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Last updated: April 8, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1889


1889:


1889 / See Kingston Myst. / Glb Dem (Nov 9, 1889) said that in Nov., 1888, James Fletcher, an old man who lived in a shanty, had died; that since then yells, cries as if of a person in distress had been heard coming from the shanty. [B; 998. “A Haunted Shanty.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, November 8, 1889, p. 9 c. 1. "A Haunted Shanty." Pulaski Citizen, (Tennessee), December 12, 1889, p. 1 c. 4. The shanty was located in Bridgeville, a hamlet of Thompson, New York. See: (Kingston Myst.).]


1889 / Have Glb-Dem. Spook Dept all year / NewsJan-Feb 15 / Ap 1-7 / Sept. 1-Dec 31. [B; 999.]


1889 / J. Ripper notes under Ripper. [B; 1000. See: (Ripper).]


1889 / Year of Missing Vessels. [B; 1001.]


1889 / I cut the Spooks in Globe-Dem except special one like the polts of 1888 / and lights. [B; 1002.]


1889 / Sunspots / See Research. / OA / near Rec. Sci in Lib. [VI; 1511. See: (Research).]


1889 Jan 1 / (Fr) / 6:15 a.m. / Saligny / q. / sound like thunder clap. / L'Astro 8-191. [VI; 1512. “Tremblements de terre en France.” Astronomie, 8 (1889): 191.]


1889 Jan 1 / q. / Philippines / BA '11. [VI; 1513. A class II earthquake. Milne, 735.]


1889 Jan 2 / [LT], 3-d / Met. [VI; 1514. “Brilliant Meteor.” London Times, January 2, 1889, p. 3 c. 4.]


1889 Jan 2 / Conj Mars and Venus. [VI; 1515. Conjunction of Venus and Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1889, 466.]


1889 / 2 new stars by Prof Ritchey in the nebula of Andromeda / Bull Soc Astro de F 1918-180. [VI; 1516. "Découvertes de deux novæ dans la nébuleuse d'Androède." Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 32 (1918): 180.]


1889 Jan / q's / Nature 39-305. [VI; 1517. “Notes.” Nature, 39 (January 24, 1889): 304-307, at 305.]


1889 Jan / Floods / Argentine / Symons 49/81 / N.M. [VI; 1518. "Floods in the Argentine Republic." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 49 (June 1914): 81-82.]


1889 Jan. 4 / Ghost at a revival / See Jan 29, 1889. [B; 1003. See: Ghst at a revival / 1889 / (4) / Jan 29, (SF-IV; 31).]


1889 Jan 5 / [LT], 5-e / q. / Costa Rica. [VI; 1519. “Earthquake in Costa Rica.” London Times, January 5, 1889, p. 5 c. 5.]


1889 Jan 7-8 / Vesuvius active and a serious eruption feared. / Liverpool Echo9th. [VI; 1538. “Vesuvius Distrubed.” Liverpool Echo, January 9, 1889, p. 4 c. 3.]


1889 Jan. 9 / Cyclone / Pa. [VI; 1520. (Refs.???)]


1889 Jan 11 / 6:30 p.m. / Shock / Plattsburg, N.Y. / Glb Dem 12-6-2. [VI; 1521. “An Earthquake Shock.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 12, 1889. p. 6 c. 2.]


1889 Jan 11 / Feb 15, 23 / Ap. 12 / Famine in China / N.Y. Trib. [VI; 1522. Ellinwood, F.F. "Famine in North China." New York Tribune, January 11, 1889, p. 7 c. 4. Ellinwood, F.F. "The Famine in China Over." New York Tribune, June 7, 1889, p. 7 c. 2.]


1889 Jan. 11 / N.Y. Times, 7-4 / Famine / N. China. [VI; 1523. “The Famine in China.” New York Times, March 17, 1889, p. 2 c. 6.]


1889 Jan. 14 / big q / Greece / [BA] '11. [VI; 1525. A class III earthquake. Milne, 735.]


1889 Jan 14 / [LT], 6-a / Volc / Hawaii. [VI; 1526. “Hawaii.” London Times, January 14, 1889, p. 6 c. 1. The Kilauea volcano was not in eruption in 1889.]


[1889 Jan 15. Wrong date. See: 1889 June 15, (VI; 1527).]


1889 Jan 15 / afternoon / Routt, Colorado / thunderous sounds and q's. / N.Y. Trib 26-1-2. [VI; 1528. "An Earthquake in Colorado." New York Tribune, January 26, 1889, p. 1 c. 2.]


1889 Jan 16 / Spon Comb / Early morning, Pittsburg, Pa / Glb-Dem 17-3-7 / Ab 1:30 a.m., a policeman saw a blaze in the home of Arthur Roddey, 514 Carson St. Alarm turned in. Firemen entered the room where the fire was seen. Except in one place there was very little damage. "When the firemen entered the room, they found Mrs. Roddey and her child lying on a couch which was in flames. The woman's body was burned to a crisp, and the child was painfully, but not seriously, injured. The origin of the fire is unknown." [B; 1004.1, 1004.2, 1004.3. “Mysterious and Fatal Fire.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 17, 1889, p. 3 c. 7.]


1889 Jan 16 / Date of dispatch / Poas Volcano, Costa Rica, active. / NY Trib 17-1-1. [VI; 1529. "Damage by Earthquakes in Costa Rica." New York Tribune, January 17, 1889, p. 1 c. 1. The Poas volcano.]


1889 Jan 18 / Scotland / shock Leith Valley and western Edinburgh / NY Trib 19-1-2. [VI; 1530. "Earthquake in Scotland." New York Tribune, January 19, 1889, p. 1 c. 2.]


1889 Jan. 18 / 2 shocks, neighborhood of Edinburgh / ab. 4 and 7 a.m. / Geol Mag 1891/57. [VI; 1531. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1889.” Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 8 (1891): 57-67, 306-316, 364-372, at 60-67.]


1889 Jan 19 / [LT], 13-d / 22-10-a / q. / Edinburgh. [VI; 1532. “Earthquake in Edinburgh.” London Times, January 19, 1889, p. 13 c. 4. “The Earthquake in Scotland.” London Times, January 22, 1889, p. 10 c. 1.]


1889 Jan 20 / Pub. Ledg of / Ghost at Havre-de-race, Md. A shot fired at it, but it dodged and the bullet struck a negress. [B; 1005. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 20, 1889.)]


1889 Jan. 21 / Sarabat Valley, Syria / q / 300 houses destroyed / N.Y. Trib 22-1-2. [VI; 1533. "Destructive Earthquake in Syria." New York Tribune, January 22, 1889, p. 1 c. 2.]


1889 Jan. 22 / q. accompanied by a violent gale / Athens and other parts of Greece / N.Y. Trib 23-1-2. [VI; 1534. "An Earthquake in Greece." New York Tribune, January 23, 1889, p. 1. c. 2.]


1889 Jan 26 / "Ferocious Wild Animal" frightening residents of Freeport, L.I. [B; 1006. (Refs.???)]


1889 Jan 26 / 9:10 p.m. / Oswego, N.Y. / large met / Sc Am 60/137. [VI; 1535. “A Remarkable Meteor.” Scientific American. n.s., 60 (March 2, 1889): 137.]


[1889 Jan 26. Wrong date. See: 1889 June 26, (VI; 1536).]


1889 Jan 26 / Glb Dem of, from Chicago Journal / Ghost in Chicago / Hyde Park. [B; 1007. “An Uncanny Apparition.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, January 26, 1889, p. 12 c. 5. (Chicago Journal, ca. January, 1889.) (“Chasing a Spook.” Sioux City Journal, January 20, 1889, p. 1 c. 6.) ]


[1889 Jan 28-July 6. Wrong date. See: 1889 June 28-July 6, (VI; 1537).]


[1889 Jan 29. See: Ghst at a revival / 1889 / (4) / Jan 29, (SF-IV; 31).]


1889 / end of Jan / told of in L'Astro, Aug., 1890 / Incalculable number of larvae / seems not with snow but after / Apluie diluvienne / blacks 1 cm. / yellows 3 cm. / (verified). [VI; 1540. “Pluie de chenilles.” Astronomie, 9 (1890): 313.]


1889 / end of Jan / BO / in Canton of Neuchatel, Switzerland, in a storm fell a rain of living larvae that covered the ground. Some yellow and ab. 3 centimetres long. The others black and 5 millimetres long. With them were other insects. / Ciel et Terre 10-587. [VI; 1541.1, 1541.2. “Pluie de Chenilles.” Ciel et Terre, 10 (1889-1890): 587.]


1889 Feb. 1 / Florence Chisnell, aged 16, or Green-lane, Battersea, still in a tranceSee Dec 1, 1888. [B; 1008. See: 1887 Nov 20, (B; 979).]


1889 Feb 2 / morning / Meteorite fell in Chicago Avenue, Chicago. Ac to analysis, composed chiefly or iron. Some nickel, cobalt and manganese. / Pub Ledger, Feb 19. [VI; 1539. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 19, 1889.) (Not found in search @ Newspapers.com.)]


1889 Feb 3 / Look up myst assault on L. Decker, Kingston, N.Y. [B; 1009. "Mysterious Stabbing Case." New York Sun, February 3, 1889, p. 2 c. 5.]


1889 Feb. 3 / Vendée, France / shock and sound like thunder / 20 minutes "après minuit" /  Cosmos, N.S., 12/311. [VI; 1542. “Tremblement de terre en Vendée.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 12 (February 16, 1889): 311. About 12.20 A.M.]


1889 Feb 5 / Glb-Dem, 5-4the ghst of Havre-de-Grace, Md.a shadowy thing in black moving about townappeared at a lighthousetop of its head covered. / Black. / See Jan 20. [B; 1010. “The Perfumed Ghost.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 5, 1889, p. 5 c. 4-5. See: 1889 Jan 20, (B; 1005).]


1889 Feb 5 / Saturn in Opposition. [VI; 1543. Opposition of Saturn. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1889, 466.]


1889 Feb 7 /  Egg Harbor, N.J. / det met / MWR '89-42 / Tremendous report at New Brusnwick, N.J., at (sic) 5:30 p.m. / See Sc. Am. 60/132. [VI; 1544. (Monthly Weather Review, 1889-42.) “A Large Meteor.” Scientific American, n.s., 60 (March 2, 1889): 132.]


1889 Feb. 7 / Said in NY Times 11/5/2met seen to explode over Lake Hopatcong, Morris Co, N.J., and a large fragment seen to strike ground. Ground disturbed and fragments of seeming meteor[ic] stone found but many lumps of iron ore scattered in the district and not yet determined. [VI; 1545.1, 1545.2. “Seeing the Meteor Burst.” New York Times, February 11, 1889, p. 5 c. 2.]


1889 Feb 8 / N.Y. Times, 2-5 / 11-5-2 / Met at sunset / N.Y. City. [VI; 1546. “A Meteor at Sunset.” New York Times, February 8, 1889, p. 2 c. 5. “Seeing the Meteor Burst.” New York Times, February 11, 1889, p. 5 c. 2.]


1889 Feb 7 / That on a farm near Newburgh, NY, a large meteor fell. Snow on about an acre of ground perforated as if with gravel. / MWR '89-43. [VI; 1547. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 2; February 1889): 42-43, at 43. “A large meteor fell....” Brewster Standard, (New York), February 15, 1889, p. 3 c. 7. “A large meteor fell on a farm near the town of Highlands, Orange county, on February 7. It is described as brilliant, and in color yellow, tinged with green. It broke into many small pieces, and the snow covering about an acre was found perforated as with gravel stones. Snow has since fallen, covering the traces, but an investigation is to be made when it disappears. The meteor was seen by number in this vicinity.”]


1889 Feb. 10 / q / Lancashire / 10:40 p.m. / Research, 1-150 / N.Y. Library. [VI; 1548. “Earthquake in Lancashire.” Research: A Monthly Illustrated Journal of Science, 1 (March 1, 1889): 150.]


1889 Feb. 10 / Lancashire / q / Geol. Mag 1891/306, details / Nature 39-390. [VI; 1549. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1889.” Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 8 (1891): 57-67, 306-316, 364-372; at 306-316. Clunn, T.R.H. “The Earthquake in Lancashire.” Nature, 39 (February 21, 1889): 390.]


1889 Feb 10 / 10:30 p.m. / q. / Lancashire / at 11 p.m. at Ashton-under-Lyne / Pall Mall Gazette 11-5-2. [VI; 1550. "An Earthquake in Lancashire." Pall Mall Gazette, February 11, 1889, p. 5 c. 2.]


1889 Feb. 12 / [LT], 4-b, 6-f / q. / Lancashire. [VI; 1551. “Earthquake Shock at Blackburn.” London Times, February 12, 1889, p. 4 c. 2. “Earthquake in East Lancashire.” London Times, February 12, 1889, p. 6 c. 6.]


1889 Feb. 12 / 4:45 p.m. / Sun pillar at Sunset / Hertford / LT, March 13, 1902. [VI; 1552. “The Solar Phenomenon.” London Times, March 13, 1902, p. 15 c. 1.]


1889 / middle Feb / Volcano, w. coast of Sumatra, that had been quiet several centuries, became active. / Nature 39-613. [VI; 1553. “Notes.” Nature, 39 (April 25, 1889): 612-615, at 613. The Tandikat-Singgalang volcano.]


1889 Feb 13 / (Fr) / France and Swit[zerland] / q. / BA '11. [VI; 1554. A class II earthquake. Milne, 735.]


[The following two notes were clipped together by Fort. VI: 1555-1556.]


1889 Feb. 18. / Sim qs / Aug 3, 1846 / Jan 1, 1848 / Ap. 3, 1851 / May 15, 1851 / Nov. 26, 1852 / Jan 24, 1852 / Feb 22, 1852 / July 7, 1852 / Nov. 20, 1852 / Jan 13, 1854 / Ap. 25, 1855 / Nov 11, 1855 / Dec 5, 1855 / Ap. 9, 1858 / Sept 20, 1858 / Sept 20, 1860 / Dec 2, 1860 / Ap. 27, 1861 / Aug 21, 1861 / May 20, 1862 / July 10, 1862 / Dec. 19, 1862 / June 3, 1863 / Jan 2, 1864 / Dec 2, 1864 / May 8, 1865 / March 27, 1868 / See July 12, 1870 / Ap. 26, 1875 / Aug 24, 1874 / Sept 16, 1874 / Dec 5, 1875 / Oct 7, 1873 / Oct 14, 1879 / Dec 12, 1875 / Oct 8, 1877 / June 24, 1877 / June 10, 1881 / Aug 28, 1881 / July 19, 1882 / Sept 1, 1888 / Feb 18, 1889 / Aug 17, 1889 / May 17, 1892 / June 24, 1892 / Ap. 27, 1894 / June 19, 1894 / March 4, 1898 / Aug 10, 1898 / Jan 17, 1897. [VI; 1555. See: 1846 Aug 3to Sept, (II; 1010); 1848 Jan 1, (II; 1184); 1851 Ap. 13, (II; 1501); 1851 May 15, (II; 1518); 1852 Jan 24, (II; 1580); 1852 Feb. 22, (II; 1593);  1852 July 7, (II; 1628);   1852 Nov. 20, (II; 1668); 1852 Nov. 26, (II; 1670); 1854 Jan 13, (II; 1756); 1855 Ap. 25, (II; 1834); 1855 Nov. 11, (II; 1883); 1855 Dec 5, (II; 1892); 1858 Ap 9-May 2, (II; 2159); 1858 Sept 20 to Oct 10, (II; 2236); 1860 Sept. 20, (III; 38); 1860 Dec 2, (III; 48); 1861 Ap. 27, (III 92); 1861 Aug. 21, (III; 171); 1862 May 20, (III; 255); 1862 July 10, (III; 266); 1862 Dec 19, (III; 342); 1863 June 3, (III; 428); 1864 Jan 2-11, (III; 528); 1864 Dec 2 to 26, (III; 638); 1865 May 8, (III; 558); 1868 March 27, (III; 1317); 1870 July 12, (IV; 192); 1873 Oct 7, (IV; 1320); 1874 Aug 24, (IV; 1498); 1874 Sept. 16, (IV; 1513); 1875 Ap. 26, (IV; 1654); 1875 Dec 5, (IV; 1771); 1875 Dec 12, 13, (IV; 1778); 1877 Oct 8, (IV; 2228); 1877 June 24, (IV; 2157); 1879 Oct 14, (IV; 2805); 1881 June 10, (V; 524); 1881 Aug 28, (V; 617); 1882 July 19, (V; 876); 1888 Sept. 1, (VI; 1442); 1889 Feb 18, (VI; 1557); 1889 Aug 17, (VI; 1875); 1892 May 17, (VII; 496); 1892 June 24, (VII; 525); 1894 Ap. 27, (VIII; 1008); 1894 June 19, (VII; 1039); 1897 Jan 17, (VII; 1671); 1898 March 4, (VIII; 219); and, 1898 Aug 10, (VIII; 298).]


1889 Feb 18 / (It / Sounds) / Aquila / preceded and followed by sounds / See 1816. [VI; 1556. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 41. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1889 Feb 18 / qs / France and Japan / BA '11. [VI; 1557. Two class I earthquakes. Milne, 735. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1889 Feb 18 / q / Isère, France / Nature 39-396. [VI; 1558. “Notes.” Nature, 39 (February 21, 1889): 395-398, at 396.]


1889 Feb. 20 / 10p.m. / Stavanger, w coast Norway / remarkably brilliant meteor / from S.E. moving westerly / Nature 39-446. [VI; 1559. “Notes.” Nature, 39 (March 7, 1889): 446-449, at 446.]


1889 Feb. 21 / N.Y. Trib, 1-2 / Famine in Corea. [VI; 1524. "A Terrible Famine in Corea." New York Tribune, February 21, 1889, p. 1 c. 2.]


1889 Feb 23 / evening / Cor in NY Trib, March 4-7-3, writes of remarkable change of colors of Venus. From Crimson to Green. Seemed to burst from darker colors to lighter. [VI; 1560. "What Was the Matter With Venus?" New York Tribune, March 4, 1889, p. 7 c. 3.]


1889 Feb. 24 / Augs / Arthur Mee, Astro Soc of Wales, writes that he saw a multitude of particles sweeping like a snow storm across disk of sunhe from Llanelly. This Eng Mec, 49/70. Page 110, cor says he saw this [at] Hereford. It was snowbecause soon after there was a snowstorm. [VI; 1561. Mee, Arthur. “Astronomical.” English Mechanic, 49 (no. 1252; March 22, 1889): 70. Jenkins, G. Parry. “Astronomical.” English Mechanic, 49 (no. 1254; April 5, 1889): 110.]


1889 Feb. 27 / 1:40 a.m. / Shock / Pecan Point, Arkansas / N.Y. Trib, March 11-7-4. [VI; 1562. Barnett, E.M. "Earthquake Shock in Arkansas." New York Tribune, March 11, 1889, p. 7 c. 4.]


1889 Feb. 28 / Heavy rains and violent earthquakes in Madagascar / Cosmos, N.S., 13-80 / See Feb. 7, 1887. [VI; 1563. Camboué, Paul. “À Madagascar.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (May 4, 1889): 113-114. See: 1887 Feb. 7, (VI; 1000).]


