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Last updated: April 8, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1890


1890:


1890 / Look for Bellport, L.I., with 1894. [B; 1068. See: 1896 Feb 17, (C; 293).]


1890 / Steve Haven, sleep walker, near Fowlerville, Mich. / See Nov 18, 1892. [B; 1069. See: 1892 Nov 18, (C; 77).]


1890 / Lum obj near Oakland, CalSee Feb. 14, 1892. [B; 1070. See: 1892 Feb. 14, (B; 1265).]


1890 / Mollie Fancher / Cor Gates Ave and Downing Street, Brooklyn. [B; 1071. Dailey, Abram Hoagland. Mollie Fancher, the Brooklyn Enigma. Brooklyn: Eagle Book, 1894, 8.]


1890 / Dymoch Hall, Denbyshire / strange murders / Not said this year. / See March 15, 1901. [B; 1072. See: 1901 June 30, (C; 500).]


1890 / Polt / Ashfordsby Rectory. Leicestershire / for ab 30 years / See Aug 13, 1913. [B; 1073. See: 1913 Aug 23, (D; 686).]


1890 / Have for strange animal of 1890Melb Argus, Jan.-March. [B; 1074.]


1890 / For more of myst animal of Australia / Have Melb Argus to May 5. [B; 1075.]


1890 / Sunspot minimum / not 1889. [VI; 1939. (Refs.???)]


1890 / I stop MWRmirages. [VI; 1940.]


1890, ab. / Polts / Teignmouth / [Typescript]. [B; 1076. Typescript Note.]


1890 / 5 or 6 months / Polt in home of a police officer in village of Kooliegoda, Ceylon / Med. and Dayb., Oct 7, 1892, p. 647. [B; 1077. (Medium and Daybreak, October 7, 1892, p. 647.)]


1890 (?) / Jan / Railroad light between Clinton and Boston / See under Owls. [B; 1078. See: (Lum.) / + / 1890 / Jan , (SF-IV; 3).]


1890 / ab Jan. 1 / Start Sleeping boyJesse Streitt, Seymour, Ind. / See July 18, 1891. [B; 1079. See: 1891 July 18, (B; 1143).]


1890 Jan 1 / ab. / Red rain off Newfoundland / NQ 11-9-344. [VI; 1941. Peacock, Edward. "Showers of Blood." Notes and Queries, s. 7 v. 9 (May 3, 1890): 344. "The United States." London Morning Post, February 5, 1890, p. 7 c. 5.]


1890 / Sun to Feb 15. [VI; 1942.]


1890 / From 1890, cannot consider NY Times Indexed. [VI; 1943.]


1890 / ab. Jan 1 / Brisbane / Fall of jagged lumps of ice. One measured 8 by 10 inches. / Pub Ledger, Feb. 17. [VI; 1944. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 17, 1890.)]


1890 Jan 2 / NY Times, 5-4 / Aerolite found in Hartford / G.F. Kunz. [VI; 1945. "The Hartford Aerolite." New York Times, December 30, 1889, p. 1 c. 4. Kunz, George Frederick. “Bogus Meteorites.” New York Times, January 2, 1890, p. 5 c. 4. See: 1889 Dec 10, (VI; 1931).]


1890 Jan 3 / Mirage at Williamsburg, Va. / Sc Am 62/103. [VI; 1946. Coleman, Cynthia Beverley Tucker. “A Beautiful Atmospheric Phenomenon.” Scientific American, n.s., 62 (February 15, 1890): 103. “The city of Williamsburg, in Virginia, is situated on that ridge of land known in history as 'The Peninsula.' It is about two hundred feet above the level of the sea, and is separated from the rivers by well wooded land, the tall trees effectually concealing all trace of the billowy streams, which in their ebb and flow have carried out and brought in the messengers of commerce which have for nearly three centuries connected America with the nations of Europe. These rivers can only be descried on a clear day from the highest towers of the town. On the morning of January 3 they lay uncovered before the astonished eyes of the inhabitants, seemingly not more than a mile away, blotting out, in their turn, the trees by which they had been so long concealed. On the north lay the York in blue light, with the shores of Gloucester distinctly outlined on the further side. Shades of color produced by the dashing waves and varied depth of the water were well marked. On the south, the James unrolled its tawny length, stretching off on the one hand to the old historic island of Jamestown, and on the other, sweeping with majestic curve, lapped the marl banks of Carter’s Grove, then widening out into Burwell’s Bay,
passed out of view fifteen miles away.”]


1890 Jan 5, 19 / Mar 15 / May 29 / Aug 8 / Nov 16 / Dec 1 / Invergarry q's / Geol Mag 1891-454. [VI; 1947. Davison, Charles. "On the British Earthquakes of 1890, With the Exception of Those Felt in the Neighbourhood of Inverness." Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 8 (1891): 450-455, at 454.]


1890 Jan 6 / bet. 1 and 2 a.m. / Sound or q / Tulliallan, Perthshire / Geol Mag 1891-455. [VI; 1948. Davison, Charles. "On the British Earthquakes of 1890, With the Exception of Those Felt in the Neighbourhood of Inverness." Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 8 (1891): 450-455, at 455.]


1890 Jan 7 / was Woolwich, p. 369 / 12:30, 1:25 / qsChelmsford / Nature 41-256. [VI; 1949. “Notes.” Nature, 41 (January 16, 1890): 254-256, at 256.]


1890 Jan 7 / 0.30 and 1:25 p.m. / As to reported q. at Chelmsford, Charles Davison writes that was firing of one of the 110-ton guns at Woolwich. / Symons 25-40. [VI; 1950. "Not An Earthquake." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 25 (April 1890): 40.]


1890 Jan 9 / (Disap) / (unknown language) / Melb Argus, 21st / Dr. Rohring, Health Officer of Hastings, near Melbourne, "inclined to spiritualism," born in Austria but an [word missing] long residing in the Colony, had disappeared. Before the 9th he had drawn out all money to his account in the bank, except a few shillings, and had left this with his daughter. His watch and jewelry had not gone with him and his diary excited interest because of "certain entries in an unknown tongue. One of these was said by someone who examined the diary to be a slight modification of "Hic Jacet", and another Greek, meaning, "roughly," "It is finished." "Below there was some undecipherable matter of Greek and German mixed." The police were informed. It was learned that "Dr Rohring had not left the district by train or coach, or by boat, or by any conveyance whatever." Full description was in the hands of every constable in Victoria, but nothing learned. Dr. Rohring is described as tall, 6 ft. 1 in. in height, with full gray beard and mustache, a man who would be marked in any community. Seems to have disappeared at night. Morning of 9th his daughter found his room had not been occupied. [B; 1080.1, 1080.2, 1080.3. "Strange Disappearance of a Doctor." Melbourne Argus, January 21, 1890, p. 5 c. 4. "The Disappearance of Doctor Rohner." Melbourne Argus, January 23, 1890, p. 7 c. 5. The name was corrected to Dr. Charles William Rohner, (not Rohring); and, his disappearance remains a mystery.]


1890 Jan 15 / Disap / In St Louis Globe Dem, March 2-6-4 / Vanished on Jan 15 in New York, Frank McGowan, one of the best-known of Edison's associates, the man who led the South American expedition in search for the peculiar kind of bamboo wanted by Edison in his incandescent light experiments. Last seen boarding a Christopher St car on his way to his home in Orange, N.J. All institutions within 100 miles of NY been searched, circulars distributed; 3 of Pinkerton's men been searching. [B; 1081.1, 1081.2. “Vanished From View.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, March 2, 1890, p. 6 c. 4.]


1890 Jan 17 / [LT, 5-f / q / S. Car[olina]. [VI; 1951. “The United States.” London Times, January 17, 1890, p. 5 c. 6.]


1890 Jan 20 / 6 p.m. / Det met / Chester, Pa. / Sun 21-5-3. [VI; 1952. "A Brilliant Meteor." New York Sun, January 21, 1890, p. 5 c. 3.]


1890 Jan 22 and 23 / It Sounds / Aquila / rombi / See 1816. [VI; 1953. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 42. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1890 Jan 23 / 4 a.m. / at Batoum / Calm weather. Sudden disturbance of sea. / Ciel et Terre 1890-251. [VI; 1954. “Marée Imprévue.” Ciel et Terre, 11 (1890-1891): 251-252. Batoum is now identified as Batumi, Georgia.]


1890 Jan 24 / 8:40 p.m. / Met. / Philadelphia / S Am. 62/103. [VI; 1955. Wilson, L.B. “A Beautiful Meteor.” Scientific American, n.s., 62 (February 15, 1890): 103.]


1890 Jan 24 / ab 9 p.m. / Met, Brazoria, Texas, a day or two after reported in newspapers that a great meteorite weighing several thousand pounds had fallen on Comanche Peak, Texas. / Sc Am 62-151 / (See Jan 31.) [VI; 1956. Chinn, R.M. “A Large Meteor.” Scientific American. n.s., 62 (March 8, 1890): 151. See: 1890 Jan. 31, (VI; 1960)]


1890 Jan 28 / A wolf captured in Plainfield, N.J. Supposed to have escaped from a menagerie "last summer". / Pub Ledg, Jan. 31. [B; 1082. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 31, 1890.) “The Menagerie Broke Loose.” Courier-News, (Bridgewater, New Jersey), January 30, 1890, p. 1 c. 3.]


1890 Jan 28 / New little black spot on rampart of Plinius seen by M. Navarro. / L'Astro 1890/187. [VI; 1957. Navarro, Manuel S. "Un nouveau cratère dans l'arène e Plinius." Astronomie, 9 (1890): 187.]


