes were murdered on September 30, 1888; and, Mary Jane Kelly was murdered on November 9, 1888.]


1888 Aug 7 / New comet by Brooks in Ursa Major / Sc Am 59/121. [VI; 1419. Brooks, William Robert. “Discovery of Comet Brooks of 1888.” Scientific American, n.s., 59 (August 25, 1888): 121. Comet C/1888 P1.]


[1888 Aug 8. Wrong date. See: 1888 July 30, (VI; 1420).]


[1888 July 30] 1888 Aug 8 / unknown fish / Pub. Ledger of / “During a heavy rainstorm at Seymour (Ind) last week, a telegram asserts a large number of fish of a variety unknown there, some of them four inches in length, fell in that neighborhood.” [VI; 1420. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 8, 1888.) “Minor Notes.” Indianapolis Journal, August 4, 1888, p. 2 c. 3.]


1888 Aug 10 / Animal / Pub Ledger of / Peculiar and destructive animal roaming around about Athol and Royalston, Mass. More than one hundred sheep had been killed by it. It had been seen and was described as ab. 3 feet long and 2½ high; slim body covered with yellow hair. "It bore a long tail and carried its head high in the air." Suggested that it was one of the animals that had escaped from Barnum's fire at Bridgeport the winter before. [B; 938.1, 938.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 10, 1888.) Only one lion was said to have escaped from the fire that burned the winter home of Barnum's circus, on November 20, 1887. "Barnum Burned Out." New York Sun, November 21, 1887, p. 1 c. 7 & p. 2 c. 1. "The lion which police attempted to kill at the time the fire broke out was afterward found in a barn devouring a cow which he had killed. He was shot."]


1888 Aug 11 / Trance / Religio-Phil Jour, 5-1 / Thomas Gullfoyle, just awakened from a trance of 2 years, at Binghampton, N.Y. [B; 939. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 25; August 11, 1888): 5, (c. 1). "About two years ago last March, he sank one night into a partial trance or epileptic sleep, and since that time he has lain in this remarkable slumber. Lately he awoke, and though somewhat weak, he is on the high road to recovery. Of his sleep he remembers nothing. It appears to him as though he had only slept for a night."]


1888 Aug 11 / Religio-Phil Jour, 6-1. copied from The Northwestern (Oshkosh, Wis) / Proceedings in the court at Danford, Wisconsin, to keep Wm. Roberts, a farmer, living near Princeton, from killing his neighbor, Mrs Albright, whom he blamed for phe—Phe began ab Christmas, 1887—spot of blood appeared on sheet of his bed—no matter how often changed, Large pool of blood on floor. Great letters "B" and "R" in blue ink drawn on wall—food and utensils disappear from table—sworn to by Roberts and his wife. / See other note, Dec 25, 1887. [B; 940.1, 940.2. "Extraordinary Manifestations." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 44 (no. 25; August 11, 1888): 6, (c. 1). "Wished to Kill the Witch." New York Sun, July 23, 1888, p. 1 c. 7. See: 1887 Dec 25, about, (B; 825).]


1888 Aug 11 / During a storm / Long Lake, Conn. / A ball of fire 10 feet long ac to observers plowed down the lake casting up great waves. / Phil Pub Ledger, Aug 17. [VI; 1421. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 17, 1888.) "The Lake Ploughed by a Ball of Fire." New York Sun, August 13, 1888, p. 4 c. 6. The account came from the Hartford Times, (Connecticut).]


1888 Aug 12 / Nebulous cloud in Perseus / disap. reap. / E Mec (Eng. Soc.) 56/340 / (Cut). [VI; 1422. Packer, David Elijah. “Stationary Meteor Clouds.” English Mechanic, 56 (no. 1445; December 2, 1892): 340. Another “nebulous meteor” was observed by Packer, on October 13, 1888.]


1888 Aug 12 / 6:50 p.m. / Det met / Sebastian, Fla. / M.W.R. '88-203. [VI; 1423. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 16 (no. 8; August 1888): 202-203, at 203.]


1888 Aug 14 / Grahamstown, SA / area of more than 360 sq. miles / Like others “heralded by an almost incessant low rumbling thunder.” Major L.A. Eddie, in Knowledge 23/19 / See Aug 6, 1899. [VI; 1424.  Eddie, Lindsay Atkins. “The Black Rain of August 6, 1899.” Knowledge, o.s., 23 (January 1, 1900): 19-21. Eddie said he published an account in the Grahamstown Journal of August 28, 1888; (at Newsbank.com.) See: 1899 Aug 6, (VIII: 482 & 483).]


1888 Aug 14 / See Aug 6, 1898. [VI; 1425.1. See: 1898 Aug 6, (VIII; 296). (Shock at Messina???)]


1888 Aug 14 / At Baleine, a singular cloud of bizarre structure during a storm / Cosmos, N.S., 13-298. [VI; 1425.2. Rocquigny-Adanson, Guillaume-Charles de. “Météorologie de l'Année 1888 au Parc de Baleine.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (June 15, 1889): 295-298, at 298.]


1888 Aug 16 / N.Y.T., 2-2 / q. / Maine. [VI; 1426. “An Earthquake in Maine.” New York Times, August 16, 1888, p. 2 c. 2.]


1888 Aug 16 / Nature of / Native birds of North America supposed be rapidly disappearing reappeared in remarkable numbers this summer, attracting attention especially in New York and Illinois. / Nature 38-373. [VI; 1427. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (August 16, 1888): 371-375, at 373. “Friday, August 3, 1888.” Science, s. 1 v. 12 (August 3, 1888): 49-50, at 49.]


1888 Aug 16 / (mirage) / Abraham McAdams had seen, ab 4 miles east of Atwood, Neb., cloud, seemingly occupied by a woman, rise and float off, then turn and approach near. There were dissolving scenes—the woman, then a horse, then a man that McA recognized as his uncle. At Bateman, Neb., he received a letter telling him his uncle was dead. / Sun 28-4-5. [VI; 1439.1, 1439.2. "Saw His Uncle's Ghost in the Sky." New York Sun, August 28, 1888, p. 4 c. 5.]


1888 Aug 17 / ab. 3 a.m. / Island of Rugen, in the Baltic / deep rumbling heard and then two enormous waves / Nature 38-422. [VI; 1427. “Notes.” Nature, 38 (August 30, 1888): 421-423, at 422.]


1888 Aug 17 / At Rugen on the Baltic—no wind, sea calm—two enormous waves, supposed seismic. / Sci News 2-311. [VI; 1428. “Supposed Submarine Earthquake in the Baltic." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 2 (September 21, 1888): 311.]


1888 Aug 18 / Sun, 4-6, from Lewiston (Me) Journal / Mysterious bright lights appearing near Portland and causing much discussion. Discussed in Portland Advertiser, like “big fires at a distance. [VI; 1430. "Mysterious Bright Lights." New York Sun, August 18, 1888, p. 4 c. 6.]


