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Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1869 to 1870


1869:


1869 / Religio Phil Jour, Oct 29, 1870, p 5, quotes Human Nature, of polt disturbances in a house at Muchelney, near Yeovil. Maid servant left and phe stopped. / See July, 1868. [A; 528. "'Human Nature' says...." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 9 (no. 6; October 29, 1870): 5, (c. 1). "Reports of Progress." Human Nature, 4 (no. 10; October 1870): 480-483, at 481. "Our readers will remember the case of the haunted house at Muchelney, near Yeovil, which we had so much to say about upwards of a year ago. We have made inquiries as to the result of the dlsturbances, and learn that the maid-servant soon left the house, when the disturbance entirely ceased. She seems to have to been a medium, and that her powers were developed in association with other influences centered in that place. Such an explanation will account for similar phenomena not occurring to the girl at other places where the proper requisites do not exist."]


1869 / Body of Mrs W. I. Peters, Frankfort, Ind. /  See Dec 22, 1888. [A; 538. (See: 1888 Dec 22.)]


1869 / South Bend, Ind. / Body of Anna Rees / See Aug 11, 1872. [A; 539. See: 1872 Aug 11, (A; 776).]


1869 / A. W. Underwood / Negro boy / Paw Paw / Fire breath / See May 1, 1880. [A; 540. (See: 1880 May 1.)]


1869 / H.H. / Gardner, Kansas / See March 7, 1874. [A; 541. See: 1874 March 7, (A; 909).]


1869 early / Stones / recorded under March, 1872 / Natal. [A; 542. See: 1872 March, (A; 748).]


1869 // Santorin still active / C.R. 68-555. [III; 1671. "M. De Cigalla adresse de Santorin quelques détails relatifs au volcan des îles Cammènes...." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 555. The Santorini volcano.]


1869 // Comrie / Shocks recorded 1851, 57, 67, 69 / Wm Roper / List of Earthquakes / See Ap. 8 '86. [III; 1673. Roper,  . See: (1886 Ap. 8).]


1869// See Sig—Moon / Mars—for spots on moon. [III; 1674. See: (Sig—Moon / Mars—for spots on moon.)]


1869 // Mets of France / BA 69-281. [III; 1675. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 281.]


1869, etc. // Q's in Greece / mets in Germany. [III; 1676.]


1869 Jan / Santorin still active from 1867. [III; 1672. The Santorini volcano.]  


1869 Jan / Great bush fires in Australia / Melb. Age, Jan 14-2-7 / [14]-3-4, 5 / and before // 15-3-8 / Etc. // 16-3-6, 7 // 19-2-5, 6. [III; 1677. "Bush fires of some magnitude are reported...."  The Age, (Melbourne), January 14, 1869, p. 2 c. 5. "During the past week there have been extensive fires...." The Age, (Melbourne), January 14, 1869, p. 3 c. 7. "An immense extent of country is now being swept with fire. Our informant says that fires extend from Launceston to Table Cape, a distance of over 100 miles." "The Country." The Age, (Melbourne), January 15, 1869, p. 3 c. 8.]


1869 Jan / Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil / (F). [III; 1678. Fletcher, 103. This is the Angra dos Reis meteorite.]


1869 Jan 1 / Metite / Hessle / C.R. 68-363 / Common type / most resembled Dec. 9, 1858. [III; 1679. Fletcher, 103. This is the Hessle meteorite. "M. Daubrée présente à l'AcadÙmie des météorites...." Comptes Rendus, 67 (1868): 363-364. See: 1858 Dec 9, (II; 2258 & 2259).]


[1869 Jan 1 /] 1860 Jan 1 / Hessle, Sweden / organic matter / D-74. [II; 2410. The note copies information from page 74 of The Book of the Damned. Flight, Walter. "Meteorites and the Origin of Life," Eclectic Magazine, 89, (n.s., v. 26; December 1877): 711-718, at 717. This is the Hessle meteorite.]


1869 // Krahenberg, Rhenish Bavaria / (F). [III; 1680. Fletcher, 103. This is the Krähenberg meteorite.]


1869 Jan. 1 (Sound 3) / (F) / early evening / Stockholm / Three loud detonations and stones fell at south of Upsal in a lake. / L'Astro 5/297 / Carbonaceous. [III; 1681. Fletcher, 103. This is the Hessle meteorite. Flammarion, Camille. "Accroissement de la Masse et du Volume de la Terre...." Astronomie, 5 (1886): 293-304, at 297.]


1869 Jan. 9 / Yaxley, Suffolk / and Stowmarket / loud report and q / Times 12-5-f / 15-3-f / 16-5-f / ab 11:15 a.m. / 20 miles from Colchester. Someone else writes from W. Harling, Thetford. Heard loud reverbrating sound but felt no q. [III; 1682. "A Supposed Earthquake." London Times, January 12, 1869, p. 5. c. 6. Sewell, William H. "The Supposed Earthquake."  London Times, January 15, 1869, p. 3 c. 6. "The Supposed Earthquake." London Times, January 16, 1869, p. 5 c. 6.]


1869 Jan 10 / Violent q. / Bengal / Cosmos 3/4/171, 206. [III; 1683. "(Tremblement de terre à Calcutta.)" Cosmos, s. 3 v. 4 (February 13, 170-171. "Nouveaux détails sur le tremblement de terre du 10 janvier au Bengale." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 4 (February 13, 1869): 206.]


1869 Jan 10 / 7:35 p.m. / Aberdeen, Scotland / fireball ½ ap. size of moon / BA 69-252. [III; 1684. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 252-253.]


1869 Jan 10 / Violent q / Assam / L'Annee Sci 14-352 / BA '11. [III; 1685. "Les tremblements de terre en 1869." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 14 (1869): 351-357, at 352. Milne, 721.]


1869 Jan 10 to 21 / q. / Calcutta, etc. / Y.B. '70-234. [III; 1686. "Earthquake in India." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1870, 234. "Earthquake in India." Athenæum, 1869 (no. 2164; April 17): 545.]


1869 Jan 13 / 1:20 a.m. / Brighton / Meteor—slightly West of North, followed by 2 reports like gunfire / D. News 14-3-6. Seen at Hampton / B.A. 69-307. [III; 1687. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 307. "A Meteor." London Standard, January 14, 1869, p. 6 c. 2. "A Meteor." London Standard, January 15, 1869, p. 3 c. 6. "Meteoric Light." London Daily News, January 14, 1869, p. 3 c. 6.]


1869 Jan 13 / 1:20 a.m. / Brighton / det. meteor / Symons' 4-10. [III; 1689. "Chronicle of the Month—January." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (February 1869): 10-12, at 10.]


1869 Jan 15 / Nature 30/19 / Cor. writes th[note cut off] / q near Colchester / ac. to one witness th[note cut off] / 3 more sounds and an interval / three more sounds. [III; 1688. "The Earthquake." Nature, 30 (May 1, 1884): 17-19, at 19, cv. "O. Fisher."]


1869 Jan. 18 / "A splendidly well-defined meteor-shower / Italy / BA 71-46. [III; 1690. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 46.]


[1869 Jan 21 /] 1868 Feb 18 / Ice / Says that in the storm near Warwick, Queensland, fell a hailstone that broke the skull of a horse and killed him. / Bendigo Advertiser, Feb. 27. [III; 1707. "A Horse Killed by a Hailstone." Bendigo Advertiser, February 27, 1869, p. 2 c. 1. "As an instance of the extraordinary size of the hailstones...." Warwick Examiner and Times, January 30, 1869, p. 2 c. 3. "As an instance of the extraordinary size of the hailstones which fell during the storm of Thursday week past, we may mention that a carrier named Hutton, who was coming into town with his team, had one of his horses struck in the forehead with a hailstone, which felled him to the ground as if struck by a bullet. His owner was compelled to leave him lying insensible while he got the remainder of his team safe to town. On the folowing day the horse was hunted up by Hutton, when it was found that his skull was broken, and he died on the third day after. This is the only instance we hare ever heard of where hailstones fell of sufficient weight to break a horse's skull. Fortunately the stones did not fall very thickly, or nothing could have stood before them. The full weight of the storm was felt west and south of the town, and much damage waa done by it. Many farmers have had their corn and other growing crops completely ruined, and at Lyndburst three acres of grapes were almost destroyed. Incredible as it may seem, we have been assured by many who reside in the directions mentioned that the hailstones fell the size of ordinary pineapples, some of them measuring from 9 to 11 inches in circumference."]


1869 Jan. 26 / 8 p.m. / Meteor / Trémont (Saône-et-Loire) / C.R., 68-276 / N.M. [III; 1691. "MM. Lemozy et Magnien signalent l'apparition d'un bolide observé à Trémont...." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 276.]


1869 Jan 29-30 / (Alps) / at Arâches (Haute Savoie) / Cosmos—3/4/455 / Data communicated to the Association Scientifique, by M. Rey de Morande. This night, after a gale, snow fell. In the morning, a great number of living larvae found in the snow. They could not have had origin in Switzerland, where temperature had been very low. They appeared to be mostly larvae of Trogossita mauritanica, which were common in the "midi" of France. Also some of a little butterfly of a family of Noctucliens, probably Stibia stagnicola. This caterpillar reaches full size in "le courant" of February and lives in the center and "midi" of France. This fall was at an altitude of from 1000 to 1200 metres. / See La Sc. P. Tous, 15-183. / B.D. 93. [III; 1692.1 to 1692.4. "Pluies d'insectes à Arâches (Haute Savoie), et à Turin." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 4 (April 24, 1869): 455. "Pluies d'Insectes à Arache (Haute-Savoie) et à Turin." La Science Pour Tous, 14 (no. 23; April 26, 1869): 183. The note copies information from pages 93 to 94 of The Book of the Damned. Flammarion, Camille. James Glaisher, ed. The Atmosphere. New York: Harper, 1874, 414.]


1869 Jan 29-30 / Insects fell on ground at altitude of 1000 to 1200 metres. / Cosmos, 3-4-455 / Ground frozen—had been very cold. From 25th, the average temperature at 7 a.m. was 5 degrees. [III; 1693. "Pluies d'insectes à Arâches (Haute Savoie), et à Turin." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 4 (April 24, 1869): 455.]


1869 Jan 29-30 / Larvae—different / at Araches / Haute Savoy / In the snow that fell this night, ac to M. Tissot, who so observed. / The Student, 3-400, could not have been hatched there, the temp. so low. Said were common to S of France. They were of Trogossita mauritanica and caterpillars "supposed" to belong to Stibia stagnicola. [III; 1694.1, 1694.2. "Rain of Insects at Araches and Turin." Student and Intellectual Observer, 3 (1869): 400.]


1869 Jan 29 / [LT of], 5-d / Expected Meteor. [III; 1695. Chevallier, Temple. "Expected Meteor." London Times, January 29, 1869, p. 5 c. 4. Kayser, E. "Schreiben des Herrn Dr. Kayser an den Herausgeber." Astronomische Nachrichten, 73 (1869): 127. Kayser had observed two meteors, on January 30, 1866, and January 30, 1868, and believed both had orginated in a radiant point between β and γ Pegasi; thus, on January 30, 1869, another meteor observed might indicate a new meteor stream.]


1869 Jan 30 / Dust and Waters / or newspaper of that date as copied in Melbourne Age, Feb 3-2-7 / At Wagga-Wagga, dust and darkness—"Suddenly a mighty roaring was heard in the distance, and looking westward one beheld what [really had the appearance of] a solid wall of water rushing [rapidly] on the town. [III; 1696. "All parts of the colonies appear to have been visited of late by severe thunderstorms...." The Age, (Melbourne), February 3, 1869, p. 2 c. 7.]


1869 Feb 2 / Met / France / BA 69-281. [III; 1697. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 281.]


1869 Feb 2 / Unusual cluster sunspots, western limb of sun / E Mec 8/468, 491. [III; 1698. Denning, William Frederick. "Spots on the Sun." English Mechanic, 8 (no. 203; February 12, 1869): 468. Denning, William Frederick. "Spots on the Sun." English Mechanic, 8 (no. 204; February 19, 1869): 491, (illustration).]


1869 Feb 3 / [LT of], 12-b / Sunspots. [III; 1699. Denning, William Frederick. "Spots on the Sun." London Times, February 3, 1869, p. 12 c. 2.]


1869 Feb 4 / Marseilles / fog, but moist, spreading disagreeable odor / C.R. 68-1023. [III; 1700. Deville, Ch. Sainte-Claire. "Des retours périodiques de certains phénomènes en mai, août et novembre 1868, février 1869." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 1021-1023, at 1023.]


1869 Feb 8 / Met / France / BA 69-281. [III; 1701. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 281.]


1869 Feb. 9 / S Africa / Fire broke out over region 400 miles long, 15 to 150 wide. / Sci Rev 4/100. [III; 1702. (Sci. Rev., 4-100.) "South Africa." New York Tribune, April 15, 1869, p. 1 c. 6.]


1869 Feb 11 / 5:31 p.m. / Malta / Large met passed near Mars. / BA 74-292. [III; 1703. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 292-293.]


1869 Feb 12 / Remarkable storm / Symons 4/21. [III; 1704. "The Remarkable Storm of February 12th, 1869." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (March 1869): 21-24.]


1869 Feb 13 / Op Mars / (A1). [III; 1705. (Confirm.)]


1869 Feb 13-14 / 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. / Many meteors at Marseilles. 93 counted. / C.R. 68-1023. [III; 1706. Deville, Ch. Sainte-Claire. "Des retours périodiques de certains phénomènes en mai, août et novembre 1868, février 1869." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 1021-1023, at 1023.]


[1869 Feb 18. Wrong date. See: 1869 Jan 21, (III; 1707).]


1869—L / Feb 23 / Eleven spots on floor of Plato / Astro Reg 7/178 / but turned to Mars? [III; 1708. Birt, William Radcliffe. "Spots on the Floor of Plato." Astronomical Register, 7 (August 1869): 178-179.]


1869 Feb 24 / Met / France / BA 69-281. [III; 1709. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 281.]


1869 March 2 / Met / France / BA 69-281. [III; 1710. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 281.]


1869 March 3 / Melbourne / Sky dark and great dust fall / The Field, May 22-424-2. [III; 1711. (Field, May 22, 1869, p. 424.)]


1869 March 3 / Ice / Bendigo Advertiser of / That a cor writing to the Ballarat Star had reported as having fallen in a recent th. stor a large block or sheet of ice 20 feet by 20 feet by about 20 inches thickness. The story was doubted but the Editor of the Ararat Advertiser. Wrote that the ice had fallen and had been visited by many persons, and was solid ice and no accumulation of hailstones. [III; 1712.1, 1712.2. "A Monster Hailstone." Bendigo Advertiser, March 3, 1869, p. 2 c. 4. "A correspondent, writing to the Ballarat Star the other day, described a large block of ice deposited by the late thunderstorm, which was lying somewhere between the Challicum and Gorinn runs. He described it, if our memory serves us, as over twenty feet in length, and of about the same breadth, while it was nearly twenty inches in thickness. The veracity of the account was doubted by a good many, who could scarcely credit the deposit of such a " hailstone" on the spot where it was found. " We are in a position to state, however," says the Ararat Advertiser, "that the account was quite correct, and that the block of ice was visited and seen by nearly every resident in the neighborhood. Some think that the ice may have been an accumulation of hail from the heavy storm referred to; but the mass presented no indication of such a formation, being apparently quite solid." "A correspondent, writing to the Ballarat Star the other day...." Melbourne Argus, March 1, 1869, p. 5 c. 5-6. Either this same large block of ice or another, with different measurements, fell near Challicum, Victoria, Australia. "Persons of strong powers of belief...." Ovens and Murray Advertiser, (Beechworth, Victoria), February 27, 1869, p. 2 c. 7.

"Persons of strong powers of belief have a good opportunity of exercising them on the following paragraph from the Dunolly Express:—'A most extraordinary circumstance is said to have happened near the Challicum station during the storm on Monday last. A large mass of ice, from fifteen to twenty feet loug, six or seven feet wide, and three feet in thickness, fell to the ground, where it remained unthawed till Thursday."]


1869 March 3 / Aust and Europe / See Auroras / Ap 15 and May 14. [III; 1713. See: (Auroras / Ap 15 and May 14.)]


1869 March 3 / Melbourne in darkness and great dustfall / Field, May 22. [III; 1714. (Field, May 22, 1869.)]


1869 March 3 / Dust / Melbourne / The Age, 4-3-5 / Ab 7 a.m., vast clouds of dust and Melbourne in darkness. Fell in a gale at Castlemaine and Ballarat. "Such a peculiar storm is unprecedented in this colony." Said been something like it in Sydney ab 16 years before. / See March 4. [III; 1715. "A Dust Storm." The Age, (Melbourne), March 4, 1869, p. 3 c. 5.]