1890 / At Eplatures, about 1890, midwinter fall of larvae. / Cosmos, N.S., 50-353 / Switzerland. [VI; 1958. “Les pluies de chenilles.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 50 (March 19, 1904): 353. “Les pluies de chenilles.” Ciel et Terre, 25 (1904-1905): 23-24.]


1890 / last Jan / Lausanne, Switz, larvae, incalculable numbers, some black and 1 cm. long, others yellow and 3 cm.long. / D-94 / L'Astro 1890-313 / See 1889. [VI; 1959. The note copies information from page 94 of The Book of the Damned. "Pluie de chenilles." Astronomie, 9 (1890): 313. See: (1889).]


1890 Jan. 31 / night / On the larger of the two Comanche peaks, near Granbury, Texas, meteorite fell, sending many stones rolling down. Said to have been found and was of yellow metal supposed to be gold. / Sun, Feb 9-13-3 / See Jan. 24. [VI; 1960. (New York Sun, February 9, 1890, p. 13 c. 3; not found here.) See: 1890 Jan 24, (VI; 1956).]


1890 Jan or Feb / Red rain and dust off coast of Newfoundland. / M.W.R. 1901-121. / (D-35). [VI; 1961. The note copies information from page 35 of The Book of the Damned. “Dust Storms and Red Rain.” Monthly Weather Review, 29 (no. 3; March 1901): 120-121, at 121.]


1890 Feb. / Volc disturbances and 3 new islands near Island of Bogoslaw, ab 40 miles N.W. of Unalaska. / Nature 43-279. [VI; 1962. “Notes.” Nature, 43 (January 22, 1891): 277-280, at 279. The Bogoslof volcano.]


1890 Feb. 3 / Collescipoli, Terni, Italy / (F). [VI; 1963. Fletcher, 106. This is the Collescipoli meteorite.]


1890 Feb. 8 / Glb-Dem of / Martin's Ferry, Ohio, polthouse cor of Second and Monroe Streets. Water pitcher dancing about a roomsound of footstepsbed clothes pulled off bedswindow shutters flying open. Locked doors opening. [B; 1083. “The Pranks of a Ghost.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 8, 1890, p. 13 c. 4.]


1890 Feb 8 / M. Ferry / See June 25, 1877. [B; 1084. See: 1877 June 25, (B: 150, 151 & 151.1).]


1890 Feb. 9 / Sun / Mock sun seen near Albany and Cazenovia, 110 miles away. / Science 15-133. [VI; 1964. Ledyard, L. Walters. “Mock Sun.” Science, s. 1 v. 15 (February 21, 1890): 133-134.]


1890 / Op Mars / bright projection / Astro Journal 16/208. [VI; 1965. Hussey, W.J. "Projection on the Terminator of Mars." Astronomical Journal, 16 (1896): 208.]


1890 Feb 6 / Unknown Fish / Pub Ledger of / “A shower of fish is recorded in a California exchange as having fallen near Blanco, in Monterey County, last week. The fish belong to a species altogether unknown here.” [VI; 1966. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 6, 1890.)  Larkin, Polly. “Our American Letter." Pacific Commercial Advertiser, (Honolulu), February 11, 1890, p. 3 c. 3-4. “A strange phenomenon occurred in the vicinity of Blanco, Cal., during a recent storm, it being nothing more nor less than the fall of a shower of fish. They were of a bright, silvery color, about two inches in length, and instead of fins they had sharp spines about one-fourth of an inch long where the pectoral and dorsal fins should be. Some of the fish were preserved and they are a rare curiosity. No one who has yet viewed them have ever seen or read of their like before.”]


1890 Feb 10, 17 and 22 / Very active Volc Bogoslava, Alaska / Sun, May 17-1-5 / then on. [VI; 1967. "Bogoslova in Eruption." New York Sun, May 17, 1890, p. 1 c. 5. The Bogoslof volcano was active from 1883 to around 1895.]


1890 Feb. 10 / 2 slight shocks / St. Louis, Mo. / Galignani Messenger, 12th. [VI; 1968. (Galignani Messenger, February 12, 1890.)]


1890 Feb 13 / N.Y. Trib, 1-1 / Volc / Japan. [VI; 1969. "Volcanic Eruption in Japan." New York Tribune, February 13, 1890, p. 1 c. 1. A doubtful eruption of the Zaozan volcano.]


1890 Feb 20 / Terni, Italy / L'Astro 9-155. [VI; 1970. "Chute d'un uranolithe." Astronomie, 9 (1890): 155. This is the Terni meteorite.]


1890 Feb 15 / Ashes from volc? / Ac to “The Two Republics”, copied in the St. L. Globe Dem, March 6-6-7That throughout the state of Guanajuata, Mexico, beginning 10:30 a.m., ashes fellsky had been cloudlessthe gray material was thick and the appearance was of a snowstorm. People terrified. Supposed came from the Columa Volcano, which had been active. [VI; 1971.1, 1971.2. “Ashes Rained Down from a Cloudless Sky.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, March 6, 1890, p. 6 c. 7. The Colima volcano was in eruption from August 9, 1889, to February 16, 1890.]


1890 Feb 23 / Sound / P. Ledg., 26th“What Was It?A number of residents of the southern portion of West Chester (Pa.) were aroused before daylight Sunday (23rd) morning by a loud rushing noise as if of a cyclone passing far overhead. Outside all appeared to be calm and wind was blowing but slightly. They are unable to account for the phenomenon.” [VI; 1972.1, 1972.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 26, 1890.)]


1890 Feb 23 / 11 p.m. / 2 stong shocks at Rome. / Cosmos, N.S., 15/363 / Flocks of sheep showed alarm before the fall. [VI; 1973. “Tremblements de terre.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 15 (March 8, 1890): 363.]


1890 Feb 24 / Queen Charlotte Island, Bri. Col, 18 up to Ap. 1. q's and rumblings / See the Alaska volc. / Sun, June 1-18-4. [VI; 1974. "Eighteen Shocks of Earthquake." New York Sun, June 1, 1890, p. 18 c. 4. The period of the eighteen shocks extended to "the middle of April," (not April 1). See: 1890 Feb 10, 17 and 22, (VI; 1967).]


1890 Feb 26 / Atlantic / Ship hits a spout. / Sun, March 15-1-5. [VI; 1975. "Charged by a Waterspout." New York Sun, March 15, 1890, p. 1 c. 5.]


1890 Feb 27 / NY Times, 1-6 / Tennessee / cyclone. [VI; 1976. “In a Cyclone's Path.” New York Times, February 27, 1890, p. 1 c. 6.]


1890 Feb 28 and March 1 / Animal / Melb. Argus of / That near Euroa, 90 miles NE of Melbourne, a reed-cutter had seen and had watched an extraordinary animal for 10 minutes, and that later it had been seen by other persons (list of names published). About 30 feet long and a head like a bulldog's. The existence of some altogether unheard-of monster is thus vouched for by a cloud of credible witnesses." / Said that on Feb 15, Mr. C.E. Goyder, of Euroa, had seen it and had fired at it. It had not been seen since, and was thought may have been killed by the shot, but that such excitement that a hunting party set out on the 22nd. The Zoological Gardens of Melbourne sent a representative who brought nets with him. There was a photographer in the parts. About 40 men searched the swamps near Euroa. Said that suspicious-looking tracks were found but that the animal was not seen. [B; 1085.1 to 1085.5. "Moglonemby." Euroa Advertiser, February 14, 1890, p. 2 c. 6. "A Singular Story." Melbourne Argus, February 20, 1890 p. 4 c. 1. "From Our Correpondent." "Euroa, Tuesday." "Considerable excitement has been caused in Euroa by reports as to an extraordinary animal having been seen in a swamp at Wylonemby, about 14 miles distant. The swamp is about 150 yards across, and a creek flows through it. For six years or more the swamp is reputed to have been the haunt of something abnormal, tales being told of dogs flying out ot the place and never again being induced to enter Last week a couple of young men went into the swamp for the purpose of cutting reeds, which are 6 ft. high and very thick, when they were alarmed by a sudden splashing and snorting near at hand, and the rushes waved as if allowing passage to some large animal. They quickly retired, but next day one ventured back to carry out the reeds he had cut, when he was again alarmed by strange sounds. He leaped upon a log, and at some thirty paces away saw a large head upreared, which he likens to that of a bull dog. It kept this position for about ten minutes, when it disappeared, the motion of the rushes giving the idea of an animal some 30 feet long. The young man was greatly scared. On a report of the occurrence appearing in the local journal, a party of Euroa sportsmen went out to the swamp, where they were joined by local residents on horseback. After beating about for more than an hour they were about to give up the quest, when a sudden rustling was heard, and two of the party saw an enormous tail, as thick as a man's thigh, disappearing into the large trunk of a fallen tree. A shot was fired at the animal, but its effect is a matter ot conjecture. Attempts were made to dislodge the 'bunyip,' but without avail, the only result being a small black snake, which was quickly despatched. Night coming on the party retired, but will again visit the scene on Saturday. Those who saw the animal describe it as being of a yellow colour underneath and a dark brown above, 'as thick as Mr. Barr's belltopper.' It is supposed to be an immense serpent, such as is found in Queensland." "Baiting a Bunyip." Euroa Advertiser, February 14, 1890, p. 2 c. 6. "The first spectator declares his conviction that the 'bunyip' is a Queensland carpet snake, fully fifteen feet in length, judging from its girth, which was equal to a man's thigh. The other corroborates this opinion, asserting that the snake is 'as thick as Barr's belltopper.' The party shortly afterwards returned home, and another expedition will probably leave for the scene to-morrow. An analysis of reports concerning the creaturehead like a dog, tail like a man's thigh, together with the various noises heard, have suggested the idea of a fresh-water seal, but speculation is likely to be soon set at rest now that public attention has been drawn to the matter." "A Search for a Mysterious Animal." Melbourne Argus, February 28, 1890, p. 6 c. 4. "From Our Correspondent." "Euroa, Thursday." "On Saturday a large party of hunters went out to the swamp in Daly's paddock, which is reported to be the home of some strange animal or reptile. The party was headed by Mr. Meekin, who arrived from Melbourne on the previous day, with nets, &c., for the purpose of capturing the animal alive. In the interest of the Zoological-gardens. An amateur photographer was also on the scene for the purpose of getting a picture of the animal, if possible. Upwards of 40 pedestrians and horsemen traversed the swamp in extended order, every inch being well beaten, but without result. Several suspicious looking tracks were found among the reeds, but nothing sufficiently definite to give point to the extraordinary tales which have been current during the last fortnight. Mr. Meekin was most indefatigable, not a corner escaping his notice, and the committee of the Zoological gardens may rest assured that their lack of the fabled animal is not due to the want of zeal of their hunter. After a hard day's work the party retired in disappointment. That some large creature was in the swamp is attested by the evidence of eye-witnesses, viz., Messrs. Broderick, Ralston, C.E. Goyder, Cockburn, and Ewert, and there are two theories to account for its non-appearance. Either it was mortally wounded by the shot fired at it by Mr. Goyder on the previous Saturday, or it has gone away up or down the creek which flows through the swamp." "It is to be feared that after all the pursuit of the bunyip...." Melbourne Argus, March 1, 1890, p. 9 c. 2. "The Bunyip Hunt." Traralgon Record, March 4, 1890, p. 2 c. 4.]