1888 Aug 19 / wld woman / Glb-Dem, 5-2 / Wld woman, Waco, Texas / Excitement at Waco. Wild woman seen 6 miles west of Waco, a nude negress with an infant. Had been chased but had eluded. But—on 18th, Mr. W.C Edwards, a farmer, found her devouring the raw flesh of a chicken. She tried to kill him with a club but was overpowered, bound, and delivered to the police at Waco. Whereabouts of the infant not discovered. Said by a negro that he could identify her as a woman who had gone crazy. [B; 941.1, 941.2. “A Wild Woman.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, August 19, 1888, p. 5 c. 2. "A Wild Woman." Waco Evening News, August 18, 1888, p. 4 c. 1-2. ]


1888 Aug 19 / In Nature, 38-415, Hugh Taylor writes that near Stockton on Tees, he saw dust suddenly rise in a road 40 or 50 yards ahead of him. “There was not a breath of air stirring at the time.” The force left the road and passing through a field took up large wisps of hay carrying them ¼ mile at a height of 50 feet. “The mind instantly recurred to stories of witches transporting haystacks through the air, and it was difficult not to believe that, with increased force [of current] almost anything might have been carried aloft in a similar way.” “The general aspect of the weather was somewhat thunderous though it remained fine until night.” [VI; 1431.1, 1431.2, 1431.3. Taylor, Hugh. “A Column of Dust.” Nature, 38 (August 30, 1888): 415.]


1888 Aug 19 / MWR '88-203 / 6:30 p.m. / Butte City, Montana / det met and cloud 10 minutes / Science 12-132. [VI; 1432. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 16 (no. 8; August 1888): 202-203, at 203. Knight, A.B. “A Brilliant Meteor.” Science, s. 1 v. 12 (September 14, 1888): 132.]


1888 August 27, 28, 29, 30, 31 / It Sounds / frequent sounds like cannon fire / Sept 5, strong concussion / (See 1816.) / Balduini near Spolito. [VI; 1433. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 41. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1888 Aug 23 / Stevenson, Ala. / 5:40 a.m. / Heavy shock / Glb-Dem, 24th. [VI; 1434. “An Earthquake Shock.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, August 24, 1888, p. 3 c. 2.]


1888 Aug 24 / volc / Thick sulphurous atmosphere off Iceland / Scientific News 2-312. [VI; 1435. “Earthquake in Iceland." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 2 (September 21, 1888): 312.]


1888 Aug. 24 / By Prof. H. Fol, at Toulon, a new red star of more than 1st mag. in Virgo. Watched 7 minutes. Then disappeared. / Scientific News 2-311. [VI; 1436. “A Variable Star (?)." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 2 (September 21, 1888): 311. “Professor H. Fol reports having seen from the balcony of the Grand Hotel at Toulon, on August 24th last, a little before 9 p.m., a star more brilliant than those of the first magnitude and having a very red lustre. It was in the upper part of the constellation Virgo and at the same height above the horizon as Antares. It had no apparent movement, and seemingly no diameter. The observer The observer after watching for some minutes went in to fetch a map of the stars, but on his return it had disappeared.”"Observation astronomique." La Nature, 1888 pt. 2 (no. 797; September 8): supplement, p. 1. Hermann Fol stated that the sky was clear at the time, but he only identifies the position of the "très rouge" star in relation to two bright stars and the constellations, (but, not to any of the planets). "Elle se trouvait dans la partie supérieure du territoire de la constellation de la Vierge, dans l'angle qu'il forme avec les espaces occupés par la Balance et le Bouvier. Elle se trouvait à la même hauteur au-dessus de l'horizon qu'Antarès, occupant le sommet d'un angle obtus qu'elle formait avec Antarès et avec Arcturus, mais deux fois plus près de cette dernière étoile que de la première." Venus had just followed the sun below the horizon, in the west, at this time. The position described, (as closer to Arcturus, and between Libra and Boötes), suggests that it could have been Alpha Serpens, (an orange giant); its elevation above the horizon, (the same as Antares), suggests that it could have been Mars, in Libra; but, neither Alpha Serpens nor Mars, (nor Jupiter, also in Libra), would have disappeared from a clear view. Few variable stars would fade away so rapidly, and no flare stars are known in this celestial region.]


1888 Aug 27 / Stone-showers / Pub Ledger of / "A house at Cartersville, Ga, is being bombarded with stones, the throwers of which nobody has been able to detect as yet. The negroes think it is due to a supernatural agency and are generally excited. [B; 942. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 27, 1888.)

"A house at Cartersville...." Savannah Morning News,  August 22, 1888, p. 6 c. 1. "Georgia in Brief." Columbus Enquirer-Sun, (Georgia), August 25, 1883, p. 3 c. 2. "At Cartersville, after much tribulation, the source of the falling rocks upon the negro house has been discovered in the person of a diminutive African who, being possessed of the devil and capacious pockets, has, by filling the latter with rocks, and watching his opportunity to drop them upon the housetops or at the feet of unwary passers, created a greater excitement among his people than the advent of a circus."]


1888 Aug 28 and 29 / Dust storms / Johannesburg / Eastern Star / Johannesburg / Aug 31. [VI; 1437. (Eastern Star, Johannesburg, August 31, 1888.)]


1888 Aug 29-30 / night / Geneva, N.Y. / great meteor reported by Prof Brooks from Corona Borealis / Boston Post 31-1-5. [VI; 1438. (Boston Post, August 31, 1888, p. 1 c. 5; not @ Newspapers.com)]


1888 Aug 30-31 / Cl burst / Hot Springs, Ark. / “Terrible rainstorm” for two hours flooded the city. A number of small houses swept away and the occupants drowned. Wagons in streets carried far away. Pic., Sept 1-12-4 / Sept 3-1-5—nothing of 2 clouds coming together—said the cloud was seen appearing to dissolve. [VI: 1440.1, 1440.2. “Hot Springs.” New Orleans Picayune, September 1, 1888, p. 12 c. 4. “Arkansas.” New Orleans Picayune, September 3, 1888, p. 1 c. 5.]


1888 Aug 31 / Another = the 3rd Whitechapel murder / Another soon later. [B; 943. Mary Ann Nichols was murdered on August 31, 1888.]


1888 Aug 31 / The Marietta, Georgia, sky man / See under Sky Objects. [B; 944. See: See: Objs / Sky / Balloon? / 1888 / Sept 8 , (SF-IV; 214).]


1888 Sept 1, etc. / potential / region in Spain where the q's of Dec, 1884 / Had been no rain since May—then deluges so great that the little river Almansara rose 90 feet and was 1500 feet wide. / L'Astro 7-432. [VI; 1441. Gonzalès, Ildefonso. “Pluie diluvienne.” Astronomie, 7 (1888): 432.]


1888 Sept. 1 / qs / New Zealand and Mexico / BA '11 / Sims / See Feb18, 1889. [VI; 1442. A class I earthquake. Milne, 734. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1888 Sept 3 / 12:20 p.m. / Myst explosion in air in front of a house in NY City. A bomb? / (N) / Sun 4-1-4. [VI; 1443. "A Bomb From a Clear Sky." New York Sun, September 4, 1888, p. 1 c. 4.]


1888 Sept 5 and 6 / Sun protuberance / Bull Astronomy 1889-450. [VI; 1444. "Revue des Publications Astronomiques." Bulletin Astronomique, 6 (1889): 432-462, at 450. Fényi, Jules. "Deux éruptions observées sur le Soleil en septembre 1888." Comptes Rendus, 108 (1889): 889-891.]


1888 Sept 5 and 6 / 2 eruptions from the sun observed by M Jules Fényi. / Cosmos, N.S, 13-163. [VI; 1445. Fényi, Jules. “Deux éruptions observées sur le soleil en septembre 1888.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (May 11, 1889): 163.]


1888 Sept 8 / Slow Stones / Globe-Dem. of / Dispatch from Cumberland, Md.—That for more than a week at the home of Samuel Mysers, at Eckhart, Allegany Co., stones had been breaking glass in one window, arriving rather slowly, or with force just sufficient to break the glass. There was excitement. Neighbors watched the house but the phe went on. [B; 945.1, 945.2. “Is It the Work of Spooks?” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, September 8, 1888, p. 12 c. 1. “Mysterious Stone Throwing,” Frederick News, (Maryland), August 30, 1888, p. 3 c. 3.]