1889 March / no q's / B.A., '11. [VI; 1564. Milne, 735.]


1889 March 1 / myst light / Pub. Ledger of / At Holsworthy, Englanda mysterious light that was flashing intermittently across a railroad cutting. From dusk to midnight railroad station filled with investigators. [B; 1011. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 1, 1889.) “Curious Condensations.” Pittsburg Dispatch, March 4, 1889, p. 4 c. 8. “A Strange Light at Holsworthy.” Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, January 31, 1889, p. 5 c. 5. “A Holsworthy correspondent writes:—A curious scene may be nightly witnessed here, and it forms a light that is reviving stories of superstition that have long been dormant in this district. Every evening a strong light may be seen on the railway-line between the viaduct and a deep cutting near Simpson Farm. This light cannot be accounted for, and hundreds of people every night visit the station for the purpose looking at it. Sometimes it appears soon after six o'clock, and keeps constantly appearing and disappearing throughout the night. At other tunas people have to wait till past nine o'clock before it can be seen. I visited the station Tuesday night, and after waiting about a quarter of an hour saw, at a long distance up the line, a pale bluish-coloured light rapidly cross the line and disappear. This was followed in quick succession by mor vivid flames, lasting for about a few minutes. The flames seemed to rise from the earth, and float in the air at about few feet distant from the ground, sometimes fixed, and sometimes travelling with great celerity. Many efforts have been made to discover the cause of the light, but so varied are its appearances, and the weather so cold to stand for hours waiting for an opportunity, that all attempts have totally failed. People have thought whether or not the apparition proceeded from the rays light thrown off from some other light. The lamps on the signal-posts have been put out, and yet it appears. It is said there is no marshy or boggy land near the spot. Some of the railway officials state that they have seen the light for the last twelve months or more, but not so frequently as now. It seemed as if a stream of gas was issuing from the sides of the cutting, and from some cause or other it had become ignited. Bacause three people have been killed near the spot during the last few years by passing trains this light is looked upon by a few of the illiterate class as an of superstition, and they call it 'the ghost.'”]


1889 March 2 / Religio-Philosophical Journal of / Ghost / Tuscola, Ill. [B; 1012. "A dispatch from Tuscola...." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 46 (no. 2; March 2, 1889): 4, (c. 5). "A dispatch from Tuscola, Ill., to the Chicago Herald says: 'The people of this city have been excited over ghosts for two weeks past. The place of appearance of his ghostship is in and about a vacant house on East Sale street, in one of the most fashionable residence portions of town, where once resided Edward L. Smith, a lawyer. Domestic difficulties caused him to cut his throat with a, razor one night, and it is said by the parties who live in the neighborhood that the apparition resembles him in every particular as it moves about the yard clad in a robe of white or as the face appears at the windows of the house. Although the house is vacant it frequently appears lighted np, and shadows can be seen on the walls, but when a citizen with more bravery than the rest undertakes to investigate these mysterious movements the lights suddenly disappear and the shadows vanish. This has been the case frequently of late, and the result is that the women and all superstitions people avoid passing on that side of the street late at night. The phantom lawyer usually makes his appearance in the yard between 11 and 12 o’clock at night, and among those who claim to have witnessed the apparition are such reputable citizens as Brown Ervin, L.G. Macpherson, City Marshal Jewell, James L. Dawson, Oscar Sloan,. J.M. Newman, Clint Ashwill and several ladies. The latter have been frightened on several occasions. Families who have lived in the house claim to have heard strange noises nightly and protested that they could not keep a door shut about the place unless it was locked. When not locked after night the door wonld fly open as soon as the lights were out, and even when locked the latch wonld invariably rattle as though some one was trying to get in.”]


1889 March 2 / Incend. / Began series of barn-burning near Waco, Texas. 6 large barns up to the 30th. All in daylight. Supposed incendiary. No clew. / Globe Dem, Ap 1-1-5. [B; 1018. “Mysterious Burning of Barns.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 1, 1889, p. 1 c. 5-6.]


1889 March 2 /  11:15 p.m. / Ecuador / violent shock followed by others / NY Trib 4-1-1. [VI; 1565. "Earthquake Shocks in South America." New York Tribune, March 4, 1889, p. 1 c. 1.]


1899 March 4 / N.Y. Trib, 1-1 / Rumor in naval circles in Germany of a fight at Samoa between an American man-of-war and the German corvette Olga. [B; 1013. "Startling Story of War." New York Tribune, March 4, 1889, p. 1. c. 1.]


1889 March 4 and 6 / It Sounds / Alassio / Genoa / rombi / See 1816. [VI; 1566. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 41. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1889 March 6 / White spot on Saturn's rings announced by Dr. Terby. / Observatory 12-195 / See Aug., 1885. [VI; 1567. “White Spot on Saturn's Rings.” Observatory, 12 (1889): 195.]


[1889 March 6 /] 1888 March 6 / Mediterranean / red rain / See March 18. / D-40. [VI; 1276. The note copies information from page 40 of The Book of the Damned. Flammarion, Camille. "Pluie de sable des 6 et 18 Mars a Alexandrie." Astronomie, 8 (June 1889): 201-205. See: 1889 March 18, (VI; 1292).]


1889 March 6-18 / Dust / Alexandria / Met Zeit 6/197-99 / Same dates 1888. [VI; 1568. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 6 (1889): 184-200, at 197-199. See: 1889 March 18, (VI; 1292). Fort copied the wrong date, (1888), that was in The Book of the Damned.]


1889 March 6 / ab. 6:30 a.m. / Alexandria / obscuration / 10:30 Sand not all same colorat first yellowthen cinnamon-color / L'Astro 8-201 / On 18th again / Supposed to have come from African desert, but was found to be rich in organic material. [VI; 1569. Flammarion, Camille. “Pluie de Sable des 6 et 18 Mars à Alexandrie.” Astronomie, 8 (1889): 201-205.]


1889 March 8 / Pub Ledger of / Flash of lightning from a clear sky struck a boy at Ontario, California, burning his hair and clothing; but he would recover. [B; 1014. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 8, 1889.) “A Strange Phenomenon.” San Francisco Chronicle, February 28, 1889, p. 1 c. 7.]


1889 March 8 / Shock / Wilmington, Del. / NY Trib, Sept 2-7-3, 1895. [VI; 1570. "A Tremor Felt in Delaware." New York Tribune, September 2, 1895, p. 7 c. 3.]


1889 March 8 / 7:30misprint for 6:30? / Severe q. in Maryland / Carroll, Baltimore, Cecil, Harford Counties / town of Westminster / NYT 9-1-4 / Evidently misprint for 6:30. = 6:40 in Tribune 9-1-2. [VI; 1571. “Light Earthquake Shocks.” New York Times, March 9, 1889, p. 1 c. 4. "Shaken By an Earthquake." New York Tribune, March 9, 1889, p. 1 c. 2.]


1889 March 8 / FireBaltimore / Corry, Penn. / Louisville / NY Times 9-2-2. [VI; 1572. “Losses by Fire.” New York Times, March 9, 1889, p. 5 c. 2. “A Big Fire in Louisville.” New York Times, March 9, 1889, p. 5 c. 4.]

 

1889 March 8 / qs and sound after / At about 6:30 loud report and q in Pennsylvania. / Lebanon / York / Reading / noise like thunder / NY Times 9-1-4. [VI; 1573. “Light Earthquake Shocks.” New York Times, March 9, 1889, p. 1 c. 4.]


1889 March 9 / Flames / Religio-Philosophical Jour of, from Pittsburg Dispatch / House near Charleston, S. Carolina. Vacant house where ghosts been reported. At times sheets of flames shot up from the house. Intense light. [B; 1015. "A House Full of Ghosts." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 46 (no. 3; March 9, 1889): 7, (c. 1). "A House Full of Ghosts." Pittsburg Dispatch, February 18, 1889, p. 4 c. 5. "Charleston, S.C., February 17.For years and years the house of the Trummonds, in the Joyce branch neighborhood of Barnwell county, has been known as 'the haunted house.' The story goes that on dismal, rainy nights the ghostly visitations are manifest by the house being suddenly brilliantly illuminated by an unearthly light. Doors are slammed and clanking chains proclaim the presence of an invisible visitor who treads heavily about the house, but never troubles the inmates except by the noise." "The illuminations proceed from the hearths. Without an instant's warning fire blazes in empty fireplaces and throws a weird light that gives the windows from the outside the appearance of huge locomotive headlights. This always occurs in the dead of night, between 12 and 2 o'clock, never lasting but a few seconds. No member of the Trummond family ever died a violent death. Two generations of the family have lived there. These charges against their abode are partly admitted by the family, but they never talk upon the subject when it can be avoided." "On last Saturday night the mystery of years was deepened. A wagon load of colored folks returning from a meeting passed the house at midnight. They were singing a campmeeting hymn, when, as they passed directly in front of the house, an unearthly glamor shot from the windows athwart their terror-stricken forms. The mule attached to the vehicle darted toward darkness, carrying his shrieking and praying load swiftly from the scene. The yells of the frightened colored people awoke every one for a half mile about them. Soon a sheet of flame shot skyward apparently from the chimney of the Trummond residence, wavered for an instant and vanished. The air was damp and the sky cloudy, but no rain was falling, and the atmospherical conditions were not as favorable for the ghostly flame as on occasions when it had appeared in a less striking degree. The flame was intense, and rendered the smallest objects in the vicinity distinctly visible. No one approached the house that night, although the inmates remained inside. The family were ignorant of there having been a ghostly illumination of more than usual brilliancy. Doors had slammed that night and lights appeared." "This story, as improbable as it seems, is vouched for by persons of the utmost trustworthiness. B.L. Perkins, a prominent farmer, who lives near the haunted house, says that he has frequently seen the flames. The story was published by the Sun this afternoon, and telegraphic inquiries from Barnwell bring the answer that it is correct in all essential facts."]


1889 March 9 / MontrealRumor of U.S. warship sunk by the Germans at Samoa! / The Gazette, Montreal, March 9. [B; 1016. “A Very Startling Report.” Montreal Gazette, March 9, 1889, p. 1 c. 7. "Is It War At Last?" Pittsburg Dispatch, March 4, 1889, p. 1 c. 5. A rumor from Kiel, Germany, suggested shots were exchanged between American and German warships, but doubts were stated as no such news had been received in Berlin, Washington, nor London.]


1889 March 9 / Trib, 1-2 / q / Baltimore. [VI; 1574. "Shaken By an Earthquake." New York Tribune, March 9, 1889, p. 1 c. 2.]


1889 March 10 / Levant Herald / Quakes, no damage reported, week before in Turkey. At Adana and at Koniah in Turkey. / 10th and 17th report floods, and 24th. [VI; 1575. (Levant Herald, March 10, 17, 24, 1889.)]


1889 March 13, 22, 24, 27, 31 (Ireland) / Ap. 15, 27 / May 22, 29 / Meteors / Nature 40/150. [VI; 1576. Denning, William Frederick. “Remarkable Meteors.” Nature, 40 (June 13, 1889): 150-151.]


1889 March 15 / Substance like ashes at Constantinople / L'Astro 8-205. [VI; 1577. Flammarion, Camille. “Pluie de Sable des 6 et 18 Mars à Alexandrie.” Astronomie, 8 (1889): 201-205, at 205.]


1889 March 15 / Constantinople / fall of dust in wind / Cosmos, N.S., 13/63. [VI; 1578. Maze, Camille Modeste. “Pluie de Boue.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (May 4, 1889): 63-66.]


[1889 March 15 /] 1889 March 22 / Discolored rain at Constantinople / Cosmos, N.S., 13-63. [VI; 1584. Maze, Camille Modeste. “Pluie de Boue.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (May 4, 1889): 63-66. March 22 is the date of a letter, (not the date of the fall of dust, on March 15).]


1889 March 16 / Religio-Phil. Jour, 4-4 / Maria Wylley, a nurse at St Luke's hospital in St Louis, accused by the inmates of witchcraftthat cast spells on them. [B; 1017. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 46 (no. 4; March 16, 1889): 4, (c. 5).]


1889 March 16 / Heavy snowfall, in Rome and Naples, such not been seen for 10 years. / Pictorial News, Ap. 13, p. 6. [VI; 1579. (Pictorial News, April 13, 1889, p. 6.)]


1889 March 16 and 17 / Greatest known hurricane / at Samoa / Sun, Ap 14-1-7. [VI; 1580. "The Disaster at Samoa." New York Sun, April 14, 1889, p. 1 c. 7 & p. 2 c. 1-4.]


1889 March 16 / Samoan Cyclone / details / Nature 45-161. [VI; 1581. “The Samoan Cyclone of March 16, 1889.” Nature, 45 (December 17, 1891): 161-162.]


[1889 March 18 /] 1888 March 18 / See March 6. / Red rain / Mediterranean / D-40. [VI; 1292. The note copies information from page 40 of The Book of the Damned. Flammarion, Camille. "Pluie de sable des 6 et 18 Mars a Alexandrie." Astronomie, 8 (June 1889): 201-205.]


1889 March 18 / See March 6. [VI; 1582. See: 1889 March 6, (VI; 1569).]


1889 March 19 / (Cut) / B. Guns / by Mr. La Touche, of the Geological Survey. / Sounds like gunfire in the Khasia Hills, Bengal, between 5 and 6 p.m. Usuaally two in quick succession, with short low booms occurring 3 or 4 times, About 8 p.m. there was a th. storm. / See Ap. 28, 1888. [VI; 1583. See: 1888 / April 28, '88, to March 11, '89, (VI; 1317).]


[1889 March 22. Wrong date. See: 1889 March 15, (VI; 1584).]


1889 March 22 / Rugby / 6:30 p.m. / A meteor. Its cloud one hour. / Nature 39-537. [VI; 1585. “Vapour, or Meteoritic Particle.” Nature, 39 (April 4, 1889): 537. The meteor's trail was visible for about 45 minutes, (not one hour).]


1889 / ab March 23 / q / Frederick, VA / See Ap. 6. [VI; 1586. See: 1889 Ap 6, (VI; 1619).]


1889 March 23 / Vicksburg, Miss. / pollen in rain / M.W.R. 1889-69. [VI; 1587. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 3; March 1889): 68-69.]


1889 March 25 / At Buenos AyresKnowledge 12-170An enormous number of moths. At night there fell a rain of small flies, in some places so thick that people had to run to get through them. [VI; 1588. Nicolls, G.W. “Insect Swarms in South America.” Knowledge, o.s., 12 (n.s., 4; June 1, 1889): 170.]


1889 March 25 / 7:26 p.m. / Det. met / Newburyport, Mass / M.W.R. '89-68. [VI; 1589. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 3; March 1889): 68-69, at 68.]


1889 March 26 / Strong shocks, Alhama and Granada, Spain / N.Y. Trib 27-1-1. [VI; 1590. "Earthquake Shocks in Spain." New York Tribune, March 27, 1889, p. 1 c. 1.]


[1889 March 28. Wrong date. See: 1899 March 28, (VI; 1591).]


1889 March 28 / Destructive q / Hayti / L.T., Ap. 13-7-3. [VI; 1592. “Earthquake in Hayti.” London Times, April 13, 1889, p. 7 c. 3.]


1889 March 28 / 2 somewhat sharp earthquakes / Costa Rica / San Fran Chronicle, May 21. [VI; 1593. “Spanish America.” San Francisco Chronicle, May 21, 1889, p. 6 c. 6-7.]


1889 March 30 / (m[oon]) / Black spot seen for the first time, near Central peak of Copernicusby Gaudibert. / L'Astro 1890-235. [VI; 1594. Gaudibert, Casimir Marie. “Nouveau cratère dans Copernic.” Astronomie, 9 (1890): 235.]


1889 Mar 25 / Greatest brill. Venus. [VI; 1595. Venus at greatest brilliance. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1889, 466.]


1889 March 31 / cl brst / ab. 3 p.m. / Few miles from Hico, Hamilton Co., Texas, a few minutes after a storm had passed, cloudburst reported“and that about twelve inches of rain fell in a few minutes.” / M.W.R. 1889-65. [VI; 1596. “Winds.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 3; March 1889): 64-65, at 65.]


1889 / spring / Unknown animal in Ky. / See Nov 6, 1889. [B; 1019. See: 1889 Nov. 6, (B; 1058).]


1889 March-April / Nothing in Melbourne Age. [VI; 1597.]


1889 / early in April / Sociologio / Prince Jerome Bonaparte on a vessel to Doverboilers blows upon way back to Francea collision. / Melb. Age, Ap. 8. [B; 1020. "Extraordinary Occurrence." The Age, Melbourne, April 8, 1889, p. 5 c. 4.]


1889 Ap. 1 / (Met) / 9 p.m. / Portland, Oregonheavens illuminated by a great meteor from 20 degrees below zenith in N.E.travelled N.W. through handle of the Dipper. / Chicago Tribune, Ap. 2 / Trib 6-1-6said detonated and fallen in Wash. Ter. [VI; 1598.1, 1598.2. “Appearance of a Brilliant Meteor.” Chicago Tribune, April 2, 1889, p. 2 c. 6. "Searching For a Meteorite." New York Tribune, April 6, 1889, p. 7 c. 5.]


1889 Ap. 2 / Severe shock in Bosnia / Nature 39-613. [VI; 1599. “Notes.” Nature, 39 (April 25, 1889): 612-615, at 613.]


1889 Ap. 2 / At Aitken, Minn. / Phil Pub Ledger of 5ththat the substance was like emery and contained metallic particles. [VI; 1600. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, April 5, 1889.) “It Snowed Mud.” Oshkosh Northwestern, April 4, 1889, p. 1 c. 6. “Aitkin, Minn., April 4A peculiar phenomenon occurred here yesterday. It became so dark that lights were obliged to be lighted in business houses and the air was filled with snow that was as black and dirty as though it had been trampled into the earth. Six ounces of snow and one-fourth ounce of dirt and sand solid was found in the bottom of a dish This dirt was very fine something like emery, and contains particles that have a metallic luster. This dirty snow fell to the depth of half an inch The atmosphere at the time presented a peculiar greenish tinge. There was a little wind blowing at the time from the northeast, though there seemed to be considerable wind higher in the air. Solid chuncks [sic] of ice and sand are reported to have been picked up in various places. Several parties have saved up small vials of the sand as a curiosity. At midnight it was still coming fast, but the snow now is as white as usual.”]


1889 Ap. 2 / (M.W.R., Ap., 1889, p. 90) / At Fort Sully, Dakota, clouds of sand and small pebbles. “At 2 p.m. prairie fires started in the country, some from no known cause.” “All combustible matter appeared to be highly susceptible of ignition.” Said that building surrounded by from 50 to 100 rods of ploughed ground were consumed, bursting into flames in all parts instantaneously. / See at Pierre. / (Electric condition. Showers of sparks from barbed wire fences.) [VI; 1601.1, 1601.2, 1601.3. “Winds.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 4; April 1889): 89-91, at 90. See: “at Pierre.”]


1889 Ap. 2 / “Fierce gales and terrible prairie fires” in Dakota. A prairie fire nearly destroyed all buildings on several farmsMontreal Gazette, Ap. 4. / Almost whole village of Mt. Pleasant, Dakota, burned by a fire that swept in from the prairie. / At Marshall, Minn, the worst wind storm ever known there. “The air for hours was laden with dust.” / Montreal—The Gazette of the 4th / “The American Northwest Swept by Hurricanes of Fire.” Prairie fires but unexplained fires in towns of Minn, Towns of Volin, Olivet, Pukawane, Lesterville and Mt Vernon—partly or almost completely destroyed. Intense darkness—at Gary, people thought end of world had come—not smoke but dust so great that engineers could not see tracks ahead of them. In many places crops were covered with dust and sand. Fires near Aberdeen, Dakota—hundreds of farm houses in ashes—fires sweeping west and north of Lake Benton, Minn—Dispatches from Huron and Blunt and Miller and Yankton, Dakota—all this in the moisture and green shoots of April—“horrors on all sides”—“forty families destitute”—county “devastated”. [VI; 1602.1 to 1602.5. “The Prairie Ablaze.” Montreal Gazette, April 4, 1889, p. 1 c. 4. “Dire Distress in Dakota.” Montreal Gazette, April 5, 1889, p. 1 c. 5-6.]