1890 Feb. 28 / Nothing in Melb. Age. [B; 1086.]


1890 March / Substance / Entomological News of / “A correspondent in Hardeeville, S.C., says that he 'witnessed a most wonderful phenomenon: from noon to sundown, with a gentle wind blowing from the southwest and a perfectly clear sky, a shower of white balls filled the air and covered the ground for a space of ten miles square, with a gentle shower of a white, fleecy substance, as fine as silk, which was very strong when twisted.'" He had never seen anything like it there before. Editor does not say aeronautical spider, but that the little balls were excess-remains of the substance of which spiders make their cocoons being cut off, floating away. / This not account for great fallwhich never seen before. [VI; 1977.1, 1977.2, 1977.3. Blake, C.A. "A correspondent in Hardeeville...." Entomological News, 1 (March 1890): 44.]


1890 March 4 / obj / Noted in C.R., March 10, a sunspot in N. lat. 65°. / On photo of the sun, taken at Greenwich this day, no trace of such a spot. / Nature 41-472. [VI; 1978. Dierckx, G. “Tache solaire de trés haute latitude.” Comptes Rendus, 110 (1890): 513. Spörer, Friederich Wilhelm Gustav. “Sur la position de la tache solaire du 4 mars.” Comptes Rendus, 110 (1890): 696-697. Maunder, Edward Walter. “Solar Spot in Very High Latitude.” Observatory, 13 (1890): 159-160. “Sun-Spot in High Latitudes.” Nature, 41 (March 20, 1890: 472.]


1890 March 4, etc. / East / Near N.E. limb of sun, large spotconspicuous several days, and on 13th diminished so as to be seen with difficulty. / Sid Mess 9-182. [VI; 1979. "Sunspots." Sidereal Messenger, 9 (April 1890): 182.]


1890 March 4 / At Melbourne, appearance in western sky in evening as of tail of comet with nucleus below horizon. / Melb Argus 7-7-5. [VI; 1980. "A Supposed Comet." Melbourne Argus, March 7, 1890, p. 7 c. 5. "Several communications have been received at tbe Observatory since the evening of the 4th instant, describing an appearance in the western sky on Tuesday evening bearing a striking resemblance to the tail of a very large comet, the nucleus ot which seemed to be well below the horizon after twilight. The descriptions all agree very closely, and one correspondent saw the phenomenon, but attributed it to auroral streamers, more especially as there were two persistent luminous streaks visible. It often happens that the zodiacal light, auroral streaks, and, on moolight nights, filaments of cirrus cloud take on the appearance of comets' tails, and are reported as such. This may be so in this instance, but a small comet which was discovered by Borelly, at Nice, on December 12, 1889, and which passed its perieclion [sic, perihelion] passage on January 26 last, but which has since been so nearly in a line with the sun as to be invisible, and was reported to the Observatory from Kiel some two months ago, is expected to appear in the position indicated by tbe several correspondents who witnessed the phenomenon on Tuesday evening. It is possible, therefore, that what was seen was actually the tail of this comet. If this be so it will be rather remarkable that a comet whose brightness was appareutly not very great at perihelion should now be so great as to be visible to the naked eye in strong moonlight. Its distance from the sun on the 4th inst. was about 95,680,000 miles, and from the earth 189,000,000 miles Its position was, RA. 23 hours 29min., and declination 21deg. 53min south, which agrees very closely with the position described by the correspondents. It was looked for on Wednesday night and last night, but clouds obscured the western heavens until after 10 o'clock." Another luminous object similar to a comet's tail was observed at Yass, Australia, on April 22. "A Strange Phenomenon." Australian Star, (Sydney), April 24, 1890, p. 3 c. 5. "Yass, Wednesday.A strange phenomenon appeared in the western sky on Monday night. Just above the horizon there appeared a beautiful light, and above that again was a brilliant star with a tail like a large comet. Both were visible for about 12 minutes, and were seen by a number of people, who thought it was a star comet. The meteor was eagerly lookod for last night, but did not appear."]


1890 March 8 / Religio Phil Jour, 3-2 / Haunted shantycries from itat Bridgeville, Sullivan Co., N.Y. An old eccentric, named James Fletcher, had died there ab. a year before. [B; 1087. "A Haunted Shanty." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 48 (no. 3; March 8, 1890): 3, (c. 2). See: 1889, (B; 998).]


1890 March 9 and 18 / Eruption / Island of Reunion / L'Astro 1890-274. [VI; 1981. Dubuisson, Ed.  "Volcan.Lueurs crépusculaires.—Krakatoa et cyclones." Astronomie, 9 (1890): 274-275.]


1890 March 12 / mirage / 4 p.m. / Sky, Ashland, OhioLarge unknown citysupposed by some to be Mansfield, 30 miles awayothers Sandusky, 65 miles away, and, “The more superstitious declare that it was a vision of the New Jerusalem." / Sun 16-19-6. [VI; 1982.1, 1982.2. "Mirage in Ohio." New York Sun, March 16, 1890, p. 19 c. 6. "A City in Mid-Air." Philadelphia Times, March 14, 1890, p. 2 c. 1.]


1890 March 15 / Religio-Phil Jour, 6-5 / A number of haunted houses in Hamilton, Ohio, and another reported white form seenbrings a coffin with it and gets in, or appears to. / O / Hercules beetle / from Dominica. [B; 1088.  "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 48 (no. 4; March 15, 1890): 6, (c. 5).]


1890 March 15 / Violent explosion at Vulcano / Nature 46-118. [VI; 1983. “The Eruption of Vulcano (August 3, 1888, to March 22, 1890).” Nature, 46 (June 2, 1892): 117-118.]


1890 March 18 / metite / night / On a farm near Gainesville, Texas, obj like flat rock of several hundred pounds. / Sun 24-4-6. [VI; 1984. "Fell from the Sky with a Roaring Sound." New York Sun, March 24, 1890, p. 4 c. 6.]


1890 March 18 / (BO) / water falling / Pub. Ledger of, from Savannah, (Ga.) Newsthat upon a litttle knoll, 2 miles from Thad, in Chattahoochee Co, water was falling steadily from a cloudless sky, upon a space about 50 feet square. Ac to a witness the water came down from the sky. He stood there and held out his handkerchief, which was soon saturated. [VI; 1985.1, 1985.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 18, 1890.) “Rains There Perpetually.” Seattle Post-Intelligencer, April 2, 1890, p. 9 c. 6. “D.R. Parkman tells of a curions phenomenon in Chattahoochee countya place where rain falls perpetually. The spot is located on a littie knoll in a thin wood on the Shipp place, two miles from Thad. Mr. Parkman says the discovery was first made last Thursday, and that rain had been falling steadily on the knoll since that time. Tbe downfall covers a space of fifty feet square. This space is perfectly wet, and the leaves on the ground are full of water. Mr. Parkman says he visited the place with G.A. McBryde at noon Tuesday. There was not a cloud to be seen in the sky, and the leaves every where, except on the square, were as dry as tinder.” "I stood with the space between me and the sun,' said Mr. Parkman, "and saw the raindrops coming steadily down from the sky. 1 held out my handkerchief, and it was  soon saturated with water.” “Mr. Parkman says that everybody who hears about the phenomenon is skeptical, but that the many who have visited the place in the last few days have gone away convinced. No one has yet offered an explanation of the mysterious rainfall. Mr. Parkman suggests that some powerful unknown substance attracts the moisture from the atmosphere.”]


1890 March 18, 19 / Meteors not in M.W.R. [VI; 1986.]


1890 March 19 / evening / Gainesville, Texas / Met exploded and fragments found, ac to Chicago Tribune. / Sid Mess 9-287. [VI; 1987. “Gainesville Meteor.” Sidereal Messenger, 9 (June 1890): 287. “Fall of a Meteor in Texas.” Chicago Tribune, March 20, 1890, p. 6 c. 7. “A meteor weighing several hundred pounds fell at Gainesville, Texas, in the yard of S.P. Hargis, who lives near here, on the evening March 19. The meteor had the appearance of a huge flint rock, and its flight through the air caused a roaring sound which was heard several seconds before it struck the earth and which resembled distant thunder. It exploded with a report like a cannon while still in the air, and fragments of the stone were scattered for rods around. The main bodv of the strange visitor struck about fifty feet from Mr. Hargis' house with such force as to imbed itself deeply in the ground.”]