1869 March 3 / Melbourne dust / At 1 a.m., a hot wind blowing. About 7 a.m., came a "tremendous duststorm which obscured the city. / The Argus (Melbourne) March 4—everything in darkness. "A very peculiar phenomenon was noticeable in the approach of this duststorm. Along the whole of its upper edge glowed a strong, yellow light, which gave the idea of a fierce fire raging behind dense clouds of smoke." Writer thinks it due to electric conditions. / A violent magnetic storm at the same time. [III; 1716.1, 1716.2. "Melbourne and its vicinity was yesterday morning...." Melbourne Argus, March 4, 1869, p. 4 c. 5-6. "Extraordinary Storm." Melbourne Argus, March 4, 1869, p. 5 c. 5. There were no references to a magnetic storm in these articles.]


1868 March 4 / 23-24 // Dustfall / Italy / Zeit. Met 4/204 // Sicily and Calabria / ink rains on 25th, p. 206 / p. 229. [III; 1717. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 4 (1869): 200-208, at 205-206. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 4 (1869): 227-235, at 228-230.]


1868 March 4 / at Castlemaine / Ab 9 p.m., 2 extraordinary meteors. They left dark trains that turned yellow. Visible 80 seconds. / trains or mets? not said / (Melb.) The Age 6-2-5. [III; 1718. (Melbourne Age, March 6, 1869, p. 2 c. 5.; this issue's date is not online.)]


1869 March 7 / Long trains of sunspots / M. Notice 29-226. [III; 1719. Browning, John. "On an extensive Train of Sun-spots." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 29 (March 12, 1869): 225-226, (illustration).]


1869 Mar. 10 / Mar 24 // Mediterranean / Red sand / C. Rendus 70/1044. ** [III; 1720. Tarry, H. "Sur les pluies de poussière et les pluies de sang." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 1043-1046, at 1046. Lais, Giuseppe. "Sedimente Sabbiosi delle Acque de Pioggia." Atti dell'Accademia Pontificia de'Nuovi Lincei, 29 (1875-1876): 246-252, at 251.]


1869 March 10 / Brownish yellow matter / (Naples) / Cosmos 3/4/398. [III; 1721. "Les pluies de poussière...." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 4 (April 10, 1869): 397-398.]


1869 March 10 / dry fog and sand / Supposed sirocco / fog and red rain / L'Annee Sci 14-191. [III; 1722. "Le sirocco à Naples." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 14 (1869): 191.]


1869 March 10 / With dust / find no meteors in BA. [III; 1723.]


1869 March 12 / Time of fall of dust at Batna, there was a slight shock of earthquake at Biskra. / La Sci Pour Tous 15-159. [III; 1724. "Correspondance." La Science Pour Tous, 15 (no. 20; April 16, 1870): 159.]


1869 March 14 / Large sunspot / M. Notices 29-300. [III; 1725. Browning, John. "Note on a Sun-spot seen March 14, 1869." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 29 (May 14, 1869): 300-301.]


1869 March 15 / 6 p.m. / Smart shock, E Lancashire / March 17, several, afternoon and evening E Yorkshire / Birmingham Gazette, March 20. [III; 1726. "A very distinct shock of earthquake...." Birmingham Daily Gazette, March 17, 1869, p. 2 c. 7. (Birmingham Gazette, March 20, 1869; wrong date.)]


1869 March 15 / ab. 6 p.m. / Lancashire / q / LT, March 16 / and W. Yorkshire // and loud rumbling sound like distant thunder / Times, 17 // rumbling sound at Hull / no mention of shock felt—Times 19-12-f. /// 1—[note cut off] / 1— /  1— /  1— / L 19. [III; 1727. "Earthquakes." London Times, March 16, 1869, p. 11 c. 6. "The Earthquake," and, "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, March 17, 1869, p. 12 c. 2. Hare, William. "The Earthquake in Yorkshire." London Times, March 19, 1869, p. 12 c. 6.]


1869 March 16 / ab. 3 p.m. / Several shocks and rumbling sounds / E. Yorkshire / [L] Times 19-11-f. [III; 1728. Hare, William. "The Earthquake in Yorkshire." London Times, March 19, 1869, p. 12 c. 6. Hare reported shocks in Hull, about 6 P.M.]


1869 March 17 / Great explosion in Paris / also one at Saintes, Belgium / D News 22-2-5. [III; 1729. "Terrible Explosion in Belgium and Loss of Life." London Daily News, March 22, 1869, p. 2 c. 5. (No reference to the explosion in Paris. Find. Fix.)]


1869 March 23 / Volc? / Straits of Messina, 3 p.m., for 20 minutes fell a heavy shower of mud. / Sci. Op., Ap. 7, 1869, p. 439. [III; 1730. (Scientific Opinion, April 7, 1869, p. 439.)]


1869 March 23 / Sicily / thick clouds and a yellow rain / In all respects like that of the 10th. / See 24. [III; 1731. See: 1869 March 24, (III: 1732 & 1733).]


1869 March 24th / See 23. / Colored rain at Lesina and Illyria / C.R. 70/1371. [III; 1732. Tarry, H. "Sur les pluies de poussière et les pluies de sang." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 1369-1372, at 1371. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 4 (1869): 200-208, at 205-206. See: 1869 March 23, (III: 1730 & 1731).]


1869 March 24 / Dustfall / Daranelles / Monatsb. Ak., Berl / 1869-308. [III; 1733. Ehrenberg, Christian Gottfried. "Über den am 24. Märs dieses Jahres mit Nord-Ost-Sturm gefallenen rothen Passatstaub in den Dardanellen und dessen Verbreitung über Griechenland bis Krain." Monatsberichte der Königlich-Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin, 1869, 308-320.]


1869 March 27 / (met Mars) / 9:55 p.m. (at Paris) / by M. Laussedat / came from a point near Mars / C.R. 68/785. La Sci P. T 14-149 / C.R. [III; 1734. Laussedat. "Sur un bolide observé à Paris le 27 mars 1869." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 784-785. "Météorologie.—Bolide Observé à Paris, le 27 Mars 1869." La Science Pour Tous, 14 (no. 19; April 10, 1869): 149.]


1869 March 27 / Bolide at Paris / La Sci Pour Tous 14-149. [III; 1735. "Météorologie.—Bolide Observé à Paris, le 27 Mars 1869." La Science Pour Tous, 14 (no. 19; April 10, 1869): 149.]


1869 March 27 / Red snow / Sicily and Dardenelles / Les Mondes 25/226. [III; 1736. Ehrenberg, Christian Gottfried. "Résume sommaire de recherches suivies depuis 1847 sur les germes organiques, invisibles à l'oeil mu, suspendus dans l'atmosphère." Les Mondes, 25 (1871): 224-228, at 226.]


1869 March 29 / Auroral bands and lunar halo / N. Zealand / Trans. N.Z. Inst 1902-406. [III; 1737. Skey, Henry. "Notes on the Aurora in the Southern Hemisphere." Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 35 (1902): 405-408, at 406. "A similar phenomenon occurred on the 29th March, 1869, in which the bands extended from north to south, accompanied by a lunar halo, the moon being near full and over the east."]


1869 March 30 / Thunder and lightning and earthquake shocks at Ballarat, Victoria / Melbourne Age—Ap 1-2-5. [III; 1738. "Some correspondents, quite respectable enough to be reliable, inform the Courier...." The Age, (Melbourne), April 1, 1869, p. 2 c. 5.]


[1869 Aprl. 1. Wrong date. See: 1869 April 11, (III; 1739).]


1869 Ap 2, 3, 8, 9 / Aurora in north of Europe / C.R., 68-951+. [III; 1740. Rayet. "Aurore boréale du 15 avril 1869." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 950-953, at 951.]


1869 Ap. 3 / 5 a.m. / Detonating meteor of Carlisle / Sci Gossip 1869-119. [III; 1741. Bowman, J. "Large Aerolite." Science Gossip, 5 (no. 53; May 1, 1869): 119.]


1869 / early in April // (3) / Carlisle / Flaming thing struck a gate post—passed over town—gave impression of being "prevented from falling by some invisible connecting cord." / Symons Met 4/37. [III; 1742. "A Pillar of Fire (?)." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (April 1869): 37. No "struck" mentioned.]


1869 April / q / I / [Small] / Peshawar, India / BA '11. [III; 1743. Milne, 721.]


1869 Ap 9 / Leaves / Last Oct., 1889. [III; 1744. See: (1889 Oct.)]


1869 Ap 9 / D-242 / Leaves fell. / Autrèche (Indre-et-Loire), France. [III; 1745. The note copies information from page 242 of The Book of the Damned. "Pluie de feuilles de chène par un temps très-calme et serein à Autrèche (Indre-et-Loire)." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 4 (May 22, 1869): 574.]


1869 Ap. 10 / Leaves / Ap. 1, 1900. [III; 1746. See: (1900 Ap. 1).]


1869 Ap. 10 / Leaves / Ap, 1885 / Ap 25, 1886. [III; 1747. See: (1885 Ap.), and, (1886 Ap 25).]


1869 Ap. / Leaves / Oct last, 1889. [III; 1748. See: (1889 Oct).]


1869 Ap. / Leaves / Dec 12, 1920. [III; 1749. See: (1920 Dec 12).]


1869 Ap. / Leaves / Ap 1, 1900. [III; 1750. See: (1900 Ap 1).]


1869 Ap 10 / Leaves / Ap. 25, 1886. [III; 1751. See: (1886 Ap. 25).]


1869 Ap. 10 / Leaves / See May 2, 1885. [III; 1752. See: (1885 May 2).]


1869 Ap 10 / Leaves / Dec 11, 1920. [III; 1753. See: (1920 Dec 11).]


[1869 April 11 /] 1869 Aprl. 1 / 4 meteors / Montcalieri / L'Année Sci 14-11. [III; 1739. "Les Bolides en 1869." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 14 (1869): 9-20, at 11. Two meteors, (not four), were observed by Francesco Denza, at Montcalieri, and, at the same times, by Giuseppe Zezioli, at Bergamo.]


1869 April 15 / Aurora / La Sci Pour Tous 14-180. [III; 1754. Quetelet, E. "Sur l'aurore boréale du 15 avril 1869, observée à Bruxelles." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 990-991.]


1869 Ap. 15 / haze / 7:45 p.m. / New York / Mars in a ring [of] light with radiating bars. / Moon like nucleus [of] a comet with vast tail. / Sci Am. 20-299. [III; 1755. "The Recent Auroral Display." Scientific American, n.s., 20 (May 8, 1869): 299.]


1869 Ap. 15 / Great aurora, Toronto / Nature 2-453. [III; 1756. Elvins, A. "The Haze Accompanying Auroral Displays." Nature, 2 (October 6, 1870): 453.]


1869 Ap. 15 / "Very fine display" of aurora / Victoria, Australia / Trans Roy Soc Victoria 10-62. [III; 1757. Ellery, Robert Lewis John. "On the late Exceptional Season and Frequency of Aurorae." Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria, 10 (1870-1872): 56-64, at 62.]


1869 Ap. 15 / Melbourne Argus, Ap. 16-4-7—ab midnight, aurora illuminating a large extent of the southern heavens, wide arch from horizon to horizon. Also a glare which was thought by many persons to be the reflection of a great fire from beyond St. Kilda. [III; 1758. "That beautiful phenomenon, the aurora australis, was visible...." Melbourne Argus, April 16, 1869, p. 4 c. 7.]


1869 Ap. 15 / at Paris / C.R. 68-947 / 8 p.m., shafts of light from Great Bear toward E., like a fan. [III; 1759. Robert, E.; Chapelas; and, Tremeschini. "observation d'une aurore boréale, à Paris et dans les environs, le 15 avril à 8 heures du soir." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 947-949, at 947.]


[1869 Ap. 15 /] 1869 Aug 15 / Aurora / Paris / C.R. 68/947. [III; 2061. Robert, E.; Chapelas; and, Tremeschini. "observation d'une aurore boréale, à Paris et dans les environs, le 15 avril à 8 heures du soir." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 947-949.]


1869 April 15 / Aurora / C.R. 68/950 / at Brussels—990, 991, 1049, 1120, 1140, 1164 / Circumstances—962 / Liverpool and Munich—1051, 1201. [III; 1760. Rayet. "Aurore boréale du 15 avril 1869." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 950-953. "M. Ch. Sainte-Claire Deville présente les remarques suivantes sur les diverses circonstances...." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 962-965. Quetelet, E. "Sur l'aurore boréale du 15 avril 1869, observée à Bruxelles." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 990-991. Silbermann, J. "Note sur les diverses apparences qu'a successivement présentées l'aurore boréale du 15 avril 1869." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 1049-1051. "M. Ch. Sainte-Claire Deville communique l'extrait d'une Lettre de M. Robert Scott...." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 1051. Silbermann, J. "Sur les aurore boréales et, en particulier, sur celles des 13, 14 et 15 mai 1869." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 1164-1167. Lamont. "Remarques sur les aurores boréales observées à Munich." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 1201-1202.]


1869 Ap 15 / A / Am J Sci 2/48/114, 146. [III; 1761. Kingston, G.T. "Aurora at Toronto, Canada." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 48 (1869): 65-67. Gilman, W.S., Jr. "On the Aurora seen in New York, April 15, 1869." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 48 (1869): 114-116. "Aurora Borealis of the evening of April 15th." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 48 (1869): 146.]


1869 Ap. 16 / N.Y. Times, 1-7 / Aurora. [III; 1762. "The Northern Lights." New York Times, April 16, 1869, p. 1 c. 7.]


1869 April 17 / [LT of], 8-c / 17-12-b // Aurora / Worcestershire. [III; 1763. "The Season." London Times, April 17, 1869, p. 8 c. 3. Talmage, C.G. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, April 17, 1869, p. 12 c. 2.]


1869 April 18 / afternoon / Lyndon, Ill. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [III; 1764. Finley, 4.]


1869 Ap 25 or 18 / (Levitation) / Galagnani's Messenger, Ap 30, from the Exeter Gazette—about noon "Sunday", sun shining brilliantly—cloudless—"not a breath of wind—suddenly a noise like that of a rocket and dust was whirled. A current of air rushed across River Exe, raising a wave ab a foot high. [III; 1765.1, 1765.2. "A natural phenomeon was witnessed at Exeter...." Galagnani's Messenger, April 30, 1869, p. 2 c. 2. "Whirlwind." Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, April 30, 1869, p. 6 c. 1. "A phenomenon of an interesting as well as somewhat alarming character, was witnessed on Sunday, at noon, near the Port Royal Inn, by the side of the River Exe. The sun was shining brilliantly, the sky clear, and not a breath of wind was stirring, when, suddenly, at least ha;f-dozen persons who were passing at the time heard a noise like that made by the progress of a rocket, and saw the dust whirled up the pathway skirting the river. Instantaneously a strong current of air rushed across the river, raising a boiling wave about a foot in height and from five to six feet in breadth, and throwing up spray some three feet in the air. The boats in the vicinity rolled considerably, and those which were moored to the rafts across the stream were turned round swiftly, as if by a strong gale. About eighteen years ago a simlar phenomenon was observed in the same locality, when a boat was lifted up several feet from the ground. The phenomenon only lasted about a minute. The whizzing noise was heard by persons in the Port Royal Inn, as well as by those outside. It is understood these occurrences are of electrical origin." The "Sunday" was April 25.]


1869 Ap. 27 / began // Religo-Phil Jour, Oct 2-1-4, copying from the Richmond Enquirer of Sept 1 / W. R. Chiles / Home of Mr. Chiles, North Street, Richmond, Furniture "turned topsy turvy". Stones thrown. A Mrs. Bagsett arrested. Someone swore saw her throw a stone. Others testified that they saw stones arriving at times Mrs B near them and under watch, and not guilty. Also doorbell ringing—Mrs. B was the next door neighbor. Raps / Ap 27 and for 10 days doorbell ringing and raps on door. End of 10 days stones began and reached climax May 27. Stopped ab June 1. [A; 543.1, 543.2, 543.3. "A Virginia Ghost." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 7 (no. 2; October 2, 1869): 1, (c. 4). "A Virginia Ghost." Keowee Courier, (Pickens Court House, South Carolina), October 8, 1869, p. 1 c. 2-3.]  


1869 Ap. 27 / Mrs B acquitted without jury leaving box. / There was a Miss B "young lady". [A; 544.]


1869 Ap. 28 / Met / France / BA 69-281. [III; 1766. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 281.]


1869 / early in May // Vast fire from earth—naptha on Caspian Sea caught fire. / Che News 19/286. [III; 1767. "Extraordinary Phenomenon." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 19 (June 11, 1869): 286.]


1869 May 1 / Nothing in Birm Daily Post. [III; 1790.]


1869 May 1 / Great sunspot / M. Notices 29-302. [III; 1768. Bidder, George Parker, Jr. "On a Remarkable Sun-spot observed May 1st 1869." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 29 (May 14, 1869): 302.]


1869 May 1 / Remarkable sunspots with spiral effect / on 2nd, spiral effect gone / Sci Op 2-79. [III; 1769. (Science Opinion, 2-79.)]


1869 May 2 / 12 p.m.—Cor who signs self D.T.K. / Astro Reg 7/139 / Northampton. Looking at Venus and saw strange objects of various sizes—some appearing larger than Jupiter. Stream for more than an hour. Many of the larger had a bluish fringe on one side. Thinks could not be seeds so early in May. [III; 1770.1, 1770.2. "Bright Objects Passing the Sun." Astronomical Register, 7 (June 1869): 138-139.]