1888 Sept 8 / Balloon / See Aug 31. / Or Sept 6—See Aug 31. [VI; 1446. See: Objs / Sky / Balloon? / 1888 / Sept 8 , (SF-IV; 214).]


1888 Sept 9 / 4:50 p.m. / Watkins, N.Y. / storm of insects “resembling winged ants / about 1 hour / Sc Am 59/181 / to great degree cutting off sunlight. [VI; 1447. Slauson, D.T. “An Insect Cloud in New York.” Scientific American, n.s., 59 (September 22, 1888): 181.]


1888 Sept 9 / q / III / Greece / BA '11. [VI; 1448. A class III earthquake. Milne, 734.]


1888 Sept 10 / It Sounds / San Lorenzo Nuovo, near Viterbo / rombi / See 1816. [VI; 1449. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 40.) See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1888 Sept 12 / Stromboli seen to be in eruption. / Sci News 2-335. [VI; 1450. “Eruption of Stromboli." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 2 (September 28, 1888): 335.]


1888 Sept 14 / Polt, stones, etc. / Phe began, ac to Globe Dem. 20-13-3, quoting the Chicago Mail. In the home of Michael Cure, a farmer in the township of Palos, southern part of Cook Co., Ill. Dining table whisked from one part of a room to another. Stove door shot open and a pan of food came out on floor. Case was investigated by neighbors. All the time they were there, there was a shower of gravel against the window panes. Different tricks. One day every door in the house was locked. Said that messages were received from something that was looking for "Pete"—then another shower of stones. [B; 946.1, 946.2, 946.3. “Singular Antics of Spooks.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 20, 1888, p. 13 c. 3. (Chicago Mail, ca. September, 1888; not @ Newspapers.com.)]


1888 Sept 15 / Globe-Dem of, from New London (Conn.) Telegraph / A haunted house on the west side of Main Street, Stonington, Conn. Sounds and lights seen. [B; 947. “Stonington's Haunted House.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, September 15, 1888, p. 12 c. 1. (New London Telegraph, ca. September, 1888.)]


1888 Sept 15 / “Commander Jones of the S.S. Resolute reports hearing sounds [of] distant firing to the S.E. [on September 1th, 1888] about 10:30 P.M. There was no thunder, but slight sheet lightning [to] the N.E.” / See April 28. / Another somewhere “Resolute” and sound. [VI; 1451. "Report on Barisal Guns...." Proceedings of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1889 (August): 198-209, at 201. See: 1883 July 30, (V; 1377 & 1379), and, 1888 / April 28, '88, to March 11, '89, (VI; 1317).]


1888 Sept 15 / Religio-Phil. Jour, 6-5 / At Leesburg, Fla., “the other afternoon, meteor size of full moon. [VI; 1453. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 45 (no. 4; September 15, 1888): 6, (c. 5).]


1888 Sept 18 / (Invader) / St. Louis Globe-Democrat of, in NY Sun 30-5-6 / That been rumors in Hardin, Ill, of a luminous obj that had been seen at Diamond Island, a place in the river ab. 2 miles from town. “Now, after a thorough investigation, the mysterious something is no longer considered a myth.” Some young men had gone there—at night—bright red object rose ab. 40 yards and then faded away—Then their boat moved away—occupied by a luminous object, but a luminous man—changed again to the luminous sphere and slowly moved upward, disappearing. [B; 948.1, 948.2, 948.3. “The Ghost of Diamond Island.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, September 22, 1888, p. 13 c. 5. "The Spook of Diamond Island." New York Sun, September 30, 1888, p. 5 c. 6.]


1888 Sept 18 / Bienville Co, La. / det. met. / MWR 88-231. [VI; 1452. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 16 (no. 9; September 1888): 230-232, at 231.]


1888 Sept 20 / Sun, 4-6 / Young alligator 20 inches long caught in a pond at Osgood, Ind. [B; 949. "Caught an Alligator in Indiana." New York Sun, September 20, 1888, p. 4 c. 6. “Caught a Young Alligator.” Indianapolis Journal, September 15, 1888, p. 2 c. 4.]


1888 Sept. 21 / BO / (liv) / Station called “Gnalta”, west of Darling River, Australia. Torrential rain fell. 3 fishes picked up. The whole country was at the time suffering from a very serious drought. No body of water nearer than the Darling River, 100 miles away. / Paper read by H.C. Russell, before the Roy Soc N.S. Wales, Aug 3, 1898. [VI; 1455.1, 1455.2. Russell, Henry Chamberlaine. “Water-Spouts on the Coast of New South Wales.” Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 32 (1898): 132-149, at 137.]


1888 Sept 22 / Globe Dem of / Special correspondence dated Sept 18 from Hardin, Ill—the island and lights story. [B; 950. “The Ghost of Diamond Island.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, September 22, 1888, p. 13 c. 5. See: 1888 Sept 18, (B; 948).]


1888 Sept 22 / [LT], 7-c / Stromboli. [VI; 1454. “Eruption of Stromboli.” London Times, September 22, 1888, p. 7 c. 3. The Stromboli volcano.]


1888 Sept 23 / Maryland / several places, vast swarm of milk-weed butterfly / Insect Life 1-221. [VI; 1456. Ellzey, M.G. “A Swarming of the Milk-weed Butterfly in 1886.” Insect Life, 1 (January 1889): 221.]


1888 Sept 29 / Religio-Phil. Jour., 4-5 / Doubt that Richard Proctor died of yellow fever. [B; 951. "General Item." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 45 (no. 6; September 29, 1888): 4, (c. 5).]


1888 Oct-Dec / Number of other disaps in Globe-Dem. / Nothing developed. [B; 952.]


[1888 Oct, early. Wrong date. See: 1887 Oct 25, (VI; 1457).]


1888 Oct 1 / Insane—spirits / Glb-Dem. of, 2-7 / At Mattoon, Ill, a machinist named Peter Strau, from Chicago, was rushing frantically about the streets. He said that he had one eye, and that spirits were trying to induce him to gouge that out. The next morning he was found insensible near a barn. He had gouged out his eye. [B; 953.1, 953.2. “Tore Out His Eyes.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 1, 1888, p. 2 c. 7.]


1888 Oct 5 / Sounds, S. Car. / Pub. Ledger of / In the country around Due West, S. Carolina—for several days heavy, roaring sounds. [VI; 1458. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 5, 1888.) “Strange Noises in Abbeville.” Newberry Herald and News, (South Carolina), October 4, 1888, p. 2 c. 2. “Due West, October 1.It is reported throughout the surrounding country that for the past several days a succession of heavy roaring sounds have been heard, and are supposed by some to be the echoes of subterranean disturbance. The noise is somewhat similar to that made by a distant train of cars, and it seems impossible to locate the direction whence it comes. As yet no motion of the earth is reported to have been noticed.”]