1890 March [19] / [LT], 5-e / q's / BonnSpain / 27-9-d / Trieste. [VI; 1988. “Earthquake at Bonn,” and, “Earthquake in Spain.” London Times, March 19, 1890, p. 5 c. 5. “Earthquake Shock at Trieste.” London Times, March 27, 1890, p. 9 c. 4.]


1890 March 21 / NY Times, 5-3 / Shark's tooth found in Brooklyn. [VI; 1989. “Fossilized Tooth of a Shark.” New York Times, March 21, 1890, p. 5 c. 3.]


1890 March 27 / Great Tornado / Kentucky / (great) / Sun, 29th, etc., pages and pages. [VI; 1990. "Wind Swept Louisville." New York Sun, March 29, 1890, pp. 1-3.]


1890 March 28, 29, 30, 31 / NY Times, p. 1 / Ap 1-1-6 / 2-1-7 / Ky. / Cyclone. [VI; 1991. “A Cyclone at Louisville.” New York Times, March 28, 1890, p. 1 c. 5-6. “Hundreds of Lives Lost.” New York Times, March 29, 1890, p. 1 c. 4-7 & p. 2 c. 1-6. “The Stricken Territory.” New York Times, March 30, 1890, p. 1 c. 7 & p. 2 c. 1-4. “Louisville's Brave Heart.” New York Times, March 31, 1890, p. 1 c. 6. “Rising from the Ruins.” New York Times, April 1, 1890, p. 1 c. 6. “The Kentucky Cyclone.” New York Times, April 2, 1890, p. 1 c. 6.]


1890 March 29 / Cyclone from UtahKansas, Mo, Ky, Tenn on south / and Neb, Iowa, Minn, Wis, Mich on N / Sc Am 62/210. [VI; 1992. “The Western Cyclone.” Scientific American, n.s., 62 (April 5, 1890): 210.]


1890 March 30 / Moon / New spot in Copernicus / L'Astro 9-235. [VI; 1993. Gaudibert, Casimir Marie. "Nouveau cratère dans Copernic." Astronomie, 9 (1890): 235.]


1890 / ab March-April / Plague of caterpillars / N.S. Wales / “most providentially appeared flocks of ibis, destroying great numbers. [VI; 1994. (Refs.???)]


1890 March 31 / Aspen, Colorado / about an inch of snow of “a delicate pink hue / Sun, May 4-15-7. [VI; 1995. "A Fall of Pink Snow." New York Sun, May 4, 1890, p. 15 c. 7.]


1890 Ap. 5 / Moulins / rain from clear sky / L'Astro 1890-274. [VI; 1996. "Pluie dans nuages." Astronomie, 9 (1890): 274. Isolated drops of rain fell for about 15 minutes, followed by a rain that lasted for another 15 minutes, during which time there was no sensible wind.]


1890 Ap. 6 / (mir) / St. Vincent, Minn / general miragesmall house estimated to be 25 miles away / M.W.R. '90-107 / In all these cases whole scene of observers place affected. [VI; 1997. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 18 (no. 4; April 1890): 106-108, at 107. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 18 (no. 5; May 1890): 133-134, at 133. On May 29, 1890, another mirage at Vincent appeared at 5:10 A.M. “The country for about thirty miles south of that place was plainly brought into view.”]


1890 Ap. 10 / Baldohn, Courland, Russia / (F). [VI; 1998. Fletcher, 106. This is the Baldohn meteorite.]


1890 April [11] / Death of the Elephant Man. [B; 1089. “Death of the Elephant Man.” London Times, April 16, 1890, p. 6 c. 6. Joseph Carey Merrick was known as as the “Elephant Man.”]


1890 Ap 13 / Chattanooga / Wild Man / Sun 20-18-7. [B; 1090. "A Trifle Too Much Wild Man." New York Sun, April 20, 1890, p. 18 c. 7.]


1890 Ap 13 / Sun, 15-7 / Woman in a trance 2 years. [B; 1091. "Is It Hypnotic Trance?" New York Sun, April 13, 1890, p. 15 c. 7.]


1890 Ap. 15 / It Sound / Isernia / rombi / See 1816. [VI; 1999. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 42. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1890 Ap. 24 / metite? / Man hit by someone or metite? / Derby, Conn / Sun 27-1-4 / (N). [B; 1092. "Mysterious Assault." New York Sun, April 27, 1890, p. 1 c. 4.]


1890 Ap. 26 / hail / Baltimore, I think / afternoon / Hail chunks size of man's fist. “The large pieces were a dirty mud color.” / Trib 28-1-2. [VI; 2000. "Ruin in Eight Minutes." New York Tribune, April 28, 1890, p. 1 c. 2.]


1890 Ap. 26 / (Trib), 1-1 / Cloudburst / Texas / See July 4. [VI; 2001. "A Cloudburst in Texas." New York Tribune, April 26, 1890, p. 1 c. 1. See: 1890 July 4, (VI; 2040).]


1890 Ap. 29 and 30 / Waterspouts / Atlantic / Sun, May 9-1-2. [VI; 2002. "Lots of Waterspouts." New York Sun, May 9, 1890, p. 1 c. 2.]


1890 May / Polt / Philadelphia / Light, Aug 23, p. 407. [B; 1093. "Strange Acts of Unseen Power." Light, 10 (no. 503; August 23, 1890): 407. (Philadelphia Inquirer, ca. August 1890.)]


1890 May 2 / (metite) / (F) / 5:15 p.m. / Aerolite / Winnebago, Iowa / MWR '90-133 / Concussion great in Emmet Co like the other, ac to St Louis G-Dem. [VI; 2003. Fletcher, 106. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 18 (no. 5; May 1890): 133-134, at 133. “A Brilliant Meteor.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 3, 1890, p. 4 c. 4. “A Brilliant Meteor.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 4, 1890, p. 6 c. 4-5. This is the Winnebago County meteorite.]


1890 May 2 / Det Met / columns of smoke / 5:15 p.m. / Glb-Dem 3-4-4 / Forest City, and other places in Iowa. People highly excited. Brilliant meteor from W to EReports like gunfire and concussions like of an earthquake. / More in May 4Dense column of smokeBuildings shaken and window glass brokenin Dickinson and Emmet Counties. [VI; 2004.1, 2004.2. “A Brilliant Meteor.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 3, 1890, p. 4 c. 4. “A Brilliant Meteor.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 4, 1890, p. 6 c. 4-5.]


[1890 May 4 /] 1890 May 23 / Strange birds / Phil Ledger of / Flocks of unknown birds reported from Santa Rosa and then from Petaluma, California. [VI; 2010. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 23, 1890.) “Local Brevities.” Santa Rosa Press Democrat, May 10, 1890, p. 3 c. 1. “The Petaluma Imprint says....” Santa Cruz Sentinel, May 21, 1890, p. 3 c. 5. “The Petaluma Imprint says the same phenomenon mentioned as follows by the Santa Rosa Democrat has been observed in Petaluma as well, but neither paper describes the strange fliers. For four hours Friday night the atmosphere in the central part of the city was teeming with birds of some unknown species. Flocks of these birds circled around the Court House dome and kept up a constant music until after midnight.”]


[1890 May 10. Wrong date. See: 1890 May 15, (VI; 2006).]


[1890 May15 /] 1890 May 10 / BO / Bld rain / Messignadi / To a chemical it reacted with characteristic blood-crystals. The astronomer R. [note cut off] Denza, having heard of it as reported by M. Virdia, the Director of Oppido Observatory, several miles from Messignadi, investigated and published Marini's report. [VI; 2006.1, 2006.2. "A Rain of Bird Blood." Popular Science News, 35 (May 1901): 104. Denza, Francesco. “Piogge Singolari.” Atti della Accademia Pontificia dei Nuovi Lincei, 44 (1890-1891): 28-31. “Pioggia di sangue.” Bollettino Bimensuale, s. 2 v. 20 (1900): 59.]


1890 (May 12) / (Spon.) Comb / In Science 19-100, quotes from a paper read by Dr. B.H. Hartwell, of Ayer, Mass, read before the Massachusetts Medico-Legal Society; that, May 12th, 1890, driving through woods, he was called to tend a woman on fire. He found a body burning at shoulder, both sides of abdomen, and both legs. Almost all of the clothing had been consumed. Said that she had been burning stumps and roots. Dr H's paper was written to assert that a body can burn of itself. Nothing else around much burned, because said been a rain. She was not intemperate. [B; 1094.1, 1094.2, 1094.3. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 19 (February 19, 1892): 100-103, at 100-101. Hartwell, Benjamin Hall. “So-Called Spontaneous Combustion.” Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, 126 (February 11, 1892): 135-137.]


1890 May 12 / [LT], 5-f / (Servia) / (q. / Sofia) / June 9-5-f / Bulgaria. [VI; 2005. “Earthquake Shocks in Sofia.” London Times, May 12, 1890, p. 5 c. 6. “Earthquakes in Bulgaria.” London Times, June 9, 1890, p. 5 c. 6.]


[1890 May15 /] 1890 May 10 / BO / Bld rain / Messignadi / To a chemical it reacted with characteristic blood-crystals. The astronomer R. [note cut off] Denza, having heard of it as reported by M. Virdia, the Director of Oppido Observatory, several miles from Messignadi, investigated and published Marini's report. [VI; 2006.1, 2006.2. "A Rain of Bird Blood." Popular Science News, 35 (May 1901): 104. Denza, Francesco. “Piogge Singolari.” Atti della Accademia Pontificia dei Nuovi Lincei, 44 (1890-1891): 28-31. “Pioggia di sangue.” Bollettino Bimensuale, s. 2 v. 20 (1900): 59.]