1869 May 5 / 6:32 p.m. / Metite of Krähenburg, in the Palatinate / BA 69-20. [III; 1771. This is the Krähenberg meteorite. Flight, Walter. A Chapter in the History of Meteorites. London: Dulau, 1887, 5-7. Georg von Neumayer believed that its trajectory linked it to the Eta Aquarid meteor shower, (which would indicate its origin in Halley's Comet); however, it fell in daylight from "a small cloud. Neumayer, Georg Balthazar von. "On the recent fall of an Aërolite at Krähenburg in the Palatinate." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, Notices and Abstracts, 20.]


1869 May 5 / At Ojo Caliente, Mexico, during a th. storm, body of fire fell upon a church, and exploded and wrecked the building, killing 40 worshippers. / Sunday Times (London), June 6. [III; 1772. (London Sunday Times, June 6, 1869 @ Gale News Vault.)]


1869 May 6 / 4:30 a.m. / Near Smith Island, south of Yeddo Gulf, Japan, as reported by Capt. Nickerson, of the ship National Eagle—column of smoke issuing from the ocean and volcanic rocks protruding and sea muddy. / San Fran Ev. Bulletin, June 3. [III; 1773. (San Francisco Evening Bulletin, June 3, 1869.)]


1869 May 13 / O / Aurora / 10:15 p.m. / Yorkshire / Corruscations meeting in a large irregular oval halo / ab 15 or 20 degrees SE of the zenith. This place remained fixed the whole evening but arches moved. / Astro Reg 7-135 / Belfast—body of light concentrated 8 to 10 degrees S.E. of Polaris (Ursa Majoris in the zenith). / A silver line shot from the Pointers. 10:45, at Hull, all corruscations converged toward Epsilon in Boötes. / Ab. 11, at Hull. Mars enveloped in red mass of light. / York, Mars mentioned as in it. [III; 1774.1, 1774.2, 1774.3. "'Grand Auroral Display,' May 13th, 1869." Astronomical Register, 7 (June 1869): 135-138, at 137-138. This was the coronal display of an aurora, in which its streamers converge near the observer's zenith.]


1869 May 13-14-15 / Aurora / C.R. 68/ 1159, 1162, 1164, 1203. [III; 1775. Rayet, Fron, De Vougy, Zandyck, and, Conte. Em. "Aurora boréale du 13 mai 1869." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 1159-1162. Chapelas. "Aurora boréale du 13 mai 1869." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 1162-1163. Silbermann, J. "Sur les aurore boréales et, en particulier, sur celles des 13, 14 et 15 mai 1869." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 1164-1167. "M. Ch. Sainte-Claire Deville prénte, en outre, divers documents relatifs aux aurora boréales...." Comptes Rendus, 68 (1869): 1203-1204.]


1869 May 14 / Aurora simultaneous in Australia and England / Nautical Mag 1870/120 / Aus 1869). [III; 1776. "The Same Aurora Seen in the North and the South." Nautical Magazine, 39 (1870): 120-122. (Aus, 1869???)]


1869 May 15-16 / at Grenfell / midnight / southern sky / aurora / Sydney Morning Herald, 19th / N.S. Wales. [III; 1777. "The Sydney Monthly Overland Mail." Sydney Morning Herald, May 19, 1869, p. 5 c. 1.]


1869 May 18 / Conj Mars and moon / Ast Reg 7/139. [III; 1778. "Occultation of Regulus, and Conjunction of Mars with the Moon." Astronomical Register, 7 (June 1869): 139.]


1869 May 19 / See Aug 29, 1863. / Heard again at Hawkhrust by Prof. Herschel / constant rumbling sound at 3:20 p.m. Lasted 10 minutes—heard again at 6 o'clock. He reports the effect was "awe inspiring". Says at the first sound sky blue. Says a very heavy black storm was passing along the whole N. horizon very low and distant, but to others it sounded like blasting, and he thinks it wa artillery practice at Hastings, except that would be an interupted sound. / Repeated May 31—a roaring sound with gusts of wind and rain. / Proc Brit Met. Soc., 2-102. [III; 1779.1, 1779.2. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. "Sound in the Upper Air, while the Lower Air was still." Proceedings of the British Meteorological Society, 2 (February 1864): 102-104. "Correspondence, &c." Proceedings of the Meteorological Society, 5 (November 17, 1869): 25-28. See: 1869 May 31, (III; 1795).]  


1869 May 20 / [LT], 9-b / Th. storms. [III; 1780. "Thunderstorms." London Times, May 20, 1869, p. 9 c. 2.]


1869 May 20 / ab. 11 p.m. / Great det met / New York City, etc. / BA 1870/88 / '69-308. Am J. Sci 2/48/145, 146. [III; 1781. (BA 70-88. BA 69-308.) "Remarkable Meteor of May 20th." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 48 (1869): 145-146. "Meteor of May 20th." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 48 (1869): 146.]


1869 May 22 / (Fr) / (F) / 9:45 a.m. / Cléguerec, Vendée /metites. / C.R. 68-1338 / BA '69. [III; 1782. De Limur. "Bolide tombé le 22 mai 1869 dans la commune de Cléguérec, arrondissement de Napoléonville (Morbihan)." Comptes Rendus, 69 (1869): 1338-1339. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 254-255 & 278.]


1869 May 22 / 9:45 p.m. / Meteor seen, Napoléonville (Morbihan) / C.R. 68-1338 / du sud au nord. / Fell near Cléguérec / fell incandescent / most like Jan 30, 1868. [III; 1783. De Limur. "Bolide tombé le 22 mai 1869 dans la commune de Cléguérec, arrondissement de Napoléonville (Morbihan)." Comptes Rendus, 69 (1869): 1338-1339. See: 1868 Jan 30, (III: 1274 & 1275).]


1869 May 22 / In Les Mondes 20-656, said that this met stone was, before broken by peasants, in the form of a regular cone. [III; 1784. Arrondeau. "Le bolide du 22 mai 1869." Les Mondes, 20 (1869):  655-656, at 656.]


1869 May 25? / Symons 4-137, quoting Morning Advertiser of May 28, which quotes Birm D. Post. Says that like the stones which fell at Birm the year before. They looked like Rawley ragstone until broken up, then difference apparent. [III; 1785. "A Meteoric Stone Shower at Wolverhampton?" Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (October 1869): 137-138. The Birmingham Daily Gazette, (not the Birmingham Daily Post), is quoted. See: 1869 May 25, (III; 1788.) "A Meteoric Stone Shower at Wolverhampton." Birmingham Daily Gazette,  May 27, 1869, p. 6 c. 6.]


1869 May 25 / Nothing in Wolv. Chronicle / Try Birm. paper, Wolv. Dept. [III; 1786.]


1869 May 25 / In London Morning Advertiser of 28th, from Birmingham Gazette, said that the large number of stones found after the rain "bearing resemblance to nothing with which the roads are paved, or any stones found in the district". [III; 1787. "A Meteoric Stone Shower at Wolverhampton." London Morning Advertiser, May 28, 1869, p. 3 c. 2. "A Meteoric Stone Shower at Wolverhampton." Birmingham Daily Gazette,  May 27, 1869, p. 6 c. 6.]


1869 May 25 / Description in M. Advertiser is from Birm Daily Gazette, May 27th. [III; 1788. "A Meteoric Stone Shower at Wolverhampton." London Morning Advertiser, May 28, 1869, p. 3 c. 2. "A Meteoric Stone Shower at Wolverhampton." Birmingham Daily Gazette,  May 27, 1869, p. 6 c. 6.]


1869 May 25 / In Birm Daily Gazette, 26th, said that at Wolverhampton there was a general impression that "so called thunderbolts" had fallen. [III; 1789. "Thunderstorm." Birmingham Daily Gazette, May 26, 1869, p. 8 c. 4. "Wolverhampton and the neighbourhood was visited by a storm of thunder, lightning, and heavy rain yesterday afternoon. The lightning was extremely vivid, and the thunder broke over the town with almost deafening report. Two flashes of lightning were so strong and so brilliant, and the thunder that followed so loud, that a general impression prevailed that so-called 'thunder bolts had fallen.'"]


1869 May 25 / 4-184 / In Symons Met Mag 4-137, that ac to Birmingham Gazette, after th. storm in Wolverhampton large number of small dark stones found in many streets and roads. [III; 1791. "A Meteoric Stone Shower at Wolverhampton?" Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (October 1869): 137-138.]


[1869 May 27 and June 9 /] 1867 May 27 and June 9 / Tiflis / Crystalline hailstones / See 1869. [III; 1074. See: 1869 June 9, (III; 1808).]


1869 May 27 / see 1861. / Tiflis / ext hail / D-291. [III; 1792. See: 1869 June 9, (III; 1808). Fort also links this fall of hail, at Lucerne, to another on the same day of the year in 1861. See: 1861 June 9, (III; 108).]


1869 May 28 / the Tuesday before // Met stones of Wolverhampton / Symons Met 4-158. [III; 1793. "A Meteoric Stone Shower at Wolverhampton?" Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (October 1869): 137-138.]


1869 May 29 / Met burst at point 10 or 12 degrees below Saturn. / B Assoc 1869-254. [III; 1794. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 254-255.]


1869 May 31 / Repetition of May 19. [III; 1795. See: 1869 May 19, (III; 1779)].


1869 May 31 / ab. 11 p.m. / Kent. / Met ap. size of moon—detonation shook ground. / BA 69-256. Seen Wales, Devonshire, W. to E. / In France and Belgium. [III; 1796. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 256-257.]


1869 May 31 / Det. met / France / BA 69-281. [III; 1797. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 258-259 & 281.]


1869 May 31 / (Sound) / (1) / ab 11 p.m. / Met det / Hawkhurst, etc., Kent / BA, 69/257. Heard 11:05. / In Sussex, met seen and heard 11:15 p.m. [III; 1798. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 256-261.]


1869 May 31 / 10:57 p.m. / Magnificent meteor seen to explode at Norwich./ No sound. / LT, June 2. [III; 1799. Eade, Peter. "A Meteor." London Times, June 2, 1869, p. 11 c. 6.]


1869 May 31 / Met (?) close to ground, at Herring's Gate, form of a tadpole, wiggled a fiery red tail and disappeared. About 30 feet from ground seemed to disap. / Might have been high but was seen by no one else. / Sc. Op. 2/32. [III; 1800. (Scientific Opinion, 2-32.)]


1869 June 1 / Earthquake / sea waves / San Francisco / Ref, May 13, 1850. [III; 1801. Holden, Edward Singleton. List of Recorded Earthquakes in California, Lower California, Oregon and Washington Territory. Sacramento: State Office, J.D. Young, Supt. of State Printing, 1887, 54.]


1869 June 5 / Severe q. / Christchurch, N Zealand / London Standard, Aug. 9. [III; 1802. "Australia and New Zealand." London Standard, August 9, 1869, p. 6 c. 3-4.]


1869 Jun 5 LT, p. 12 from Manchester Guardian / Crowds about the Feathers Hotel in one of the busiest centers in Manchester / For 5 weeks been ringing of all the bells in the hotel. They were muffled and stopped but began again. Police and other investigation and nothing found out. "An indescribable presence is said to have made itself manifest on the stairs, dressed in most UNghostly habiliments of black / The cook was taken seriously ill and resigned his position. [A; 545.1, 545.2. "A Ghost in Manchester." London Times, June 5, 1869, p. 12 c. 2. "An indescribable presence is said to have made itself manifest on the stairs of the hotel, dressed in most unghostly habiliments of black, to a couple of boys and a policeman, who were so much frightened by the sight that they are unable to give any account of the spirit's disappearance. Of al the inmates of the house the cook has been most affected by the spiritual influence, and on Wednesday resigned her comfortable situation...." The London Times cites the Manchester [Weekly] Examiner, (not the Manchester Guardian), as its source. "Ghost in Manchester." Manchester Times, June 5, 1869, p. 5 c. 5. Pabst also copied this note as "III; 1803(1) & 1803(2)." Thayer had apparently referred to "Box A" for this note, failed to indicate this, then resumed "Box 3." Pabst: "Missing from file. See The Fortean, #53, p. 407, c. 2."]


[1869 June 5, (III; 1803). Duplicated note. See: 1869 June 5, (A; 545).]


1869 June 6 / R. W. Payne writes from Sleaford that he saw, ab 3, 20 m of, GMT, in the afternoon, luminous obj leave the neighborhood of Venus and descend slowly. / Astro Reg 7/185. [III; 1804. Payne, R.W. "Bright Bodies on the Sun." Astronomical Register, 7 (August 1869): 185.]


1869 June 6 / Small sea shellfish. / Chester, Penn. [III; 1805.]


1869 June 6 / afternoon / Chester, Pa. / Ac to witness, Mr. Y. S. Walter, Editor of the Delaware Co., Republican. / They were exhibited to the Conchological Section of the Acad of Nat Science, Philadelphia—shells—specimens of Gemma Gemma. / Pop. Sci Rev 9/223. [III; 1806. "A Shower of Shell-fish." Popular Science Review, 9 (1870): 223-224. "Fall of Shell-Fish in a Rain Storm." American Naturalist, 3 (December 1869): 556. "A Shower of Shells." Fairfield Herald, (Winnsboro, S.C.), June 30, 1869, p. 2 c. 5. "The Delaware county (Pa.) Republican of the 15th says: 'On Saturday afternoon last about 3 o'clock a shower of shells fell in this vicinity. For an hour previous to the storm a heavy black cloud appeared in the west, which spread in all directions, betokening a thunderstorm of unusual violence. At half-past 2 o'clock a high wind prevailed, which subsided as the rain commenced to fall in large drops, accompanied by what others in this office supposed to be hail, but which proved on examination to be small shells resembling the shell-fish known as the round clam. We have a number of the minute shells now in our possession, gathered by a lady during the storm, which are open to the inspection of the curious or those who are doubtful on the subject."]


1869 June 9-10 / Cyclone in India / (L) / Sci Op 2/58. [III; 1807. (Science Opinion, 2 (1869): 58.)]


[1869 June 9 /] 1867 June 9, 21 / Hail / Tiflis / But the 2 calendars. For sketches of them, see Nature 41-134. [III; 1075. Symons, George James. "Remarkable Hailstones." Nature, 41 (December 12, 1889): 134-135, (3 illustrations).]


[1869 June 9 /] 1869 June 10 / Tiflis / ext hail / D-291 / See May, 1867. [III; 1808. The note copies information from page 291 of The Book of the Damned.  "Extraordinary hailstones." Popular Science News, 24 (March 1890): 34. The hail was said to have fallen at Beloi Kliutsch, located twenty miles southwest to Tbilisi (Tiflis), Georgia, on June 9, "1867," (and, this wrong year for the two falls of hail).  See: 1869 May 27 and June 9, (III; 1074). "On some Remarkable Forms of Hailstones Recently Observed in Georgia." Geological Magazine, 7 (1870): 27-29. The two falls were on May 27, (at 3 p.m.), and on June 9, (at 6 p.m.), in 1869. Abich, Hermann. "Zwei denkwürdige Hagelfälle in Georgien." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 4 (1869): 417-421, (illustrations).]


1869 June 12, etc. / Eruption / Colima, Mexico / A. J. Sci 3/2/381. [III; 1809. Sartorius, Charles. "Eruption of the Volcano of Colima in June, 1869." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 2 (1871): 381-383.]


1869 June 12 and 13 / Eruption / Colima / details / Nature 5-151. [III; 1810. "Notes." Nature, 5 (December 21, 1871): 150-152, at 151-152. Sartorius, Charles. "Eruption of the Volcano of Colima in June, 1869." Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution, 1869, 422-423.]


1869 June / Italian fireflies. / Some near Reading, summer of 1822. Nature 2-297. [III; 1811. Webb, Thomas William. "Entomological Inquiries, etc." Nature, 2 (August 11, 1870): 297-298. See: 1822 summer, (I; 962).]


1869 June 17, 18 / Met / France / BA 69-281. [III; 1812. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 281.]


1869 June 25-July 2 / Remarkable sunspots first seen 4 p.m. by Birmingham / Astro Reg 7-169. Gaz / Barvas / How far from sea? [III; 1813. Birmingham, John. "Sun Spots." Astronomical Register, 7 (August 1869): 169-70.]