1888 Oct. 8 / Railroad ghost / Pub. Ledger of / In Mahoning Co., Ohio, a ghost on railroad line—said that a woman had been killed there many years before. [B; 954. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 8, 1888.) “The Ghost Walks.” Pittsburgh Daily Post, October 6, 1888, p. 7 c. 3.Youngstown, O., October 5.Early in the history of this county William O. Moore was arrested charged with murdering his housekeeper, Miss Stewart. Her lifeless body was found in the marsh about a mile from his house with a stone tied around her neck. Moore was convicted of manslaughter and after remaining in the penitentiary 10 years was pardoned. The crime was committed five miles east of here, and now employe[e]s on the Pittsburgh aud Lake Erie railroad claim that every night they see the ghost of a young woman wandering around in that vicinity. A conductor named Hickman and a brakeman named McLaughlin reported here to-day that they had seen the apparition every night for a week. Several officers have started on the huut of the ghost.”]


1888 Oct 8, about / See July 12. / town of Merexull, Russia—on the Baltic / That a spectacle said been mirage of city of St. Petersburg seen in sky—and some buildings recognized—lasted about one hour. / L'Astro 1888-432. [VI; 1459. “Curieux mirage.” Astronomie, 7 (1888): 432. Merexull was the French name for Mereküla, Estonia. See: 1888 July 10, (VI; 1376).]


1888 Oct 9 / Hot Water / Off Banks of Newfoundland, by the White Star Line steamer Adriatic. It had been raining. Suddenly an electric display and thunder. And the air became warm suddenly. Hot water fell. Ac to one of the ship's officers, as this rain fell upon his hands it was as if a pailful of hot water dashed on the deck had splashed upon him. / Phil Public Ledger, 15th. [VI; 1460.1, 1460.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 15, 1888.) “Electric Storms on the Banks.” New York Tribune, October 14, 1888, p. 1 c. 5. “All of a sudden the air turned warm, and for three-quarters of an hour there was a remarkable display of lightning, with almost incessant thunder, which was peculiarly terrifying to the passengers.” “What startled the sailors most, however, was the unwonted warmth. It had been cold and raw all the morning, but as soon as the ship struck the storm the air was like a muggy day in midsummer. Even the rain, which continued falling, was warm, much warmer in fact than ordinary rain in very hot weather. One officer said yesterday that it seemed as though a pail of hot water had been dashed on the deck, as the rain splashed up on his hands.”]


1888 Oct 10 / q / India / I / Burmah / BA '11. [VI; 1461. A class I earthquake. Milne, 734.]


1888 Oct or Nov / Cal. / spider webs / See Nov. 16, 1891. [VI; 1462. See: 1891 Nov. 16, (VII; 226).]


1888 Oct 10 / 9:30 p.m. / Off South Arklow, arrived at Queenstown next day on way to New Yorkreported by officers and passengers of White Star steamer Britannica light in westward sky like a reflection from a great fire. This gave away to light like at a ship's masthead which faded. All ab. 15 minutes. / Sci. News2-408. [VI; 1463.1, 1463.2. "A Mysterious Illumination." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 2 (October 19, 1888): 408.]


1888 Oct. 10 / (Cut) / reported by Capt. of White Star steamer Britannic when off South Arklow. Dark sky to the westwardsuddenly illuminated with yellow light for 15 minutesfiery red like reflection of large steamer in flames, Capt changed vessel's course toward it. The fiery red disappeared and a luminous thing like steamer masthead light was seen and that disappeared. / Sci News, N.S., 2-408. [VI; 1464.1, 1464.2. “A Mysterious Illumination.” Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 2 (October 19, 1888): 408. “The White Star steamer Britannic, which arrived at Queenstown on October 11th, en route for New York, reports that at 9 30 on Wednesday night, when off South Arklow, a most singular phenomenon was observed in the heavens by the captain, officers, and passengers who were on deck at the time. The sky to the westward, which was perfectly dark, no stars being visible, became suddenly illuminated with a brilliant light of a pale yellowish hue, which lasted for fully fifteen minutes, gradually changing into a fiery red colour, which appeared to be the reflection of a large ship in flames. The captain and officers, who had never witnessed such a strange sight before, and not knowing but that they were in the vicinity of a burning vessel, altered the course of the Britannic somewhat, so as to bring her more in the direction of the place from which the glare seemed to arise. In a few minutes the fiery red colour became divided into two sections, which appeared disturbed by flutterings, and gradually diminished into a small clear white light resembling that of a steamer's masthead light, which faded into darkness, and the entire illumination disappeared.”]


1888 Oc 11 / (mirage) / St. Maurice (Valais) / evidently at night / image of a splendid cathedral. For ½ hour / Sci News (P), N.S., 2/502, quoting “Cosmos”. [VI; 1465. “The Mirage Again.” Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 2 (November 16, 1888): 502. “Une cathédral dans les nuages.” Cosmos, s. 4  (n.s.) v. 11 (November 3, 1888): 363.]


1888 Oct 12 / Shower of nails / Glb-Dem 16-1-7 / Dispatch from Brownsville, Texas—That on night of 12th the light-keeper's house at Point Isabel, occupied by Mrs. Schreiber, widow of the keeper who had died not long before, was struck by a number of shingle nails. The next night, about dark, another shower of nails, a few oysters shells, and clods of earth. People gathered but could not tell where the missiles were coming from. On the night of the 14th the bombardment was continuing. Same objects and now and then a scrap of copper or iron casting. A crowd collected. A Deputy Sheriff arrived from Brownsville to investigate. But the origin could not be determined. Said that ab 10 years before the house of County Clerk Glavecke in B-ville had been so bombarded. [B; 955.1 to 955.4. “Mysterious Shower of Missiles.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 16, 1888, p. 1 c. 7.]


1888 Oct 15 / Pub. Ledger of / At Fair Haven, Conn. Shape—figure of a man in a long robe that appeared upon a ceiling—appearing and disappearing. Clergyman had died in the room 20 years before. Thought be some peculiarity of the plaster and its moisture-retaining properties. / See Dec. 18. [B; 956.1, 956.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 15, 1888.) See: 1888 Dec. 18, (B; 990).]


1888 Oct. 20 / Pub Ledger of 26th / Moodus sounds heard. First time in several years. [VI; 1466. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 26, 1888.) “The Famous Moodus Noises.” Waterbury Evening Democrat, October 23, 1888, p. 4 c. 3.]


1888 Oct. 20 / early morning / Moodus sounds at East Haddam. / A peal. / Sun, Oct. 28. [VI; 1467. “The Famous Moodus Noises.” Waterbury Evening Democrat, October 23, 1888, p. 4 c. 3. "Mount Tom Rumbling Again." New York Sun, October 28, 1888, p. 10 c. 2.]


1888 Oct 21 / Glb-Dem of / “Florida's Yellow Fiend. Fifty More Stricken with the Fever in Jacksonville.” / Yellow fever since summer. [B; 957. “Florida's Yellow Fiend.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 21, 1888, p. 5 c. 1-4.]


1888 Oct 22 / Transported? / Glb-Dem of, 4-7 / That George A Johnson, a young farmer near Waco, Texas, had sold his cotton and gone to Waco. He had disappeared. His wife had gone to town and engaged every possible help to find him—but without avail. On 21st, Johnson reappeared. He said that he had taken a few drinks and had lost consciousness. About 3 days later he had found himself in a hotel at Carthage, Mo. When he recovered his senses he found that he still had almost all of his money. [B; 958.1, 958.2. “A Farmer's Strange Story.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 22, 1888, p. 4 c. 7.]


1888 Oct 22 / Public Ledger of / Haunted school house near Venango, Neb. Sounds heard. Investigated—inside was seen a thing that looked like a turkey buzzard—then it seemed a figure without a head 4 times size of a human being. It moved down the road and at the crossroads disappeared. [B; 959.1, 959.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger. October 22, 1888.) “The haunted school house....” Schuyler Sun, (Nebraska), October 18, 1888, p. 6 c. 1. The incident occurred on September 14, 1888.]