1890 May 15 / Messignadi, Italy / 1st fall4:30, and 2nd 5 / Cosmos, N.S., 18-111Commandant Marini gives the story as told by 2 of his soldiers stationed at M. A slight rain of red drops upon persons, roads, trees, vines, etc. Had been wind in the morning but then calm though gloomypanic. Soldiers calmed it and collected some of the substance. / Sent to École d'hygiène [publique de] Rome, and the report is published with details of the analysisblood. Not said that it was birds' blood. Corpuscles were seen under the microscope and the question is asked “globules de sang d'oiseau?” and the chemist explains that birds may have been injured in a storm. However, it is said that at the time there was no storm. [VI; 2007.1, 2007.2, 2007.3. “Une pluie de sang.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 18 (January 3, 1891): 111-112. “Revue des Sciences.” Journal des Debats, January 8, 1891, p. 1 & 2. Denza, Francesco. “Piogge Singolari." Atti dell'Accademia Pontificia de'Nuovi Lincei, 44 (1890-1891: 28-31, at 28-30. The substance fell without water.]


1890 May 17 / (+) / Assaults / Religio-Phil-Jour, 6-4 / In Japan, men in open air or house suddenly wounded, usually on legs. Slits ab an inch long. At time, not much pain felthour later, pain and flow of blood. [B; 1095. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 48 (no. 13; May 17, 1890): 6, (c. 5), & 7, (c. 1).]


1890 [May 20] / qs / Algeria[LT], May 20-5-c / Armenia28-5-d / New York27-5-c / Sofia12-5-f. [VI; 2008. “Earthquake Shocks in Sofia.” London Times, May 12, 1890, p. 5 c. 6. “Algeria.” London Times, May 20, 1890, p. 5 c. 3. “The United States.” London Times, May 27, 1890, p. 5 c. 3.

Earthquake in Armenia.” London Times, May 28, 1890, p. 5 c. 4.]


1890 May 20 /Asia Minor / 24-25Italy / 26Armenia / qs / BA '11. [VI; 2009. Milne, 735.]


[1890 May 20. Wrong date. See: 1890 May 26, (VI; 2013).]


[1890 May 23. Wrong date. See: 1890 May 4, (VI; 2010).]


1890 May 24 / Balloon at sea / bet Florida and Queenstown / L.T., June 10-10-c. [VI; 2011. “A Balloon in Mid Ocean.” London Times, June 10, 1890, p. 10 c. 3.]


1890 May 25 / metsky / 7 a.m. / Mohawk Valley / severe shock / heavy wind / lightning / sound like thunder / Trib 26-1-5. [VI; 2012. "Shaken By an Earthquake." New York Tribune, May 26, 1890, p. 1 c. 5.]


[1890 May 26 /] 1890 May 20 / date of dispatch from Constantinople / q destroys village of Kayi, Armenia. / Nature 42-109. [VI; 2013. “Notes.” Nature, 42 (May 29, 1890): 107-111, at 109.]


1890 May 27 / Op. Mars / (Al). [VI; 2014. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1890, 466.]


1890 May 31 / Trib, 8-1 / Ghsts. [B; 1096. "Have You Ever Seen Ghosts?" New York Tribune, May 31, 1890, p. 8 c. 1-2.]


1890 June / Polt / Chesterfield / started / See March 1, 1891. [B; 1097. See: 1891 March 1, (B; 1131).]


1890 June 4 / 8 a.m. / Met stones fell at Kakangarai in the Salem District, India. / Nature 45-20. [VI; 2015. “Notes.” Nature, 45 (November 5, 1891): 19-21, at 20. This is the Kakangari meteorite]


1890 June 6 / Nawapali, Cent. Provs., India / F. [VI; 2016. Fletcher, 106. This is the Nawapali meteorite.]


[1890 June 6. Wrong date. See: 1891 June 6, (VI; 2017).]


1890 June 7 / 6:30 a.m. / Sofia / 2 violent shocks / Nature 42-160. [VI; 2018. “Notes.” Nature, 42 (June 12, 1890): 158-161, at 160.]


1890 June 13 / 10,000 persons gather at Father Mollinger's Church in Allegheny City, to take part in celebration of St Anthony's Day. Faith cures. / Religio-Phil. Jour, July 5, 1890. [B; 1098. "Topics of the Times." Religio-Philosophical Journal, n.s., 1 (no. 6; July 8, 1890): 1.]


1890 June 13 / Disap. / Wichita, Kansas / Glb Dem 14-3-6. [B; 1099. “A Young Girl's Strange Disappearance.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 14, 1890, p. 3 c. 6.]


1890 June 14 / 2:30 a.m. / Near Findlay, Ohionitro-glycerine works blew upin Findlay it was thought an earthquake. / St L G-Dem 15-2-6. [VI; 2019. “Thought It Was an Earthquake.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 15, 1890, p. 2 c. 6.]


1890 June 16-17 / night / In the Revue Scientifique, 4-6-603, M. A. Souleyre writes that upon this night he and two other Frenchmen were upon a high plateau in the Dept. of Constantine, Algeria. At 4 o'clock in the morning they heard a bizarre sound, something between the “rugissement” of a fauve and the mugissement of a taureau. 5 series of these mugissement at regular intervals of about a secondand 105 seconds between each pair of series. This regularity of rhythm he thinks could not have been of animal origin. He says there were no animals wild or domestic in the region.. The Arabs told him that it was the sound of distant water, but he asks if anybody can explain. [VI; 2020.1, 2020.2, 2020.3. Souleyre, A. “A propos des mistpoeffers de la mer du Nord.” Revue Scientifique, s. 4 v. 6 (1896): 603-604. The time was 3:45 A.M., and diminished until disappearing after sunrise at 4:40 A.M.; and, “bizarre” sounds resembled something between the “regissement d'un fauve et le mugissement d'un taureau,” (between the roar of a wildcat and the bellowing of a bull).]


1890 June 16-17 / night / In the Revue Scientifique, 4-6-603, M. A. Souleyre writes that this night he and two other Frenchmen on a plateau in Algeria had heard sounds of a rhythmic regularity Heard five sounds separated by a second each. Then came other series of fives, separated by 105 seconds. Says that looking [at] his watch he had counted these intervals. Sound intermediate to the rugissement of a fauve and the mugissement of a taureau. / Of a wild animal or the bellowing of bull. [VI; 2021.1, 2021.2, 2021.3. Souleyre, A. “A propos des mistpoeffers de la mer du Nord.” Revue Scientifique, s. 4 v. 6 (1896): 603-604.]


1890 June 17 / This last of May / In Cosmos, N.S, 16-423, written by M. René de Champagne, Director of the French school at Diarbekir, Turkey in Asia, of a farinaceous (?) substance like mulberries, end of Maybeen found in the fields. Evidently unknown these. He calls it “Cette manne d'un nouveau genre”. It was gathered, placed on sale and eaten. / See Cosmos, N.S., 16-422. / Simply that there is a detached lichen. / Lecanora Esc. [VI; 2022.1, 2022.2. Champagne, René de. “Une nouvelle manne.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 16 (July 19, 1890): 423. Denza, Francesco. “Piogge Singolari." Atti dell'Accademia Pontificia de'Nuovi Lincei, 44 (1890-1891: 28-31, at 31.]


1890 June 17 / Manna / See Aug, 1890. / See the Dublin “berries, May 9, 1867. [VI; 2023. See: 1867 May 9, (III: 1055 to 1061), and, 1890 Aug, (VI: 2025 & 2026).]


1890 June 17 / manna / Some time preceding the eclipse of the 17th / (Le Naturaliste, Ap. 1, 1891) / Fall of “manna” near Diarbekir, Asia Minor. Samples send by the directors of the French school at D., to the Editor of Cosmosobjects ab ½ inch in diameter of a corrugated surface or convuluted yellowish outside and white inside. Placed in water for some hours, they turned gelatinous. [See B.D. gelat.] [Fort's brackets] Said be Lecanora esculenta. [VI; 2024.1, 2024.2. Meunier, Stanislas. “Dur une Pluie Singulière Observée à Diabékir en Asie Mineure.” Le Naturaliste, s. 2 v. 5 (April 1, 1891): 79-80, (illustrations). See: 1898 March 12, (VIII; 238).]


1890 June 19 / Arizona / Dragon. [B; 1100. "Found on the Desert." Tombstone Epitaph, April 26, 1890, p. 3 c. 6. "A winged monster, resembling a huge alligator with an extremely elongated tail and an immense pair of wings, was found on the desert between the Whetstone and Huachuca mountains last Sunday by two ranchers who were returning home from the Huachucas. The creature was evidently greatly exhausted by a long flight and when discovered was able to fly but a short distance at a time. After the first shock of wild amazement had passed the two men, who were on horseback and armed with Winchester rifles, regained sufficient courage to pursue the monster and after an exciting chase of several miles succeeded in getting near enough to open fire with their rifles and wounding it. The creature then turned on the men, but owing to its exhausted condition they were able to keep out of its way and after a few well directed shots the monster partly rolled over and remained motionless. The men cautiously approached, their horses snorting with terror, and found that the creature was dead. They then proceeded to make an examination and found that it measured about ninety-two feet in length and the greatest diameter was about fifty inches. The monster had only two feet, these being situated a short distance in front of where the wings were joined to the body. The head, as near as they could judge, was about eight feet long, the jaws being thickly set with strong, sharp teeth. Its eyes were as large as a dinner plate and protruded about half way from the head. They had some difficulty in measuring the wings as they were partly folded under the body, but finally got one straightened out sufficiently to get a measurement of seventy-eight feet, making the total length from tip to tip about 160 feet. The wings were composed of a thick and nearly transparent membrane and were devoid of feathers or hair, as was the entire body. The skin of the body was comparatively smooth and easily penetrated by a bullet. The men cut off a small portion of the tip of one wing and took it home with them. Late last night one of them arrived in this city for supplies and to make the necessary preparations to skin the creature, when the hide will be seat east for examination by the eminent scientists of the day. The finder returned early this morning accompanied by several prominent men who will endeavor to bring the strange creature to this city before it is mutilated."]