1869 // summer /// Upheavals reported in harbor of Machiasport, Maine. / Nature 1-220. [III; 1814. "Notes." Nature, 1 (December 23, 1869): 219-221, at 220. "The Boston Advertiser reports...." Scientific American, n.s., 21 (December 11, 1869): 371. The "curious phenomenon" that was causing the "upheaval" of water, mud, and stones at Machias, Maine, may have culminated in the Saxby Gale on the night of October 4-5, 1869. The combinations of "perigee on the 5th at 7 a.m., lunar equinox at noon, and new moon at 2 p.m." as well as "the sun's being nearer to us in October that it was on the 7th September by at least eight seconds of parallax" led Saxby to predict "extreme bad weather," (an intense equinoctal gale), between October 5 and 7, 1869. A storm surge and perigean tide wrecked havoc along the coasts of Maine, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, just as was predicted in a letter from Frederick Allison, to the Halifax Evening Express: "I believe that a heavy gale will be encountered here on Tuesday next, the 5th Oct., beginning perhaps on Monday night, possibly deferred as late this Tuesday night; but between those two periods it seems inevitable." Unusual tidal surges may have occurred in the months before, at Machias, and other inlets near the Bay of Fundy and the Gulf of Maine. Saxby, Stephen Martin. "Equinoctial Gales." London Standard, September 16, 1869, p. 2 c. 7. Saxby, Stephen Martin. "Equinoctial Gales." London Evening Standard, September 16, 1869, p. 2 c. 1.  (Allison, Frederick. "To the Editors of the Express." Halifax Evening Express, October 1, 1869, p. 2 c. 3.) Saxby, Stephen Martin. Saxby's Weather System, or Lunar Influence on Weather. 2nd ed. London: Longman, Green, 1864. See: 1869 Oct 4, (III; 2120), and, 1869 Oct 8, (III; 2128).]


1869 July / Great water eruption / Cotopaxi, Ecuador / Nature 4-212. [III; 1815. "Notes." Nature, 4 (July 13, 1871): 210-212, at 212. "In July 1869 noises were again heard and an awful flood took place, but without earthquakes and subterranean noises. Abundant fountains of water burst forth, hundreds of immense rocks were rent and thrown down, and the rivers were flooded."]


1869 July 2 / Donlevant-le-Chateau / Something in sky, called a whirlwind / Cosmos 3/5/442. [III; 1816. "Trombe dans les nuages observée à Doulevant-le-Château." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 5 (October 23, 1869): 442-443.]


1869 July 3 / Waterspout burst at Chenoa, ac to Bloomington (Ill.) papers. Trib 15-2-6. [III; 1817. "General Notes." New York Tribune, July 15, 1869, p. 2 c. 6.]


1869 July 4, etc. / Dry fog over a great part of Europe. Maximum on 10th at Palermo. Very noticeable at Paris from the 4th to 12—Rome 7th to 14th. / La Sci Pour Tous 15-214. [III; 1818. "Des Nuages, des Brouillards, des Pluies avec Sables Observées dans l'Atmosphère de l'Italie, Principalement en 1829, et des Effets Qui en Été les Conséquences." La Science Pour Tous, 15 (no. 27; June 4, 1870): 214. "Correspondance." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 1124-1125.]


1869 July 4-12 / Paris / Dry fog maximum / 7-14 Rome / 10 Palermo / 14 Ancone / (spell see) / C.R. 70-1124. Dry fog and fall of sand and turned sun red and astonished people of Europe. [III; 1819. "Correspondance." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 1124-1125.


1869 July 5 / N.Y. Times, 1-3 / 6-5-5 // qs / Tenn / Ill / Ala. / Missouri. [III; 1820. "The Earthquake in the Southwest on Friday Morning." New York Times, July 5, 1869, p. 1 c. 3. "The Earthquake." New York Times, July 6, 1869, p. 5 c. 5.]


1869 July 7 / India / Nepal / q / III / [severe] / BA '11. [III; 1821. Milne, 721.]


1869 July 7 / 5 p.m. and then others / Comrie / scarcely perceptible tremors of earth—sounds like distant thunder / L.T., July 12-7-f. [III; 1822. "Earthquakes." London Times, July 12, 1869, p. 7 c. 6.]


1869 July 8 / Germany / 6 p.m. / Det met / Z. M. 4/394. [III; 1823. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 4 (1869): 379-396, at 394.]


1869 July 13 / Shock in Peru and eruption of Isluga. Continued, and Cotopaxi and Pichinchi, especially on 23rd and 24th. London Morning Advertiser, Sept 1-2-2. [III; 1824. "Earthquakes in South American Republics." London Morning Advertiser, September 1, 1869, p. 2 c. 2. The Isluga, Cotopaxi, and Orsono volcanoes.]


1869 July 14 / Sleeper / San Francisco Ev. Bulletin, Aug 4, Miss Susan Caroline Godsey died at her home, ab 8 miles from Hickman, Ky. Had been asleep 14 years. At first she awoke regularly twice a day. In later years oftener and her recovery was hoped for. Awake a few minutes and then drop off again to sleep. [A; 546.1, 546.2. (San Francisco Evening Bulletin, August 4, 1869.)]


1869 July 14 / Godsey case / False report of death—see Oct 27, 1873. / See June 25, 1870. [A; 547. See: 1870 June 25, (A; 620); 1870 Oct 15, (A; 633); and, 1873 Oct 27, (A; 861).]


1869 July 15 / 8:45 p.m. / Met. slowly from E to N—brilliant light / Vendome (Loir-et-Cher) / Chem News 20-71. [III; 1825. "Chemical Notices from Foreign Sources." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 20 (August 6, 1869): 69-72, at 71. "Bolide, observé par Eugène Arnoult." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 5 (July 24, 1869.): 92-93.]


1869 July 15 / Bolide at [La] Flèche / La Sci Pour Tous 14-270. [III; 1826. Jouanne, G. "Correspondance." La Science Pour Tous, 14 (no. 34; July 24, 1869): 270.]


1869 July 16 / Met / London, etc. / BA 69-264. [III; 1827. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1868-69." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1869, 216-308, at 264-265.]


[1869 July 16 /] 1869 July 19 / [LT of], 19-6-b / 21-10-f / 30-4-f // Great met of July 16. [III; 1828. Herschel, Alexander Stewart. "The Great Meteor of July 16, 1869." London Times, July 19, 1869, p. 6 c. 2. "The Great Meteor of July 16, 1869." London Times, July 21, 1869, p. 10 c.6. Bird, Frederick. "The Great Meteor." London Times, July 30, 1869, p. 4 c. 6.)]


1869 July 20 / Dark spot on Copernicus. [III; 1829.  Detaille, C. "Points sombres énigmatiques observés dans les cratères lunaires." Astronomie, 4 (1885): 308-311, at 309, (illustration).]


[1869 July 20 /] 1868 July 20 / 68? / Dark spot, south wall of Copernicus / L'Astro, 4/309-310. [III; 1418.


1869 July 20 / 9 h., 35 m / Large meteor / N.Y. City / Weekly Budget, Aug 14. [III; 1830 (Weekly Budget, August 14, 1869??? No American nor British newspaper of this name listed for this date.)]


1869 July 24 / Near Reading, a dozen "clouded yellow" butterflies. Ac to records, not taken before in Berkshire. Sci Gos 1869-210. [III; 1831. Moses, Henry. "Colias Edusa." Science Gossip, 5 (no. 57; September 1, 1869): 210.]


1869 July 31 / Hail without cloud / At Aberdeen. Rain and hail, and thunder in final 10 minutes of it, the sun shining through heavy rain. / Symons Met Mag. 4/112. [III; 1832. "Meteorological Notes on the Month." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (August 1869): 111-112, at 112.]


1869 July 31 / Lumps of ice / 2 inches in diameter / great damage at Basle. Bridport News, Aug 20. [III; 1833. "General News." Bridport News, August 20, 1869, p. 4 c. 2-3. "The accounts of the thunderstorm which passed over the neighoourhood of Basle on the 31st ult., are almost incredible, but the latest report as to the destruction of property seem unfortunately to confirm them. Hail-stones, or rather lumps of ice, two inches in diameter, are said to have fallen, fields were laid desolate, branches torn from the trees, sheep killed, and men severely wounded. Some villages look if they had been exposed to volleys of grape-shot; the slates and tiles on the roofs were broken to fragments, and not a single whole pane of glass was, of course, to be found in the whole district."]

  

1869 // summer /// Animal / Naturalists' Note Book 1869-255, from Saunders' News-letter—a strange animal caught in a rabbit trap upon the estate of the Marquis Conyngham, at Slane, Co. Meath. Size of a cat—pointed snout—in the mouth four large tusks, two protruding upward and two downward. Covered with strong, dark-brown, wiry hair—small mane running down length of back—twelve toes on each foot. [III; 1834.1, 1834.2. "Capture of a Curious Animal in a Rabbit Snare." Naturalist's Note Book, 3 (1869): 255. "Capture of a Curious Animal in a Rabbit Snare." Saunders's News-Letter,  June 1, 1869, p. 2 c. 6. Fort's "The Animal."]


1869 Aug 1 / BO / (Flesh) / San Francisco Ev. Bulletin, Aug 9. / That another shower of flesh and blood like that in Santa Clara County, sveeral months before, had been rported as having occurred, on the farm of J. Hudson, in Los Nietos Township. Said that the fall lasted about three minutes, starling about a dozen persons who were in Mr. Hudson's home at the time, attending a funeral. Flesh and blood and short, fine hair, came don and covered an area of two acres. / Flesh in fine particles and in strips from one to six inches in length. One of the witnesses, Mr Parker, went to Los Angeles, and as told in the Los Angeles News, of the 3rd, showed the Editor, strips of flesh and one of them "the lower part of a heasrt, in perfect shape, and about one and a half inches long". Said that a large quantity of this flesh had been gathered and preserved. "The day was perfectly clear, and the sun was shining brightly, and there was no perceptible breeze at the time. News of the 4th quoted. Editor writes that he had seen but had chosen not to keep the unpleasant specimens, to the regret of persons who had besieged him. "That the meat fell, we cannot doubt. Even the parsons of the neighborhood are willing to vouch for that. Where did it come from, we dare not even conjecture." [III; 1835.1 to 1835.7. (San Francisco Evening Bulletin, August 9, 1869.) "Nevada, Oregon and Southern California." Daily Alta California, August 3, 1869, p. 1 c. 7. "A shower of meat, blood and hair, at Los Nitos, twelve miles southeast of thin city, yesterday at noon, lasted three minutes. Two acres on the farm of Mr. Hudson were covered with pieces of liver, lights and other meat; one piece ten inches long was brought to this city to-day. The day was clear. A dozen men saw the shower." "The Los Angeles Flesh and Blood Shower." Daily Alta California, August 11, 1869, p. 1 c. 4. "The individual who telegraphed to you from this place about the .shower of meat at Los Nietos, in this county, on the 1st of the month, had a very elastic imagination. He covered two acres with liver, lights and blood." "Mr. Rose, a merchant at Los Nietos. stated to me that he saw the shower. Only about two hundred square feet showed traces of it; here and there spatterings ol blood on tho corn and a few pieces of meat. Old Californians state that it is caused by the California vultures, which, having gorged themselves with dead horse and risen high in the air, eject it from their stomachs either from sickness or in battle with the eagle. They have frequently been seen to do this." "These birds are very large, like the South American vulture, and can take into their stomachs a vast quantity of carrion. They are very partial to dead colts, and upon the specimen brought here for examination were seen fine hairs, evidently of the colt. In this way, no doubt, can we account for the meat showers—which vivid minds enlarge upon and expand, like the tale of 'The Three Black Crows.'" "Los Angeles County Items." Sacramento Daily Union, August 14, 1869, p. 4 c. 7. "Considerable discussion has been elicited over a reported shower of blood and meat which fell in a field of corn at Los Nietos. A piece of the flesh was examined by Dr. Hayes, under a powerful microscope, and discovered to be animal flesh. The solution of the problem seems to be, that it was ejected by a California vulture in its flight from the scene of its engorgement to its home in the mountains. There is nothing unusual in such an occurrence, as we have heard of many well attested facts of a similar nature about these immense voracious birds."]


1869 Sept 10 / (Aug. 1) / (Flesh) / Llangollen (Wales) Advertiser of—shower of flesh at Los Nietos, California, upon area of about 200 square feet. Said that the phe was attributed to disgourging vultures. / (Not in BO). [III; 1836. (Llangollen Advertiser, September 10, 1869; not found here.) "Epitome of News, British and Foreign." Aberystwith Observer, September 11, 1869, p. 3 c. 6-7. "A 'meat shower' recently took place at Los Metos, California. Only about two hundred square feet showed traces of it, and old Californians account for it by saying that it is caused by the Californian vultures, which, having gorged themselves and risen high in the air, eject what they have eaten from their stomachs, either from sickness or in battle with the eagle."]


1869 Aug / People in Peru before the q. terrified because the German scientist Falb had predicted that ab 14th of Sept in consequence of sun and moon being closer to earth than usual there would be a great q. Then came the qs of Aug. / L.T., Oct 18, and preceding issues, see index / See predicted tidal wave later that came. [III; 1837.1, 1837.2. "The West India Mails." London Times, September 16, 1869, p. 10 c. 1. "Earthquakes continued throughout the Peruvian southern provinces, especially at Iquique. Professor Falo's prediction of Peru being visited from the 10th to the 12th of August with similar earthquake catastrophes to those of last ear has not been realized.. Many inhabitants of Callao took to flight, however, dreading an inundation...." "The West India Mail." London Times, September 27, 1869, p. 5 c. 1. "Mr. Falb's prediction that the west coast of South America was to be destroyed about this time by some convulsion of nature had continued exciting the fears of all classes along the coast, which was rapidly losing its inhabitants. Business of all descriptions was at a standstill; according to the latest advices, the fears of the onhabitants had risen to extreme terror from earthquakes." "The West Indies." London Times, September 28, 1869, p. 4 c. 5-6. At Arica, on August 15, a severe shock was felt at 4:30 A.M., followed by lesser shocks at 5 and 9 A.M. "During the days of the 11th, 12th, and 13th, the time at which the first great calamity was to occur, the people being much frightened at the prophecies of the wise ones left the place and went back upon the hills, but during these days no troubles were felt." "The West Indies and Pacific." London Times, October 17, 1869, p. 5 c. 5-6. "Here in Lima and Callao we have not had any severe shocks, but people are, nevertheless, in a state of great alarm, all owing to the German astronomer's ominous prophecies. Many families are leaving the port and coming to Lima, while people in Lima are in their turn emigrating in large numbers to the open country around." (London Times, October 18, 1869, p. 8 c. 6.) In 1868, Rudolf Falb began an astronomy magazine, (Sirius: Zeitschrift für Populäre Astronomie), and wrote a book, (Grundzüge zu einer Theorie der Erdbeben und Vulcanausbrüche), which would promote his theory that the tidal forces of the moon and sun upon subterranean lava were responsible for the earthquakes and volcanic eruptions on the Earth's surface. Oliver, John A. Westwood. "Earthquake Warnings." Murray's Magazine, 1 (June 1887): 813-822. Falb's predictions of "critical days" were hailed, when an earthquake occurred, but given little attention, when none occurred. Where Alexis Perrey and Charles-Eugène Delaunay predicted a slight increase in earthquake activity due to such tidal effects, Falb attributed major earthquakes to tides as though they could be predicted to precise dates. "Finally, a tidal cause of earthquakes necessarily implies a tidal regularity in their occurrence, and so far as human research has gone, no such regularity is apparent. For these, amongst other reasons, we must refuse to give Falb's theory any more credit than Delauney's from the point of view of physical science. Nor does Falb at all improve his position by including in his vaticinations the state of the weather. Our records of earthquakes may be imperfect, but our weather registers are fairly complete; and if they prove one thing more clearly than another, it is the non-existence of more than the very faintest trace of direct lunar action." Mark Twain offered no theory but anticipated Falb with his own series of earthquake predictions, following the San Francisco earthquake of October 8, 1865. Twain, Mark. "Earthquake Almanac." Golden Era, (San Francisco), October 17, 1865, p. 1 c. 2. For examples: "Oct. 23.–Mild, balmy earthquakes"; "Nov. 1.–Terrific earthquake. This is the great earthquake month. More stars fall and more worlds are slathered around carelessly and destroyed in November than in any other month of the twelve"; and, "Nov. 2.–Spasmodic but exhilarating earthquakes, accompanied by occasional showers of rain, and churches and things." For Saxby's predicted tidal wave, see: 1869 Oct. 8, (III; 2128); and, for the immense wave, see: 1869 Sept. 29, (III: 2105 & 2106).]   


1869 Aug / Insects and drought / 1893. [III; 1838. See: (1893.)]


1869 Aug / Birds, squirrels, white ants, slugs, etc. / See 1907//. [III; 1839. See: (1907.)]


1869 Aug / Scarcity and abundance / summer, 1903. [III; 1840. See: (1903, summer.)]


1869 Aug. 1 / Spon Comb / Paris (?) / [typescript]:


In Cosmos, 3-6-242, is a physician's reportupon a case. It is a communication by Dr. Bertholle to the Societe Medico-Chirugicale: That, upon the first of August, 1869, the police had send to for Dr. Bertholle, in the matter of a woman who had been burned to death. According to Dr. Bertholle, the body was on the floor, between the chimney and the bed—remains of a woman of thirty-seven—a heavy drinker. There was nothing in the room to indicate the origin of the fire. Other dwellers in the house had heard nothing. The floor, under the body, was burned, but bed clothes, mattress, curtains showed not a trace of fire. Dr. Bertholle's report is technical and detailed: left arm totally consumed; right hand gone; no trace of internal organs in the thorax; organs in the abdomen unrecognizable.  