1889 Ap. 2 / 4:45 p.m. / In Science, 13/301, quoting the Engineering and Mining Journal—at Aitken, Minn, became dark. Black snow fell—“Six ounces of snow and one-fourth ounce of dirt and sand were found in the bottom of the dish.” It is said that the substance contained particles that had a metallic lustre. Wind from the northwest. [VI; 1603.1, 1603.2. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 13 (April 19, 1889): 298-301, at 300. “Fall of Black Snow.” Engineering and Mining Journal, 47 ( April 13, 1889): 348.]


1889 Ap. 2 / S / D-180 / Dark and pebbles / Minn., U.S. [VI; 1605. The note copies information from page 180 of The Book of the Damned. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 13 (April 19, 1889): 298-301, at 300. “Fall of Black Snow.” Engineering and Mining Journal, 47 ( April 13, 1889): 348.]


1889 Ap 2 / Fire phe / Like Sept 5, 1881. [VI; 1609. See: (1881 Sept 5).]


1889 Ap. 2 / (Ch) / Chicago Tribune / isolated fires—house burning down in Sacred Heart, Minn—unknown cause—at Dowagiac, Mich, three different buildings on fire—“There is no clew to the incendiary.” Fires and a heavy wind in Des Moines, Iowa. / Trib of 6th says was no ordinary prairie fire at Yankton. “The conditions seemed similar to those existing at the time of the great Chicago fire and the fires in the Wisconsin woods, when the atmosphere was almost ready to ignite and burn.” [VI; 1610.1, 1610.2, 1610.3. “Swept by Prairie Fires.” Chicago Tribune, April 3, 1889, p. 2 c. 3-4. “Alarming Increase of Incendiaries.” Chicago Tribune, April 4, 1889, p. 1 c. 4. “It Was Like the Chicago Fire.” Chicago Tribune, April 6, 1889, p. 1 c. 6.]


1889 Ap. 2 / See Col., 1892, Jan 5, Fiery Whirls. [VI; 1611. See: 1892 Jan 5, (VII: 263, 266 to 285, 287, 288, 291, 294, 297, 298, 299, & 340).]


1889 Ap. 2 / b. snow / See Ap. 10. [VI; 1612. See: 1889 Ap. 10, (VI: 1626 & 1627), and 1889 Ap. 12, VI; 1630).]


1889 Ap. 3 / B. snow / Black snow in New York State, reported from 49 towns. It is said that the “black snowstorm” extended from Alva in Oneida Co., over a distance of 112 miles in a northeast direction to Wilmington, Essex Co, and from Pitcairn, St. Lawrence Co, southward, 30 miles to Alva. Said that at one place, a panful of snow melted gave a teaspoonful of “very fine ashes”. Nevertheless said that this substance was not ashes, because of a large number of vegetable fibres. Also any origin in the fires in the west excluded by this writer. He says that it was not ashes because of “the absence of forest fires to the windward of the region affected. He thinks that soil was excavated and carried by “some whirlwind”. [VI; 1604.1 to 1604.4. (Ref.???)]


1889 Ap. 3 / Sunspot of considerable size, ab 2 days removed from sun's eastern limb. Continued but faded out on 11th. / M.W.R. 1889-95. [VI; 1606. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 4; April 1889): 93-95, at 95.]


1889 Ap. 3 / Lundsgard, Gothland, Sweden / (F). [VI; 1614. Fletcher, 106. This is the Lundsgard meteorite.]


1889 Ap 4 / Glb Dem of, 3-4 / Incendiarism at Des Moines, Iowacity excitedrewardsextra police with shot-guns patrolling the streets. [B; 1021. “Incendiarism at Des Moines.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, April 4, 1889, p. 3 c. 4.]


1889 April 4 / [LT], 5-e / Hurricane / S. Pacific. [VI; 1607. “The Recent Hurricane.” London Times, April 4, 1889, p. 5 c. 5.]


1889 Ap. 4 / N.Y.T., 1-5 / Black snow of Aitkin, Minn. [VI; 1613. “Fall of Black Snow.” New York Times, April 4, 1889, p. 1 c. 5. “This dirty snow fell to the depth of half an inch. The atmosphere at the time presented a peculiar greenish tinge. There was a little wind blwoing at the time from the northwest, though there seemed to be a considerable wind higher in the air. Solid chucks of ice and sand are reported to have been picked up in various places.”]


1889 April / q. / Tokio / Nature 40-294. [VI; 1608. Rebeur-Paschwitz, Ernst von. “The Earthquake of Tokio, April 18, 1889.” Nature, 40 (July 25, 1889): 294-295.]


1889 Ap 6 / Metite / Sweden / L'Astro 8-352. [VI; 1615. “Uranolithe tombé en Suede.” Astronomie, 8 (1889): 352-353. This is the Lundsgård meteorite.]


1889 Ap. 6 / Met stone fell at Scania, Sweden, / Nature 40-229 / Is it Sweden? [VI; 1616. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (July 4, 1889): 228-231, at 229. See: 1889 Ap. 3, (VI; 1614). This is the Lundsgård meteorite.]


1889 Ap. 6 / It Sounds / Poggio (Perugia) / about / 4 p.m. / rombi / See 1816. [VI; 1617. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 41. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1889 Ap. 6 / This snow like in 1883 (Sept), etc., indicates volc dust obscuring sun. [VI; 1618. (Refs.???)]


1889 Ap 6 / Great storm, Va and Nor Car. / At Winchester, Va., 10:30 a.m., while snow falling, a terrific peal of thunder. Same at Frederick, Va, where a q. 2 weeks before. / Sun. [VI; 1619. (New York Sun, ca. April 1889.) “They Think it is a Thunderbolt.” New York Sun, April 20, 1889, p. 4 c. 7. “Lewiston, Pa., April 19.During the severe thunder storm that visited this region a few days ago a tree on the premises of Mrs. Amanda Bordell was struck by lightning and badly shattered. The next day Mrs. Bordell noticed a peculiar-looking object in one of the rents of the tree where the lightning had evidently struck first. She dug it out and found it to be very heavy, nearly four inches long, and shaped like an egg. It resembled iron, but was much heavier, and so hard that it resisted the finest tempered files. It is believed to be a veritable thunderbolt.”]


[1889 Ap. 7. Wrong date. See: 1899 Ap. 7, (VI; 1620).]


1889 Ap. 7 / reported by officers of steamer Tropic, off Cape Hatteras / Brilliant meteor that in a hurricane fell near the ship. / N.Y. Herald 13-6-3. [VI; 1621. “Fall of a Brilliant Meteor at Sea.” New York Herald, April 13, 1889, p. 6 c. 3-4.]


1889 Ap. 7 / Trib, 5-2 / Fire / Savannah, Georgia. [VI; 1622. "Fire Raging in Savannah." New York Tribune, April 7, 1889, p. 5 c. 2.]


1889 Ap. 9, etc. / Lum obj in a house at Barnesville, Ohio. / See Lum Objs. [B; 1022. See: Lum obj / 1889 / Ap 6, (SF-IV: 29). The object was seen in a coal mine, (not in a house).]


1889 Ap 9 and May 20 / Venus Stationary / Obs. 12/16. [VI; 1623. “Ephemeris for Venus.” Observatory, 12 (1889): 16.]


1889 Ap. 9 / Lundsgard, Sweden / metite / S A Sup. 29/11895. [VI; 1624. “A Swedish Meteorite.” Scientific American Supplement, 21 (no. 532;  April 12, 1890): 11895. “A Swedish Meteorite.” Engineering, 49 (January 31, 1890): 113. Lundsgård was mispelt and copied elsewhere as Sundsgard. This is the Lundsgård  meteorite.]


1889 Ap. 10 / moon / New black spot by Gaudibert in Moretus. / L'Astro 8-341. [VI; 1625. Gaudibert, Casimir Marie. “Études, Sélénographiques: Moretus, Gassendi.” Astronomie, 8 (1889): 338-343, at 341, (illustration).]


1889 Ap. 10 / See Ap 12. [VI; 1626. See: 1889 Ap 12, (VI; 1630).]


1889 Ap. 10 / Nature 40/202 / Lord Rosse notes that whether related to the b. rain in Ireland or not there was upon the 10th in London, bet 12:30 and 1[:30] p.m., intense blackness like that of a moonless night. [VI; 1627. Parsons, Lawrence, (4th Earl of Rosse). “Black Rain.” Nature, 40 (June 27, 1889): 202-203.]


1889 Ap 12 / Med and Day B of, p. 232 / In village of Thornborough, 2½ miles east of Buckingham, ghost of a farmer who had died shortly before, said be appearing. [B; 1023. (Medium and Daybreak, April 12, 1889, p. 232; not online.)]


1889 Ap. 12 / (th. stone) / During a severe hailstorm an aerolite fell in Monroe township. Ohio. / M.W.R. 89-94. [VI; 1628. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 4; April 1889): 93-95, at 94. “Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ohio: during a severe hail storm which passed over the southern portion of this county on the 12th, an aerolite fell near the residence of Dr. Samuel Black in Monroe township.Report of voluntary observer.”]


1889 April 12 / metite / Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ohio / an aerolite in a hailstorm / M.W.R. 1889-94. [VI; 1629. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 4; April 1889): 93-95, at 94.]


1889 Ap 12 / (+) / (b. rain) / B. rain considerable area Co. Galway, King's Co, and County of Tipperary. Lord Rosse's account in Nature 40-202. That 2 days before, early afternoon, had been an extraordinary obscuration (“intense blackness”). This here at “a distance (about 200 miles) from any large smoke-producing town”. Rosse says was skeptical, but investigated and looked at samples, and convinced did fall. / B. rains of Ireland, See March 30, 1898. [VI; 1630.1, 1630.2, 1630.3. Parsons, Lawrence, (4th Earl of Rosse). “Black Rain.” Nature, 40 (June 27, 1889): 202-203. See: 1898 March 30, (VIII; 249).]


1889 Ap. 12 / Chinese Dragon. [VI; 1631. (Refs.???)]


1889 Ap. 13 / NY Times, 5-5 / Ship struck by ball of fire. [VI; 1632. “Struck by a Ball of Fire.” New York Times, April 13, 1889, p. 5 c. 5. At 5 A.M., on April 7, during a hurricane, the streamship Tropic was north of Cape Hatteras, on its way to New York. “There was a dense mist overhead, driving along with us. Suddenly a huge ball of fire shot out of the dense fog in our stern and struck the rail. The light of this ball of fire was blinding, so that those who looking toward it were unable to see for some time afterward. The mass of electric fire exploded with a loud report as it struck the rail and scattered itself forward in a shower of brilliant sparks of every color in the rainbow. The ship was fairly enveloped in this cloud of fire.”]


1889 Ap. 13 and 14 / Volc eruption on Oshima Island, Japan. 170 persons killed beneath destroyed buildings. / Nature 40/162. [VI; 1633. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (June 13, 1889): 162-164, at 162. Milne, John. “Earthquakes in Connection with Electric and Magnetic Phenomena.” Seismological Journal of Japan, 15 (1890): 135-162, at 155-156. The Izu-Oshima volcano has no recorded eruptions between 1878 and 1909; and, Milne only records an earthquake “with Oshima as centre and 100 miles radius” on April 18, (which makes this reported volcanic eruption very doubtful).]


1889 Ap 15, 27 / Meteors / Nature 40/150. [VI; 1634. Denning, William Frederick. “Remarkable Meteors.” Nature, 40 (June 13, 1889): 150-151.]


1889 April 19 / D-243 / Dried leaves fell from sky―—no wind at the time nor for 12 hours before. / (at Blois) on the Loire / Cosmos, N.S., 13/114. [VI; 1635. The note copies information from page 243 of The Book of the Damned. “Une pluie de feuilles.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (May 4, 1889): 114. "Pluie de feuilles." La Nature (Paris), 1889 pt. 2 (no. 840; July 6): 94.]


1889 Ap. 20 / Religio-Phil Jour. / Case of fasting girl, Josephine [Marie] Bedard, for 7 years, at Tingwick, Mass. [B; 1024. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 46 (no. 9; April 20, 1889): 6, (c. 5). “Who Took the Cold Potato” Boston Globe, April 9, 1899, p. 8 c. 6. Dr. Mary Walker, who accompanied Bedard during her exhibition in Boston, stated: “Saturday night I had a lunch served to me in the private office on the third floor of the Nickelodeon. The waiter cleared the dishes off. After the last performance Josephine and mvself went to the private office, put on our wraps and went out. At the hotel I searched her clothing and found in one of her pockets a doughnut with a bite taken out (here the doctor showed the doughnut), and that satisfied me that all was not right. Then I remembered that on Fast day I had a lunch served me in a private office on the second floor. I left a platter with three pieces of fried potato on it. I went there and one of the pieces was gone. I then remembered that I went to the faucet for some water, and when I returned Josephine had her handkerchief to her mouth.” “Is that all the evidence that you have that Josephine ate anything?” “Yes, that is all. But after I accused her of it she broke down and cried, and l cried out of sympathy for the girl.” “Lives on Air.” San Francisco Chronicle, March 31, 1899, p. 6 c. 3. “Seven years ago, when living at Tingwick Can., she stopped eating but kept on living with no change in her physical condition aside from that. She grew, developed in body and mind, and is to-day, with that one exception, the same as other girls.” Tingwick, Quebec, (not Massachusetts).]


1889 Ap. 20 / insects / Religio-Philosophical Journal, in column of miscellaneous newsvast army of large beetles down upon Atlanta, Georgia, “the other night”. [VI; 1636. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 46 (no. 9; April 20, 1889): 6, (c. 5).]


1889 Ap. 22 / [LT], 6-d / 27-5-d / q / Essex. [VI; 1637. Wright, A.R. Bingham. “Slight Earthquake in Essex.” London Times, April 22, 1889, p. 6 c. 4. “Earthquakes in Essex.” London Times, April 27, 1889, p. 5 c. 4.]


1889 Ap. 23 / 9 to 9:30 a.m. / Sun dogs and ringsLittleton, New Hampshire / Sun 24-3-3. [VI; 1638. "Sun-Dogs in New Hampshire." New York Sun, April 24, 1889, p. 3 c. 3.]


1889 Ap. 26 /Shocks at Schaffhausen / 27—severe Agram / 30—coast Norway / May 8—severe Bosnia / Nature 40-393. [VI; 1639. White, William. “The Supposed Connection between Distant Earthquake Shocks,” Nature, 40 (August 22, 1890): 393-394. “I do not wish to assert that in no case are synchronous earthquakes related, for we have undoubted evidence that certain shocks have been very widespread from a single centre (as the great Lisbon earthquake in 1755); but it is my belief that nearly every earthquake, whether large or small, is due to strictly local stratigraphical causes, quite irrespective of volcanic agency. Having made many fruitless attempts myself to co-ordinate different well-authenticated shocks, I have been compelled to disbelieve the theory of their general connection, and have now adduced sufficient evidence to show that the verdict pronounced by Dr. von Rebeur-Paschwitz, that 'we may therefore safely conclude that the disturbances noticed in Germany were really due to the volcanic action which caused the earthquakes of Tokio,' is not proven, and fallacious.”]


1889 April 27 / Wingfield, Trowbridge / Cor had been signaling with a lamp—saw great meteor. / Nature 40/35 / Detonation heard. [VI; 1640. Clark, T. Herbert. “Brilliant Meteor.” Nature, 40 (May 9, 1889): 35.]


1889 Ap. 27 / At Agram, 8:35 p.m., severe q ./ Nature 40-45. [VI; 1641. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (May 9, 1889): 44-46, at 45.]


1889 Ap. 29 / Seance of / Fr Ac / Metite “recently found in Algeria. / C.R. 108-930 / Beneath surface of ground. [VI; 1642. Daubrée, Gabriel Auguste. “Météorite holosidère découverte à l'intérieur du sol en Algérie, à Haniet-el-Beguel.” Comptes Rendus, 108 (1889): 930-931. The article comes from the seance of May 7, (not April 29). This is the Haniet-el-Beguel meteorite, which was found in 1888, while digging a well, at a depth of 5 meters.]


1889 Ap. 29 / Enormous discharge of steam from the volc Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand / Nature 40-179. [VI; 1643. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (June 20, 1889): 178-180, at 179. The Ruapehu volcano.]


1889 Ap. 30 / In street a ghost / Springhill, Kansas / Rel Phil Jour, June 1. [B; 1025. Pratt, J.H. "An Apparition." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 46 (no. 15; June 1, 1889): 6, (c. 3). "I stopped, turned round, but he had vanished. I looked in every direction; there was no one to be seen. I remained down town two hours. After coming home, I described the one I saw. My wife at once recognized him as her brother William Clayton, who died eight weeks ago. In March, five years ago, I visited with him two days at Monmouth, Ill. Before returning to my wife my own mind had suggested him to be the one who had appeared to me as related."]


1889 Ap. 30 / Inf conjunction Venus-sun / Observatory 12/16. [VI; 1644. “Ephemeris for Venus.” Observatory, 12 (1889): 16.]


1889 May 2 / Cyclone / N. Carolina. [VI; 1645. (Refs.???)]


1889 May 3 / At Yakato, Akita, Ken, Japan, fire destroyed more than 1,000 houses. / Chic. Tribune. 29-2-6. [B; 1026. “Many Thousands Made Homeless.” Chicago Tribune, May 29, 1889, p. 2 c. 6.]


[1889 May 4 /] 1889 May 30 / Sun, 4-7 / Putnam co[unty], Florida / “Sunbeams” / Luminous obj resting close to earth and an explosion that was heard 15 miles away. / (det met). [VI; 1719. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, May 30, 1889, p. 4 c. 7. "About four miles south of Interlachen...." Savannah Morning News, May 13, 1889, p. 6 c. 3.]


1889 May 9 / 9:55 p.m. / Tacna, Peru / sharp shock of earthquake / S. American Journal, July 13. [VI; 1646. (South American Journal, (London, 1863+), South American Journal and Brazil and River Plate Mail, July 13, 1889.)]


1889 May 9 and 10 / BO / Rain of sand, Sicily and Piedmont. Night of 14-15 in Tuscany, Piedmont, and Lombardy, Italy. / Ascribed to whirlwind from African desert. / Cosmos, N.S., 13-258. [VI; 1647. “Pluie de Sable en Italie.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (June 8, 1889): 258.]


1889 May 10 / Fishes / Kansas. [B; 1027. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 5; May 1889): 124-126, at 126.]


1889 May 10 / fish / Wichita, Kansas / “During a thunderstorm, which occurred the afternoon of the 10th, a shower of fishes, from one to four inches long, fell at the Burton Car Works, four miles north of this city. They covered the ground in thousands. One, brought to police headquarters, was a small catfish, about three and three-quarters inches long, such as abound in the streams hereabouts.” / M.W.R. 1889-126. [VI; 1648.1, 1648.2. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 5; May 1889): 124-126, at 126.]


1889 May 10 / [LT], 5-d / q / Bosnia / Others some years or months before and after. [VI; 1649. “Earthquake in Bosnia.” London Times, May 10, 1889, p. 5 c. 4.]


(1889) May 11 / (m[oon]) / L'Astro 1889-285 / Gaudibert writes that saw upon rampart of Gassendi an object as black as ink. Neither he nor the Englishman Ingall had seen it in the month before. The next lunation, looked for. It had gone but something grayish in its place. [VI; 1650. “Nouvelles de la Lune.” Astronomie, 8 (1889): 275-276.]