1890 June 19 / Huge bird of W. Va / See May 4, 1895. [VI; 2028. See: (1895 May 4; not found).]


1890 June 19 / Dragon / See Dec. 14, 1892. / See Ap 12, 1889. / May 27, 1888 / See Chili bird. [VI; 2029. See: 1868 April, (III; 1324); 1888 May 27, (VI; 1336); 1889 Ap. 12, (VI; 1631); and, (Dec. 14, 1892; not found).]


1890 June 22 / Sun, 21-6 / Disaps and suicides in Conn / half a dozen. [B; 1101. "Meteorological Suicide." New York Sun, June 22, 1890, p. 21 c. 6.]


1890 June 25 / 10:30 p.m. / (q) / Weatherby, etc., Yorkshire / Nature 42-233 / (Times 28-14-a). [VI; 2030. “Notes.” Nature, 42 (July 3, 1890): 233-235, at 233-234. “Earthquake Shocks in Yorkshire.” London Times, June 28, 1890, p. 14 c. 1.]


1890 June 25 / Farmington, Kansas / F. [VI; 2031. Fletcher, 106. This is the Farmington meteorite.]


1890 June 25 / ab 12:50 p.m. / Washington, Kansas / metite / (F) / Sc Am Sup 30/12212. / Organic matter? [VI; 2032. Fletcher, 106. Snow, Francis Huntington. “A Stony Meteorite from Washington County, Kan.” Scientific American Supplement, 30 (no. 764; August 23, 1890): 12212. This is the Farmington meteorite.]


1890 June 25 / 26 / qs / Yorkshire / Geol Mag 1891-450. [VI; 2033. Davison, Charles. "On the British Earthquakes of 1890, With the Exception of Those Felt in the Neighbourhood of Inverness." Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 8 (1891): 450-455, at 450-453.]


1890 June 27, 28 / Large meteors / Eng / Observatory 13-272. [VI; 2034. Denning, William Frederick. “Fireball of June 27, 1890.” Observatory, 13 (1890): 272-273.]


1890 June 30 / Glb. Dem of, 1-5 / Mad dog scare in Eastern Conn and W. Rhode Island. Supposed traced back to a mad dog of autumn, 1889, when a mad dog bit dogs, pigs, etc. [B; 1102. “Overrun by Mad Dogs.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, June 30, 1890, p. 1 c. 5-6.]


1890 June 30 / [LT], 6-f / Met. [VI; 2035. “A Meteor.” London Times, June 30, 1890, p. 6 c. 6.]


1890 / summer / near Danville, Ill. / Small sun fish and frogs alive / Sc Am 117/271. [VI; 2036. Fairhall, Joseph, Jr. “Things That Fall From the Sky.” Scientific American, n.s., 117 (October 13, 1917): 271. “...This brings to my memory a hot summer’s day in the year 1890 on which a heavy rain came up suddenly—in fact it was practically a cloud burst. I was in the midst of this walking across a bare tract of land of about 160 acres, which was at least a mile from the nearest water; and I noticed as soon as the rain was over that the ground all around me for some distance was literally covered with small sun fish about 1 to 1½ inches long and small frogs about ¾ to 1 inch long and that these were as full of life as if they had just come out of the water.”]


1890 July-Sept / Sun missing. [VI; 2037.]


1890 July 1 / Black rain in Worcestershire between Crewle and Broughton Hackett / Nature 42-254. [VI; 2038. “Notes.” Nature, 42 (July 10, 1890): 251-256, at 254.]


1890 July 4 / (F) / Metite near Vitre (Ille-et-Vilaine), France / Bull S de A.F. 1912-433. [VI; 2039. Fletcher, 106. "Deux météorites françaises." Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 26 (1912): 433-434. This is the St. Germain-en-Puel meteorite.]


1890 July 4 / Trib, 1-4 / Cloudburst / Texas / See Ap. 26. [VI; 2040. "A Cloudburst in Texas." New York Tribune, July 4, 1890, p. 1 c. 4. See: 1890 Ap. 26, (VI; 2001).]


1890 July 5, 6 / White spot on Mars. / L'Astro 1894-323 / Nature 50/499. [VI; 2041. Flammarion, Camille. "La Planète Mars." Astronomie, 13 (1894): 321-329, at 323. Lockyer, William James Stewart. “Bright Projections on Mars' Terminator.” Nature, 50 (September 20, 1894): 499-501.]


1890 July 6 / Lick Ob / 2 projections Mars / Observatory 17/295. [VI; 2042. “The Bright Projections on Mars.” Observatory, 17 (1894): 295-296.]


[1890 July 11. Wrong date. See: 1890 July 17, (VI; 2046).]


1890 July 13 / 10:53 p.m. / Brilliant meteor at Veldes (Krain) / D. News 17-6-6. [VI; 2043. "Fall of a Meteor." London Daily News, July 17, 1890, p. 6 c. 6. Veldes is now identified as Bled, Slovenia.]


1890 July 15 / Clapham stones / The Echo (London) ofThe stones were large pebbles such as were used in paving stable yards. [B; 1103. (London Echo, July 15, 1890.) See: 1890 Aug 2, (B; 1104).]


1890 July 16 / Severe shock / Helsingland, Sweden / 3 houses collapsed. / Galignani Messenger, 18th. [VI; 2044. (Galignani Messenger, July 18, 1890.)]


1890 July 17 / frogs / Neuilly-Plaisance, France / L'Astro 1890/313. [VI; 2045. “Pluie de grenouilles.” Astronomie, 9 (1890): 313. “Pendant l'orage si violent qui s'est abattu sur Paris et ses environs le 17 juillet dernier, de une heure et demie à deux heures et demie de l'après-midi, une pluie de grenouilles a été observée à Neuilly-Plaisance. En quelques minutes des milliers de petites grenouilles ont couvert les chemins.”]


[1890 July 17 /] 1890 July 11 / frgs / Neuilly-Plaisance / in Paris? [VI; 2046. Neuilly-Plaisance is a commune in the suburbs of Paris, (about 12 kilometres from the centre of Paris). See: 1890 July 17, (VI; 2045).]


1890 July 17 / Nothing in The Galignani Messenger. [VI; 2047.]


1890 July 19 / 8:52 p.m. / Rock Island, Ill / meteor / Science 16-66. [VI; 2048. Udden, Johan August. “A Scintillating Meteor.” Science, s. 1 v. 16 (August 1, 1890): 66.]


1890 July 22 / 4 p.m. / clbrst in Grand Canyon, Colorado / B. Eagle 23-4-7. [VI; 2049.1. “Cloud Bursts in Colorado.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 23, 1890, p. 4 c. 7. Grand Canyon Hills, (“Grand Canon”), is not the famous Grand Canyon, (about 650 kilometres away, in Arizona), but is only a few miles from Canon City, Colorado, along the Arkansas River.]


1890 July 22 / See Hastings sounds. / Jan., 1926 / or 25? [VI; 2049.2. See: 1926 Jan., (XI; 555).]


1890 July 22 / Lake Sounds / Similar phe at Lake Whatcom, Oregon / St. Louis Globe-Democrat / Aug 11, 1888 / A chanting sound. Sometimes a murmur as if of distant waves. / Said been a massacre near here by Indians long beforeso ghosts bought in. [VI; 2050. “Voices of Indian Ghosts.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, August 11, 1888, p. 13 c. 4.]


1890 July 22 / clbrst, foot-hills of Santa Rita Mts., Arizona. Carried a train of freight cars a mile. / B. Eagle 22-2-2. [VI; 2051. “An Arizona Cloudburst.” Brooklyn Eagle, July 22, 1890, p. 2 c. 2.]