[A; 548. A typescript note. Bertholle, Joseph-Théophile. "Combustion humaine spontanée." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 6 (February 26, 1870): 240-242. Bertholle, Joseph-Théophile. "Combustion humaine spontanée." L'Union Médicale, s. 3 v. 9 (February 15, 1870): 251-253.]


1869 Aug. 1 / Spon Comb / France / Paris? / Cosmos 3/6/242. [A; 549. Bertholle, Joseph-Théophile. "Combustion humaine spontanée." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 6 (February 26, 1870): 240-242. See: 1869 Aug. 1, (A; 548).]


1869 Aug. / Ghost at Hampstead. [A; 550.]


1869 Aug 3 / Destructive whirlwind, Venice, 2 days before been one north of Venice / London Morn. Advertiser, 16th. [III; 1841. "A Destructive Whirlwind. " London Morning Advertiser, August 16, 1869, p. 6 c. 2. "On the Sunday morning previous, a whirlwind of almost equal violence broke down upon the mountainous region to the north of the Lago di Garda...."]


1869 Aug 3 / Near town of Apaneca, Salvaador, the volc of Ahuachapan. / L.T.-Sept. 28-4-f, 1869 / Air was heavily charged with electricity. About noon there came from the volc a whirlwind, like a black column, with loud detonations raising large logs. Followed by heavy rain. [III; 1842. "The West Indies." London Times, September 28, 1869, p. 4 c. 5-6. The Ahuachapán volcano has no recorded eruptive history, but is a thermal feature of the Apaneca range of volcanoes, so this "whirlwind" does not appear to represent a volcanic eruption.]


1869 Aug 6. / Tide at St Vincent ebbed and flowed 15 times between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. and was ascribed to a great q. somewhere. / Ayrshire Express, Aug. 28. [III; 1843. (Ayrshire Express, August 28, 1869; not at BNA.)]


1869 Aug 7 / 4 observers saw "with the naked eye" a brilliant little object about moon's diameter pass the sun's limb. / (Nature 18-663). And a Mr Vincent with a small telescope saw a crescent-shaped object ab 3 times as far from the sun. / Observatory 3/137 / St Paul's Junction, Iowa. [III; 1844. Hind, John Russell. "Stellar Objects seen during the Eclipse of 1869." Nature, 18 (October 24, 1878): 662-663. Ledger, Edmund. "Observations or supposed observations of the Transits of Intra-Mercurial planets or other Bodies across the Sun's Disk." Observatory, 3 (1879-80): 135-138, at 137.]


1869 Aug 7 / Ec. of sun / J. Sci 7-443. [III; 1845. Gilman, W.S., Jr. "The Eclipse of August 7, 1869.—'Anvil' Protuberance." Quarterly Journal of Science, 7 (October 1870): 443-448.]


1869 Aug 7 / NY City / 7:45 p.m., met as bright as Venus shot from point several degrees west of Arcturus. / 9 p.m., met from Vega to point near Antares. / N.Y. Trib. 14-2-3. [III; 1846. Fletcher, Rd. "Brilliant Meteors." New York Tribune, August 14, 1869, p. 2 c. 3.]


1869 Aug 7 / Pop. Astro., 2/332 / at Shelbyville, Kentucky, by Prof. Winlock and Alvan G. Clark, Jr. Small objects crossing field of the finder, in straight line, and by Clark and (Blake) soon after. [III; 1847. "Meteors Observed During a Total Eclipse of the Sun." Popular Astronomy, 2 (March 1895): 332-333. Report of the Superintendent of the United States Coast Survey, Showing the Progress of the Survey during then Year 1869. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1872, 136 & 143. A possible explanation for some of these "small objects" seen atop the college building at Shelbyville might be offered, (at page 136): "The birds about the building were apparently quite excited during the totality and flew about wildly."]


1869 Aug 7 / Pop Astro 3/159 / See by Prof Swift at Mattoon, Ill. Saw objects crossing the moon—too improbable that meteors—he thinks they were thistle down. [III; 1848. Swift, Lewis. "Meteors Seen During a Solar Eclipse." Popular Astronomy, 3 (November 1895): 159. See: 1878 July 29, (IV; 2410).]


1869 Aug 8 / (+) / N./Y. Times, 1-4 / 7-4-7 / 11-8-3 / 12-4-6 // The eclipse. [III; 1849. "The Eclipse To-Day." New York Times, August 7, 1869, p. 4 c. 7. "The Eclipse." New York Times, August 8, 1869, p. 1 c. 4. "The Eclipse." New York Times, August 11, 1869, p. 8 c. 3. "The Eclipse." New York Times, August 12, 1869, p. 4 c. 6-7.]


1869 Aug 10 / Perseids considered by Mr. Wood to be approaching minimum / BA 70-101. [III; 1850. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1869-70." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1870, 76-102, at 102.]


1869 Aug 10 / Perseids below the average / L.T. 14-9-5. [III; 1851. "The August Meteors." London Times, August 14, 1869, p. 9 c. 5.]


1869 Aug 10 / 146 Perseids counted at Marseilles remarked for large size. London Ev. Star, Aug 25. [III; 1852. (London Evening Star, August 25, 1869; wrong title???)]


1869 Aug 10 / Capt of vessel bet Bristol and Cork kept watch for Perseids and, though a clear sky, saw not one. / Standard 17-5-7. [III; 1853. Kemp, George. "Meteor Showers." London Standard, August 17, 1869, p. 5 c. 7.]


1869 Aug 12 / Standard of / That near Mendrisio, in the Ticino, a plague of black caterpillars, which entered houses and crept into beds, causing painful swellings by their touch. Thousands been killed, but no decrease in numbers. In some places pubic prayers for removal of the scourge. [III; 1854. "Another Plague." London Standard, August 12, 1869, p. 5 c. 3.]


1869 // summer /// Gipsy moth / In Sci Gos, Feb., 1870, cor writes he had liberated a "largish" number of caterpillars of the gipsy moth. Never able afterward to discover cocoons or moths. / March number, someone else had liberated them in England—never heard from again. [III; 1855. Clifford, J.R.S. "The Gipsy-Moth (Liparis dispar)." Science Gossip, 6 (no. 62; February 1, 1870): 32. "The Gipsy Moth (Liparis dispar)." Science Gossip, 6 (no. 63; March 1, 1870): 71.]


1869, the "Insect Year" (begins):


                                                                                                   

[Thayer: "From this point until you read a disclaimer, all the notes were within one wire clip affixed by Fort," (which ends with "1869 // autumn, (III; 2056.).]


1869 // summer /// Gypsy moth first appear in Amer? / Said that a French Canadian had brought a caterpillar from Europe in 1869, experimenting upon hybrid silkworms that could withstand the climate, and then spread. / Chicago Tribune, July 15. [III; 1856. (Chicago Tribune, July 15, 1869.)]


1869 Aug / Syrphi / Isle Wight / Aug. 14, 1864. [III; 1857. See: 1864 Aug 14, (III; 592)]


1869 Aug / Insect year / 1892. [III; 1858. See: (1892.)]


1869 Aug / Insect year / 1886. [III; 1859. See: (1886).]


1869 Aug / Swarms of 1921 / not said insect famine but drought equals this. [III; 1860. See: (1921).]


1869 // summer /// Locusts in England / Notes and Queries 2/4/267, 397 / 5/37. [III; 1861. Taylor, Henry W.S. "Locusts in England." Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 4 (October 3, 1857): 267. "Locusts in England." Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 4 (November 14, 1857): 397-398. Taylor, E.S. "Locusts in England." Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 5 (January 9, 1858): 37.]


1869 Aug / Butterflies one place / ants other place / July 16, 1926. [III; 1862. See: (1926 July 16).]


1869 Aug / Insects scarce and abundant / See summer, 1865. [III; 1863. See: (1865).]


1869 Aug / Swarms / 1888. [III; 1864. See: (1888).]


1869 Aug / Insects / See autumn, 1872. [III; 1865. See: 1872 autumn, (IV: 975 & 976).]


1869 Aug 12 / Insects / See Sept., 1921. [III; 1866. See: (1921 Sept).]


1869 Oct / Locusts and drought in England / July 6, 1921. [III; 1867. See: (1921 July 6).]


1869 Aug 12 / A green fly in London / Feb 21, 1921. [III; 1868. See: (1921 Feb 21).]


1869 Aug 13 / Swarms / 1892. [III; 1869. See: (1892).]


1869 Aug 10 / Insects and drought / June, July, etc., 1921. [III; 1870. See: (1921).]


1869 Aug 13 / Locusts / Ireland / London / Aug 31, 1857. [III; 1871. See: 1857 Aug 31, (II; 2082).]


1869 Oct / Locusts and sunpots / Editorial, N.Y. Times, 1879, Jan 15-4-6. [III; 1872. "The maximum and minimum of sun-spots...." New York Times, January 15, 1879, p. 4 c. 6-7.]


1869 Oct / Locusts in Feb., in England / 1875. [III; 1873. See: 1875 Feb 25, (IV; 1609).]


1869 Aug. / Insect year / 1846. [III; 1874. See: (1846).]


1869 Aug 10 / Hosts of saw flies and ladybirds / Aug 2, 1858. [III; 1875. See: 1858 July 31, (II; 2218).]


1869 Aug. / Locust in winter / Feb 25, 1875. [III; 1876. See: 1875 Feb 25, (IV; 1609).]


1869 Oct / Locusts / appeared in 1846 / Field, Oct 23, 1869. [III; 1877. (Field, October 23, 1869.)]


1869 Oct / Locusts / Ireland / London / 1857 / [LT], Sept 1-7-d / 2-7-d / Aug 31-8-c. [III; 1878. "A Strange Visitor." London Times, August 31, 1857, p. 8 c. 3. "A Live Locust in London." London Times, September 1, 1857, p. 7 c. 4. "Locusts in England." London Times, September 2, 1857 p. 7 c. 6. See: 1857 Aug 3, (II; 2082). These reports of locusts are from 1857, (not 1869).]


1869 Aug 13 / "Harpatus" / near Dover / Aug 12, 1839. [III; 1879. See: 1839 Aug 12, ([II; 74).]


1869 Aug 13 / (Col) / Ants of a foreign species / Jan. 10, 1913. [III; 1880. See: (1913 Jan 10).]


1869 Aug / Aphides / July 24, 1839. [III; 1881. See: 1839 July 24, (II; 64).]


1869 // summer /// See Summer Insects, etc., 1892. [III; 1882. See: (1892).]


1869 Aug / L.B. / See Aug 8, 1826. [III; 1883. See: 1826 Aug 8, (I; 1274).]


1869 Aug 13 / (+) / L.B. / (Lead up to all year) / See Aug 20, 1864. / See July 24, '69. [III; 1884. See: (1864 Aug 20), and, 1869 July 24, (III; 1973, 1974, & 1985).]


1869 Aug / L.B.'s / Summer of 1807. [III; 1885. See: 1807 Aug ?, (I; 207).]


1869 Oct / No locust in immature state in Britain ever recorded / Sci Gos, May 1895, p. 83. [III; 1886. Briggs, C.A. "Locusts in London." Science Gossip, n.s., 2 (May 1895): 83.]


1869 Oct / Locust in Eng. / Feb. 25, 1875. [III; 1887. See: 1875 Feb 25, (IV; 1609).]


1869 Oct / Locusts / England and Ireland / Aug 31, 1857. [III; 1888. See: 1857 Aug 31, (II; 2082).]


1869 (Oct) / Great numbers of locusts in England in 1846 / Field, Oct. 3, 1857. [III; 1889. See: 1846, (II; 913).]


1869 Oct / Spiders / Just such a fall of spiders away from webs, in Oct 5, 1869. [III; 1890. Refs???]


1869 Aug / L.B. / Aug 8, 1826 / Always about at Brighton. [III; 1891. See: 1826 Aug 8, (I; 1274).]


1869 Aug 31 / See b. swan, 1846. / Black swan killed near Lowestoft "without the slightest traces of an escaped bird. / Zoologist 1869-1867. [III; 1892. Gunn, T.E. "Black Swan on the Suffolk Coast." Zoologist, s. 2 v. 4 (1869): 1867.]


1869 Aug 13 / Swarms / 2 kinds / March 25, 1889. [III; 1893. See: (1889 March 25.)]


1869 Aug / Insects / See 1893. / summer. [III; 1894. See: (1893).]


1869 // summer /// Daily News / have Aug 15—Sept 15. [III; 1895.]


1869 July-Aug / LLoyd's Weekly Newspaper / Have. [III; 1896.]


1869 Aug 13 / Ladybirds / France / No mention in Petites Nouvelles Entomologiques. [III; 1897.]


1869 Aug 13 / Nothing of L.B. in Cosmos. [III; 1898.]


1869 Aug 13 / L.B. / Nothing findable in Jour. des Debats. [III; 1899.]


1869 Aug 13 / Nothing of L. birds in Rev. et Mag de Zoologie, 1869. [III; 1900.]


1869 Aug 13 / L.B. / No mention of ladybirds in pubs of Ent Socs of France and Belg. / Nothing in L'Abeille. [III; 1901.]


1869 // summer /// BO / In Battersea Park (London) clous of insects, hovering over trees in such smoke-like volume that people thought trees been set afire. / Field, June 4, 1870, p. 474. [III; 1902. (Field, June 4, 1870, p. 474.)]


[1869] // Insect famine might mean mysterious awareness other parts of this earth. / But the foreign lb's clearly (?) not of this Earth—not of England, not from France. [III; 1903.]


1869 Aug 13 / See Aug 13, 1841. / Ramsgate, etc. / vast swarms ladybirds / L.T. Index. [III; 1904. "Ladybirds." London Times, August 19, 1869, p. 4 c. 6. "The Great Flight of Ladybirds." London Times, August 21, 1869, p. 5 c. 2. "Lady-Birds." London Times, August 25, 1869, p. 4 c. 5. "Lady-Birds." London Times, August 28, 1869, p. 10 c. 6. There is no note regarding ladybirds for August 13, 1841. See: 1847 August 16, etc., (II; 1137).]


1869 Aug 13 / The lb's described in The Field of Aug 28. "Strange to say, they are all, with a very few exceptions, yellow." Cor writes that never before had he, so far as he could remember, seen yellow ladybirds of this species (the seven-spotted), the yellow ones in his experience having been the 22-spotted. [III; 1905.1, 1905.2. (Field, August 28, 1869.)]


1869 Aug 14 / l.b. / Dover "covered with them". / Sci. Op. 2-26. "I some exceptional instances being accompanied by number of wasps." [III; 1906. (Scientific Opinion, 2-26.)]


1869 Aug 13 / In the Thanet Advertiser (Ramsgate and Margate News). The enormous numbers told of and it is said that there could be no doubt that they had come from the Continent. [III; 1907. (Thanet Advertiser, 1869.)]


1869 Aug 14 / Ramsgate / bathers with a rash of them / eczema of them. [III; 1908. Refs???]


1869 Aug 13 / ldbs / The slaughter enormous. Whereever passed over water, it caught many—D. News, Aug 23—cor tells of skimming hundreds from a cistern. [III; 1909. "Lady-Birds." London Daily News, August 23, 1869, p. 5 c. 1.]


1869 Aug 13 / In Land and Water, quoted L.T., Aug 21, description of them, pointing out their "feeble flight". Spoken of as coming "in clouds from foreign shores"—What foreign shores? [III; 1910. (Land and Water, 1869.) "The Great Flight of Ladybirds." London Times, August 21, 1869, p. 5 c. 2. "Whence these ladybirds came and where they were hatched, whether in Central Russia, France, or Germany, and how they managed to fly with feeble wings across the sea between England and the Continent, no hman beings knows."]


1869 Aug 13 / Aug 21, Rugby Gazette, said that latter part of the week of 7-14th. the lbs had covered the cliffs at Walton-on-the-Naze (Essex), having come from inland—on the 15th were flying back. Nothing said that were seen coming from inland, simply that they appeared and thickly covered the ground. [III; 1911.1, 1911.2. (Rugby Gazette, August 21, 1869; not at BNA.)]


1869 Aug 13 / (+) / Editorial in the Field, Aug 28—In many parts of Kent, fires lighted to burn them; in Folkstone—so recorded—drains opened and bushels of them swept in. / (+) "Our friend, Mr. Jenner Weir, thinks these migrants slightly different from the ordinary English specimens of the same insect. The red is paler and there are divers slight differences that rather indicate a foreign origin. [III; 1912.1, 1912.2. (Field, August 28, 1869.)]


1869 Aug 13 / Stress that a yellow flight (foreign) / Do red describing for 1848. [III; 1913.]


1869 Aug / Field, Oct. 1, 1864 / Editor writes that ladybirds move from place to place in search of aphides but otherwise are not migratory. [III; 1914. (Field, October 1, 1864.)]


1869 Aug 13 / Plan / Tell ladybirds. Syrps with them. / What other go back to June. The mystery of cold space. Answer is rising temperature with insects of October with warm air. [III; 1915.]


1869 Aug / L.b's / Worchstershire visited by a plague of them. / Field, March 12, 1870. [III; 1916. (Field, March 12, 1870.)]