1889 May 11 / West Virginia / Large meteor exploded near Addison, with sound heard 2 or 3 miles around. / M.W.R., May, 1889. [VI; 1651. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 5; May 1889): 124-126, at 125.]


1889 May 11 / Addison, Webster Co, W. Va. / Metite fell, burying itself in the earth after explosion that jarred earth several miles around. / M.W.R. 1889-125. [VI; 1652. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 5; May 1889): 124-126, at 125.]


1889 May 12 / Trib, 6-4 / Cyclone stories / Ed. [VI; 1653. "The Cyclone Stories." New York Tribune, May 12, 1889, p. 6 c. 4.]


1889 May 13 / (NY Trib) / Died Washington Irving Bishop, at the Lambs Club, 34 W. 26th St. He entertained with some mind-reading. Claye Greene, the playwright, who was a skeptic, was chosen to test him. Greene thought of the name Townsend. Bishop wrote it, writing the name backward. He went into a tranceawoke and joked about itwent again into a trance, his body rigid. He did not recover and was taken to his home. Several times that night he became conscious only to lapse. The attending physicians pronounced him dead, about midnight. For about 15 years he had been an exposer of spiritualism, doing well-known spiritualistic stunts in the light. He did Houdini escapes from tied hands. Then he developed mind-reading. Said that his life had not been altogether creditablemarital troubles, use of narcotics, confiement in a lunatic asylum on account of his excesses. Greene had picked up a book and from it selected the name Townsend. / Trib 21-7-4a cor. tells of a Col Townsend who could simulate a cataleptic trance so as deceive physicians into thinking that he was dead. Because of suspicions that Bishop was not dead but had been killed in an autopsy, the Coroner held investigated. 3 physicians, Irwin, Ferguson, and Hance, were held under bail. At the inquest, his mother said that he had gone into many death-like trances. In 1872, 3 days in a trance, he was pronounced dead by physicians. Said that he feared autopsy or burial alive, and that a few days before the 13th of May, he had in his possession a paper forbidding an autopsy. At the inquest Dr Nevin testified to being with Bishop in 1873, when he went into a trance and by two other phsycians was pronounced dead. The Coroner's Jury found that he was dead at time of autopsy. / Bishop appeared first with a spiritualistthen exposedthen developed mind-reading. [B; 1028.1 to 1028.10. "Suspended Animation." New York Tribune, May 21, 1889, p. 7 c. 4. (Other refs.???)]


1889 May 13 / NY Times, 5-2 / Identity of a balloon. [VI; 1654. “Whose Balloon Is This?” New York Times, May 13, 1889, p. 5 c. 2.]


1889 May 13 / Substance grayish like ashes / Calvi, Corsica / L'Astro 8-205. [VI; 1655. Flammarion, Camille. “Pluie de Sable des 6 et 18 Mars à Alexandrie.” Astronomie, 8 (1889): 201-205, at 205.]


1889 / Middle May / Great flight of potato bugs / L.I. / Sun 29-2-6. [VI; 1656. "Potato Bugs Swarming on the Water." New York Sun, May 29, 1889, p. 2 c. 6.]


1889 May 16 / Great fire / Quebec / Others in this period. [B; 1037. (Refs.???)]


1889 May 17 / In Med and Day B., May 24, p. 329, cor says that on 17th, near village of Coundn, on road leading to Ferryhill Churchyard, he saw a young woman carrying a child, pass him. Then, glancing in direction she took, could not see her. Upon looking the other way he saw her moving in the other direction. [B; 1038.1, 1038.2. (Medium and Daybreak, May 24, 1889, p. 329; not online.)]


1889 May 17 / Floods / Kansas, Wisconsin / N.Y. Trib 19-1-3 / Tornadoes / Mo and Ill. [VI; 1659. "Heavy Rains in the West." New York Tribune, May 19, 1889, p. 1 c. 3.]


1889 May 20 / 2 villages near Scranton, Pa., ruined by a tornado. / NY Trib 21-1-4. [VI; 1660. "Two Villages in Ruins." New York Tribune, May 21, 1889, p. 1 c. 4.]


1889 May 20 / Led up to by falls of dusts from March early. [VI; 1661. (Refs.???)]


1889 May 20 / BO / Public rejoicings in Smyrna over rains, though they resulted in floods. / Levant Herald, May 27 / Had been a drought here. Told in issue of June 4-2-5. [VI; 1662. (Levant Herald, May 27, 1889.) (Levant Herald, June 4, 1889, p. 2 c. 5.)]


1889 May 20 / BO / At Jackson, Cal, a dam was washed away in a flood. The day before had been an earthquake shock. / S. Francisco Chronicle 24-6-1. [VI; 1663. “A Dam Disaster.” San Francisco Chronicle, May 24, 1889, p. 6 c. 1.]


1889 May 20 / BO / District of Crimmintzschau, Saxony, a waterspout burst. Several persons drowned. / Nature 40-84. [VI; 1664. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (May 23, 1889): 84-86, at 84.]


1889 May 20 / Meteor, 8 p.m., at Uitenhage. Detonation heard in a line 40 miles long, / Cape Argus, May 28. [VI; 1665. (Cape Argus, May 28, 1889.)]


1889 May 20 / “Terrible waterspout” and flood, western Bohemia. About 100 deaths. / Liverpool Echo, 25th. [VI; 1666. “Terrible Waterspouts in Austria.” Liverpool Echo, May 25, 1889, p. 4 c. 1.]


1889 May 21 / Cyclone / Atlantic Ocean / NY Trib 25-1-6. [VI; 1657. "The Yantic in a Cyclone." New York Tribune, May 25, 1889, p. 1 c. 6.]


1889 May 21 / BO / “Heavy black clouds broke over the whole island, flooding the streets and blocking the drains.” / St Helena Guardian, May 23 / On May 27th, heaviest rain known there in a long time. / issue of 30th. [VI; 1667.1, 1667.2. (St. Helena Guardian, May 23, 1889.) (St. Helena Guardian, May 30, 1889.)]


1889 May 22 / BO / Glb-Dem 23-6-6 / Dam broke at Littleton, N.H. [VI; 1668. “A Bursted Reservoir.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 23, 1889, p. 6 c. 6.]


1889 May 22 and 24 / BO / 2 large meteors seen in Alabama. / M.W.R., May, 1889. [VI; 1669. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 5; May 1889): 124-126, at 125.]


1889 May 22, 29 / Meteors / Nature 40/150. [VI; 1670. Denning, William Frederick. “Remarkable Meteors.” Nature, 40 (June 13, 1889): 150-151.]


1889 May 22 / (q phe) / 9:30 p.m. / Great det. meteor and sounds that appeared to be subterranean at Otranto, near Bari, Italy. / Cosmos, N.S., 13/251. [VI; 1671. “Bolide.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (June 8, 1889): 251.]


1889 May 22 / q near Ben Nevis / Geol. Mag 1891/306. [VI; 1672. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1889.” Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 8 (1891): 57-67, 306-316, 364-372; at 364-365.]


1889 May 23 / Snowstorm / Findlay, Ohio / Quebec Mercury, 27th. [VI; 1673. “Current News and Gossip.” Quebec Mercury, May 27, 1889, p. 1 c. 4.]


1889 May 23 / BO / Reported in Melb. Argus, 24th“Immense floods” in Victoria from the heavy rains that started falling in the 19th. Upon June 3rdnew floods. Floods again in Victoria, June 6th. A body of water that fell near Avoca, is described in the Argus, (p. 6), June 7th, as “a waterspout”. Flood at Numurkah was such as never been known there before. [VI; 1674.1, 1674.2. "Floods in the Country." Melbourne Argus, May 24, 1889, p. 6 c. 7. "The Rainfall in the Country." Melbourne Argus, June 3, 1889, p. 6 c. 7. "Fresh Floods at Numurkah," and, "Heavy Rain in the Country." Melbourne Argus, June 7, 1889, p. 6 c. 7.]


1889 / ab May 23 / At Hyogo, Japanhad been heard detonations and the sea had been violently disturbed. / Straits Times (Singapore), May 30. [VI; 1675. “China and Japan News.” Straits Times, (Singapore), May 30, 1889, p. 3 c. 4. “The vernacular press publishes a strange statement....” Japan Daily Mail, 11 (May 11, 1889): 450. “The vernacular press publishes a strange statement to the effect that a noise resembling the discharge of a big gun has been frequently heard of late at sea in the neighbourhood of Hyogo, and that it has once or twice been attended by violent disturbance of the surface of the water. Naturally people are excited about so strange a phenomenon, some predicting the advent of a volcanic eruption others a big earthquake.” There were no volcanic eruptions nor major earthquakes in Hyōgo Prefecture in 1889.]


1889 May 24 / BO / Destructive cloudburst near Columbus, Indiana / Globe-Democrat, 25th. [VI; 1676. (St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 25, 1889; not found here.)]


1889 May 24 / On night of 27th, gauge at Sydney Observatory registered 16.78 inches since 24th. / Syd Morn Herald, 28th, 6½ columns./ Tells of cattle and bridges carried away. / Issue of 29th = 7 columns. [VI; 1677. "Extraordinary Rainfall." Sydney Morning Herald, May 28, 1889, p. 5 c. 5-7 & p. 6 c. 1-4. "The Extraordinary Rainfall." Sydney Morning Herald, May 29, 1889, p. 7 c. 6-7 & p. 8 c. 1-6.]


1889 May 24 / Ice / night / Storm in Worcestershire and fall of lumps of ice. Some of them, picked up next morning, still were more than inch in diameter. / Liverpool Echo, 27th. [VI; 1678. “Remarkable Hailstorm in Worcestershire.” Liverpool Echo, May 27, 1889, p. 3 c. 7.]


1889 May 24 / BO / Penang Gazette of“Great floods at Larutmany bridges have been carried away, and twelve mines in Kamunting are flooded. [VI; 1679. (Penang Gazette, May 24, 1889.)]


1889 May 25 / BO / Times of Cyprus, May 30thAt Nicosia, rushing and roaring sounds were heard and the river Pedias swelled in a sudden flood. Then came several days of heavy rains (June 6). Continued and on 9th very heavy (14th). / Several persons narrowly escaped. [VI; 1680. (Times of Cyprus, May 30, 1889.)]


1889 May 25 / BO / Belize Advertiser / “Water is now extremely scarce in Belize. On this account, most of the poorer classes have left town for the bush.” Editorial upon the drought in issue of 8th. On 1st and 2nd had been heavy rains. [VI; 1681. (Belize Advertiser, May 25, 1889.) (Belize Advertiser, June??? 8, 1889.)]]


1889 May 25 / BO / Quebec Daily Mercury of / In a windstorm in Dakota, air filled with a fine dust that had the appearance of a snowstorm; impossible to distinguish objects a few feet away. Electric phenomena. Strong shocks from stoves and other iron things. [VI; 1682. “The recent windstorm in Dakota....” Quebec Mercury, May 25, 1889, p. 2 c. 1.]


1889 May 25 / BO / Red rain fell at Cardiff. / D. News, 25-2-8 / A quantity of this red water was exhibited in a window of the Western Mail building. [VI; 1683. "A Remarkable Phenomenon." London Daily News, May 25, 1889, p. 2 c. 8.  [VI; 1683. "A Remarkable Phenomenon." London Daily News, May 25, 1889, p. 2 c. 8. "Singular Phenomenon at Cardiff." Cardiff Western Mail, May 25, 1889, p. 3 c. 3.]


1889 May 25 / BO / Phe is described in Cardiff Western Mail, 25th; said that a conventionalist, Prof Parker of the University College, had explained that the red rain had not fallen but that ordinary rain had been colored by contact with something after it fell. Said this explanation not account for fact that the red rain was seen in many places in Cardiff. [VI; 1685.1, 1685.2. "Singular Phenomenon at Cardiff." Cardiff Western Mail, May 25, 1889, p. 3 c. 3.]


1889 May 25-30 / AustraliaChina / Symons' Met Mag 24-101 / Editor writes, “The following may or may not be a mere coincidence, but we call attention to the dates and leave others to theorize." Quotes the Sydney Morning Herald, May 29, 31, that May 25-28 at various places in N.S. Wales from ab 20 to 24 inches of rain. May 29-30 in Hong Kong ab 34 inches of rain. It is mentioned that the annual fall at Norfolk, England, is ab 29 inches. [VI; 1686.1, 1686.2. "Two Great Rainfalls, May 25th30th, 1889." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 24 (August 1889): 101-104.]


1889 May 25 / BO / night / One of the most violent of earthquakes at Manila. / North China Herald, June 8 / Lesser shocks later. [VI; 1687. (North China Herald, June 8, 1889.)]


1889 May 25 / Appeared by rotation a large sunspot. / The Sunspot, Nov., 1925. [VI; 1790. “Rescued from Oblivion.” The Sunspot, 11 (no. 10; November 1925): 3-11, at 7.]


1889 May 26 / BO / Substance / Madras Mail, June 21 / At Ooha (under Junagad) / Kathiawar / Ab 3 p.m. fell hailstones, some of them the size of pomegranates. Av 14 miles away, at the village of Kandhi, fell a shower of Nagli, a kind of grain, like mustard seed. [VI; 1688. (Madras Mail, June 21, 1889.)]


1889 May 26 / 2 a.m. / q / Manila / The Celestial Empire, June 10. [VI; 1690. (The Celestial Empire, (Shanghai newspaper), June 10, 1889.)]


1889 May 27 / BO / ab. 7:15 / Napier and other places in N. Zealandthe severest shock in many years. / Otago Witness 30-2-4, Supplement. [VI; 1689. "A shock of earthquake...." Otago Witness, May 30, 1889, Supplement, p. 2 c. 4.]


[1889] May 27 / BO / Levant Herald / Torrential rains and hail, destroying vineyards and carrying away cattle, in Livinia, Greece. [VI; 1691. (Levant Herald, May 27, 1889.)]


1889 May 27 / BO / early morning / at Dunedin, N.Z. / (Otago Witness, June 6) / Rumbling sounds heard and shocks felt and whole sky illuminated as if by a volcano, and a large meteor seen. [VI; 1692. "A very brilliant meteor was observed...." Otago Witness, June 6, 1889, Supplement, p. 2 c. 3-4.]


1889 May 28 / BO / afternoon / Cyclone / Kansas / lumps of ice, one of them 13 inches in circumference / S. Francisco Chronicle 30-6-4. [VI; 1693. “Destroyed by Wind.” San Francisco Chronicle, May 30, 1889, p. 6 c. 4.]


1889 May 28 / BO / Levant Herald / That for several days a fine, red dust had been falling at Hyerès. / An island off the coast of France, near Toulon. [VI; 1694. (Levant Herald, May 28, 1889.)]


1889 May 28 / Cape Argus / Severe drought, Uitenhage. Great grass fires. A herd of buffaloes driver for water to a pool within 5 miles of the town. [VI; 1695. (Cape Argus, May 28, 1889.)]


1889 May 29 / Crops badly damaged by frost / N.Y., Pa., Mich., Minn. / NY Tribune 30-1-2. [VI; 1658. "Killing Frosts East and West." New York Tribune, May 30, 1889, p. 1 c. 2.]


1889 May 29, 30 / BO / Fireball / Ireland and England / Nature 40-174. [VI; 1696. Denning, William Frederick. “The Fireball of May 29, 1889.” Nature, 40 (June 20, 1889): 174.]


1889 May 29 / Rain begantold in 6-page supplement to Overland China Mail, June 1. [VI; 1697. (Overland China Mail, June 1, 1889.)]


1889 May 29 / Fireball / England / Nature 40/174. [VI; 1698. Denning, William Frederick. “The Fireball of May 29, 1889.” Nature, 40 (June 20, 1889): 174.]


1889 May 29 / BO / Journal de St. Petersbourg / Absence of rain in Russia. [VI; 1699. (Journal de St. Petersbourg, May 29, 1889.)]


1889 May 29 / BO / Heavy rains throughout Western Australia. / Adelaide Advertiser, 30th / Upon 30th, heavy rains in S. Australia (Advertiser, June 1). [VI; 1700. "Western Australia." Adelaide Advertiser, May 30, 1889, p. 5 c. 3. "Rain in the Country." Adelaide Advertiser, June 1, 1889, p. 4 c. 6.]


1889 May 29 / BO / Cor (Hugh M. Thompson) in St Louis Globe-Democrat, 30th / That at St Louis, on 30th, he saw falling with the rain numerous particles of a substance that he could not identify. Crystalline, white, translucent; one of them was pinkish. Ac to microscopial examination, they were not dust particles of any kind. Continued to fall for several hours. / Visible without microscope. [VI; 1701.1, 1701.2. Thompson, Hugh M. “Phenomena in Rain.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, May 30, 1889, p. 6 c. 6.]


1889 May 29 / Daily Picayune of, tells of “long hoped for rain” having come at last, in Louisiana where for six weeks there had been a drought, and, (p. 6), “a gloomy outlook” for crops in five other southern states. / Issue of 30th, an editorial upon this drought and its effects upon crops and business. [VI: 1702.1, 1702.2. “The Weather.” New Orleans Picayune, May 29, 1889, p. 6 c. 3. “The Drought and the Crops.” New Orleans Picayune, May 30, 1889., p. 4 c. 3-4.]


1889 May 29-June 6 / No spot on sun, reported from the Mauritius Observatory. / Commercial Gazette, June 10 (Port Louis, Mauritius). [VI; 1703. (Commercial Gazette, Port Mauritius, June 10, 1889.)]


1889 May 29 / BO / Madras Mail of / At Ganjamdrought severeoutlook very graveall tanks dry and wells and streams fast falling. [VI; 1704. (Madras Mail, May 29, 1889.)]


1889 May 28, 29 / BO / Cantonrain at Canton so that the city wall was undermined and fell in parts, The swollen river indicated heavy rains up country. / N. China Herald, June 8. [VI; 1705. (North China Herald, June 8, 1889.)]


1889 May 30 / Liverpool Echo of / At Aberdeen, James Crombie died after swallowing an ounce of sulphuric acid, with the delusion that 2 men had compelled him to take it. [B; 1039. “Fatal Hallucination.” Liverpool Echo, May 30, 1889, p. 4 c. 5.]


(1889) May 30 / BO / 8:15 p.m. / Sharp shock, island of Guernsey. / D. News 31-5-6. [VI; 1706. "Shock of Earthquake in Guernsey." London Daily News, May 31, 1889, p. 5 c. 6.]


1889 May 30 / BO / q in Italy / La Nature 33-47. [VI; 1707. "Le tremblement de terre du 30 mai." La Nature, 1889 pt. 2 (no. 837; June 15): 47.]


1889 May 30 / BO / San Fran Chronicle, May 31Such a downpour at Huejutla, Mexico, that the river inundated the town, drowning many persons. [VI; 1708. (San Francisco Chronicle, May 31, 1889; not found here.)]


1889 May 30 / Destructive tornado in Virginia / S.F. Chronicle 31-1-8. [VI; 1709. “Work of a Tornado.” San Francisco Chronicle, May 31, 1889, p. 1 c. 8.]


1889 May 30 / BO / Extraordinary and unseasonable fall of snow in Michigan / S.F. Chronicle 31-1-7. [VI; 1710. “Snow in Michigan.” San Francisco Chronicle, May 31, 1889, p. 1 c. 7.]


1889 May 30, 31 , June / Rainfall in w. and central Pa. was unprecedented there. / MWR, May. [VI; 1711. “Precipitation.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 5; May 1889): 113-119, at 117-118.]