1888 Oct 24 / (Insane) / Glb. Dem 26-5-4 / At Kansas City, Mo., a brother and a sister, Robert and Hannah Traverse, supposed from Champlain, N.Y., with tickets for Topeka, both went insane on a Rock Island train, and shouting "help!" were handed over to the police, at Kansas City. [B; 960.1, 960.2. “Went Insane on a Train.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 26, 1888, p. 5 c. 4.]


1888 Oct. 24— / (Cut) / By Terby—11 p.m.—that cleft “rainure” near Godin shone out like a luminous filament. / Ciel et Terre 9-432 / (Eurp.[note cut off]es of light). [VI; 1468. “Rainure Lunaire.” Ciel et Terre, 9 (1888-1889): 432.]


1888 Oct 25 / rain repeating / Pub Ledger, 31st, from the Fort Gaines (Ga.) Star. / At 2 p.m.—cloudless sky—rain falling. Attributed to a tree—again of 28th at same hour. [VI; 1469. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 31, 1888.) “A Rain Tree.” Daily Republican, (Wilmington, Delaware), November 3, 1888, p. 3 c. 4. “We discovered last Thursday what to us was indeed a curiosity. It is a veritable rain tree. At 2 o'clock on Thursday, beneath a cloudless sky it was in active irrigation, and again on Sunday, near the same hour, we visited it under similar circumstances and found it still doing business at the same stand. The tree stands about 20 paces inside of the cemetery gate leading to the park. We were not botanists enough to know what kind of tree it is, but that it throws off a continuous mist like rain we do know.”]


1888 Oct 26 / Globe Dem. of, 5-4 / “Kansas City, Mo., Oct 25—In a corner of the ladies' waiting room of the Union Depot this morning, were seated a man and a woman, who frequently startled the inmates by cries of "help," followed by strange mutterings and inarticulate sounds. They were Robert and Hannah Traverse, brother and sister, who both went insane on a Rock Island train last night. They were placed in charge of the police. They had tickets for Topeka, and are supposed to have come from Champlain, N.Y.” [B; 961.1, 961.2. “Went Insane on a Train.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 26, 1888, p. 5 c. 4.]


1888 Oct 25 / Catalepsy / Mrs John Herbert, of Joliet, Ill., who as had been told in the newspapers, been in a trance for 9 months, had awakened, but was violently insane and had been taken to police headquarters. Her mania was to kill herself or her children. / Glb-Dem. [B; 962.1, 962.2. “The Case of Mrs. Herbert.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 25, 1888, p. 6 c. 7.]


1888 Oct 26 / Spiritualist, J.D. Jones, of Columbiana, Ohio, dies / Rel-P.-J, Dec. 1. [B; 963. Coates, A.W. "Passed to Spirit Life." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 45 (no.15; December 1, 1888): 6, (c. 3).]


[1888 Oct 27] / + / Burial / Religio Phil Jour, 1888, Oct 27-6-5—at Blandford churchyard, near Petersburg, Va. Body that been entombed 30 years—"almost perfect state of preservation". [B; 964. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 45 (no. 10; October 27, 1888): 6, (c. 5). “Scraps of News.” Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, October 8, 1888, p. 1 c. 1. “It was in an ordinary metallic case.”]


1888 Oct. 27 / Religio-Phil. Jour. of, 6-5 / Blandford churchyard, near Petersburg, Va. / A body that had been entombed 30 years—"almost perfect state of preservation". [B; 965. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 45 (no. 10; October 27, 1888): 6, (c. 5). "Items of Interest." Savannah Morning News, October 10, 1888, p. 4 c. 6.]


1888 Oct. 27 / Glb-Dem. / That the Macon (Ga) Telegraph had reported an unknown roaming white animal and had published received reports. [B; 966. “That Spook Again.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 27, 1888, p. 12 c. 1. “That Spook Again.” Macon Telegraph, (Georgia), October 17, 1888, p. 5 c. 5.]


1888 Oct 27 / Glb-Dem of, from San Fran. Examiner / House in San Francisco, 1421 California Street, occupied by Saul Liebenbaum, well-known business man. For some months he and his family had been annoyed or terrified by slamming doors and windows—said figure seen and was like that of a man who had committed suicide in the house. Neighbors thought it the ghost of a former owner who had fallen and broken his neck. [B; 967.1, 967.2. “Terrified by a Groaning Ghost.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 27, 1888, p. 12 c. 2-3. “A Haunted House.” San Francisco Examiner, October 19, 1888, p. 8 c. 2.]


1888 Oct 31 / (It / Sounds) / Tiriolo, Catanzaio / rombi at intervals of a few minutes / See 1816. [VI; 1470. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 41. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1888 Nov-Dec / Sunspot minimum / only 2 spots these months / Sci Amer 60-81. [VI; 1471. “Astronomical Notes.” Scientific American, n.s, 60 (February 9, 1889): 81.]


1888 Nov 1, about / Disap / Glb Dem 23-3-3 / H.H. Fuller, of Collinsville, Ill., started to the town of Mitchell, ab 1st Nov. No more heard of him. [B; 968. “A Strange Disappearance.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, November 23, 1888, p. 3 c. 3.]


1888 Nov 1 / Bird / Always so definitely identified. / Nature 39-185 / In Denmark, bird shot. Identified as the Cursorius isabellinus of the Sahara. [VI; 1472. “Notes.” Nature, 39 (December 20, 1888): 183-186, at 185.]


1888 Nov. 2 / Disap. / Glb. Dem of, 8-7 / Excitement in South Cadron Township, Ark. Miss Edna Beatty stepped from her home to a spring 50 yards away. "She did not return and all efforts to find her are unavailing. [B; 969. (St. Louis Globe-Democrat, November 2, 1888, p. 8 c. 7; not found here.) “Pretty Edna Beatty.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, November 1, 1888, p. 6 c. 6. “It Was an Elopement.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch, November 4, 1888, p. 8 c. 7.]


1888 Nov 2 / More of / See Oct 31. / Tiriolo. [VI; 1473. See: 1888 Oct 31, (VI; 1470).]


1888 Nov 2 / Paris / extraordinary darkness / L'Astro 1888-464. [VI; 1474. “Obsçurcissement du ciel.” Astronomie, 7 (1888): 464. An enourmous cloud darkened the city, between 8:30 and 9 A.M., (after sunrise), such that houses turned on gas lamps for illumination.]


1888 Nov 2 / [LT], 5-c / q / Digne / Eng? [VI; 1475. “France.” London Times, November 2, 1888, p. 5 c. 3. Digne, (Digne-les-Bains), is capital of the department of Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, France.]


1888 Nov. 3 / 7:45 p.m. / Sheep for several miles each side of the Thames. / Symons Met Mag 23, 24 / (Cut) / (1887?) [VI; 1476. Wake, Richard H. “A Puzzle.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 23 (November 1888): 154. “The Stampede of Sheep on Nov. 3rd.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 23 (December 1888): 161-164. “The Doubly Observed Meteor of Nov. 4th, 1889. The Sheep Stampede of November 3rd, 1888.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 24 (December 1889): 161-163.]


1888 Nov 3 / Symons' Met Mag 23-163 / little before 8 p.m. / Almost every flock for a distance of nearly 20 miles by 7 or 8 in Valley of Thames from 5 miles below Abingdon, nearly to Goring. Evening was very dark. No lightning, No meteor seen by anybody. As to joke or malice, said that not believed 1,000 men could have released all these sheep simultaneously. [VI; 1477.1, 1477.2. “The Stampede of Sheep on Nov. 3rd.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 23 (December 1888): 161-164.]