1869 // Entomologists Annual, 1870, says was an insect-famine so that many swallows starved to death. [III; 1917. Knaggs, H. Guard. "Notes on New and Rare British Lepidoptera (Excepting Tineina) in 1869." Entomologists Annual, 1870, 121-135, at 121-122.]


1869 Aug / N. / L.B. / Trans. Norfolk and Norwich Naturalists Soc.-1-62 / Mr. T. Southwell tells of the arrival of the ladybirds in Norfolk. He thinks that their onward movements in search of food would account for the appearance on the shore that led to the idea they had come from the Continent, unable to accept that their powers of flight could have carried them over the sea. He says that upon July 24th off Hunstanton was seen a mass of dead ladybirds in a stripe ten feet broad and two or three miles along. These ladybirds he thinks had left the Norfolk shore alighting on sand then drowned in a rising tide.  At this place was a tremendous swarm of Syrphidae, that it seems had accompanied the ladybirds and were saved by their superor powers of flight. He thinks that those of August could never have come from the Continent, but unobserved had gone out from the Norfolk coast and had been blown back. [III; 1918.1 to 1918.5. Southwell, Thomas. "Note on the Recent Visitation of Lady-Birds, &c." Transactions of the Norfolk and Norwich Naturalists' Society, 1 (1869-1874): 62-64.]


1869 Aug 13 / In the Times, Aug 28, cor describes the cloud that came in an East wind as if from Calais. Asks that naturalists in France find where the origin. [III; 1919. "Lady-Birds." London Times, August 28, 1869, p. 10 c. 6.]


1869 Aug 15 / L.B.'s / London account in Zoologist 2/4/1840 / and 1922. [III; 1920. Healy, Charles. "A Swarm of Ladybirds." Zoologist, s. 2 v. 4 (1869): 1840. Cordeaux, John. "The Last of the Ladybirds." Zoologist, s. 2 v. 4 (1869): 1922.]


1869 Aug / LB / They made trees look fruitful and eccentric as to size of the cluster. Strawberries on elm trees, oak tress with tomatoes, etc. [III; 1921.]


1869Aug 13 / (Times) / Reached London on 15th. / Children scooping them up and filling paper bags with them. Someone explains that so abundant because state of the climate favorable this year (but see other notes on unfav.). Such explainers ignore that the lb's were seen to arrive in England. Spread not only to London. Times, 28th, that on 14th, 15th, 16[th], "countless multitudes" appeared upon the coast of Kent and Sussex. / On 15th, at Dover, another "enormous multitude of these insects, like a cloud, coming over the sea as if from Calais. Said that earlier this day had been a similar occurrence when they had rattled against east windows like colored hail. This writer can't think that swarm after swarm had been blown from English shores and then blown back. He has to think they came from France and hopes observers there can explain. [III; 1922.1 to 1922.4. "Ladybirds." London Times, August 19, 1869, p. 4 c. 6. "Lady-Birds." London Times, August 28, 1869, p. 10 c. 6.]


1869 Aug 14-15 / (+) / Ramsgate / lb's / "Languid and weak, either from long flight or absence of food." "The majority were of large size and of a dull yellow hue." / The Student 4-160. [III; 1923. "Great Swarm of Lady-Birds." Student and Intellectual Observer, 4 (1870): 160.]


1869 Aug 18 / Standard of—Cor. writes that Lady birds had appeared upon the coast of Essex covering the cliffs of Walton-on-the-Naze. So incrediable the notion that they had flown from France that this writer, like others, says that a wind blowing from England appeared to have taken them E out to sea—wind veering—carrying them back. Standard, Aug 19—at Hastings—impossible to take a step without crushing some. 2 letters upon vast swarms in London on 14th and 15th. Standard, Aug. 20—swarms in St. Leonard's-on-Sea, Southend, Essex and Bedford. Cor from St. Leo. writes "They all seem to be much larger than the common ladybird; of a paler color, with more spots. Standard, 21st, at Woodbridge—"myriads." [III; 1924.1, 1924.2, 1924.3. "Ladybirds." London Standard, August 19, 1869, p. 7 c. 1. "Ladybirds." London Standard, August 20, 1869, p. 5 c. 2. (London Standard, August 21, 1869.)]


1869 Aug 14 / ac to cor to Times of 21st or 28th / On 15th, a cloud of lb's at Dover / As if coming from Calais. [III; 1925. "Lady-Birds." London Times, August 28, 1869, p. 10 c. 6.]


1869 Aug 13 / (Bug—Evidence) / All flights ab. Aug 13. / Not another here since 1869. / Notes upon U.S. phe especially abundant between 1880 and 1895 but not one. / See 1902 instance—cosmic times / But aphides of this earth do migrate. / There are no flights of terrestral ladybirds. / Then we conceive of an impulse somewhere else ab. Aug. 13. / Then arriving in a well aggregated column and vigorous they did not come far. [III; 1926.1, 1926.2.]


1869 Oct 3 (.) / Spiders / Kendal Mercury 9-4-3 / That soon after the 3rd, people became conscious of an unusual presence in the air. Said they were spiders—air alive with them—myriads of small brown insects upon long streamers. Said covered the town and neighborhood. Said that they came in with more genial weather. [III; 1927.1, 1927.2. "A Shower of Spiders." Kendal Mercury, October 9, 1869, p. 2 c. 6.]


1869 Oct 4 / Spiders / Carlisle / Carlisle Journal 5-2-4 / A shower of spiders a dark mahogany color an came down in countless numbers. Ac to description not aeronautical spiders, no mention of falling webs, but said that after landing they began to spin webs. "Small spiders, resembling ants in form, but smaller." Webs were "whiter and more visible than those of ordinary spiders". [III; 1928.1, 1928.2. (Carlisle Journal, October 5, 1869, p. 2 c. 4; 1869 not at BNA.)]


1869 Oct 8 / (spiders) / The account is in Daily News 14-6-1. Same account. [III; 1972. "Strange Phenomenon." London Daily News, October 14, 1869, p. 6 c. 1.]


1869 Oct. 12 (before) / Tiverton Times of—(same cor as other note) / That a day or two before writing—had seen in a field and also in the streets of Tiverton a vast number of strands of spider web, and spiders moving in the air. Says that members of the British Association lived in Tiverton but they had not explained. [III; 1929.1, 1929.2. (Tiverton Times, October 12, 1869; not at BNA.)]


1869 Oct. 15 / Webs / Tiverton Times, Oct. 19—That South Moulten had been visited on 15th by "a wonderful phenomenon. About noon suddenly came intense heat equal to any temperature in July. In the forenoon had been noted "cobwebs like pieces of cotton" floating in the air. They increased in numbers and continued to fall all the rest of the day "in wondrous quantities—covering fields—houses, persons, silk hats seeming to have a special attraction for them. "They were perfectly white, and in the form of iummensely long shreds, at intervals on which were large flocculent masses like balls of gun cotton." "The shreds were quite tough, like hemp, and extremely coarse" but they were composed of striated fibres. "It appeared remarkable that insects were not entangled by them." "Some few say that they remarked small spiders attached i rare instances." The wind was northwest by north. The northwest writer says that in Barnstaple, 12 miles to the W.N.W., they had not appeared. [III; 1930.1 to 1930.5. (Tiverton Times, October 19, 1869; not at BNA.)]


1869 Oct. 12 / (Flies) / Tiverton Times of / Cor writes that swarms of flies had collected against the upper window of the Town Hall. "Myriads of the the insects were there congregated and gave two or three of the windows a blackened appearance." "A short time since." He hopes that readers who had been accounting for the plague of ladybirds might explain this phe. He tells of the spider webs. [III; 1931.1, 1931.2. (Tiverton Times, October 12, 1869; not at BNA.)]


1869 Oct / Spiders / Plymouth paper / Western Daily Mercury/ nothing. [III; 1932.]


1869 Oct 15 / Where L and D, nothing in Luton Gazette and Dunstable Courier. [III; 1933.]


1869 (Oct 4) / Tiverton Times of Oct 19, in commenting upon fall at Carlisle(in another column), says that "A similar visitation was noticed at Kendal, but no explanation has as yet been offered for the strange phenomenon." / K. is 35 miles from Carlisle. [III; 1934.1, 1934.2. (Tiverton Times, October 19, 1869; not at BNA.)]


1869 Nov 19 / See Oct. / E Mec of / That the town of S. Moulton, N. Devon, had been visited by cobwebs. "They were perfectly white, in long shreds, some many yards in length, quite tough, extremely coarse. Insects were not entangled in them, but in a few instances spiders were seen attached to them. The microscope revealed them to be composed of striated fibre distinctly separated, at distances nucleated." [III; 1935.1, 1935.2, 1936. "Singular Phenomenon." English Mechanic, 10 (no. 243; November 19, 1869): 235-236.]


1869 Oct 15 / Point is, I have looked in Barnstaple and Bideford Times and other papers. Seems that this great fall that was seen, so far as I can find out, only at Carlisle, did come down. / (Tiverton 18 miles SE of S Moulton) / Not at Tiv, either. [III; 1937.]


1869 Aug / L.B. det / dropping on—a cloud of them taking the form of Westminster Abbey—dark cloud precipitating enormous crystal / own suspicion that everything that had form only outlines upon underlying pattern. [III; 1938. Refs???]


[III; 1939. "Duplicate of III-1982." See: 1869 Aug 31, (III; 1892).]


1869 // summer /// All the invasions at or near the Coast. [III; 1940.]


1869 Oct, early in / Cor to The Field, Nov. 27, writes that 2 locusts had been captured at Burton-on-Trent. Says that not the locust that had frequently before been seen in England but was the locust of northern Africa and Asia. So far as he was aware, the insect had never before visited Europe. [III; 1941.1, 1941.2. (Field, November 27, 1869.)]


1869 Oct / The Burton locust. It was exhibited at the Meeting of the Entomological Society, Nov. 15, 1869—"It appeared to be identical with a species [of which the British Museum possess five examples] from North Bengal." It was found in a yard of a brewery and one of the entomologists suggested it came from N. Bengal in an empty returned ale cask. This would have it only coincidence with the locusts of Plymouth, etc. [III; 1942.1, 1942.2. "November 15, 1869." Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, 17 (1869): Proceedings, 24-27, at 24, (xxiv).]


1869 Oct 8-9 / Locusts / Writer in the Journal of the Plymouth Institute 4-156 says that he believes there is no record of a previous visit to England b these locusts (Acridium peregrinum). "The heat in the shade on the 8th and 9th was 74 degrees and 76 degrees Fahr. May not the temperature have influenced the migration?" / My own notion is that volume of heated air and the locusts from the same place. [III; 1943.1, 1943.2. Rowe, Joshua Brooking. "Natural History Notes." Annual Reports and Transactions of the Plymouth Institution and Devon and Cornwall Natural History Society, 4 (1869-1873): 154-156 , at 156.]


1869 Oct / Ent. Mo. Mag. of / And yet a cor writes that ac to his experience and reading, insects had been unusually scarce, summer of 1869. / Editor writes that especially white butterflies had been unusually scarce. / In Jan, 1870, issue, someone else writes upon the subject, especially the scarcity of butterflies. / Feb., 1870, p. 218, another writes and mentions "the unfavorable season" of 1869. [III; 1944.1, 1944.2. Marsden, Herbert. "Note on the scarcity of Lepidoptera in 1869." Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 6 (January, 1870): 191. Bloomfield, E.N. "Lepidoptera captured at Guestling in 1869." Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 6 (February 1870): 218.]


1869 Oct / locusts / In Ent Mo Mag 7-1, said these locusts were new to European fauna. Said mentioned in no work upon European Orthoptera (Italics). Said at Plymouth many taken; so large that one of them was thought to be an escaped canary. The writer says that he had investigated. Had a query published in a French entomological publication, but no news reached him that they been seen in any part of Europe. He says that if had come from Africa, scarcely likely that the passage would have escaped notice in Italy, France or Spain. / Here said was an African locust but in the Entomologist said appeared to be identical with a species from Bengal. / Here mention 5 counties in which been seen. [III; 1945.1 to 1945.4. Brown, Edwin. "Remarks on the Recent Migration to Britain of Acridium Peregrinum, a Locust New to the European Fauna." Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 7 (June 1879): 1-3. Newman, Edward. "English Locusts." Entomologist, 5 (January 1870); 13-14.]


1869 // BO / Cor, Field, Aug 28, says of those that visited Shropshire, were yellow of a species he had no recollection of having ever seen before. / In a "leader" the Editor writes that in ionion of Mr Jenner Weir they were different from ordinary English specimens. "The red is paler, and there are divers slight differences that rather indicate a foreign origin." [III; 1946.1, 1946.2. (Field, August 28, 1869.)]


1869 Aug. 13 / BO / LBs / Nothing in Bibliotheque Universelle nor Revue des Cours Scientifiques. [III; 1947.]


1869 July / Cor to Sci Op., 3-261, saw oblong white objects ab ⅓ inch long on leaves and found them to be cotton-like secretions of a new insect for which he proposed the name Coccus flocciferus. [III; 1948. "A New Insect: Coccus Flocciferus." Scientific Opinion, 3 March 16, 1870): 261. Westwood, John Obadiah. "The various instincts exhibited by different species of animals...." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1870 (March 5): 308, (illustration). Westwood's new species was named Pulvinaria floccifera.]


1869 Aug 13 / In Galignani's Messenger (Aug 22) (Paris), the invasion of England by the lb's is told of. But no mention in any issue of this newspaper of lb's seen in or going from, France. / Also told of 5th and Sept. 4. [III; 1949. "Ladybirds." Galignani's Messenger, August 22, 1869, p. 2 c. 3. "Ladybirds." London Times, August 19, 1869, p. 4 c. 6. The Galignani's Messenger copied the Times article.]


1869 // Scarcity / Field, Sept 4 / Cor writes that he had been in more than 6 weeks at Axminster he had seen exactly 4 houseflies. [III; 1950. (Field, September 4, 1869.)]


1869 (Aug. 25) / BO / p. 193 / This is Sci Op. 2-292 / "Thrips. [III; 1951. (Scientific Opinion, 2-292.)]


1869 Aug 12 / L.B. / See Aug., 1807. [III; 1952. See: 1807 Aug ?, (I; 207).]


1869 Sept 8 / Myriads of lb's near the Humber. / Zoologist 1869-1922. [III; 1953. Cordeaux, John. "The Last of the Ladybirds." Zoologist, s. 2 v. 4 (1869): 1922.]


(1869) // BO / LBs / First ap at Ramsgate on 9th. / Land and Water, Aug 21 // Det glitter in sunlight // L.W., Sept 4 / Amusing description of 5 cats attracted to a lawn, gazing with amazement at the multitudes on the lawn, gazing as intently as if hypnotized. [III; 1954.1, 1954.2. (Land and Water, August 21, 1869. Land and Water, September 4, 1869.)]


1869 Sept 5 and 6./ BO / Inverness Courier, Sept. 9—that suburbs of Burntisland infested with swarms of the fly known as the "spinning jenny". "They literally covered the Links and road east of the town, and clustered in the doorways and window sills of the houses." [III; 1955. "A Plague of Flies." Inverness Courier, September 9, 1869, p. 3 c. 6.]


1869 // BO / Locusts peculiarity is that though a main swarm in Oct, others earlier. One Sept 14th, and one in August in Gloucestershire. / Field, Oct. 23. [III; 1956. (Field, October 23, 1869.)]


1869 Aug 28 / Gardener's Magazine of—discussion of the subject, said, p. 100, that in 1868 the caterpillar of the small white butterfly had been common. So how account for the rarity in 1869? [III; 1957. (Gardeners' Magazine, August 28, 1869, p. 100.)]


1869 Aug 28 and Sept 4 / Ayrshire Express of—several notices of hummingbirds that had been seen in different places in Scotland. The Editor writes that they must have been hummingbird moths. [III; 1958. (Ayrshire Express, August 28, 1869. Ayrshire Express, September 4, 1869; not at BNA. Only one hummingbird was reported in John Ballantine's garden, at Cumnock, Scotland, in a few newspapers.)]


1869 Aug 20 / BO / Scarce / Standard / Writers says that at St Leonard's-on-Sea, all insects except ladybirds and black ants were "few and far between". // Showered down at Shoeburyness that men interfered with in work in the brick fields. / Standard, 20th. [III; 1959.1, 1959.2, 1959.3. "Ladybirds." London Evening Standard, August 20, 1869, p. 2 c. 6.]


1869 Aug. 24 / BO / At Long Benton appeared immense number of Pieris rapae, so scarce everywhere else. / Ent. Mo. Mag., Dec, 1869. Swarms falling every garden. Thousands killed by the gardeners. [III; 1960. Bold, T.J. "Great abundance of Pieris rapae." Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 6 (December 1869): 171.]


1869 Aug 18 / BO / Aberdeen Free Press, Aug 20 / For two hours Inverness invaded by midges. "At some points the cloud was so dense that people had to hold their breath and run through." [III; 1961. "An extraordinary flight of midges...." Aberdeen Free Press, August 20, 1869, p. 8 c. 5.]


1869 Aug 18 / The midges told of in Inverness Courier, of 19th, and said that been unusual number of aphides. [III; 1962. "Flight of Midges." Inverness Courier, August 19, 1869, p. 5 c. 6.]