1890 July 22 / Sounds (like telegraph wires) / Science, 22-245 / Edwin Linton, of Washington, Pa, writes of sounds he heard over Shoshone Lake, while making investigations in the vicinity of Yellowstone Lake, for the U.S. Fish Commission. Heard first ab. 8 a.m., July 22, a strange, echoing sound in the sky. Heard again next morning, each time seeming to begin overhead and move to the southwest. He and Prof. S.A. Forbes heard again Aug 4, at 8 a.m. Began overhead and passed away, having a slight hint of metallic resonance. “There was a faint resemblance to the humming of telegraph wires, but the volume was not steady nor uniform.” This time heard at a distance, growing louder overhead, filling the upper air with a medley of wind in the top of pine trees and in telegraph wires, echoes of bells and humming of bees. On the afternoon of Aug. 9th (3:20 p.m.), when upon Yellowstone Lake, “I heard a sound overhead, like rushing wind, or like some invisible but comparatively dense body moving very rapidly through the air, and not very far above our heads.” Seemed could not be attributed to wind. There was no disturbance of clouds floating at different levels. He quotes from Prof. Forbes' published description“Here we first heard, while out on the lake in the bright still morning, the mysterious aërial sound for which this region is noted. It put me in mind of the vibrating clang of a harp lightly and rapidly touched high up above the tree tops, or the sound of many telegraph wires swinging regularly and rapidly in the wind, or, more rarely, of faintly-heard voices answering each other overhead.” / (See April, 1868.) [VI; 2052.1 to 2052.8. Linton, Edwin. “Overhead Sounds in the Vicinity of Yellowstone Lake.” Science, s. 1 v. 22 (November 3, 1893): 244-246. Forbes, Stephen Alfred. “A Preliminary Report on the Aquatic Invertebrate Fauna of the Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and of the Flathead Region of Montana.” Bulletin of the United States Fish Commission, 11 (1891): 207-258, at 215. “Here we first heard, while out on the lake in the bright still morning, the mysterious aërial sound for which this region is noted. It put me in mind of the vibrating clang of a harp lightly and rapidly touched high up above the tree tops, or the sound of many telegraph wires swinging regularly and rapidly in the wind, or, more rarely, of faintly-heard voices answering each other overhead. It begins softly in the remote distance, draws rapidly near with louder and louder throbs of sound, and dies away in the opposite distance; or it may seem to wander irregularly about, the whole passage lasting from a few seconds to half a minute or more. We heard it repeatedly and very distinctly here and at Yellowstone Lake, most frequently at the latter place. It is usually noticed on still, bright mornings not long after sunrise, and it is always louder at this time of day; but I heard it clearly, though faintly, once at noon when a stiff breeze was blowing. No scientific explanation of this really bewitching phenomenon has ever been published, although it has been several times referred to by travelers, who have ventured various crude guesses at its cause, varying from that commonest catch-all of the ignorant, 'electricity,' to the whistling of the wings of ducks and the noise of the 'steamboat geyser.' It seems to me to belong to the class of aerial echoes, but even on that supposition I can not account for the origin of the sound.” See: (1868 April.).]


[End of Series VI. Beginning of Series VII.]


1890 July 26 / Cyclone / Lawrence, Mass. / Pop Sci News 24-137. [VII; 1. "A novelty in New England Meteorology...." Popular Science News, 24 (September 1890): 137.]


[1890 July 27 /] 1890 July 30 / 11:15 p.m. / Sea Girt, N.J. / meteor / Science 16-81. [VII; 2. “A Brilliant Meteor.” Science, s. 1 v. 16 (August 8, 1890): 81. The observation occurred on July 27, (not July 30, the date of the letter).]


1890 July 30 / Nothing / Chicago Tribune. [VII; 3.]


1890 July 30 / (+) / luminous obj. / In Phil Public Ledger, Aug 1, said that night of 30th, just after dark, in the western heavens “about where Venus shines when an evening star” had appeared a luminous body, like Venus in size but deep red. For half an hour it was stationary. Then it suddenly shot northward, leaving no trail behind. [VII; 4.1, 4.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 1, 1890.) Venus would have been visible for about 90 minutes after sunset on the western horizon, with a visual magnitude of -5.1; Saturn was between Venus and the Sun, with a visual magnitude of 0.8; Mars was above the southern horizon, with a visual magntiude of -1; and, the Moon and Jupiter would have been rising above the eastern horizon.]


1890 July 30 / Venus / Inf Conj / Dec. 3, 1890. [VII; 5. Opposition of Jupiter, (on July 30). Inferior conjunction of Venus, (on December 3). Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1832, 467. See: 1890 Dec. 3, (VII; 37).]


1890 Aug / Fall of manna in Asia Minor. Same description as fall in Prussia of March, 1852. “Small sphérules; yellowish on the outside, it is white within.” / Nature 43/255 / See June 17. [VI; 2025. “Notes.” Nature, 43 (January 15, 1891): 254-256, at 255. See: 1890 June 17, (VI: 2022, 2023, and 2024).]


1890 (Aug) / The director of the central dispensary of Bagdad sent specimens of an edible substance that fell from the sky at Merdin and Diakbékir (Turkey in Asia, in heavy rain. Seeds like a glutinated millet. Yellow outside and white inside. Ground into flour and made excellent bread. Examined by botanists. They were said to be of a plant of Lichens, known under the name of Lecanora esculenta. Point is that seeds of corn, wheat, millet, etc., not fall in showers so special to these seeds. / Nature 43-255 / La Nature 36-82. [VI; 2026.1, 2026.2. “Notes.” Nature, 43 (January 15, 1891): 254-256, at 255. Tissandier, Gaston. "Pluie de Mann en Turquie d"Asie." La Nature, 1891 pt. 1 (no. 919 ; January 10): 82.]


1890 / 1st week in August / (metite) / Pub Ledger, Aug 13thT.J. Mitchell, who lives on the National road, 3 miles east of Greenville, Ind, discovered a large stone, weighing 500 or 600 pounds, in his cornfield last week, and as it was not there when he last plowed the field, Mr. Mitchell does not know how to account for its presence. Large numbers of people have seen the stone and many think it meteoric. Its size and form and the uninjured condition of the corn seem to preclude the fact of its having been carried there by jokers. [VII; 6.1, 6.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 13, 1890.)]


1890 Aug 2 / Stones / Light of / At home of Mr. Piddock, a Hafer-road, Claphameight o'clock (Monday evening) stone weighing a pound through glass in conservatory. Followed by four others. More hour later and till 1:30 a.m. / Miss Piddock in a dying state in room in upper floor. Police arrived in afternoon. Continued for hours. [B; 1104.1, 1104.2. "Is It a Case of Stone-Throwing by Spirits?" Light, 10 (no. 500; August 2, 1890): 371. "A Mysterious Affair at Clapham." St. James's Gazette, July 17, 1890, p. 11.]


1890 Aug 6 / 8:50 p.m. / Palmyra, NJ / remarkably brilliant meteor / Pub Ledg, 9th. [VII; 7. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 9, 1890.)]


1890 Aug 6 / early evening / Met burst over N.Y. City from s.w. to n.e. / NY Times 7-8-3 / 10-8-4 / Was seen Conn and Mass and N.H., and heard in Mass and N.H./ det. met. [VII; 8. “A Brilliant Meteoric Display.” New York Times, August 7, 1890, p. 8 c. 3. “Wednesday Night's Meteor.” New York Times, August 10, 1890, p. 8 c. 4.]


1890 Aug 9, before / (Sk Ho) / Spon Cob / [Typescript]. [B; 1105. Typescript note.]


1890 Aug 11-12 / Perseids unusually abundant in Italy / Bull. Astro, 7-407. [VII; 9. "Revue des Publications Astronomiques." Bulletin Astronomique, 7 (1890): 384-412, at 407. Denza, Francesco. "Les étoiles filantes du 9-11 août 1890, observées en Italie." Comptes Rendus, 111 (1890): 416-417.]


1890 Aug 15 / Great solar eruption / L Astro 9-453. [VII; 10. Fényi, Jules. “Éruptions Solaires Gigantesques.” Astronomie, 9 (1890): 453-456.]


1890 Aug 16 / Trib, 6-4 / Sunspots and Tornadoes / Ed. [VII; 11. "Sunspots and Tornadoes." New York Tribune, August 16, 1890, p. 6 c. 4.]


1890 Aug 25 / (phe) / P. Ledger of, quoting the Kennebec Journal / That at Saco, ab 11 p.m., a dark cloud was seen to descend from sky and settle on a roof. There was a flash of fire and volumes of smoke rolled away but the house not set on fire. [VII; 12. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 25, 1890.) “|The Passing Show.” Akron Beacon Journal, September 1, 1890, p. 2 c. 3. “'The residents of Dyer street, Saco, are puzzling,' says the Kennebec, Me., Journal, 'over a strange phenomenon recently noticed at the home of Lawyer George F. Haley. About 11 o'clock at night a dark cloud was seen to apparently descend from the sky and settle upon the roof of the house. There was a flash of fire and then volumes of smoke rolled away from the roof. Those who were witnesses began to cry fire, but before the alarm had spread the smoke had cleared away and the house was seen, to be all right. A dozen responsible parties say they saw the queer spectacle.”]


1890 Sept / Frgs / Desert / Nevada / [Letter to Fort from John T. Reid August 29, 1926]. [VII; 13. (Letter; Reid, John T., to Fort; August 29, 1926.)]


1890 Sept, Oct / LT together. [VII; 14.]


1890 Sept 2 / [LT], 3-a / 6 fires in Brooklyn. [B; 1106. “The United States.” London Times, September 2, 1890, p. 3 c. 1.]


1890 Sept 6 / [LT], 10-b / 17-4-b / 18-8-f / Met. [VII; 15. Lewis, Lennard. “A Brilliant Meteor.” London Times, September 6, 1890, p. 10 c. 2. “A Meteor.” London Times, September 17, 1890, p. 4 c. 2. “A Meteor.” London Times, September 18, 1890, p. 8 c. 6.]


1890 Sept 7-15 / Change in a star near the nucleus of the Andromeda nebula, ac to David Packer, / E Mec 54/351. [VII; 16. Packer, David Elijah. “The Star of 1890....” English Mechanic, 54 (no. 1394; December 11, 1891): 350-351.]


1890 Sept 7 / Great cloudburst / Arizona / Amer Met Jour 10/385. [VII; 17. Parker, John Dempster. “A Cloud-Burst in Arizona.” American Meteorological Journal, 10 (January 1894): 384-388.]


1890 Sept 10, 30 / Small short eruptions / Mayon Volc, Philippines / RefFeb 1, 1814. [VII; 18. Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


1890 Sept 13 / Pub Ledger of, quoting the Milledgeville Chronicle / Whirlwind that pounced on small boy carrying an umbrella and carried him over a water tank to other side. [VII; 19. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, September 13, 1890.) "Georgia and Florida." Savannah Morning News, September 10, 1890, p. 6 c. 1-2. Milledgeville, Georgia.]