1889 May 30 or 20 / See 20th. / A waterspout over the district of Czimmitzschau, in Saxony. Several persons were drowned. / Nature 40/84. [VI; 1712. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (May 23, 1889): 84-86, at 84. See: 1889 May 20, (VI; 1664).]


1889 May 30 / 8:30 p.m. / Strong shock / Normandy / Cosmos, N.S., 13/251, 279. [VI; 1713. “Tremblement de terre en Normandie.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (June 8, 1889): 251. “Le tremblement de terre à Laval.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (June 15, 1889): 279.]


1889 May 30 / q / Eng Channel / Nature 40-141. [VI; 1714. “The Earthquake.” Nature, 40 (June 6, 1889): 140-142.]


1889 May 30 / ShocksEngland and France / N.Y. Herald, June 1, p. 4. [VI; 1715. “Summary of the News.” New York Herald, June 1, 1889, p. 4 c. 1-2.]


1889 May 30 / q. / France / C.R. 108-1188. [VI; 1716. Flammarion, Camille. “Sur le tremblement de terre du 30 mai.” Comptes Rendus, 108 (1889): 1188.]


1889 May 30 / (Fr) / (B.A. '11) / q / several pages, Symons 34/73. [VI; 1717. A class I earthquake. Milne, 735. Jones, J.H. "Black Rain." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 34 (June 1900): 73-74.]


[1889 May 30. Wrong date. See: 1889 May 4, (VI; 1719).]


1889 May 30 / 3 short, sharp shocks at Cherbourg. / Standard 31-5-5. [VI; 1720. “Earthquake in France.” London Standard, May 31, 1889, p. 5 c. 5.]


1889 May 30 / Heavy rains in Ontario, Canada / Standard 31-5-5. [VI; 1721. “Severe Weather in Canada.” London Standard, May 31, 1889, p. 5 c. 5.]


1889 May 30 and 31 / Rainfall in Western Pennsylvania about 5 inchesalmost twice the normal amount for whole month of May, in Pittsburg. / N.Y. Trib, June 3-6-3. [VI; 1791. "An Extraordinary Summer Storm." New York Tribune, June 3, 1889, p. 6 c. 3-4.]


1889 May / BO / At Lausanne, Switzerland, one of the most torrential rains recorded. / Bib. Univ. 3-22-68. [VI; 1684. “Seance du 5 juin 1889.” Bibliothèque Universelle: Archives des Sciences Physiques et Naturelles. s. 3 v. 22 (1889): 64-69, at 67-68.]


1889 May / BO / Long continued drought and famine in China / N. China Herald, June 8. [VI; 1718. (North China Herald, June 8, 1889.)]


1889 May / BO / In Kashmir and the Punjab, earthquakes and thunderstorms. / The Englishman (Calcutta), June 1 and 3. [VI; 1722. (Calcutta English, June 1, 1889.) (Calcutta Englishman, June 3, 1889.)]


1889 May 31 / Johnstown flood. [VI; 1723. (Refs.???)]


1889 May 31 / BO / noon / Shock at Tucson, Arizona Territory / S.F. Chronicle, June 1-6-3. [VI; 1724. “A Little Tremble.” San Francisco Chronicle, June 1, 1889, p. 6 c. 3.]


1889 May 31 / The (Standard) / 1500 houses carried away. Village of Conemaugh, June 4. Subsiding waters disclosing the corpses. Scores of railroad engines. An engine driver, looking back, saw houses, bridges, etc., up in the stream. Dam broke, so that the whole lake slid down the valley. Conemaugh Lake 5 miles by 2. / Bodies never counted. On June 5th, 6,000 men were working, finding and burying them. Later, 10,000 men were working. [VI; 1725.1, 1725.2. (“Terrible Floods in Pennsylvania.” London Standard, June 3, 1889, p. 7 c. 6-7. “The Pennsylvania Flood.” London Standard, June 4, 1889, p. 5 c. 5-6. “The Pennsylvania Flood.” London Standard, June 5, 1889, p. 7 c. 5-6. (London Standard, May 31, 1889.)]


1889 May 31 / (Fr) / [LT], 5-c, 9-f / June 1-9-b / q. / France / 8-7-d. [VI; 1792. “Earthquake in France.” London Times, May 31, 1889, p. 5 c. 3. “Earthquake in Guernsey.” London Times, May 31, 1889, p. 9 c. 6. “France.” London Times, June 1, 1889, p. 9 c. 2. “Earthquake Shocks.” London Times, June 8, 1889, p. 7 c. 4.]


1889 May 8 to June 6 / Rainfall 1.15 inches below average for 15 years at Mauritius. / Commercial gazette (Port Louis, Mauritius), June 10. [VI; 1726. (Commercial Gazette, Port Louis, Mauritius), June 10, 1889.)]


1889 May-June / The white spot on Saturn's ring / E. Mec. 49-201, etc. [VI; 1727. Elger, Thomas Gwyn. “Bright Spot on Rings of Saturn.” English Mechanic, 49 (no. 1258; May 3, 1889): 195. Jenkins, G. Parry. “The White Spot on Saturn's Rings.” English Mechanic, 49 (no. 1259; May 3, 1889):  10, 1889): 218. “Saturn.” English Mechanic, 49 (no. 1259; May 10, 1889): 218. “Royal Astronomical Society.” English Mechanic, 49 (no. 1260; May 17, 1889): 234-235, at 235. Gemmill. “Venus—34 Bootis....” English Mechanic, 49 (no. 1260; May 17, 1889): 237-238, at 238. “Scientific News.” English Mechanic, 49 (no. 1261; May 24, 1889): 256-257. “White Spot on Saturn's Ring.” English Mechanic, 49 (no. 1262; May 31, 1889): 281.]


1889 May 31 / BO / Press dispatch. Swansea Ev. Express, June 1, for instance. “It is supposed that a waterspout together with the swollen streams, caused the disaster.” [VI; 1728. (Swansea Evening Express, June 1, 1889.)]


1889 May 31 / BO / Ljungby / a brilliant meteor / Nature 40-179. [VI; 1729. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (June 20, 1889): 178-180, at 179.]


1889 / last of May / Great fires in cities / China, Japan, Austria, U.S.A. [VI; 1730. (Refs.???)]


1889 May / BO / Ab. 20 reports upon extreme drought, mostly in the S. States, in M.W.R., May. [VI; 1731. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 5; May 1889): 124-126, at 125-126.]


1889 May 31 / BO / Large meteor / Arkansas / M.W.R., May, 1889. [VI; 1732. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 5; May 1889): 124-126, at 125.]


1889 / last of May / Heavy rains in Ceylon / Overland Ceylon Observer, June 1st. [VI; 1733. (Overland Ceylon Observer, June 1, 1889.)]


[The following two notes were folded together by Fort. VI: 1734-1735.]


1889 May 31 / A singularly lurid sunset at Paris. Shocks that night. Aurora at 4 next morning. / Standard—June 1-5-3 / May 30 / ab 8:20 p.m. / Shocks many parts of south of England, / Standard, June 3-4-4. [VI; 1734. "The Earthquake." London Evening Standard, June 1, 1889, p. 5 c. 3. "The Earthquake." London Evening Standard, June 3, 1889, p. 4 c. 4.]


1889 June 7 / Shock, New Bedford, Mass. / Standard 8-5-4. / At Brest shock was violent at 1:15 p.m. / June 7 / morning / Spain / shock / Standard 8-5-4. [VI; 1735. "Earthquake Shocks." London Evening Standard, June 8, 1889, p. 5 c. 4.]


1889 May 31 / Typhoon at Manila travelling toward Hong Kong. / North China Herald, June 8. [VI; 1736. (North China Herald, June 8, 1889.)]


1889 June 1 / Block of houses in Boissevain, burned. / Manitoba Free Press, June 6. [B; 1040. (Manitoba Free Press, Winnipeg, June 6, 1889; not found here)]


1889 June 1 / [LT], 14-c / q. / England. [VI; 1737. “Earthquake Shocks in England.” London Times, June 1, 1889, p. 14 c. 3.]


1889 / ab June 1 / South American Journal, July 6 / Rio Negro, Uruguay, greatly swollen. / of July 27Many inundations, Brazil and Uruguaygreat part of the city of Pelotus under water. [VI; 1738. (South American Journal, July 27, 1889.)]


1889 June 1st, ab. / Dark spot on Jupiter first seen. In June, 1890, still of the same appearance. / M. Notices 50/521 / Moving toward red spot. [VI; 1739. Williams, Arthur Stanley. “On a coming Conjunction of a Remarkable Dark Spot on Jupiter with the Red Spot, and the relative Altitudes of these Objects.” Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 50 (June 13, 1890): 520-523, at 521.]


[1889] June 1 / BO / In western Canada, several dams burst and villages were devastated. / D. News 4-5-7. [VI; 1740. "Disastrous Floods in Canada." London Daily News, June 4, 1889, p. 5 c. 7.]


1889 June 1, about, and for about a week / Torrents destroyed the vineyards in many places inTurkey. / Levant Herald, June 10 / The weekly edition tells June 2. A drought that had threatened dire distress, broken by these rains. [VI; 1741. (Levant Herald, June 10, 1889.)]


1889 / ab. June 1 / This Mexican town spelled Buejutala in the Victoria Weekly Colonist, June 7. [VI; 1742. (Victoria Weekly Colonist, June 7, 1889.)]


1889 / ab. June 1 / At Tangier, as told in the Times of Morocco, “rain very sadly needed for the crops”, and then, ab June 1, abudance of rain. “Great suffering from the drought”“lack of rain severely. [VI; 1743. (Times of Morocco, ca. June 1, 1889.)]


1889 June 1 / BO / Dam at Laurel, Pa, gave way. / Chic Trib., June 3. [VI; 1744. “Lives Lost at Williamsport.” Chicago Tribune, June 3, 1889, p. 3 c. 4.]


1889 June 1 / In the Amer. Meteorological Journal of the period, nothing of heavy rains or floods anywhere. [VI; 1745.]


1889 / ab June 1 / BO / Drought and loss of crops relieved in Bahama Islands. (Nassau Guardian, June 8). [VI; 1746. (Nassau Guardian, June 8, 1889.)]


1889 June 1 / BO / The phe at Cobourg. In Toronto Globe, June 3, described as a “waterspout”. [VI; 1747. (Toronto Globe, June 3, 1889.)]


1889 May 29 / June 1, Overland Mail of. / 30 inches in 33 hours. Greatest rainstorm in history of the Colony. 16 or 17 lives lost. Correspondence from Canton, dated May 27, tells of deluges and ruined crops. [VI; 1748. (Overland Mail May 29, 1889.) (Overland Mail, June 1, 1889.)]


1889 / ab June 1 / June 17, Madras Mail ofThat not long before, at sea, off Kamakura, Japan, sea smooth, sky clear, the sky suddenly became overcast, and immense waves rose in the ocean, the water turning brown and muddy. [VI; 1751. (Madras Mail, June 17, 1889.)]


1889 June 1 / early morning / Water fell not in drops but in sheets at Andover, N.Y.—2 dams gave awa and villages destroyed. / N.Y. Herald 2-12-4. [VI; 1752. “Still Another Disaster.” New York Herald, June 2, 1889, p. 12 c. 4.]


1889 June 2 / BO / night / Lausanne, Switzerland, visited by a “waterspout, by which some of the streets were five feet deep in water. / D. News, 4-5-6. [VI; 1753. "Severe Storm in Switzerland." London Daily News, June 4, 1889, p. 5 c. 7.]


1889 June 2 / BO / At Coburg, Ontario“This morning, what appeared to be a large body of water passed over the town in a northwesterly direction and burst when about two miles distant. Creeks became rivers and all dams between this place and Lake Ontario burst. / S.F. Chronicle, June 3-1-7. [VI; 1754.1, 1754.2. “A Cloudburst in Canada.” San Francisco Chronicle, June 3, 1889, p. 1 c. 7.]


1889 June 2 / BO / Pioneer Mail ofthat rai had relieved the drought in Behar, Bengal. / (Allahabad). [VI; 1755. (Pioneer Mail, June 2, 1889.)]


1889 June 2 / Ice / Near Liverpool, irregular lumps of ice ab 1½ inches diameter. / Liverpool Echo, June 3 / Also in Liverpool. In Liverpool and Flintshire, in morning, big hail. Also floods and great hailstones, Flintshire and Cheshire, Westmoreland and Staffordshire. Some of these places, 2-inch hailstones. / Big hail of Westmoreland at 9 a.m. [VI; 1756.1, 1756.2. “Yesterday's Hailstones.” Liverpool Echo, June 3, 1889, p. 3 c. 5. “Great Thunderstorms.” Liverpool Echo, June 3, 1889, p. 4 c. 3.]


1889 June 2 / BO / Northern China / Most destructive tornado in many years. / N. China Herald, June 15. [VI; 1757. (North China Herald, June 15, 1889.)]


1889 June 3 / 11:35 p.m. / Met as if from Episol Borealis (Cor. Bor) / Maryland / M.W.R. 89-156. [VI; 1749. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 6; June 1889): 155-157, at 156.]


1889 June 3 / BO / Floods in Eden Valley, S. Australia. / Advertiser / 4th, Heavy rains. / 3 houses were swept away. Continued at least to the 9th, when more floods—one of them at night so sudden people first learned by water entering their houses—Advertiser, 10th. / Here (Narracoorte). [VI; 1758.1, 1758.2. "FLoods at Narracoorte." Adelaide Advertiser, June 10, 1889, p. 5 c. 3.]


1889 June 3 / BO / 11:35 / Meteor of great size in Frederick Co, Maryland / M.W.R., June. [VI; 1759. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 6; June 1889): 155-157, at 156.]


1889 June 3 / Standard of, 5-6—At Tattenhall, near Chester, a lake swollen by rains, burst from its banks and flooded roads and fields. [VI; 1760. “The Provinces.” London Standard, June 3, 1889, p. 5 c. 6.]


1889 / to June 3 / Most destruction recorded floods in U.S. in Middle Atlantic States. / M.W.R., June. [VI; 1761. “Precipitation.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 6; June 1889): 144-150, at 148-150. “Inland Navigation.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 6; June 1889): 154-155, at 154.]


1889 June 4 / BO / in D. Picayune, of 5th-2-3 / Many weeks of drought broken in Cuba. [VI; 1762. “Cuba.” New Orleans Picayune, June 5, 1889, p. 2 c. 3.]


1889 June 4 / [LT], 10-c / 5-12-c / Balloon picked up at sea. [VI; 1763. “Balloon Picked Up at Sea.” London Times, June 4, 1889, p. 10 c. 3. “The Balloon Disaster.” London Times, June 5, 1889, p. 12 c. 3.]


1889 June 4 / Torrents at Sargans, Switzerland—bridges and houses washed away. / D. News, 5-5-5. [VI; 1764. "Floods in Switzerland." London Daily News, June 5, 1889, p. 5 c. 5.]


1889 June 4 / BO / Levant Herald tells of earthquakes that preceded ad then from the middle of May continued with heavy rains in Sparta. [VI; 1765. (Levant Herald, June 4, 1889.)]


1889 June 4-5 / BO / night / Reichenbach, Saxony, visited by a “second waterspout”. / L.T. 6-5-1. [VI; 1766. “Germany.” London Times, June 6, 1889, p. 5 c. 1.]


1889 June 4 / BO / 5:30 a.m. / Ongole / Madras Mail of 6th—N to S. brilliant meteor. [VI; 1767. (Madras Mail, June 6, 1889.)]


1889 June 4 / Another “waterspout” in Saxony, “sweeping away houses, crops, roads, and bridges.” / L.T. 6-5-1. [VI; 1768. “Germany.” London Times, June 6, 1889, p. 5 c. 1.]


1889 June 5, 30 / Sunspots far from equator / Nature 41/88. [VI; 1769. “Sun-Spots in High Southern Latitudes.” Nature, 41 (November 28, 1889): 88-89.]


1889 June 5 / Destructive cyclone / Lamar Co, Texas / Toronto Globe, 6th. [VI; 1770. (Toronto Globe, June 6, 1890.)]


1889 June 6 / The fire at Seattle destroyed 31 blocks of houses. [B; 1029. (Refs.???)]


1889 (June 6) / Great Brill. Venus. [VI; 1771. Venus at greatest brilliance. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1889, 466.]


1889 June 6 / BO / Heaviest fall of rain in Iowa in 8 years / D. Pic. 9-2-5. [VI; 1772. “Heavy Rains in Iowa.” New Orleans Picayune, June 9, 1889, p. 2 c. 5.]


1889 June 6 / BO / Straits Times (Singapore) of 6th / Long drought, followed by heavy rains in Java. [VI; 1773. “Netherland India News.” Straits Times, (Singapore), June 6, 1889, p. 3 c. 3.]


1889 June 6 / (BO) / LT, 5-1 / Drought and prayers for rain in some parts of Germany. [VI; 1774. “Germany.” London Times, June 6, 1889, p. 5 c. 1.]


1889 June 6 / afternoon / Violent hailstorm, Madrid—several persons injured. Great damage to buildings. Also city flooded. / Liverpool Echo, 7th. [VI; 1775. “Great Thunderstorms.” Liverpool Echo, June 7, 1889, p. 4 c. 2.]


1889 June 7 / 1:15 (sic) / Brest / Sound and shock like from firing of a gun of large calibre. One same day, New Bedford, Mass. / Nature 40-162. [VI; 1776. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (June 13, 1889): 162-164, at 162.]


1889 June 7 / BO / night / 3 inches of rain. / Darjeeling / The Englishman, June 11 / And at least 3 following nights, ab. 3 inches rain each night. / Englishman, 14th. [VI; 1777. (Calcutta Englishman, June 11, 1889.) (Calcutta Englishman, June 14, 1889.)]


1889 June 7 / BO / Shock / France and Italy / Cosmos, N.S., 13-310. [VI; 1778. Denza, Francesco. “Tremblements de terre en Italie.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (June 22, 1889): 310.]


1889 June 7 / BO / 9 p.m. / Near Lagnieu, France, meteor. / Cosmos, N.S., 13-282. [VI; 1779. Philippe, A. “Un bolide.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (June 15, 1889): 282.]


1889 June 7 / BO / Buenos Ayres Standard of 8th / Heavy rain, Argentina. People in Ayacucho driven from their homes. [VI; 1780. (Buenos Ayres Standard, June 8, 1889.)]


1889 June 7 / 10:35 a.m. / New Bedford, Mass / q. / N.Y. Herald 8-4-4. [VI; 1781. (New York Herald, June 8, 1889, p. 4 c. 4.)]


[The following two notes were folded together by Fort. VI: 1782-1783.]


1889 June 7 / waterspout / little village of Chetnole, Dorsetshire / In the afternoon, thunder and lightning incessant but very little rain. / (Symons Met Mag. 24-75) / About 6 o'clock in the evening, great waves of water, from eight to ten feet high, rolled down the Batcombe hills upon the little village of C., large trees battering into the village. The cause of the remarkable occurrence was for some time unknown. "It has now been ascertained that a waterspout burst on Batcombe-hill.” / p. 84. / Said that where the volume of water from the sky, or the “waterspout”, had struck the earth had been found in the hills, holes torn into the earth, deepest almost a summit—they were 8 or 9 feet deep. No waterspout from the land. “It is much to be regretted that no record seems to have been preserved as to whether the water was fresh or salt.” [VI; 1782.1 to 1782.4. "Waterspout in Dorset, June 7th." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 24 (June 1889): 75. "The Dorsetshire Waterspout of June 7th." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 24 (July 1889): 84-86.]


[1889 June] / BO / Cl brsts and no salt / See hail, June, 1889. [VI; 1783. See: (1889 June).]