1869 Aug 14 / Standard of / Extraordinary abundance in Donegal Bay, of salmon, mackeral, herrings and other species. [III; 1963. "Remarkable Abundance of Fish in Donegal Bay." London Standard, August 14, 1869, p. 3 c. 3.]


1869 // For several days early in Sept—air full and earth covered with yet another swarm of insects. / Gardener's Chronicle, Sept 18 / This at Beccles for several days—gnats "nothing like such an infliction had ever been seen by the 'oldest inhabitant.'" [III; 1964. "Yet another Swarm of Insects." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1869 (September 18): 991.]


[1869] // BO / LBs / Land and Water, Aug 28 / Cor writes that with them were osome with colors reversed: black bodies and red spots. / Sept 4—In Land & W, description of the invasion of 15th. Watched as a dark cloud coming in from the sea. [III; 1965. (Land and Water, August 28, 1869.)]


1869 // BO / Fireflies had been so numerous that they had been "denounced as a nuisance". [III; 1966. "Fire-Flies in Surrey." London Times, July 20, 1869, p. 11 c. 1. "Having been in the tropics, I recognized my beautiful visitors, which had been, so numerous were they, denounced as nuisances."]


1869 // BO / L. and W., Sept 4—description of cloud of beetles thought to have been (Aphodius contaminatus) last of August, at Ullswater. An army that flew in regiments occupying ½ hour in passing. /// 266 / 44. [III; 1967. (Land and Water, September 4, 1869.)]


1869 [July 31] // BO / Shower of frogs at Henwick, near Worcester. / Dover Telegraph, Aug 25. [III; 1968. (Dover Telegraph, August 25, 1869; not at BNA.) "Shower of Frogs near Worcester." Birmingham Daily Gazette, August 5, 1869, p. 6 c. 6. "A correspondent sends us the following:—On Saturday evening last, about seven o’clock, I happened to make a call upon a friend in the Henwick road, near Worcester, and, after a little conversation, lasting a quarter of an hour, I resumed my walk up the road; but, to my great astonishment, found the way, for a quarter of a mile, covered with myriads of minute frogs, hopping about as lively as so many newly-landed little sailors. They were about the size of a sixpence or a shilling, some a little larger. Now, I should state that nothing of the kind was visible fifteen minutes before,—that is, when we entered our friend’s dwelling. Talking to a respectable person in the neighbourhood upon the subject, we were informed that a similar phenomenon occurred something like a year ago; but, on that occasion, they were toads, not frogs, being of a much darker colour."]


[1869 July 31 /] 1869 Aug 7 / frgs / Cor to Weekly Budget (London), Aug 14 / On Henwick road, near Worcester road, for ¼ mile covered with myriads of little frogs size of a sixpence to a shilling. He had passed that way ¼ of an hour before and not one visible. Says were frogs and not toads. Says year before such an invasion of little toads had been seen. [III; 2033.1, 2033.2. (London Weekly Budget, August 14, 1869.)  See: 1869 July 31, (III; 1968).]


1869 Aug 21 / Insects / Field of / Cor writes that one afternoon "last week" (so about middle of August) there was a swarm of midges or "thunder bugs" between Wingham and Adisham. Seems not of local origin. Cor's clothes covered. So other persons whos aid "that they had never previously been so assailed." [III; 1969.1, 1969.2. (Field, August 21, 1869.)]


1869 August / At Long Benton. Immense swarms of small, black Thrips swarmed into houses and were swept from the walls and floors like dust; doorsteps black with thousands of them. / Ent. Mo Mag, 1869-171. [III; 1970. Bold, T.J. "Great abundance of Thrips." Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 6 (December 1869): 171.]


1869 Aug 25 / Scarborough / sudden appearance of myriads of a minute winger insect. of a species of "Thrips / There had been similar swarms in the summer of 1859. / Sci Opinion 2-292. [III; 1971. (Scientific Opinion, 2-292.)]


1869 July 24 / Dead Ladybirds on Norfolk Coast. / See Aug trans Norfolk. Syriphidaes with them. [III; 1973. Southwell, Thomas. "Note on the Recent Visitation of Lady-Birds, &c." Transactions of the Norfolk and Norwich Naturalists' Society, 1 (1869-1874): 62-64.]


1869 July 24 / Off coast of Norfolk a mass of dead ladybirds ab. 10 feet broad and two or three miles long. / Sci Gos 1869-231 / Ab 9 miles from Coast. / At same time an immense swarm of Syrphidae. [III; 1974. Southwell, Thomas. "Insect Visitation." Science Gossip, 5 (no. 58; October 1, 1869): 231-232, at 231.]


1869 Sept 12 / Boro' Bridge / Unknown little moth caught. The wings were composed of feathers. Nothing like it described in Newman's British Moths and similar works. / Sci Op 2-359. [III; 1975. (Scientific Opinion, 2-359.)]


1869 Oct 8 / BO / 2 p.m. / Large white flakes if web fell at Cowes. / L. and Water, Oct 23 / And an "immense quantity of flakes" at Andover, Sept 29, ac to F. Buckland. According to my records these 6 (?) falls in period of 2 weeks more than equalled all other such falls in England since the year 1800. [III; 1976.1, 1976.2. (Land and Water, October 23, 1869.)]


1869 Aug 25 / Field of Aug 28 / Margate "overwhelmed" by a new invasion. A wasp-like fly—two species. Tremendous numbers. "They are slow, stupid and hungry, and quite harmless." Another cor—"On Wednesday (25th) I went to Ramsgate by steamboat and as we approached within five or six miles of Margate, complaints of wasps began to be heard. I soon ascertained that they were no wasps but a bee-like fly. As we neared Margate, they increased to millions, and at Margate pier they were almost unendurable." He sent some specimens to the Editor, who identified 2 species of Syrphus. Someone else wrote that a swarm had appeared before this swarm at Forest Hill. he Editor ientified specimens as of one of the preceding and also of a third species of Syrphus. [III; 1977.1 to 1977.4. (Field, August 28, 1869.)]


1869 Aug 24 / At Long Benton. "Immense swarms of small, white Pieris rapae. / Ent Mo. Mag 1869-171 / Thousands were killed by the gardeners. / his is the butterfly that had been so scarce. In Ent pubs, number of comments upon the scarcity of small white butterfly Pieris Rapae. In the Entomologist 1869-300, Edward Newman writes that up to July 12, he had seen only 3 specimens. Pp 313-315, half a dozen cors confirm this. [III; 1978.1, 1978.2. Bold, T.J. "Great abundance of Pieris rapae." Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 6 (December 1869): 171. Newman, Edward."Scarcity of White Butterflies." Entomologist, 4 (August 1869): 300. Stowell, Hugh A. "Scarcity of White Butterflies in Derbyshire." Entomologist, 4 (September 1869): 313-314. Cox, H. Ramsay. "Scarcity of White Butterflies in the New Forest." Entomologist, 4 (September 1869): 314. Lock, G. "Scarcity of White Butterflies at Newport, Mon."Entomologist, 4 (September 1869): 314. Watkins, C.J. "Scarcity of White Butterflies in Glouchestershire." Entomologist, 4 (September 1869): 314.Clifford, J.R.S. "Scarcity of White Butterflies, &c., near London." Entomologist, 4 (September 1869): 314-315.]


1869 Aug 21 / Times of / Writer mentions scarcity of white butterflies and wonders how to account for it. [III; 1979. "The Great Flight of Ladybirds." London Times, August 21, 1869, p. 5 c. 2.]


1869 Aug / Thrips / Longbenton / 3 miles from Newcastle / Wingham in E. Kent. 6 miles E of Canterbury / ab 6 miles from Coast / less than 10 from Ramsgate. [III; 1980. (Refs???)]


1869 Aug 24 / Walton-on-the-Naze—"a countless swarm of Syrphi. / Entomologist 5-15 / 7 species. [III; 1981. "Swarms of Coccinellæ and Syrphi." Entomologist, 5 (January 1870); 15-16.]


1869 // summer /// Can't say all cases invasions craneflies may been prevalence. [III; 1982.]


1869 May / 2 uncommon bats killed near Torquay—of different species—one across wings 13½ inches. / Zoologist 1869-1768. [III; 1983. Hügel, A. de. "Rare Bats at Torquay." Zoologist, s. 2 v. 4 (1869): 1768.]


1869 June 1 / At Windsor Great Park, cor to the Field, June 5, came upon a bird of "huge dimensions" inknown to him: legs and beak black; rest white. Cor asks if could have been a stork. Editor says most probably was a stork. [III; 1984. (Field, June 5, 1869.)]


1869 July 24 / Ab. 13 miles off the Lincolnshire Coast, belts of water, some a few yards, some hundreds of yards wide, a "thick pea-soup appearance" with Aphides. / Zoologist 1869-p. 1839. [III; 1985. Cordeaux, John. "Aphides seen at Sea." Zoologist, s. 2 v. 4 (1869): 1839.]


1869 June / Minley, in Hampshire / Found on a dusty road a Rhynchophorous beetle of species and genus new to listed British beetles. / Ent. Mo. Mag 1869-86. [III; 1986. Black, F. Alfred. "Occurrence in Britain of Lepyrus binotatus, a genus and species new to our lists." Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 6 (September 1869): 86.]


1869 June 15 / Insects / Cor to The Naturalist's Notebook, 1869-318, caught at Norwich an unknown moth—"quite different to any figured or described in Mr. Newman's History of the British Moths." Forewings 1¼ inches from tip to tip—prevaiing color orange—whitish lines. [III; 1987. Laddiman, R. "What Is It?" Naturalist's Note Book, 3 (1869): 317.]


1869 June / Aberdeenshire / A beetle new to British lists of Coleoptra. Said be rather common in Lapland, the Alps, the Caucasus. / Ent. Mo Mag., Feb., 1870. [III; 1988. Hislop, Robert. "Occurrence in Aberdeenshire of Amara Quenseli, Schön.; a species new to the British list of Coleoptera." Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 6 (February 1870): 212-213.]


1869 July 31 / Field of / Scarcity of white butterflies commented upon by 2 cors. / and Aug 14. [III; 1989. (Field, July 31, 1869. Field, August 14, 1869.)]


1869 July / Scarcity of white butterflies noted in The Field. [III; 1990. (Field, ???)]


1869 // autumn /// Butterfly rare in England / Deiopeia pulchella / 3 captures in England recorded / The Entomologist 25/153 / Quite rare. For instance, for years 1887-1891 inclusive, no known captures. [III; 1991. South, Richard. "Deiopeia Pulchella in England." Entomologist, 25 (July 1892): 152-155.]


1869 Aug 13 / See 1807. [III; 1992. See: 1807 Aug ?, (I; 207).]


1869 Aug. 13-17 / Ladybirds first reported in Times, of Aug 19-4-f, from Ramsgate and other places on Coast—covering people's clothes—men engaged to shovel them into sewers. On 15th in London—Westminster Abbey covered—came from the east on Channel—children in filling bags with them. 14th, 15th, 16th—multitudes on Coasts of Kent and Surrey—Point is feeble flight. Never have crossed the Channel, writer says—but as if from Calais—piers covered—red piers out in water—High up and looking like flakes of snow. Writer asks for insertion of his letter—if were seen to leave France—L.T., Sept 1—that on 30th, docks of Bristol and Bath covered. / See Aug., 1847. / Ill. London News, Aug. 21 / Daily News, 20th. [III; 1993.1, 1993.2, 1993.3. "Ladybirds." London Times, August 19, 1869, p. 4 c. 6. "Lady-Birds." London Times, August 28, 1869, p. 10 c. 6. "The Ladybird Visitation." London Times, September 1, 1869, p. 6 c. 3. "Country News." Illustrated London News, 55 (August 21, 1869): 175. (London Daily News, August 20, 1869; nothing found here.) See: 1847 Aug 9, (II; 1132), and, (1847 Aug; several notes).]


1869 Aug / L.B. / No findable record of an invasion since. [III; 1994.]


1869 Oct / Have Daily News. [III; 1995.]


1869 // l. birds / See July 24. / Aug 25 / Sept 7 (2) / Oct 2 and Oct. [III; 1996. See: 1869 July 24, (III; 1973, 1974, & 1985); (1869 Sept 7); 1869 Oct 2, (III; 2043); and (Oct).]


1869 // summer // And if anyone should ask why it is that only insects came / The animal. [III; 1997. See: 1869 // summer, (III; 1834).]


1869 Aug / Have N.Y. Trib. [III; 1998.]


1869 Aug 13 / Lead ap with 1848 and Syrps of Aug., 1864. [III; 1999. See: (1848, and 1864, Aug.).]


1869 Aug 13 / Begin by listing all up to Nov. 19. / lb's, too / Then l.b's specially. [III; 2000.]


1869 Aug 13 / Plan / The exotic insects of July 1st / The lbs and then they = exotic / Then the later ones. [III; 2001.]


1869 July 17 / LT of / Cor from Ashford, Kent writes that a firefly of southern Europe (Lampyris Italica) had been caught in his garden. / In 20th, appears a letter from a cor in Catherham, Surrey. "The enclosed specimen is one of many that have every evening for the past week, attracted by the lights, flown into my dining room. Having been in the tropics, I recognized my beautiful visitors which had been, so numerous were they, denounced as a nuisance. / July 21. Letter from another cor that on 24th of June he had, at Dover, 15 miles from Ashford, released 12 fireflies that he had brought in a bottle from Coblentz. / 12 fireflies from Coblentz seem to have nothing to do with a denounced numerousness

of tropical or sub-tropical fireflies. [III; 2002.1 to 2002.4. "Fireflies in Kent." London Times, July 17, 1869, p. 12 c. 4. "Fire-Flies in Surrey." London Times, July 20, 1869, p. 11 c. 1. "Fireflies in Kent." London Times, July 21, 1869, p. 11 c. 2. See: 1869 / middle of July, (III; 2057.3).]


1869 Sept. 8 / Myriads of ladybirds moving toward the Humber. / Zoologist. Nov. 1869. [III; 2003. Cordeaux, John. "The Last of the Ladybirds." Zoologist, s. 2 v. 4 (1869): 1922.]


1869 Aug 13 / BO / Story—astonishment—someone who had hung out a wash and went to see it loaded with l.bs. / Standard, Aug 23. [III; 2004. "The Flight of Ladybirds." London Evening Standard, August 23, 1869, p. 4 c. 3.]


1869 Aug 13 / BO / Standard, 23rd, said some nearly ½ inch long. [III; 2005. "The Flight of Ladybirds." London Evening Standard, August 23, 1869, p. 4 c. 3.]


1869 Aug 13 / "The majority were of large size and of a dull yellow hue, appeared languid and weak, either from long flight or abstinence from food." / The Student—4/160. [III; 2006. "Great Swarm of Lady-Birds." Student and Intellectual Observer, 4 (1870): 160.]


1869 Aug. / BO / Symons' Met Mag., Aug, 1869 / from Shiffnal / "scarcely a white butterfly seen, and only one wasps' nest found up to the 21st." [III; 2007. "Meteorological Notes on the Month." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (August 1869): 111-112, at 111.]


1869 Aug 12, etc. / BO / lb's "all yellow, with few exceptions". / Symons' Met Mag, Sept, 1869.  [III; 2008. "Meteorological Notes on the Month." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (September 1869): 126-128, at 126, cv. "Shiffnal."]


1869 Aug 13 / BO / Cor.,  Standard, Aug 23. Cor said that these unlike any others known to him. Had power of inflicting a sharp nip or bite. [III; 2009. "The Flight of Ladybirds." London Standard, August 23, 1869, p. 5 c. 7.]


1869 // BO / At Stonefield, Lincoln, appeared beetles that were well known (Scolytus destructus) but that had never been seen there before. / Field, Oct 16th. [III; 2010. (Field, October 16, 1869.)]


1869 Aug 13, 14 / "Countless millions of them at Ramsgate. / L.T., 19th. [III; 2011. "Ladybirds." London Times, August 19, 1869, p. 4 c. 6.]


[1869] // BO / 2 cors to Entomologist, Sept, 1869, note remarkable scarcity of another species, P. Brassicae. Oct issue, cor writes never before had seen so few beetles, and one upon almost utter absence of wasps and bees—one absence of moths. [III; 2012. Lock, G. "Scarcity of White Butterflies at Newport, Mon."Entomologist, 4 (September 1869): 314. Nix, Arthur P. "Occurrence of White Butterflies at Truro." Entomologist, 4 (September 1869): 315. Reeks, Henry. "White Butterflies, &c., at Thurston." Entomologist, 4 (October 1869.): 321-322. Fetherstonhaugh, S.R. "Scarcity if Butterflies in Ireland." Entomologist, 4 (October 1869): 322.]


1869 Aug 12 / 3 p.m.—on vessel between Norelight and Margate. Thousands of ladybirds alighted upon it, a number of white butterflies, and a host of small yellow flies with black marks across the backs. / London Morning Advertiser 31-5-5. [III; 2013. "The Ladybirds Advent." London Morning Advertiser, August 31, 1869, p. 5 c. 5.]