1890 Sept 14 / 6:13 a.m. / Colma (Cal?) / daylightcor heard a loud sputtering soundsaw a banana-shaped luminous obj. “turning end on end shooting out sparks. / Pubs Astro Soc Pacific 3/41. [VII; 20. "Bright Meteor Observed in Daylight." Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 3 (no. 14; January 1891): 41.]


1890 Oct 4 / 4:49 p.m. / q. / Java / 5th, 2:31 a.m., q., Trinidad / B.A. '11. [VII; 21. Two class I earthquakes. Milne, 736.]


1890 Oct 5 / 2:31 a.m. / q. / Trinidad, W. Indies / BA 1911-55. [VII; 22. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 55.]


1890 Oct or Nov / Cal / spider webs / See Nov 16, 1891. [VII; 23. See: 1891 Nov. 16, (VII; 226).]


1890 Oct 7 / afternoon / 3:30 o'clock / Shocks and rumbling in Phil. from powder factory blown up 35 miles away. / Sun 8-1-5. [VII; 24. "They Blew Up One by One." New York Sun, October 8, 1890, p. 1 c. 5.]


1890 Oct 8 / At Nexo, Island of Bornholm, slight rumbling of earthquake almost an hour. / Nature 42-648 / See Oct 8, 1888. [VII; 25. “Notes.” Nature, 42 (October 30, 1890): 646-649, at 648. See: 1888 Oct 8, about, (VI; 1459).]


1890 Oct 15, ab. / Started the sleeper of Wilkes-Barre / See Jan 19, 1892. [B; 1107. See: 1892 Jan 19, (B; 1234).]


1890 Oct 16 / 9 p.m. / 50 miles east of Kent's Group / In a heavy th storm a bulky mass was seen from barque Killarney to fall into the sea. / South Sea Islands (?) / Nature, 43-590. [VII; 26. “Notes.” Nature, 43 (April 23, 1891): 590-593, at 590. “The Killarney.” Melbourne Argus, November 5, 1890, p. 10 c. 6. “The barque has been exposed to a good deal of adverse weather, and the tedium of the passage was varied by a meteoric display of a phenomenal character, which occurred at 9 p.m. on the 16th ult. The wind had been blowing a gale from N.W. to S.W., and at the hour named it shifted during a terrific storm of thunder and lighting. In the middle of an unusually heavy peal of thunder a mass of somethingpresumably an aerolitefell into the sea at a distance of about 200 yards from the vessel. The great splash sent the spray some 30ft. or 40ft. into the air. The barque at the time was about 50 miles east of Kent's Group.” The Kent Group are north of the main island and are part of the state of Tasmania.]


1890 Oct 18 / Etna / Nature 42-618. [VII; 27. “Notes.” Nature, 42 (October 23, 1890): 617-619, at 618.]


1890 Oct 19 / Account in Mary L. Lewes' "Queer Side of Things", of an apparition seen on a road near Little Milford, Pembrokeshire. Strange looking animallarger than a cathead more like  fox's than a cat'sother queer animal apparitions seen here later. / See Nov 10, 1892. [B; 1108.1, 1108.2. Lewes, Mary Louisa. The Queer Side of Things. London: Selwyn, 1923, 3-9. See: 1892 Nov. 10, (C; 76).]


1890 Oct 22 / (+) / (It Sounds) / S. Ginesio (Macerata) / light concussion and loud aerial sound. / See 1816. [VII; 28. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 42. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1890 Oct 27 / Comet-like / S. Africa / D-276. [VII; 29. The note copies information from page 276 of The Book of the Damned. "A New Comet (?)." Nature, 43 (November 27, 1890): 89-90. "A New Comet." London Times, November 24, 1890, p. 6 c. 2.]


1890 Nov, Dec / LT together. [VII; 30.]


1890 Nov / Saylesville, R.I. / Ghst / Sun, Nov 24-3-5. [B; 1109. "A Real Ghost in a Rhode Island Hamlet." New York Sun, November 24, 1890, p. 3 c. 5.]


1890 Nov. 17 / [LT], 6-d / Dec 2-5-f / q. / Scotland. [VII; 31. “Earthquake in Scotland.” London Times, November 17, 1890, p. 6 c. 4. “Earthquake in Scotland.” London Times, December 2, 1890, p. 5 c. 6.]


1890 Nov. 19 / P. Ledger of / Myst rappings at Pawtucket, R.I. Police discovered caused by a big rooster that slept on an inverted wash tub and when he moved down it go to one side or the other. [B; 1110. (Philadelphia Public Ledger. November 19, 1890.) “Scraps.” Indianapolis News, November 22, 1899 p. 4. c. 4.]


1890 Nov. 19, Dec. 26 / Sounds and qs. / Feddan. / Gt Brit / Geol Mag, 1891-455. [VII; 32. Davison, Charles. "On the British Earthquakes of 1890, With the Exception of Those Felt in the Neighbourhood of Inverness." Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 8 (1891): 450-455, at 454.]


1890 Nov. 20 / 4:30 a.m. / q. / Trinidad, W. Indies / BA 1911-55. [VII; 33. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 55. ]


1890 Nov. 26 / (Hun) / [LT], 5-e / qs of Hungary in Times Index poorly listed. [VII; 34. “Austria-Hungary.” London Times, November 26, 1890, p. 5 c. 5.]


1890 Nov. 28 / (Hun) / Pressburg / BA '11. [VII; 35. A class I earthquake. Milne, 736.]


1890 Dec / Disap / Ward / See Dec, 1890, N.Y. Times Index. [B; 1111. (New York Times Index, Dec., 1890.)]


1890 Dec 2 / Shock / Mexico / severest in years / Nature 43-131 / evening, [VII; 36. “Notes.” Nature, 43 (December 11, 1890): 130-133, at 131.]


1890 Dec. 3 / 17 h / Venus Inf conjunction sun / Observatory 13/7. [VII; 37. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1832, 467. (Ephemerides for Mercury, Venus, Mars.) Observatory, 13 (1890): 7.]


[1890 Dec 4 /] 1890 Dec 6 / The Thursday before, ac. to Birmingham Daily Post, of the 6th, copied in Med and Dayb. of 12th, at Soho Station, as train from Wolverhampton to Snow Hill went by, a woman leaped from it to the platform. She gave her name of Matilda Crawford, of Wolverhampton, and said that in train a young man had insulted her and then pushed her through the window. Ac to testimony of a railway detective in next apartment, no such man there. / As if occult phe. Girl so thrown but not injured. [B; 1112.1, 1112.2, 1112.3. "Curious Incident at Soho Station." Birmingham Daily Post, December 6, 1890, p. 7 c. 4. (Medium and Daybreak, December 12, 1890' not online.)]


1890 Dec 6 /Phil Ledger of / At Missoula, Mont, alleged ghost that left graveyard every night, and went to a cabi where someone had died and there sawed wood. [B; 1113. (Philadelphia Public Ledger. December 6, 1890.)]


1890 Dec 7 / Sun, 2-5 / Ac to Philadelphia Press, a devil-ape seen in a railroad roundhouse. [B; 1114. (Philadelphia Press, ca. December, 1890.) "They Say It's the Devil." New York Sun, December 7, 1890, p. 25 c. 5.]


1890 Dec 14 / Sun, 30-2 / in Reading, Pa. / H. House. / Doors, even locked, fly openand noises. [B; 1115. "A House of Curious Noises." New York Sun, December 14, 1890, p. 30 c. 2.]


1890 Dec. 14 / Detonating Fireball / Essex, etc. / Jour. B.A.A. 1/462. [VII; 38. Booth, David. "The Detonating Fireball of December 14, 1890." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 1 (1890-1891): 462.]


1890 Dec. 14 / at Worksop / (Cut) / 9:45 p.m. / bright starlight / Cor's gardener told him had seen distant lightningbut there had been a meteor at the time. There had been 2 or 3 flashes at intervals of a few seconds. / Symons' Met Mag 26/27. [VII; 39. Mellish, Henry. "Bright Meteor December 14th, 1890." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 26 (March 1891): 27.]


1890 Dec 15 / Manna / Le Naturaliste of / That in Mesopotamia had been a shower of little dark objects like mulberries, of which edible flour could be madesaid be a lichen known as “Lecanora esculenta”. / (See June 17, 1890.) [VI; 2027.1, 2027.2. "Une pluie étrange." Le Naturaliste, s. 2 v. 4 (no. 91; December 15, 1890.): 288-289. See: 1890 June 17, (VI: 2022, 2023, and 2024).]


1890 Dec 16 / [LT], 3-f / Met. [VII; 40. “A Meteor.” London Times, December 16, 1890, p. 3 c. 6.]


[1890 Dec 16 /] 1890 Dec 26 / See Jan 9, 1891. [VII; 42. See: 1891 Jan 9, (B; 1124).]


1890 Dec.18 / 9 p.m. / near Utica, Ohio / det met like a q. / But bright red light seen in the N.W. Shock was stunning, / Sid Mess 10-106 / 2 shocks / one slight / then greater several minutes later. [VII; 41. "The Explosion of a Meteor." Sidereal Messenger, 10 (February 1891): 106.]


1890 Dec 25, ab / Polt / Chesterfield / again / See March 1, 1891. [B; 1116. See: 1891 March 1, (B; 1131).]


[1890 Dec 26. Wrong date. See: 1890 Dec 16, (B; 1124).]


1890-91 / Frogs / Rand Daily Mail, March 6 / [Letter to the Editor from] / Nicholas, (R.J.) / 9 London House, Box 1512 / or “The Laurels”, Illovo. [VII; 43. (Rand Daily Mail, March 6, ????) (Refs.???)]

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