1888 Nov 3 / Sheep—in a place “curiously near where meteor of Nov. 20 exploded. / Symons Met 23-154. [VI; 1478. Wake, Richard H. “A Puzzle.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 23 (November 1888): 154. Symons notes: “It is curiously near the locality where the bolide mentioned on p. 153 of this number, is supposed to have burst.” “The Meteorite of the 20th of November, 1887.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 23 (November 1888): 153.]


1888 Nov. 3 / See Nov 20, 1887. [VI; 1479. See: 1887 Nov. 20, (VI; 1188).]


1888 Nov. 3 / “Terror exhibited by a dog at Wargrave without apparent cause.” / Symons 23-162. [VI; 1480. “The Stampede of Sheep on Nov. 3rd.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 23 (December 1888): 161-164, at 162.]


1888 Nov. 3 / In Symons, said bet 7:45 and 8 p.m.—Remarkable sheep not run in all directions. Shepherd stated felt slight earth-tremor before it. Astonishing that these sheep burst out in Benson, Brightwell, Hagbourne, Moreton, Stoke, Solwell, Warborough and other places and no one heard or knew till morning. [VI; 1481.1, 1481.2. “The Stampede of Sheep on Nov. 3rd.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 23 (December 1888): 161-164, at 162.]


1888 Nov. 3 / Sheep cowering under hedges “had the appearance of having been hunted almost out of their lives”. Rolled in mud. Some injured. One sheep farmer tells of parts of stone wall that fallen in, but he had heard of no earthquake. [IV; 1482.  “The Stampede of Sheep on Nov. 3rd.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 23 (December 1888): 161-164, at 163-164.]


1888 Nov. 3 / Note I have several hundred notes of slight tremors and sharp shocks in England, but few of sheep affected. [VI; 1483.]


1888  Nov. 3 / Correspondents try to explain. Say sound of one frightened flock frightens another, but not a sound heard, by any human being, of the sheep. [VI; 1484. (Refs.???)]


1888 Nov. 3 / See Nov 4, 1889. [VI; 1485. See: 1889 Nov 4, (VI: 1907 & 1908).]


1888 Nov 3 / “Curiously near where bolide of Nov 30, 1887, supposed to have burst. [VI; 1486. (Refs.???)]


1888 Nov 3 / Sheep / See Dec 10, 1920. [VI; 1487. See: 1920 Dec. 10, (X: 1191, 1192, & 1194).]


1888 (Nov. 5) / Attack by Ghst / Glb Dem of Dec. 22, from N.Y. World. / That it was said that the house, No. 581 Third Ave., N.Y. City, was haunted. That Nov. 5, a man named Leonard had hired a room. On the night of the 6th, he was almost hammered to death by a ghostly thing. A World reporter visited the place. It was a five-story tenement house, but only one occupant besides the housekeeper. The housekeeper denied and scoffed at the story. The remaining tenant told the story of the man, who had fled after paying a month's rent in advance; that he had been pummeled and beaten and bruised by a shadowy shape that he had seen. This tenant, Mrs. Maloney, told that the walls of her room shook forcibly every night. / (See Dec. 10.) [B; 970.1 to 970.4. “Did a Spook Do Him Up?|” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 22, 1888, p. 12 c. 3. “Did A Ghost Pound Him?” New York Evening World, November 16, 1888, p. 3 c. 1. See: 1888 Dec. 10, (B; 980).]


1888 Nov. 6 / night / Brilliant meteor over Mariton, N.J. / Ph. Pub. Ledger, 10th. [VI; 1488. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, November 10, 1888.)]


1888 Nov. 9 / Daily News / Extraordinary epidemic among rabbits on estate of Marquis Cholmondelez, in Cheshire. "Dead rabbits lie about in all directions." [B; 971. "Extraordinary Rabbit Epidemic." London Daily News, November 9, 1888, p. 6 c. 5.]


1888 Nov. 10 / witchcraft / Glb. Dem of, from N.Y. Sun / Jerry Pritchard, a farmer of Venango Co., Pa., went to town of Franklin to lay his case before a lawyer. That several of his neighbors, whom he named, "stood beside him while he was at work, and, by some peculiar power, deprived him of the strength to perform any labor". Case not taken up, however, by a lawyer. [B; 972.1, 972.2. “A Bewitched Farmer.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, November 10, 1888, p. 13 c. 5. "Says He Is Bewitched." New York Sun, October 29, 1888, p. 3 c. 5.]


1888 Nov. 10 / Another Whitechapel Murder. [B; 973. Mary Jane Kelly was murdered on November 9, 1888.]


1888 Nov. 10 / West Bromwich / cottage in flames / bust open—woman in a crouching position / burnt to death / Daily Chronicle, Nov. 12. [B; 974. (London Daily Chronicle, November 12, 1888.)]


1888 Nov. 10 / Bosnia / q / BA '11. [VI; 1489. A class I earthquake. Milne, 734.]


1888 Nov. 10 / 8 h, 52 m, p.m. / Jamaica / Detonating meteor / Nature 39-368. [VI; 1490. Hall, Maxwell. “Detonating Meteor.” Nature, 39 (February 19, 1889): 368.]


1888 Nov 15 / Standard / 44 sheep stolen from Inisfallen Island. / Boat house broken into on mainland Muckross and boats found afloat. Said Muckross men had rowed to island and carried off sheep. [B; 975. “The Provinces.” London Standard, November 15, 1888, p. 3 c. 4.]


1888 Nov 15 / Shortly before 15th, fresh activity at Vulcano, one of the Lipari Islands—dust reaching Messina, / Sci. News, 2-551. [VI; 1491. "Vulcano in a State of Fresh Eruption." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s.,  2 (November 30, 1888): 551-552. The Vulcano volcano.]


1888 Nov. 20 / [LT], 13-e / 23-4-f / Ext. phe. / Sheep? [B; 976. “An Extraordinary Phenomenon.” London Times, November 20, 1888, p. 13 c. 5. Symons, George James. “An Extraordinary Phenomenon.” London Times, November 23, 1888, p. 4 c. 6.]


1888 Nov. 22 / 10:23 p.m. / Pernambuco / a met as if exactly from Castor / Observatory 12-76. [VI; 1492. “Jumping Stars.” Observatory, 12 (1889): 75-76.]


1888 Nov. 27 / Animal Man? / Glb-Dem, 6-4 / That afternoon of the 24th, at Walnut Bend, near Gainesville, Texas, William S. Pears, a farmer, suddenly became a maniac, and rushing into the yard attacked a dog, grabbing it and biting it. He ran to the road, and meeting a neighbor on horseback, leaped upon him, biting him. The man was captured and sent to an asylum. [B; 977.1, 977.2. “Manuevers of a Madman.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, November 27, 1888, p. 6 c. 4.]


1888 Nov 27 / or 20 / morning / SL Globe-Dem 30-9-2, from N.Y. World / Ac to Capt Henry, steamship Regulus, 30 miles off Nantucket, a dazzling ball of fire passed over the ship. [VI; 1493. “A Ball of Fire at Sea.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, November 30, 1888, p. 9 c. 2. (New York World, ca. Nov. 30, 1888.)]


1888 Nov. 30 / Pub Ledger of / Ghost at Medford, Mass. [B; 978. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, November 30, 1888.)]