1889 June 7 / Salt hailstones did fall at Tunbridge Wells. / Symons Met Mag. 24/105. [VI; 1784. Webb, J. "Salt Hailstones." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 24 (August 1889): 105.]


1889 June 7 / morning / Great damage by hailstones at Margate. / Liverpool Echo, 7th. [VI; 1785. “Great Thunderstorms.” Liverpool Echo, June 7, 1889, p. 4 c. 2.]


1889 June 7 / Symons' 24-84 / The water fell in a solid stream size of a man's body. / Not water widely concentrated from a hill. Nearly at the top of the hill were deep pits where it fell—deepest only 7 or 8 feet from summit. 8 or 9 feet deep. Said here no record as to whether salt or fresh water. No waterspout—at Cattistock Lodge, 4 miles away, from 2:45 to 5:45 p.m., 3.78 inches fell in torrents. [VI; 1786.1, 1786.2. "The Dorsetshire Waterspout of June 7th." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 24 (July 1889): 84-86.]


1889 June 7 / Salt Hail / Symons, 24-105, cor (I. Webb) writes that big hail fell at Tunbridge Wells. On his farm, a friend of his, Mr. William Rogers, tasted some and found them salt. / p. 119, cor. R.J. Lecky writes he had asked a resident of T. Wells to investigate, and he wrote, “Mr Rogers seemed greatly surprised and amused at his remark as to the saltish taste of the hailstones having been taken seriously.” Said that he had fancied a saltish taste and had said so, but was not sure. / Ac to others no salty taste. / Mr Webb says he got it from letter from Mrs Rogers, who said her father told her, “Very salt.” [VI; 1787.1, 1787.2, 1787.3. Webb, J. "Salt Hailstones." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 24 (August 1889): 105. "Salt Hailstones." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 24 (September 1889): 118-119.]


1889 June 8 / A London reservoir burst, submerging the district of Edmonton. / D. News 10-3-7. [VI; 1788. "Bursting of a Reservoir." London Daily News, June 10, 1889, p. 3 c. 7.]


1889 June 9 / Another heavy fall rain at Hong Kong. / China Overland Mail, June 15. [VI; 1789. (China Overland Mail, June 15, 1889.)]


1889 June 9 / Organic / Russia / (32) / (D-75). [VI; 1804. The note copies information from page 75 of The Book of the Damned. ("A singular meteorite." Scientific American Supplement, 29 (February 22, 1890): 11798. This is the Mighei meteorite.]


1889 June 9 / BO / In Aveyron, France, 9:15 p.m., magnificent meteor. / Cosmos, N.S., 13-311. [VI; 1805. Cayla, P. "Phénomène lumineux.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (June 22, 1889): 311.]


1889 June 9 / S. Francisco Chronicle of / Reported from ab 75 miles south of Cape Hatteras, large rafts of cut timber which had the appearance of having been in the water only a short time. [VI; 1806. “Wreckage on the Atlantic.” San Francisco Chronicle, June 9, 1889, p. 9 c. 6.]


1889 June 10 / Sudden rise of the river at B. Ayres / B. Ayres Standard, 11th. [VI; 1807. (Buenos Ayres Standard, June 11, 1889.)]


1889 [June 10] / BO / Chicago Tribune, June 10—“The people of Johnston have lost all their faith in Providence. Many of them have thrown away their Bibles and since the disaster have openly burned them.” [VI; 1809. “Losing Faith in the Bible.” Chicago Tribune, June 10, 1889, p. 2 c. 6.]


1889 June 11 / 9:30 p.m. / Great meteor / Conn. / M.W.R., June. [VI; 1793. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 6; June 1889): 155-157, at 156.]


1889 June 11 / Hail like fragments of icicles / Oswego, N.Y. / (D-182). ** [VI; 1794. The note copies information from page 182 of The Book of the Damned. "Winds." Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 6; June 1889): 151-154, at 152.]


1889 June 11, 23, Aug 5 / Shocks / France / BA 1911-49. [VI; 1795. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 49.]


1889 June 11 / BO / Torrents in Tasmania. Floods on 13th. / Adelaide Advertiser, 14th / Here variety in thousands of bodies of rabbits. / Advertiser, 15th. [VI; 1808. "Floods in Tasmania." Adelaide Advertiser, June 14, 1889, p. 5 c. 3. "Floods in Tasmania." Adelaide Advertiser, June 15, 1889, p. 5 c. 1.]


1889 June 11 / Fr / Bouches du Rhone / (q) / BA '11/49. [VI; 1810. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 49.]


1889 June 12 / 11:16 p.m. / Copenhagen / brilliant met from Tau Leonis toward Beta Virginis / Nature 40/229. [VI; 1796. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (July 4, 1889): 228-231, at 229.]


1889 June 12 / 11:16 p.m. / Brilliant meteor / Sweden / Nature 40-229. [VI; 1797. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (July 4, 1889): 228-231, at 229. At Copenhagen, (not at Sweden).]


1889 June 13 / Met. below clouds / Nature 40/174. [VI; 1798. Mott, Frederick Thompson. “Meteor.” Nature, 40 (June 20, 1889): 174. [VI; 1798.]


1889 June 13 / fish / Holland / (D-91). [VI; 1799. The note copies information from page 91 of The Book of the Damned. "Pluie de poissons." Astronomie, 8 (1889): 353-354. Cardon. “Curieux effet de la foudre.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 13 (June 22, 1889): 310-311. The observation was made at Steyl, Tegelen, Venlo, Holland; but, “June 13” is the date of Cardon's letter, (not the recent date of the phenomenon reported to him by his brother).]


1889 June 14 / BO / Homeward Mail / Famine so extreme in China that sale of women and children common in the worst of the cannibalistic districts. [VI; 1750. (Homeward Mail, June 14, 1889.)]


1889 June 14 / BO / Floods higher than before and reported from more places in S. Australia. / Advertiser, 15th. [VI; 1800. "The Floods in Victoria," and, "Country Telegrams." Adelaide Advertiser, June 15, 1889, p. 5 c. 4.]


1889 June 15, etc.-July 25 / Large sunspot / E Mec 50-77 / See Sept. / Out of view 22nd June, Ap. again July 11 or 12. Seems to have appeared again on 10th of Aug some distance from the e. limb. / p. 96, 116 /also later / See Sept 7. [VI; 1801. Webb, J. “Sunspots.” English Mechanic, 50 (no. 1278; September 20, 1889): 77. Brown, E. “Sunspots.” English Mechanic, 50 (no. 1279; September 27, 1889): 96. Webb, J. “Sunspots.” English Mechanic, 50 (no. 1289; October 4, 1889): 116. Brown, E. “Sunspots.” English Mechanic, 50 (no. 1281; October 11, 1889): 137. See: 1889 Sept 7, (VI; 1880).]


1889 June 15 / 10 p.m. / Villages around Lake Arresö, Denmark / heavy “subterranean” rumbling. / shock / Nature 40-229. [VI; 1802. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (July 4, 1889): 228-231, at 229.]


[1889 June 15 /] 1889 Jan 15 / It Sounds / Bargone (Chiavari) / rombi / see 1816. [VI; 1527. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 41. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1889 June 17 / Frogs / Brooklyn. [B; 1030. "Lots of Small Green Toads." New York Sun, June 18, 1889, p. 3 c. 4.]


1889 June 17 / (+) / frgs, Brooklyn / “Hundreds of very small and very green toads” after rainstorm on an area of about 3 blocks in 24th and 25th wards, Brooklyn. At one point in Halsey street, so numerous that almost impossible to walk without stepping on some. / Sun 18-3-4. [VI; 1803.1, 1803.2. "Lots of Small Green Toads." New York Sun, June 18, 1889, p. 3 c. 4.]


1889 June 21 / Magheja, Kherson, S. Russia. [VI; 1811. See: 1889 June 9, (VI; 1804). This is the Mighei meteorite.]


1889 June 22 / Sunspot / Cor writes that from position on Potomac river he saw during sunset, a sunspot of great magnitude distinctly visible to the n.e. / Thursday following he saw it in telescope just at dusk on western limb. / Sid Mess., 8-322. [VI; 1812.1, 1812.2. "Sun-Spot Seen by Naked Eye." Sidereal Messenger, 8 (August 1889): 322.]


1889 June 22 / Shock and rumbling sound / Wales / Nature 40/208. [VI; 1813. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (June 27, 1889): 207-209, at 208.]


1889 June-Sept / Sunspots in a supposed minimum period, [VI; 1814. (Refs.???)]


1889 June 23 / Fr / Vendée / q / BA '11-49. [VI; 1815. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 49.]


1889 June 22 / Rhondda Valley, Glamorganshire / q / See 1858. / See Oct 16, 1896. [VI; 1816. See: (1858), and, 1896 Oct 16, (VII; 1603).]


1889 June 22 / S. Wales / Lyme Regis / Sounds, then and between / Geol. Mag 1891-371 / (+). [VI; 1817. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1889.” Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 8 (1891): 57-67, 306-316, 364-372; at 371.]


1889 June 24 / Jupiter in Opposition. [VI; 1818. Opposition of Jupiter. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1889, 466.]


1889 June 24 / [LT], 11-e / q / Wales / May, June together. [VI; 1819. “Earthquake Shock in Wales.” London Times, June 24, 1889, p. 11 c. 5.]


1889 June 26 / (3 mets) / 8 p.m. / Worcester Co, Md., great det met. / M.W.R. 1889-156 / Another at 8:30 p.m. and another at 9:10 p.m. said to have fallen near Springfield, Prince George's Co, Md. [VI; 1820. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 6; June 1889): 155-157, at 156.]


1889 June 26 / 8 p.m. / Great det met / Maryland (Worcester Co.) / M.W.R. 17-156 / One twice reported at 8:20 or 8:21. One at 8:30. One at 9:10. [VI; 1821. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 6; June 1889): 155-157, at 156.]


1889 June 26 / 8:30 p.m. / 9:10 p.m. / Large meteors / Prince George Co., Maryland / Whether one of these a detonating met seen in Worcester Co., ab. 8 p.m. / M.W.R., June, 1889. [VI; 1822. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 6; June 1889): 155-157, at 156.]


[1889 June 26 /] 1889 Jan 26 / It Sounds / small q. / Aquila / q and rombi / See 1816. [VI; 1536. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 41. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


[1889 June 28-July 6 /] 1889 Jan 28-July 6 / It Sounds / rombi / Aquila / See 1816. [VI; 1537. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 42. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1889 June 28 (?) / See 1891. / q / Basses Pyrènées. [VI; 1823. See: (1891).]


1889 July / Japan / Tail-like thing from sky. / Nature 41/10. [VI; 1824. Burton, Wiiliam Kinnimond. “Electrical Cloud Phenomenon.” Nature, 41 (November 7, 1889): 10.]


1889 July / Ergheo, Somalialand, E Africa. [VI; 1825. (Refs.???)]


1889 / summer / before June 13 / Limbourg / Fish / '89-353. [VI; 1826. "Pluie de poissons." Astronomie, 8 (1889): 353-354. Limbourg, Belgium.]


1889 July 2 / Chan Ping district of China / 7 villages overwhelmed by a waterspout / Victoria (B.C.) Weekly Colonist 19-5-6. [VI; 1827. (Victoria Weekly Colonist, July 19, 1889, p. 5 c. 6.)]


1889 July 2 / night / Luminous clouds over Berlin / Cosmos, NS, 24-166. [VI; 1828. Battandier, Albert Marie Joseph. “Les Nuages Lumineux de Nuit.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 24 (January 7, 1893): 165-167, at 166, (illustration).]


1889 July 5 / 9 p.m. / at Belize / Belize Advertiser, 6tha large brilliant light, from the west, rapidly crossed the sky, occupying about 3 minutes. [VI; 1829. (Belize Advertiser, July 6, 1889.)]


1889 July 5 / bet 11 and 11:15 / Lyme Regis / Sounds like those of gunfire. Writer was unable to learn of any gunfire at sea. / Nature 40-294. [VI; 1830. Sharpe, A.R. “An Earthquake?” Nature, 40 (July 25, 1889): 294.]


1889 July 5 ./ 11-11:15 p.m. / Lyme Regis / Sounds that persons thought like gunfire. / Nature 40/294 / Lyme Bay, Eng Channel / See June 26. [VI; 1831. Sharpe, A.R. “An Earthquake?” Nature, 40 (July 25, 1889): 294. See: (June 26).]


1889 July 7 / Cl burst / At the meteorological station of Curtea de Arges, 50 kilometres west of Brasov, water fell. 205 m.m. in 20 minutes. / Bull Soc Astro de F., 1923-233 / Roumania? [VI; 1832. Florin, Lazare. "Pluie grande chute de pluie sur le globe.” Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 37 (1923): 233. (Curtea de Argeș, Romania, supposedly also recorded a rainfall of 205 mm. (8.1 inches) in another 20 minute period, on July 7, 1947, (“Table 3C.18 World-Wide Extremes of Temperature and Precipation.” The Water Encyclopedia. 3rd ed. p. 3-109); however, this could be the 1889 record, with “1947” copied from the next record, in World Meteorological Organization, 1994. WMO-No. 168, 5th ed., Guide to Hydrological Practices. Data Acquisition and Processing, Analysis, Forecasting and Other Applications, at p. 403.)]

https://books.google.ca/books?id=7tJHiqC11D0C


1889 July 8 / 2:30 p.m. / Guernsey / shock more violent than that of May 30 / Cosmos, N.S., 13/420. [VI; 1833. “Un tremblement de terre.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 13 (July 20, 1889): 420.]


1889 July 9 / Since 7th had been series of shocks around Arroya Grand, New Mexico. Night of 9th a destructive cloudburst near Albuquerque. / Victoria, (B.C.) W. Colonist, 12th. [VI; 1834. (Victoria Weekly Colonist, July 12, 1889.)]


1889 July 9 / Cloudburst / Mohawk Valley / Sun 10-1-5 / 11-1-3 / Been a dozen in few years here. [VI; 1835. "Swept by a Cloud Burst." New York Sun, July 10, 1889, p.1 c. 5. "The Deluge at Johnstown." New York Sun, July 11, 1889, p. 1 c. 3-4.]


1889 July 10 / 8:30 p.m. / N.W. sky / large meteor / Charleston, S.C. / M.W.R. 17-188. [VI; 1836. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 7; July 1889): 188-189, at 188.]


1889 July 11 / 11 p.m. / Northern sky / Springfield, Ill / brilliant meteor / WMR 17-188. [VI; 1837. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 7; July 1889): 188-189, at 188.]


1889 July 11-12 / night of 11th / Violent q at Djarkend (Semiretschink), Central Asia / and at Charleston, S. Car. / Cosmos, N.S., 14/1. [VI; 1838. “Tremblements de terre.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 14 (August 3, 1889): 1. "Djarkend" is now identified as Sarkand, Kazakhstan.]


1889 July 11 / Nothing in Times of India. [VI; 1839.]


1889 July 12 / Siberia / Half the town of Tashkend destroyed by a q. / Devon Ev. Express, 13th. [VI; 1840. (Devon Evening Express, July 13, 1889; not @ BNA.)]


1889 July 12 / Lightning perforations / Dunstable, England / Nature 40/544 / 41/10. [B; 1031. "On some Effects of Lightning." Nature, 40 (October 3, 1889): 543-544, at 543. "Effects of Lightning." Nature, 41 (November 7, 1889): 10.]


1889 July 12 / big q / Russian Turkestan / [BA] '11. [VI; 1841. A class III earthquake. Milne, 735.]


1889 July 13, etc. / Sunset glows reappear at Hawaii. / Nature 40-415 / In Western NY at ab same time. / p. 645. [VI; 1842. Bishop, Sereno Edwards. “Sunset Glows at Honolulu.” Nature, 40 (August 29, 1889): 415. Veeder, Major Albert. “Sunset Glows.” Nature, 40 (October 31, 1889): 645.]


1889 July 13 / [LT], 7-e / q / Charleston / 22-6-bMemphis / Sept 12-3-aPenn. [VI; 1843. “Earthquakes.” London Times, July 13, 1889, p. 7 c. 5. “Earthquake Shocks in America.” London Times, July 22, 1889, p. 6 c. 2. “The United States.” London Times, September 12, 1889, p. 3 c. 1.]


1889 July 13 / [LT]. 7-e / Great q. / Djarkend. [VI; 1844. “Earthquakes.” London Times, July 13, 1889, p. 7 c. 5. Djarkend is now identified as Zharkent, Kazakhstan.]


1889 July 15 / q / Kintyre and Arran, Scotland / Geol. Mag. 1891/366. [VI; 1845. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1889.” Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 8 (1891): 57-67, 306-316, 364-372; at 365-367.]


1889 July 16 / 7 p.m. / Big balloon passed over Providence, R.I. / Sun 19-1-2 / But bet 5:30 and 7:30 a sea captain was chasing a balloon 120 miles east, southeast of Sandy Hook and 74 south by east of Montauk Point. [VI; 1846. "The Air Ship at Sea." New York Sun, July 19, 1889, p. 1 c. 1-3.]


1889 July 16 / Capt Sylvester of a pilot boat saw something like a balloon (3 p.m.) sailing s. easterly direction near ab. 25 miles south of Fire Island. Saw a man throwing out ballast and waving a white flag. / Sun 20-5-7. [VI; 1847. "A Rival to the Sea Serpent." New York Sun, July 20, 1889, p. 5 c. 7.]


1889 July 16 / E.D Hogan went up in balloon from Brooklyn. / Policeman in L.I. City reported having seen that night ab 10 p.m. a balloon. Watched it for an hour. Rockets fired from it. / Sun 20-3-7. [VI; 1848. "A Rival to the Sea Serpent." New York Sun, July 20, 1889, p. 5 c. 7.]


1889 July 17 / 8th Whitechapel Murder. [B; 1032. (Refs.???)]


1889 July 18 / Ferguson, Nor. Car. / See 1829. [VI; 1849. See: 1829 May 8, (I: 1464, 1465, & 1469).]


1889 July 19 / Cl. brst / Otsego Co., N.Y. / Sun 20-1-4. [VI; 1850. "Cloudburst in Richfield Springs." New York Sun, July 20, 1889, p. 1 c. 3.]


1889 July 19 / Cloudburst near Columbus, Ohio / Victoria (B.C.). W. Colonist, 26th. [VI; 1851. (Victoria Weekly Colonist, July 26, 1889.)]


1889 July 19 / Tennessee and Moluccas / BA '11 / See Feb. 18. [VI; 1852. Two class I earthquakes. Milne, 735. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


1889 July 19 / Morristown, W. Va., destroyed by cl burst. / Sun 20-1-5. [VI; 1853. “Swept by Another Storm.” New York Times, July 20, 1889, p. 1 c. 5.]


1889 July 20 / q. / Memphis, Tenn. / Cosmos, N.S., 14/1. [VI; 1854. “Tremblements de terre.” Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 14 (August 3, 1889): 1.]


1889 July 20 / 11 p.m. / from N to S / Brilliant meteor / Wilmington, N.C. / M.W.R.17-189. [VI; 1855. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 7; July 1889): 188-189, at 188.]


[1889 July 22. Wrong date. See: 1888 July 22, (VI; 1856).]


1889 July 23 / 9:15 p.m. / Nashville, Tenn / brilliant meteor / MWR 17-189. [VI; 1857. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 7; July 1889): 188-189, at 189.]