[1888 Dec 1, ab. Wrong date. See: 1887 Nov 20, (B; 979).]


1888 Dec 1 / Sounds / Religio-Phil. Jour, 6-5, copied from Waterville (N.Y.) Empire / “A dull rumbling sound is heard under the earth, varied by occasional explosions like heavy cannonading.” [VI; 1494. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 45 (no.15; December 1, 1888): 6, (c. 5).]


1888 Dec 3 (from Nov. 28) / Russian Turkestan / q. / BA '11. [VI; 1495. A class I earthquake. Milne, 734.]


1888 Dec. 10 / Animal—N.Y. City / Pub. Ledger of / Occupants of a house in Third Ave, N.Y. City, very much disturbed by belief that there was a strange animal roaming through the building. An organized search was unsuccessful. Then an Italian bootblack said saw it in the cellar. Ab. 2 feet long—head like a monkey—rest of body like a squirrel. / See Nov. 5. / See Feb 28, 1889. [B; 980.1, 980.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 10, 1888.) “Another What-Is-It.” New York Times, December 17, 1888, p. 2 c. 7. See: 1888 (Nov. 5), (B; 970), and, (1889 Feb 28).]


1888 Dec. 12 / moon / A straight wall in lunar crater Parry, by Terby / L Astro 8-30. [VI; 1496. “Mur rectiligne traversant un circque lunaire.” Astronomie, 8 (1889): 30, (illustration).]


[1888 Dec 12 /] 1889 Dec 12 / q and ashes / (at sea) / 2 a.m. / N 31° and W 62°/ Capt Walle, of the bark “Beta”—a heavy earthquake in a gale and a shower of black or dark gray ashes. / MWR 89-14 / Here the familiar description—ship felt as if had struck ground. [VI; 1932. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 1; January 1889): 13-14, at 14.]


1888 Dec 13 / Attack / Glb-Dem 15-6-1 / A week before, there had been, in Chicago, a mysterious assault—upon a plumber named Romke. Night of 13th, a "mysterious stranger" shot at a servant girl. Hulda Johnson, in Hyde Park, Chicago. Shot twice and "disappeared in the darkness". [B; 981.1, 981.2. “Chicago's Mysterious Assailant.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 15, 1888, p. 6 c. 1.]


1888 Dec. 15 / Near Anna, Ill., on railroad, a red light waved by a figure in white. / Glb Dem, 1889, Jan 5 / First time seen. Then again. Said a brakeman killed near there 2 years before. [B; 982. “A Ghost in White Waves a Red Light.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 5, 1889, p. 12 c. 1-2.]


1888 Dec 15 / (Disap) / Birmingham, Ala., Mystery No. 2. / St Louis Globe Dem. 20-4-4 / "The other mystery is the disappearance of John Anderson, a farmer; Anderson came to the city (Birm.) Saturday (15th) last with a load of produce. He was driving a good team of horses and was last seen early Saturday evening after he had sold his produce. Both man and team disappeared as completely as if the ground had opened and swallowed them. No trace of them can be found anywhere. Anderson was a farmer in good circumstances, having a pleasant home and family. His family and friends believe he has been murdered, and his body disposed of in some way. [B; 983.1, 983.2, 983.3. “The Birmingham Mysteries.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 20, 1888, p. 4 c. 4.]


1888 Dec 15 / Small short eruption / Mayon Volc, Philippines / Ref—Feb. 1, 1814. [VI; 1497. Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


1888 Dec. 15 / Mayon Volc, Philippines. / Nature 39-376 / See March 6. [VI; 1498. “Notes.” Nature, 39 (February, 1889): 375-378, at 376. See: 1888 March 6, (VI; 1279).]


1888 Dec 17 / Birmingham, Ala, Myst. No. 1 / St L. Globe-Dem. 20-4-4 / Such a new mystery at B that the Hawes Murder Mystery was being overlooked. "The body of the man found in the woods near town, Monday night (17th), still lies unidentified at the undertaking rooms, and this may become a greater mystery than the Hawes crime. No one who has seen the body can remember having seen the man in life, and identification seems impossible. The dead man was evidently a man in good circumstances, if not wealthy, and what he could have been doing at the spot where the body was found is a mystery. Several parties who have seen the body are of the opinion that the man was a foreigner. Anyway he was an entire stranger in this vicinity, and his coming must have been as mysterious as his death." Hawes murder no mystery. [B; 984.1 to 984.4. “The Birmingham Mysteries.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 20, 1888, p. 4 c. 4. West, Goldsmith B. The Hawes Horror and Bloody Riot at Birmingham. Birmingham, Alabama: Caldwell Printing, 1888. Richard Hawes, a locomotive engineer, was convicted of murdering his wife, and was probably involved in the murder of her mother, sister, and her two daughters.]


1888 Dec 17 / Daily Picayune—21-1-6—Mysterious foreigner still unidentified. Had a laundry ticket. Search of the laundries discovered it had been issued by a Birmingham laundry.—Chinese laundry. [B; 985. “Oxmoor.” New Orleans Picayune, December 21, 1888, p. 1 c. 6.]


1888 Dec 17 / Ab. Feb 1, 2 miles from Birmingham was found the body of J.W. Meadows, a railroad man. Ap. 4, a negro having Meadows' watch and chain was arrested. / Glb Dem, Ap. 5-5-3. [B; 986. “A Murderer's Confession.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 6, 1889, p. 3 c. 2.]


1888 Dec 17 / On Feb. 3, another body found in woods near Birmingham, badly decomposed. Was body of Dick Thompson, a railroad detective. It was supposed that Dick Hawes, who had murdered his wife on Dec 1, had murdered Thompson, who had disappeared Nov. 30. Hawes in jail denied that he had murdered either of them. Said that Thompson had been upon "too intimate" terms with Mrs. Hawes. [B; 987.1, 987.2. (Refs.???) "News in Brief." Maysville Evening Bulletin, (Kentucky), February 9, 1889, p. 4 c. 2. "Not Dick Thompson." Maysville Evening Bulletin, (Kentucky), February 11, 1889, p. 4 c. 1.]


1888 Dec. 17 / Ap. 1, on Stone Mt., Georgia, an unknown murdered man found. But with another stranger, who was captured, as he had gone there. / (Glb-Dem, Ap 3-5-6). [B; 988. “A Georgia Murder Mystery.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 3, 1888. p. 5 c. 6.]


1888 Dec 17 / 2 cases of somnambulism reported this day at Police Headquarters, Philadelphia. One by Phil. policeman. Other by a Camden policeman. Women in nightclothes. Their names given. / St. L Globe-Dem 24-3-3. [B; 989. “White-Robed Figures.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 24, 1888, p. 3 c. 3.]


1888 Dec. 18 / Pub. Ledger of / See Oct 15. / Town of Eaton, Ohio, aroused over outlines of a man's face appearing on window glass of house in which someone named Christman had been murdered 2 years before ac to Cincin. Enquirer. Said to have been appearing since March, but had not been made known generally for fear of bother by the curious. [B; 990.1, 990.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 18, 1888.) “On a Window.” Cincinnati Enquirer, December 14, 1888, p. 5 c. 3. See: 1888 Oct 15, (B; 956).]


1888 Dec. 20 / Costa Rica / Dec 23Calcutta / 28Baluchistan / 30Costa Rica / q's. / BA '11. [VI; 1499. Milne, 734-735.]


1888 Dec 21 / Explosion / 8 p.m. / Glb-Dem 22-3-3 / "Mysterious explosion" at Wichita, Kansas. A loud report in Market street was heard. The building occupied by the J.B. Wilcox Millinery business wrecked. Bulding in flamesall walls burst apart, by a powerful explosive of no known origin. [B; 991.1, 991.2. “A Mysterious Explosion.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 22, 1888, p. 3 c. 4-5.]