1889 July 25 / Home of Mr. Peter Bothwick and family, 14 Horseferry Road, Greenwichhad been rapping before, especially July 25, 1888.loud rapspolice called inraps continued. People tried to communicate but responses to many dif. questions were 3 raps. / The People, Aug. 11, copied in Med and Dayb., Aug 16. [B; 1033.1, 1033.2. "A Haunted House at Greenwich." People, August 18, 1889, p. 7 c. 2. (Medium and Daybreak, August 16, 1889; not online.)]


1889 July 25 / Sun, 4-7 / “Sunbeams” / Red rain “recently” in province of Lublin, Poland. [VI; 1858. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, July 25, 1889, p. 4 c. 7.]


1889 July 26 / 3 persons saw on a farm near Middletown, N.Y., or town of Crawford, a man, a team of white horses, and a mowing machine on a farm./ Copied from the Middletown Daily Argus in Religio-Phil Jour, Sept 21, 1889. / One of them was Mr Jacob F. Shorter, well-known resident. He and his sister, 10 o'clock, sunshiny morning, and a farmer driving along the road saw the appearances and notified the owner of the land that someone mowing in his meadow. Investigationno one seen—no grass cut—no impress of wheels or hoofs. [B; 1034.1, 1034.2, 1034.3. "A Summer Morning Apparition." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 47 (no. 31; September 21, 1889): 2, (c. 4-5). "A Very Strange Story." Port Jervis Evening Gazette, August 16, 1889, p. 1 c. 4.]


1889 July 27 / Little Rock, Ark / 9:18 p.m. / very bright meteor / others / MWR 17-189. [VI; 1859. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 7; July 1889): 188-189, at 189.]


1889 July 28 / Sun, 7-5 / Alligators / ab. 500 lbs / Killed in Susquehanna River near Red Rock, Pa. [B; 1035. "Caught the Mystery." New York Sun, July 28, 1889, p. 7 c. 5.]


1889 July 31 / [LT], 5-c / Sept 5-5-f / great q. / Japan. [VI; 1860. “Destructive Earthquake in Japan.” London Times, July 31, 1889, p. 5 c. 3. “The Earthquakes in Japan.” London Times, September 5, 1889, p. 5 c. 6.]


1889 July 31 / 8:40 p.m. / Charleston, Coles Co, Ill / meteor / MWR 17-189. [VI; 1861. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 7; July 1889): 188-189, at 189.]


1889 / ab. Aug / Girl in Bedford confessed setting fires. / Med and Dayb., Oct 18, p. 658. [B; 1041. (Medium and Daybreak, October 18, 1889, p. 658; not online.)]


1889 Aug 1 / Ants / Strasbourg / (D-91). [VI; 1862. The note copies information from page 91 of The Book of the Damned. “Pluie de fourmis.” Astronomie, 8 (1889): 353.]


1889 Aug 2 and 5 / Comet 1889 (V) seen to have four “outriders. / a group / Clerke, Hist Astro./366. [VI; 1863. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 4th ed., 1902, 366-367. Comet 16P/1889 N1.]


1889 Aug 2 / (Frgs) / D-91 / Saint Pierre-d'Albigny (Savoy.) / Thunderclap on a foggy day and rain and little frogs falling alive in great numbers. / L'Astro 8-353. [VI; 1864. The note copies information from page 91 of The Book of the Damned. “Pluie de crapauds.” Astronomie, 8 (1889): 353. The amphibians were identified as toads, (not frogs).]


1889 Aug 3 / Trance / Religio-Phil. Jour, 6-3 / Trances of Mrs Emma Althouse, of Attica, N.Y., coming to an end, and she taking some food, whisper and move a little. Took to bed 2 years before. Weight down from 200 lbs. to 100. Longest trance was 35 days. Several averaged from 12 to 24 days. An attempt had been made by a visitor to poison her. No details. / See April, 1888. [B; 1042.1, 1042.2. "The Wonderful Trances of Mrs. Altmark Have Practically Ended." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 46 (no. 24; August 3, 1889): 6, (c. 3). See: 1888 Ap. 21, (B; 901), and, 1888 Ap. 28, (B; 905).]


1889 Aug 3 / See March 11, 1888. [B; 1036. See: 1888 March 11, (B: 881 & 882), and, 1888 Ap. 21, (B; 901).]


1889 Aug 3 / Comets / 4 or 5 comets together / Sc Am 61/151. [VI; 1865. “A Cluster of Comets.” Scientific American, n.s., 61 (September 7, 1889): 151. Barnard, Edward Emerson. “A Very Remarkable Comet.” Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 1 (no. 4; September 28, 1889): 72-74. “The two brighter companions were perfect miniatures of the larger comet, each having a small, fairly well-defined head and nucleus, with a faint, hazy tail, the more distant one being the larger

and less-developed. The three comets were in a straight line, nearly east and west, their tails lying along this line. There was no connecting nebulosity between these objects, the tails of the two smaller not reaching each other or the large comet. To all appearance they were absolutely independent comets. The four which were discovered here I have named B, C, D, E, in the order of increasing right

ascension, A being the original comet discovered by Mr. Brooks.” Barnard, Edward Emerson. “On the Companions to Comet d 1889 (Brooks).” Astronomical Journal, 9 (1889): 77-78. Comet 16P/1889 N1.]


1889 Aug 4 / Sun, 7-6 / Yarn of fish like thing fell from clouds into a boat. [VI; 1866. (New York Sun, August 4, 1889, p. 7 c. 6; not online.)]


1889 Aug 5 / Fr / Bretagne / (q) / BA '11/49. [VI; 1867. (BA 1911-49.)]


1889 Aug 5 / (D-279) / Torpedo (?) / E. Twickenham, Eng. [VI; 1868. The note copies information from page 279 of The Book of the Damned. Hare, Alfred Thomas. "Globular lightning." Nature, 40 (August 29, 1889): 415. "Globular Lightning." Nature, 40 (August 29, 1889): 415.]


1889 Aug 5 / Mirage at Clayton on the St Lawr[ence] / looming / NM / Trib-9-6-6. [VI; 1869. "The Talk of the Day." New York Tribune, August 9, 1889, p. 6 c. 6. "It is rarely that a mirage is seen upon the St. Lawrence River but one was plainly visible upon Monday morning at Clayton. All the country about Cape Vincent seemed lifted in the air. This was the first mirage since 1880, when the people at Carthage, forty miles distant, were able to distinguish various objects in Cape Vincent."]


1889 Aug 6 / Time of Ripper. / "Terribly mutilated" body of a woman found on railroad bet. Creme and Madeley. / Devon Ev. Express, Aug 7. [B; 1043. (Devon Evening Express, August 7, 1889.)]


1889 Aug 10 / Trance / Religio-Phil Jour, 5-3 / Sleeping infant, at Warren, Ill. Earl Leroy Gibbs, only son of Leroy and Alice Gibbs. Weighed 12 pounds at birth. Born on June 9. 2 days later fell into sleep. Unbroken sleep but he was fed from a spoon. [B; 1044. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 46 (no. 25; August 10, 1889): 5, (c. 3-4).]


1889 Aug 10 / 8:40 a.m. / Severe shock / northern N.Y. / NY Times 11-1-7. [VI; 1870. “Felt the Earth Quake.” New York Times, August 11, 1889, p. 1 c. 7.]


1889 / ab. Aug 10 / Great floods / Japan. [VI; 1871. (Refs.???)]


[1889 Aug. 11. Wrong date. See: 1889 Aug. 17, (VI; 1872).]


1889 Aug 13 / Fr / [LT], 5-c / q / Poitiers. [VI; 1873. “France.” London Times, August 13, 1889, p. 5 c. 3.]


1889 Aug 15 / Tremendous flight of ants / Lake Keuka, N.Y. / Sun 17-5-2. [VI; 1874. (New York Sun, August 17, 1889, p. 5 c. 2.; not online.)]


1889 Aug 16 / Devon Ev. Express / At Chapeltown, near Sheffield, an iron-molder, named James Parkin, died of hydrophobia. Not been bitten. Doctor's theory that after cutting self by shaving, been licked by a dog. [B; 1045. (Devon Evening Express, August 16, 1889.)]


1889 Aug 17 / Bosnia and Mexico / q. / Sims / See Feb 18, 1889. [VI; 1875. Milne, 735. See: 1889 Feb. 18, (VI; 1555).]


[1889 Aug. 17 /] 1889 Aug. 11 / q. / Bosnia / also earlier / Nature 40/401 / When fish fall? [VI; 1872. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (August 22, 1889): 401-403, at 401.]


1889 Aug 29 / On Mount Shasta, far above snow-line, myriads of Vanessa californica. / Insect Life 2-355. [VI; 1876. Hopkins, C.L. “Mountain Swarming of Vanessa Californica.” Insect Life, 2 (May and June, 1890): 355-356.]


1889 Aug 30 / [LT], 3-e / q. / Japan. [VI; 1877. “Earthquake in Japan.” London Times, August 30, 1889, p. 3 c. 5.]


1889 Sept / The Devil Polt / Canada / See Religio Phil Jour, Dec 28, 1889, p. 2 / See Jan 4, 1890, p. 1. / YRA. [B; 1046. "The Great Mystery." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 47 (no. 16; December 7, 1889) 1 & 8. Wake, C. Staniland. "The Great Mystery." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 47 (no. 19; December 28, 1889): 2, (c. 2-4). Hartley, Henry. "More Canadian Mysteries." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 47 (no. 20; January 4, 1890): 1, (c. 1-2). YRA is the shelf mark for this journal at the New York Public Library.]


1889 / ab Sept 1 / At Surrency and Griffin, Ga., loud noises and (stones?) / Glb Dem, Sept 7. [VI; 1878. “Mysterious Manifestations.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, September 7, 1889, p. 10 c. 6. Folsom, Montgomery M. “Surrency's Spook” Atlanta Constitution, February 3, 1889, p. 12 c. 3-4. See: 1872 Oct 21, (A: 785 & 786).]


[1889 Sept. /] 1891 Feb. 21 / Stones (open field) / Glb. Dem offrom the Richmond Dispatch / That the people of Culpepper were "exercised". Stones as if thrown not in showers but one or two at a time were falling upon the farm of J. Ambler Brooke, ab a mile from C. The place was in the center of the farm, near the railroad and near a cabin or small house. The stones came from different directions, usually toward the house, and had struck several persons, who were present, watching for phenomena. Said that responsible citizens had seen the stones in the air and falling. The stones were similar to others in the fields. As to trickery it is said the phe was occurring in an open field with no bushes or any other place of concealment. [B; 1129.1 to 1129.4. “A Culpepper Mystery.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, February 21, 1891, p. 9 c. 6. "A Culpeper Mystery." Richmond Daily Dispatch, (Virginia), September 18, 1889, p. 2 c. 4. No falls occurred on September 15, 1889, when about a hundred visitors had come to the farm; but, the falls had taken place over "the last few days," and witnessed by Mr. Brooke, several of his family, and neighbors.]


1889 Sept. 6 / Great explosion, Antwerp, and great fire of petroleum. [VI; 1879. (Refs.???)]


1889 Sept 7 / Ac to J. Webb, during the preceding night 2 large [sun]spots had broken out near the old spot of June 15, etc. / E Mec 50/116 / Old spot reappeared again Sept 24. [VI; 1880. Webb, J. “Sunspots.” English Mechanic, 50 (no. 1289; October 4, 1889): 116. See: 1889 June 15, etc.-July 25, (VI; 1801).]


1889 Sept 11, 12, 13 / N.Y. Trib of / Great Storm / Atlantic City. [VI; 1881. "Fears For Atlantic City." New York Tribune, September 11, 1889, p. 2 c. 3. "Atlantic City An Island." New York Tribune, September 12, 1889, p. 1 c. 5-6. "Computing Losses At Atlantic City." New York Tribune, September 13, 1889, p. 1 c. 5 & p. 2 c. 1.]


1889 Sept (13) / (14) / (moon) / In L'Astro, 1889-431, Prof. Thury that upon the two well-known peaks in Plinius had appeared a circular disk, intensely whitea black spot in the center of it. Same 14thnot seen again. [VI; 1882. Thury, Marc. “Changements dans la Lune. Le cirque Plinius.” Astronomie, 8 (1889): 431-432.]


1889 Sept / Ac to a telegram from Kiel, that Prof Thury, of Geneva Observatory, had noted changes in Pliny. / Ob, 12/393. [VI; 1883. “Pliny.” Observatory, 12 (1889): 393.]


1889 Sept. 15 / Stones, Flames, Voice, Hair, etc. / In Medium and Daybreak, Dec 13, copied from the Daily Times, Brockville, Ontario, Nov. 13, 1889home of George Dagg, farmer in Township of Clarendon, in the County of Pontiac, Province of Quebec, seven miles from Shawville. / Family = George Dagg, aged about 35; wife, Susan; child, Mary, 5; John, 2; and Dinah Borden McLean, aged 11. This little girl had been sent out from Scotland, and was adopted from the Belleville home by Mr. Dagg. This report by Mr. Percy Woodcock, an artist, who went from Brockville to investigate. First phe. Sept 15, window panes crashing in as if struck from outside. Mr. Dagg went outside to investigate, but while looking more panes struck in. Fires broke outas many as eight in a day. Stones hurled. A large one struck Dagg's little daughter, but "strange to say not hurting her in the least". "One afternoon, little Dinah felt her hair, which hung in a long braid down her back, suddenly pulled, and on crying out, the family found her braid almost cut off, simply hanging by a few hairs. On the same day, the little boy began crying, and said that somebody had pulled his hair all over. Immediately it was seen by his mother that his hair had also been cut off in chunks, as it were, all over his head. Said that one day Dinah saw a figure in her room and, urged by people in the house to strike it, did so with a whip, upon which all heard a sound like the squeal of a pig. Now the allegations of voice-phe which, ac to Mr. W., all had heard and which he had hearduttering obscenities and carrying on conversations, of which Mr. W. engaged in several. Mr W. asking why the persecution, the voice answered it was only in fun, and pointed out that the fires were in the daytime, when they could be put out. There was a feud at the time between the Daggs and neighbors named Wallace. The voice accused Mrs Wallace of having sent whatever it was to the place. A crowd of farmers went to Wallace's place and returned with Mrs. Wallace but in accusing her the voice made inconsistent statements and was not believed. The story goes on that the [voice] was reasoned with by Mr. W., and repeatedly requested to stop the obscenity and ended up by repenting and singing a hymnand departing. [B; 1047.1 to 1047.12. (“Marvellous spontaneous manifestations: Canada.” Medium and Daybreak, 20 (no.1028; December 13, 1889): 785-789; not online.) (Brockville Daily Times, November 13, 1889.) (Woodcock, Percy Franklin. “The Clarendon Mystery”???; Woodcock was the principal of the Brockville Art School from 1888 to 1890.) (“Haunted by Spooks.” Montreal Gazette, November 7, 1889, p. 8 c. 5.) (“Dagg's Demon.” Ottawa Journal, November 25, 1889, p. 4 c. 2-4.) (“Dagg's Dupes.” Ottawa Journal, November 29, 1899, p. 3 c. 4.) (“Pontiac's Spook.” Ottawa Journal, December 5, 1899, p. 4 c. 3.) (Newspaper widespread reporting began about October 18, 1899, from an Ottawa dispatch.)]


1889 Sept. 15 / Phe only when the girl was present. [B; 1048.]


1889 Sept. 15 / I note that at the time considerable in Spiritualist pubs upon "earth-bound spirits" that could be reasoned with and reformed from evil or mischievous ways. [B; 1049.]


1889 Sept. 19 / Conj Mars and Saturn. [VI; 1884. Conjunction of Mars and Jupiter. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1899, 467.]


[1889 Sept 22 /] 1886 Sept 22 / Disap / 2 women see a figure like that of Clergyman case, disappear. / Disap past corner of a lane. / [illustration] / Near Norwich. Dressed like a shepherd. They heard story of such a ghost haunting the place. / Jour Soc 5/221 / Clergyman case = May 7, 1892. [B; 738. "Cases Received by the Literary Committee." Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 5 (March 1883): 221-227, at 221-223. "Cases Received by the Literary Committee." Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 5 (April 1892): 239-247, at 240. The latter article provides a corrected date; and, the phenomenon was observed by James Spurgeon Green and a woman identified only as Ella, (not "2 women"). See: 1892 May [7], (B; 1298).]


1889 Oct 2 (?) / Flames / St L. G-Dem, from the Chicago Trib. / That 6 miles n. east of Findlay, Ohio, a farm house occupied by Samuel Miller and family. Upon the Wednesday before the date of writing (Oct 2?), a bed burst into flames and was consumed without setting fire to anything else in the room: nothing left of it but ashes, but the floor under it was not even scorched. The next day, at about the same time in the afternoon, a chest of clothing in quite another part of the house was found to be in flames. This was consumed without setting anything else on fire. The next day at the same time another bed was destroyed without setting anything else afire. Then the Millers prepared to move from the house. On the 4th day a dress in a closet began to burn. The Millers moved and no other fires reported. [B; 1050.1 to 1050.4. “Spooks Burn Up Beds and Clothing.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 12, 1889, p. 10 c. 4. “Spirit Incendiaries at Findlay O.” Chicago Tribune, September 4, 1889, p. 1 c, 6. “Last Sunday” indicated September 1, 1889; and, “last Wednesday” indicated August 28, 1899.]


1889 Oct 2 / Flames Special / Nothing else burned. [B; 1051.]


1889 Oct. 2 / Rain / St. L. G-Dem of Oct 12 / Said that near Fidelity, Mo., 12 miles east of Webb City, water was falling upon the roof of a house. Said that upon Oct 2, a man had died in a room under the place where the water was falling, and it then started to fall. The usual idea that it was falling from a tree, but it was seen falling from above the tree. [VI; 1885.1, 1885.2. “Mysterious Rainfall.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 12, 1889, p. 10 c. 3.]


1889 Oct 4 / Death / Med and Dayb. of, p. 635"Frightened to death by a luminous smoke." At 12 Wood Wharf, Greenwich, Ann Hanks, aged 18. While taking clothing from a box, something like thick white smoke that sparkled, came from it ac to a witness, aged 14. The girl fell to floor, screamed, and in ½ hour dead. At inquest said her appearance indicated severe functional disturbances but the alleged smoke could not be accounted for. [B; 1051.1, 1051.2.(Medium and Daybreak, October 4, 1889, p. 635.)]


1889 Oct 5 / By John T. Stevenson, of Auckland, New Zealandwho had heard of changes noted in Plinius. Saw a very small white spot near a central craterin other obs, he found in P. several objects not known to be there. / E Mec 50/242. [VI; 1886. Stevenson, John T. “Changes in the Moon.” English Mechanic, 50 (no. 1286; November 15, 1889): 242.]


1889 Oct. 6 / Great protuberance on sun / L'Astro 9-456. [VI; 1890. Fényi, Jules. “Éruptions Solaires Gigantesques.” Astronomie, 9 (1890): 453-456, at 455-456.]


1889 Oct 6 / moon / NY Times, 9-7 / Ac to Baltimore Sun, members of the Balt Soc of Amateur Astronomers had received a dispatch from Prof Ritchie, of the Harvard Observatory, announcing changes in Pliny. [VI; 1892. “The Crater Pliny of the Moon.” New York Times, October 6, 1889, p. 9 c. 7.]


1889 Oct 7 / Light or signal / St L Glb-Dem / A light that was appearing upon hills 2 miles east of Washington, Pa. When seen, stationary on a hill. Next time seen on another hill; stationary there. [B; 1053. “A Strange Light.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 7, 1889, p. 4 c. 7.]


1889 Oct 7 / St. L. Glb-Dem / A light that was appearing upon hills 2 miles east of Washington, Pa. Stationary on a hill. Next night stationary on another hill. [B; 1054. “A Strange Light.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 7, 1889, p. 4 c. 7.]