1888 Dec 22 / ab 6 p.m. / Bradford, Pa / Explosion / nitro-glycerine / 3rd in a week / taken for a q / Sun 23-2-3. [B; 992. "A Tremendous Explosion." New York Sun, December 23, 1888, p. 2 c. 3.]


1888 Dec 22 / Buried / Religio-Philosophical Jour, 5-1 / at Frankfort, Ind / body of Mrs. W.I. Peters / Had been buried 26 years before in a wooden box in metallic case. Case good condition. Box had crumbled to dust. Body seem same condition as when buried except for slight yellowish tinge of skin. [B; 993.1, 993.2. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 45 (no. 18; December 22, 1888): 5, (c. 1-2). "General State News." Indianapolis News, November 30, 1888, p. 1 c. 4. "Body Preserved for Twenty-Six Years." Indianapolis Journal, November 30, 1888, p. 2 c. 4. "Franklin, Nov. 29.Upon removing the remains of Mrs. Wm. I. Peters from the old to the new part of the cemetery, yesterday, a remarkable discovery was made. Mrs. Peters was buried twenty-six years ago in a metallic case, which was found to be in a perfect state of preservation. Upon opening the casket the remains were found to be well preserved: the face was full and unshrunken, and the clothing had the appearance of having been prepared but yesterday for burial. The old casket was placed in a new box and reinterred." William I. Peters had died on November 26, 1888; and, the grave of his first wife, (Elizabeth Harrison Peters), who had died in 1863, was relocated before his burial. Greenlawn Cemetery, Franklin, Indiana, (not Frankfort, as stated in the Religio-Philosophical Journal).]


1888 Dec. 22 / Wild Animal / Pub. Ledger of / The wild animal that raided Farmer Mahurter's pig pen near Fishkill Village, N.Y., some time ago, is still in the vicinity, and his latest exploit was to devour a young steer, near Johnsville. Women and children, and even men, are afraid to be out after dark. The animal is to be hunted, and a party of men at East Fishkill are getting ready to go upon the trail at once. [B; 994.1, 994.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 22, 1888.) (Not found in search of New York newspapers.)]


1888 Dec. 22 / 6 p.m. / Leroy, Genesee Co.,N.Y. / 3 heavy, rumbling sounds and shocks / Pub. Ledger, 25th. [VI; 1500. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 25, 1888.)]


1888 Dec 23 / Somnamb / Globe Dem 25-3-2 / Francis T. Lamont, at Auburn, Indiana, killed by falling down stairs while walking in his sleep. / See Dec. 17. [B; 995. “Fatal Somnambulism.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 25, 1888. p. 3 c. 2-3. See: 1888 Dec 17, (B; 989).]


1888 Dec. 23 / India, Calcutta / q / I / BA '11. [VI; 1501. A class I earthquake. Milne, 734.]


1888 / ab Dec 25 / Reidsville, N. Car. / A house in which were for some months heard sounds like groans. / St L. G. D., March 9, from N.Y. Herald. [B; 996. “A Haunted House.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, March 9, 1889, p. 12 c. 1. (New York Herald, ca. December, 1888???) (Not found in search of Reidsville Times.)]


1888 Dec 28 / q. / Baluchistan / Quelta / II / BA '11. [VI; 1502. A class II earthquake. Milne, 735.]


1888 Dec 28 / 11 a.m. / q? / Hampshire / Nature 39-231 / Standard, 29th. [VI; 1503. “Notes.” Nature, 39 (January 3, 1889): 230-232, at 231. “The Provinces.” London Standard, December 29, 1888, p. 3 c. 5-6.]


1888 Dec 29 / R-P-J, 5-1 / Town of Eaton, Ohio. On window glass in home of man named Christman, who been murdered 2 years before, outlines of his face appearing. First seen in March. [B; 997. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 45 (no. 19; December 29, 1888): 5, (c. 1). “On a Window.” Cincinnati Enquirer, December 14, 1888, p. 5 c. 3. "A Murdered Man's Face On a Window." Daily Wabash Express, (Terre Haute), December 14, 1888, p. 2 c. 4. "Eaton, O., December 13.—The murder of Daniel Christman, an old and wealthy farmer, two miles west of here two years ago the 7th of this month, and the lynching of William Mussel for the commission of the crime, have been recalled to the minds of this community during the last two days by the appearance of a face upon a window glass in the house in which Christman resided at the time of the murder and which is occupied by his widow and daughter. The affair has assumed a sensational shape, and hundreds of people are visiting the house and looking at the picture. The most skeptical see something that resembles the features of a man. The majority can see a strong resemblance to Christman, and some recognize it immediately as the countenance of old man Christman." "Old Mrs. Christman and her daughter say that they have seen the face since last March, and it has filled them with such pleasure that they have avoided making it known to the public from the fact that they did not want to be bothered with the people coming to see it." The face could only been seen from outside of the house, and the glass had been in the window for nine years. See: 1888 Dec. 18, (B; 990).]


1888 Dec 29-30 / q and eruption / Severe shocks in Nicaragua / NY Trib, Jan 4-1-1 / And eruption of Volc Tragu. / 17-1-2. [VI; 1504. "Earthquake Shocks in Nicaragua." New York Tribune, January 4, 1889, p. 1 c. 1. "Damage by Earthquakes in Costa Rica." New York Tribune, January 17, 1889, p. 1 c. 1. The Poás volcano.]


1888 Dec 29 / aurora and fires / Carrington, Dakota, reflections of praire fires “like the restless shim[mer] of the most brilliant aurora”. / N.Y. Sun, Jan 3-1-5. [VI; 1505. "A Mirage at Night." New York Sun, January 3, 1889, p. 1 c. 5.]


1888 Dec. 29-30 / night / Violent shocks / Costa Rica / Pictorial Weekly, Feb. 23, p. 2 / So violent the hills near San José changed shape. [VI; 1506. (Pictorial Weekly, February 23, 1889, p. 2.; possibly Pictorial News, London newspaper.)]


1888 Dec 29-30 / night / Series q's of great severity, Nicaragua. 8 killed. / N.Y. Trib, Jan 4-1-1. [VI; 1507. "Earthquake Shocks in Nicaragua." New York Tribune, January 4, 1889, p. 1 c. 1.]


1888 Dec. 30 / 4:21 a.m. / big q / Costa Rica / [BA] '11. [VI; 1508. A class III earthquake. Milne, 735.]


1888 Dec. 31 / Great meteor / Belgium / Ciel et Terre 9-529, 571, 593. [VI; 1509. “Le bolide du 31 décembre 1888.” Ciel et Terre, 9 (1888-1889): 529-534, (illustration). “Le Bolide du 31 Décembre 1888.” Ciel et Terre, 9 (1888-1889): 571-572. “Le Bolide du 31 Décembre 1888.” Ciel et Terre, 9 (1888-1889): 593-594.]


1888 Dec 31 / Belgium and France / met train / [illustration] / L'Astro 1889/110 / La Nat. '89/1/147 / La Nat. 1889/1/147. [VI; 1510. “Le bolide du 31 décembre 1888.” Astronomie, 8 (1889): 110-111, (illustration). "Le Bolide du 31 Décembre 1888." La Nature, 1889 pt. 1 (no. 818; February 2): 147-148.]

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