1889 Oct 7 / N.Y. Trib, 1-2 / Hurricane / Sardinia. [VI; 1887. "Killed By a Hurricane." New York Tribune, October 7, 1889, p. 1 c. 2.]


1889 Oct 7 / 1:45 p.m. / Cornwall / shock and “loud underground noise like thunder” / Nature 40-576. [VI; 1888. “Notes.” Nature, 40 (October 10, 1889): 576-578, at 576.]


1889 Oct 7 / Cornwall quakes / Davisonlisted by / March 26,  '91 / May 16 and 17, '92 / Jan 26, '96 / March 29, etc., '98 / Aug 18, '92 / Nov 2, '93 / Dec 17, '96 (Hereford) / Aug 27, '95. [VI; 1889. (Davison. Ref.???)]


1889 Oct. 7 / (Times 8-7-c) /q / E. Cornwall / Geol. Mag 1891/368 / great sound. [VI; 1891. Davison, Charles. “On the British Earthquakes of 1889.” Geological Magazine, s. 3 v. 8 (1891): 57-67, 306-316, 364-372; at 368-369.]


1889 Oct 8 / Raps / Northern Daily Telegraph ofcopied in Med. and Dayb. of 18th / Lydia Hewlett, aged 9village of Homington, near Salisbury. Knockings. Girl became illsent to infirmaryphe stopped. / Salisbury, Wiltshire / Told in Bristol Mercury, Oct. 12 (copied in Med and Dayb., 25th) / Said from lively healthy child to invalid "stricken with a mysterious illness, lying in bed, never moving, never speaking, apparently at death's door. Ab. middle of Sept, girl had seen a gypsy stealing onions in neighbor's garden and had informed. Whether this to do or not, phe began several days later. People tried to find out whether the gypsy had caused the phe, and ac to reports, all knocks had been the gypsy was guilty. Then idea must have been that the gypsy was employing an evil spirit who would so betray her. / Ac to other newspaper reports, such as in Warminster Herald, the girl had been threatened by the gypsy if she told, and her own fright brought on the phe. [B; 1055.1 to 1055.5. “Witchcraft in Wiltshire.” Northern Daily Telegraph, (Blackburn), October 8, 1889, p. 2 c. 6. “Spirit Rapping in Wiltshire.” Bristol Mercury, October 12, 1889, p. 8 c. 3. “Jottings.” Salisbury Times, November 9, 1889, p. 2 c. 1-2. Lydia recovered from the illness, and the knockings had ceased by November.(Medium and Daybreak, October 18, 1889; not online.) (Medium and Daybreak, October 25, 1889.) (Warminster Herald, ca. September, 1889; not @ BNA.)]


1889 Oct 19 / Globe Dem of, 3-2 / Many small fires in Kansas City. Said traced to a band of boys. [B; 1056. “Youthful Fire-Bugs.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 19, 1889, p. 3 c. 2.]


1889 Oct 19 / period of / Hendersonville, Nor. Car. / loud rumbling sounds like rapid discharge of artillery and shocks at Hendersonville / St. L. Globe-Dem 20-6-5. [VI; 1894. “Earthquake Shocks.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 20, 1889, p. 6 c. 5.]


1889 Oct. 19 / period / See Oct. 2. / Rain / That near Jackson, Tenn., on the farm of Capt. J.H. McMillan, water was falling from a cherry tree. Day after day the water fell from the tree, and in bright sunshine its wet leaves sparkled. Looks like solutuin of the tree-explanation. A fine spray falling, gathering on leaves of trees and falling from the tree in larger drops. [VI; 1895.1, 1895.2. “A Weeping Tree.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, October 20, 1889, p. 6 c. 5. See: 1889 Oct. 2, (VI; 1885).]


1889 Oct 19-20 / (met shower) / Shower of mets / Dale Enterprise, Va / radiant in Taurus / M.W.R. '89-282. [VI; 1896. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 10; October 1889): 281-282, at 282.]


1889 Oct 28 / Sheep / I have under Nov. 4. [VI; 1897. See: 1889 Nov 4, (VI; 1907).]


1889 Oct. 28 / In the Chiltern Hills, writer from Chesham, Rev. J. Ross-Barker, writes to Standard, Nov. 7. Many flocks of sheep, a region of 30 square miles, broke from their folds. He asks any one record meteor or a q. [VI; 1898. (London Standard, November 7, 1889.)]


1889 Oct 31 / For the first identification of the photo as of Bristol, see NY Times, Oct 20, 1889. Very likely right. Has nothing to do with refractory mirage. / Times, Oct. 31, 1889 / An account by Mr L.B. French, of Chicago—representation over Glacier Bay, in the direction of Mt. Fairweather, of a city of about 100,00 inhabitants, in his view. “We could see plainly houses, well-defined streets and trees. Here and there rose tall spires over huge buildings which appeared to be ancient mosques or cathedrals. x x It did not look like a modern city—more like an ancient European city. [VI; 1899.1, 1899.2, 1899.3. “Identity of the Silent City.” New York Times, October 20, 1889, p. 13 c. 4. “The Silent City.” New York Times, October 31, 1889, p. 2 c. 1.]


1889 / last of Oct / Dumfriesshire / dried leaves / Eng Mech 108-118. [VI; 1900. "Showers of Fishes and Other Things." English Mechanic, 108 (no. 2793; October 4, 1918): 118-119.]


1889 Oct., last of / Leaves / Nature 42-637 / Dalgonar (Penpont), Dumfriesshire / Thick shower of leaves, almost vertical—all oak—fell on a tract one by 2 miles—gentle breeze at the time. [VI; 1901. Shaw, John. “Extraordinary Flight of Leaves.” Nature, 42 (October 30, 1890): 637.]


1889 Oct or Nov / Cal. / spider webs / See Nov., 1891. / May 16, 1892. [VI; 1893. See: (1891 Nov.), and, (1892 May 16).]


1889 / Sun / not for Nov and Dec. [VI; 1902.]


1889 Nov. 2 / 1:50 and 2:05 / Ill, Mo, Ky / shocks / Sun 3-2-5. [VI; 1903. "A Bit of an Earthquake." New York Sun, November 3, 1889, p. 2 c. 5.]


1889 Nov. 2 / 1:50 a.m. / Heavy shock and low report, Cairo, Ill. / St. Louis, Mo, shock and sound like distant thunder. / N.Y. Times, Nov. 3-5-2. [VI; 1904. “St. Louis Citizens Alarmed.” New York Times, November 3, 1889, p. 5 c. 2.]


1889 Nov. 2 / Ill and Mo / Cairo, etc. / shocks from one to 3 a.m. / Glb Dem 3-10-3 / Greatest shock ab 1:45 a.m. [VI; 1905. “Yesterday's Earthquake.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, November 3, 1889, p. 10 c. 3-5.]


1889 / early in Nov. / q phe and storm / Terrible storm at Catania, Sicily, and near San Matteo open a fissure a mile long, 9 feet wide, from 6 to 30deep. / Pub Ledg, Nov. 30. [VI; 1906. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, November 30, 1889.)]


1889 (Nov 4) / Fingers, etc. / Glb-Dem, Nov 7-7-2 / Two human fingers were found on one of the main streets of Chattanooga, Tenn, on the 4thon 6th, about 500 yards from where found, in a pond, a human arm, on the hand of it two fingers missing. The fingers had been torn off. [B; 1057.1, 1057.2. “Strange Murder Mystery.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, November 7, 1889, p. 7 c. 2.]


1889 Nov 4 / = Oct 28 / is Standard, Nov. 7Mr. J Ross-Barker, Vicar of Chesham, writes that night of Oct 28th, in the Chiltern Hills near Chesham, in a district about 6 miles by 5, many flocks of sheep broke out of bounds. Asks whether anyone knew of a shock of q or a meteor. [VI; 1907.1, 1907.2. Ross-Barker, John. "A Stampede of Sheep." London Evening Standard, November 7, 1889, p. 2 c. 7. See: 1889 Oct. 28, (VI; 1898).]


1889 Nov 4 / See Nov 3, 1888. [VI; 1908.1. See: 1888 Nov. 3, (VI: 1476, 1477, 1478, 1481, 1482, and 1484).]


1889 Nov 4 / Symons, 24-163 ./ See Nov 3, 1888. / Again a sheep panic on Berkshire Downs, and this time a meteor from Gloucestershire to Northamptonshire over Berkshire Downs, 7:55 p.m. [VIl 1908.2. "The Doubly Observed Meteor of Nov. 4th, 1889. The Sheep Stampede of November 3rd, 1888." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 24 (December 1889): 161-163. Ross-Barker, John. "A Stampede of Sheep." London Evening Standard, November 7, 1889, p. 2 c. 7. See: 1888 Nov. 3, (VI: 1476, 1477, 1478, 1481, 1482, and 1484).]


1889 Nov. 6 / Sun 10-21-4 / Paris, Kythat since spring, an unknown arrival around Lair station, near the Lick River, had been devouring poultry and young pigs. On Nov 6, was shot. An unknown animal ab 4 feet long and covered with glossy black hairlong, tapering head—short, broad, flat tail. Resembled a catamount more than any other known animal. [B; 1058.1, 1058.2. "What Animal Is This?" New York Sun, November 10, 1889, p. 21 c. 4.]


1889 Nov 8 / B. rain / Angers, France / L.'Astro. 1890/35. [VI; 1909. (Astronomie, 1890-35.)]


1889 Nov 9 / Religio-Phil Jour of, 6-5-x—that recently millions of butterflies at Carson, Nev. Swarms frightened horses. [VI; 1910. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 47 (no. 12; November 9, 1889): 6, (c. 5).]


1889 Nov 10 / Wld Animal / Glb-Dem of, 6-5 / In Scott Co., Ind. Great alarm. Unknown wild animal screaming hideously. Had been repeatedly seen. Described as the size of a leopard, lemon-colored with black spots. So supposed it was a leopard. Supposed escaped from some circus. Said that on 8th, a few miles away, in Clark Co., had been killed an unknown animal. It was like a wildcat but was glossy black. [B; 1059.1, 1059.2. “A Leopard at Large.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, November 10, 1889, p. 6 c. 5.]


1889 Nov 10 / Disap / Glb-Dem of, 3-7 / That Rev. O. Hudson Smith, pastor of the Pilgrim Church, of Dorchester, Mass., who had disappeared the spring before and been discovered in San Francisco, had disappeared again. [B; 1060. “A Missing Pastor.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, November 10, 1889, p. 3 c. 7.]


1889 Nov 11 / (obj) / Sun, 5-4 / That explosion on 9th, back yard of 100 Ashford st, Brooklyn. Boys had found in a field near the old New Lots road, a rusty iron ball, ab 4 inches in diameter—in it a hole that had been plugged with lead—boys made a fire of dead leaves. This skin it. Great explosion. Obj filled with leaden bullets. Question—"Was it a Revolutionary bomb?' [B; 1061.1, 1061.2. "Was It a Revolutionary Bomb?" New York Sun, November 11, 1889, p. 5 c. 4.]


[1889 Nov 25] / Buckshot from unknown gun / NY City / 1889, Sun, Nov 25-1-3 / 30-1-2 / a train bullet. [B; 1062. "Peppered With Buckshot." New York Sun, November 25, 1889, p. 1 c. 3. "A Bullet Fired Into a Harlem Train." New York Sun, November 30, 1889, p. 1 c. 2.]


1889 Nov. 18 / (+) / It Sounds / Foligno / Concussion and aerial sound / See 1816. [VI; 1911. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 42. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1889 Nov 19 to Dec / big qs / Russian Turkestan / [BA] '11. [VI; 1912. A class III earthquake. Milne, 735.]


1889 Nov 19 / (mirage) / Saint Vincent, Minn / on 8th, mirages of identified towns / one 18, other 23 miles away / MWR—'89, p. 310 / on 19th, of “some Dakota town”. [VI; 1913. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 17 (no. 11; November 1889): 309-310, at 310.]


1889 Nov 23 / Pub. Ledger of 28th / 7:30 p.m. / at Bridgewater, Mass. / Low in the north a bank of luminous vapor. In front of it a small cloud. It suddenly started to move and sped westward—the luminous bank oscillating at the point of departure. In a few minutes from the same point started a luminous ball, taking same? direction as the cloud. Some minutes later out shot a luminous cloud. The luminous cloud dissipated, casting out auroral waves. Meteors in the evening. / (Like March 10, '83). [VI; 1914.1, 1914.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, November 28, 1889.) Darling, L.A. “Queer Work Up Aloft.” Hartford Courant, November 27, 1889, p. 7 c. 2. (Boston Journal, ca. November 27, 1889; not @ Newspapers.com.)]


1889 Nov. 27 / Trib, 1-4 / Fire / Lynn, Mass. [B; 1063. "Lynn Swept By Fire." New York Tribune, November 27, 1889, p. 1 c. 4.]


1889 Dec 1 / Similars / Sept 4, 1852. [VI; 1915. See: (1852 Sept 4).]


1889 Dec 1 / Sim metites / Feb 13, 1839. [VI; 1916. See: (1839 Feb 13).]


1889 Dec 1 / L'Astro 1890-272 / Meunier gives Soko-Banja date as Oct 13, 1872. [VI; 1918. Meunier, Stanislas. "Uranolithe tombé à Jelica (Serbie)." Astronomie, 9 (1890): 272-273.]


1889 Dec 1 / Jap metites alike / See Jan 25. / 1918. [VI; 1919. See: (Jan 25), and, (1918).]


1889 Dec 1 / Different met stones found in Fayette Co., Texas. / Nature 102-394. [VI; 1920. “The Fayette County Meteorites.” Nature, 102 (January 16, 1919): 394. Merrill, George Perkins. “On the Fayette County, Texas, Meteorite of 1878 and 1900 and the Probability of Representing Two Distinct Falls.” Proceedings of the United States National Museum, 54 (1919): 557-561.]


1889 Dec 1 / Metites similar / Nature 2-210 / BO. [VI; 1921. Meunier, Stanislas. “Whence Come Meteorites?” Nature, 2 (July 14, 1870): 209-210.]


1889 Dec 1 / Times, Dec 3 / (Shocks mostly E to W but some N to S) / Violent shocks in Servia accompanied by “loud subterranean rumblings”. Reported that meteors fell in several places, “but without any loud detonation.” / See Milne's Cat. / BA 1911. [VI; 1922. “Austria-Hungary.” London Times, December 3, 1889, p. 5 c. 4-5. A class I earthquake. Milne, 735.]


1889 Dec 1 / Another Servian metite / Feb. 21, 1882. [VI; 1923. See: 1882 Feb 21, (V; 806).]


1889 Dec 1 / Same stone / See Feb. 15, 1848. [VI; 1924. See: 1842 Nov. 30, (II; 518), and, 1848 Feb.  15, (II: 1200 & 1201).]


1889 Dec 1 / Sim. stones / Feb. 15, 1848. [VI; 1925. See: 1842 Nov. 30, (II; 518), and, 1848 Feb.  15, (II: 1200 & 1201).]


1889 Dec ? / Sandstone (?) / Liverpool, Penn. / Is this 1899? / (N) / NY Times, Jan 2, 1900. [VI; 1926. Kunz, George Frederick. “Bogus Meteorites.” New York Times, January 2, 1890, p. 5 c. 4.]


1889 Dec / Sandstone said fallen from sky, Dec., 1889, at Liverpool, Pen. / NY Times, Jan 2, 1890 / G.F. Kunz says someone must have thrown it. [VI; 1927. Kunz, George Frederick. “Bogus Meteorites.” New York Times, January 2, 1890, p. 5 c. 4.]


1889 Dec. 1 / Soko-Banja. [VI; 1928. Fletcher, 106. This is the Jelica meteorite.]


1889 Dec 2 / (Servia) / Stones much alike / Alabama / Dec 5 and Nov. 27, 1868. [VI; 1917. See: 1868 Dec. 5, (III: 1659, 1660, and 1670), and, 1868 Nov. 27, (III; 1654).]


1889 Dec 8 / (+) / (Sound / It) / Aerial sound and concussion / Grassano (Potenza) / See 1816. [VI; 1929. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 42. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1889 Dec 8 / It Sounds / q at Avellino, Foggia and Lecce—Sounds heard near Trevico. / See 1816. [VI; 1930. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 42. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1889 Dec 10 / 8:15 p.m. / Hartford, ac to H. Courant, Dec. 12—Boy had seen ball of fire fall in a street. There was found fragments believed to be meteoric and fine ashes. / Sid Mess—9-41. [VI; 1931. "The Hartford Fire-Ball." Sidereal Messenger, 9 (January 1890): 40-41. “Was It a Meteor?” Hartford Courant, December 12, 1889, p. 1 c. 6.]


[1889 Dec 12. Wrong date. See: 1888 Dec 12, (VI; 1932).]


1889 Dec. 12-13 / q. / Italy in the Gargano Peninsula / BA '11. [VI; 1933. A class I earthquake. Milne, 735. The earthquake on December 12-13, 1889, occurred in Sicily, Zafferana, and Acireale, (not in the Gargano Peninsula, where an earthquake occurred on December 8). See: 1889 Dec 8, (VI: 1930]


1889 Dec. 16 / Fire / Globe-Dem of, 1-6 / "A fire was started in some mysterious way last night (16th) on the large, handsome, mahogany desk which stands in the center of the office of the Secretary of War (Washington, D.C.), and burned a large hole through the top before it was discovered and extinguished by the watchman. Several official papers were destroyed. They were not of special value and can be replaced. Secretary Proctor can not understand how the fire originated, as he does not smoke and keeps no matches about his desk." [B; 1064. “A Mysterious Fire.” St. Louis Globe-Democrat, December 18, 1889, p. 1 c. 6.]


1889 Dec 18 / Fire in Govt office / as if someone had "thought fire" / See Derby case, March 1905. [B; 1065. See: 1905 March, (C; 960).]


1889 Dec 18 / See Ap. 28, 1920. / fire / Govt office. [B; 1066. See: 1920 Ap. 28, (D: 1060 to 1062).]


1889 Dec. 18 / (Crabs) / Phil Public Ledger, Dec 21 / “A shower of crabs fell in San Francisco, Wednesday (18th). The Crustacean ranged in size from that of a dime to a silver dollar, and several of them were secured by a newspaper man, who placed them at the disposal of the San Francisco Academy of Science. [VI; 1934.1, 1934.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 21, 1889.) “Bay Happenings.” Sacramento Daily Record-Union, December 19, 1889, p. 1 c. 5.]


1889 Dec 18 or 11 / Nothing in San Fran. Chronicle. [VI; 1935.]


1889 Dec 20 / Disap / Started from New York to Boston / Buel. [B; 1067. ("Personal." Engineering and Building Record, 21 (January 4, 1890): 66. Richard H. Buel.)]


1889 Dec. 22 / Total solar eclipse / Guiana / C. [VI; 1936. (Confirmed. Refs???)]


1889 Dec. 26 / Violent explosions at Vulcano / Nature 46-118. [VI; 1937. “The Eruption of Vulcano (August 3, 1888, to March 22, 1890).” Nature, 46 (June 2, 1892): 117-118.]


1889 Dec 29 / q.—explosion / Ab 4 a.m., several persons in Rochester, N.Y., were awakened by “a long roar and a trembling of the earth. / It is said that ab 3 a.m., 10 tons of nitroglycerine had exploded at North Clarendon, Pa. So supposed that the noise and vibrations had travelled from N.C. in about an hour. / Pub Ledg, Jan 1, 1890. [VI; 1938.1, 1938.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 1, 1890.)]

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