[1869] / ab. Aug 1 // BO / Aphides near Maidstone, in numbers so great that ac to cors, they darkened the sky. / Maidstone Journal, 23rd. [III; 2014. "The Hop Crop." Maidstone Journal, August 23, 1869, p. 4 c. 6.]


1869 // BO / Cor., Field, July 24—had seen only one hornet. [III; 2015. (Field, July 24 1869.)]


1869 July 25 / BO / Weekly Dispatch of / Fireflies at Catherham. "They were so numerous a day or so since that people called them a nuisance." [III; 2016. (London Weekly Dispatch, July 25, 1869.)]


1869 Sept 18 / Illustrated London News of / Craneflies / great numbers in St. John's-Wood. [III; 2017. "Metropolitan News." Illustrated London News, 55 (September 18, 1869): 278.]


1869 September / The blue cliffs of Happisburg, Norfolk, "completely tinted with red blotches of these insects (ladybirds) congregated together in millions, and apparently in a half-dormant state. / The Field, Nov 4, 1871. [III; 2018. (Field, November 4, 1871.)]


1869 Sept 4 / A locust at Queensbury, Halifax. / The Entomologist 1870-58. [III; 2019. "Locust near Halifax." Entomologist, 5 (April 1870): 58.]


1869 Sept 17 / Cor writing on, says craneflies at Hackney, Wick, vast numbers of them. On grass clustered on places in masses several inches thick. On doorsteps and pavements so looked as if covered with mud. Great numbers destroyed by boiling water thrown on them. Said that the year before, their larvae had destroyed grass. Sc. Op. 2-342. [III; 2020. (Scientific Opinion, 2-342.)]


1869 Oct., early in / A locsut at Fairford, Gloucestershire. / The Field, Oct 23. [III; 2021. (Field, October 23, 1869.)]


1869 Oct / Locust caught in Pembrokeshire near St. David's Head. / Sci Op (L) 2/456. [III; 2022. (Scientific Opinion 2-456.)]


1869 Oct. 9 / About 30 locusts take in Plymouth. / The Entomologist, Dec., 1869. Several at Truro—on 9th. [III; 2023. Nix, Arthur. "Locusts at Truro." Entomologist, 4 (December 1869): 367. Bignell, G.C. "Locusts in Devonshire and Cornwall." Entomologist, 4 (December 1869): 367-368.]


1869 Aug 30 / Ladybirds reach Bristol and Bath. [III; 2024. (Refs???)]


1869 Oct 9 / A naturalist quoted upon the flight of locusts at Plymouth. He was not sure as to the species. / Western Daily Mercury—15-2-6. [III; 2025. (Western Daily Mercury, October 15, 1869, p. 2. c. 6. possibly @ Gale or Newsbank, on microfilm @ Plymouth Central Library.)]


1869 Oct / Locusts / large quantities of them reported from Balmoral, Scotland. / Entomologist 5-58. [III; 2026. Angus, W.C. "Locusts in Aberdeenshire." Entomologist, 5 (April 1870): 58.]


1869 Aug / fireflies / aphides / lbs /Syrps / Thrips / locusts / spiders / and odd lots / the animal. [III; 2027.]


1869 Oct 9 / Fine specimen of locust 3 inches long and wings measuring four was caught at St. Austell. / Western Daily Mercury (Plymouth) 14-3-4. [III; 2028. (Western Daily Mercury, October 14, 1869, p. 3 c. 4.)]


1869 Oct 10 / (+) / (W) / A locust at Waterford. Like local explanation at Burton. Said that near where it was caught were anchored foreign grain vessels. No doubt the locust had come in one of these. / Standard 16-3-7/ This idea disagreed with by cor of 19th, because he had caught one in Staveley, Derbyshire. [III; 2029.1, 2029.2. "A Locust in Waterford." London Standard, October 16, 1869, p. 3 c. 7. Rowlands, D.G. "Locusts." London Standard, October 19, 1869, p. 2 c. 5.]


[III; 2030. Pabst: "Void—due to T.T. typo, The Fortean, #55, p. 456 c. 1." See: 1869 Oct 10, (III; 2029), as "III; 2029.2."]


1869 Sept 1-30 / Oct 1-31 // Have Standard. [III; 2031.]


1869 / ab. Aug 10 // Extraordinary plague of aphides on Essex coast. / Maidstone Telegraph, Aug 28. [III; 2032. "The Great Flight of Ladybirds." Maidstone Telegraph, August 28, 1869, p. 7 c. 3. "The Great Flight of Ladybirds." London Times, August 21, 1869, p. 5 c. 2.]


[1869 Aug 7. Wrong date. See: 1869 July 31, (III; 2033).]


1869 Aug 13 / Aphides and locusts / July 5, 1921. [III; 2034. See: (1921 July 5.)]


1869 Aug 13 / At the meeting of the Entomological Society of London, Nov. 15, the entomologists solved the problem by deciding that there had been no migration of ladybirds, because their larvae had been extremely abundant a short time before the appearance of the swarms. / Ent Mo. Mag, Jan., 1870. [III; 2035.1, 2035.2. "Entomological Society of London, 15th November, 1869." Entomologist's Monthly Magazine, 6 (January 1870): 193-194, at 194. "November 15, 1869." Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, 17 (1869): 24-27, at 26, (xxvi).]


1869 / last of August // Wasps and flies "in overwhelming number" at Southampton. / Gardeners' Chronicle, Sept 4 / p. 945. [III; 2036. "Lady-birds." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1869 no. 26 (September 4): 945.]


1869 (July 25) / A dense column of aphides in such numbers as to give off a rank odor. / (Gardeners' Chronicle, July 31.) / Writer knew of about 10 square miles so covered. Seemed to come in huge waves at times so dense as to make his breathing difficult, all falling to the earth. He called it a "fly storm". / This at Bury St Edmunds. In issue Aug 7th, a cor says seems impossible to think it was the same invasion but this day equally thick at Chelmsford. [III; 2037.1, 2037.2. "A New Invasion." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1869 (July 31): 817. "The New Invasion." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1869 (August 7): 842.]


1869 Aug 15 / Ants / A large flight of winged ants at Maidstone. / D. News. 25-7-4 / D News 28-6-6 / Cor writes that multitudes at Farnham. He seems to think were of local origin but thinks it curious that at same time a swarm in Kent. [III; 2038. "Invasion of the Hop-Fields." London Daily News, August 25, 1869, p. 7 c. 4. "Ladybirds and Ants." London Daily News, August 28, 1869, p. 6 c. 6.]


1869 Aug / BO / Astronomer T.W. Webb, Nature 2-298 , tells of numerous bees, at Hardwick, of a kind unknown to him, having tufts of yellow hairs on the head. [III; 2039. Webb, Thomas William. "Entomological Inquiries, etc." Nature, 2 (August 11, 1870): 297-298.]


1869 Aug / Sci Gos, 1870-141 / Cor writes of strange bees that had been described to him, each with a tuft of short yellow hair between the eyes—not pollen. There were other differences, slight, almost doubtful. [III; 2040. "Strange Bees." Science Gossip, 6 (no. 66; June 1, 1870): 141. "At first it was thought that this peculiarity was due to the insect having inserted its head among the pollen of some flower; but when the same mark was detected in a number of individuals, it became evident that these could not be Hive Bees, but of an entirely distinct species." Holland, Robert. "Strange Bees." Science Gossip, 6 (no. 67; July 1, 1870): 161. Holland suggests the same "strange bees," that he had also noticed, were actually thus colored by the pollen of the yellow broom's flower, (Cytisus scoparius).]


1869 // BO / Strange bees told of by cor A.W. described by a relation of his. [III; 2041. See: 1869 Aug, (III; 2040).]


1869 // About 20 hummingbird moths seen in July in Wales. / Field, Aug 21, 1869. Many that were seen by a cor to Field, Nov 20, p. 433-col 1-+. [III; 2042. (Field, August 21, 1869, p. 433.)]


1869 Oct 2 / BO / Cor to Sci Gossip, 1869-273, says that near Conway, with a sudden rise in temperature came a flock of Humming-bird Hawkmoths and several species of butterflies—"a wonderful sight." [III; 2043. Holland, Robert. "Remarkable Flight of Moths and Butterflies." Science Gossip, 5 (no. 60; December 1, 1869): 273.]


1869 Aug 13 / Accompanied by wasps at Ramsgate. / D. Telegraph, 18th. [III; 2044. "Strange Flight of Insects at Ramsgate." London Daily Telegraph and Courier, August 18, 1869, p. 3 c. 2.]


1869 Aug 13 . Mr. J. Jenner Weir / Fellow of Ent Soc., Zoo. Soc and Linnean Soc. / Nature 49-538. [III; 2045. "Notes." Nature, 49 (April 5, 1894): 538-542, at 538.]


1869 / ab Aug 1 // Aphides / Coast of Essex / Invasion of aphides. "So enormous were they in numbers, that correspondents described their flight as having darkened the air." / Daily News, Aug 25-7-4, quoting Maidstone Journal. [III; 2046. "Invasion of the Hop-Fields." London Daily News, August 25, 1869, p. 7 c. 4. "The Hop Crop." Maidstone Journal, August 23, 1869, p. 4 c. 6 & p. 5 c. 1.]


1869 Aug 13 / before the lb's came / "In several districts of the Eastern Counties, aphides swarmed to such an extent as to darken the air for days together and render it almost dangerous to the eyesight both of man and animals to be out of doors. / The Gardener's Magazine, Aug 28-1-1. [III; 2047.1, 2047.2. (Gardener's Magazine, August 28, 1869, p. 1 c. 1.)]


1869 Aug. 13 / Kent Coast Times, Aug 19, said that in parts of Ramsgate the sky darkened with them. No explanation attempted. [III; 2048. (Kent Coast Times; not online.) See: 1869 / ab Aug 1, (III; 2046).]


1869 Aug 13 / In Gardener's Magazine, Aug 28, said that in the Eastern Counties the ruin of hop gardens was expected, because of the swarms of aphides, when the lb's appeared. [III; 2049. (Gardener's Magazine, August 28, 1869.)]


1869 Aug 15 / BO / Large flight of winged ants at Maidstone. / Maidstone Journal, 23rd. [III; 2050. "The Hop Crop." Maidstone Journal, August 23, 1869, p. 4 c. 6 & p. 5 c. 1.]


1869 Aug 13 / BO / Inverness Courier, Sept 2, copying from London Telegraph—"That they are foreigners, nobody doubts. They are nearly twice the size of the common English ladybird, and are of a paler colour." / In BO—sum up with this. [III; 2051. "The Ladybirds." Inverness Courier, September 2, 1869. p. 7 c. 3. "The ladybirds have come to town...." London Daily Telegraph and Courier, August 26, 1869, p. 5 c. 3.]


1869 Aug. / plan / Wave after wave of lb's. 3 if Brighton of 22nd was one. / By description the 2nd wave was foreign. / It was an unfavorable year of abundance of insects in England. / Syrphs in wave after wave with the lbs and independently. / Suggestion that from Africa (no records between Africa and England). / Insects of feeble flight could not have flown across the Channel. Couldn't fly across a cistern without a toll of hundreds—could have wafted, been carried across space not water. / Insects and rises of temperature and tropical insects. / Like the meteors, spiders and lb's have their dates, if activity in X they great. [III; 2052.1, 2052.2, 2052.3.]


1869 Aug 22 / At Brighton—seem to have come from the sea. "The pier was completely covered with them. / Brighton Daily News, 25th—said that several varieties were noted. [III; 2053. (Brighton Daily News, August 25, 1869; not online.)]


1869 Aug 22 / LB's at Brighton covered the roads "at every turning from the sea". / The Field, Aug 28. [III; 2054. (Field, August 28, 1869.)]


1869 Sept 4 / Ill London News of / The ladybirds of Bristol and Bath may have come from the sea. I. L. News says these places and "the new dock-works in progress at Avonmouth have been thickly studded with the insects." [III; 2055. "Country News." Illustrated London News, 55 (September 4, 1869): 227.]


1869 // autumn /// New Plant / Field, Feb. 26 / Edward Newman, Editor of the Entomologist, writes that growing in a brickyard at Highbury, Middlesex, had been discovered a plant "entirely new to Britain", Cotola cornopifolia, covering a large patch of ground, growing most luxuriantly, and flowering abundantly. He can think of no way by which appeared there. It was known upon the Continent, supposed to have been introduced from the southern hemisphere. [III; 2056.1, 2056.2. (Field, February 26, 1870.)]


[Thayer: "That is the end of Fort's string-tied bundle," (which begins with "1869 // summer, (III; 1856.)]


1869, the "Insect Year" (ends).


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

1869 Aug / LT Index / Lord Chief Justice / Disap? [A; 552. "Edinburgh, Tuesday." London Times, September 22, 1869, p. 7 c. 3. "The Lord Justice Clerk of Scotland." London Times, September 23, 1869, p. 7 c. 1. "The Lord Justice-Clerk of Scotland." London Times, September 25, 1869, p. 10 c. 3. George Patton , the Lord Justice Clerk, (not the Lord Chief Justice), disappeared on September 20, 1869, when he took a walk after breakfast, in Edinburgh. Patton's body was found in the River Almond, on September 24, 1869.]


1869 Aug / Lord Chief Justice / Found drowned in Oct. [A; 557. See: 1869 Aug, (A; 552).]


1869 Aug / Disap children / Belfast / Sept. 20, 1895. [A; 554. (See: 1895 Sept 20.)]


1869 early Aug / Myst disaps children in Cork / Rugby Gazette, Aug 28-2-5. [A; 555. (Rugby Gazette, August 28, 1869, 2-5; not online.) "Extraordinary Disappearance of Children." London Evening Standard, August 23, 1869, p. 5 c. 4.]


1869 Aug / Disaps / In a fortnight in Cork, 13 children disappeared. Not in one case explained. / Tiverton Times, Aug 31. [A; 556. (Tiverton Times, August 31, 1869; not online.)]


1869 Aug 4 / D. News / BO  Steamship Propontis, from Cardiff to Constantinople, July 29. When in Bay of Biscay an explosion heard, and deck shattered. 3 members of crew seriously injured. No one aboard could explain, except by thinking that an explosive had been surreptitiously shipped. [A; 551.1., 551.2. "Unaccountable Explosion on Shipboard." London Daily News, August 5, 1869, p. 2 c. 5.]


1869 Aug 13 / Fiery Wind / L.T. of, from the Nashville (Tenn.) Press / that upon a very hot day, near Ashland, Cheatham Co., Tenn, a burning whirlwind, travelling at the rate of ab. 5 miles an hour, appeared—taking up and burning grasses; passing over a team of horses, singeing them; firing shingles on a house; crossing the Cumberland river and raising a cloud of steam that mounted to the sky. [III; 2057.1, 2057.2. "A Fiery Wind." London Times, August 13, 1869, p. 9 c. 6. (Nashville Press, 1869.)]


1869 / middle of July // (2) / Always the explainers—and so often a cor contains unusual and seemingly the one by which to explain. In Times 21-11-b, cor from Dover writes that in June, he had brought 12 fireflies in a bottle from Coblentz and had turned them loose. He had read the letter from Kent but, his letter dated 19th, had no read of the numbers in Surrey. No mention of species. / Surrey cor—"Many every evening." [III; 2057.3, 2057.4, 2057.5. These notes follow "III; 2057.2," (tho numbered with the same number). "Fireflies in Kent." London Times, July 17, 1869, p. 12 c. 4. "Fireflies in Kent." London Times, July 21, 1869, p. 11 c. 2.]


1869 Aug 13 / L.T. of, copied from Nashville (Tenn) Press—a column of fire that travelled at the rate of 5 miles an hour. Said to have passed over a wheat field, setting stacks on fire. Whirled like a whirlwind—near Ashland, Tenn, "taking up small branches and leaves of trees and burning them in a [sort of] flaming cylinder"—burning several withered trees. / Symons 4-123 / (123). [III; 2058.1, 2058.2. "A Fiery Wind." London Times, August 13, 1869, p. 9 c. 6. "A Fiery Wind." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (September 1869): 123-124. "Extraordinary Phenomenon in Tennessee." Cambria Freeman, (Ebensburg, Pennsylvania), July 29, 1869, p. 2 c. 5. The Nashville Daily Press, (July 20, 1869), is quoted, identifying "Wednesday last"; thus, the date would be July 14, 1869.]


1869 Aug 13 / D. News, 4-2—Great excitement in Brussels over kidnapping of children. [A; 553. "The Etoile, of Brussels, says that among the working classes...." London Daily News, August 13, 1869, p. 4 c. 2.]


1869 Aug 14 / Florida / Met train / early evening / MWR 07-391. [III; 2059. (Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (September 1907): 390-397, at 391.)]


1869 Aug 14 / In a heavy rain fell a shower of little cuttlefish (2 or 3 inches diameter), some alive, on deck of H.M.S. Midge, near Great Nicobar Island. / Land and Water, Nov. 11, 1871, p. 328. [III; 2060. (Land and Water, November 11, 1869, p. 328.)]


[1869 Aug 15. Wrong date. See: 1869 Ap. 8, (III; 2061).]


1869 Aug 15 and 16 / Severe qs / Copiapo / at Arica, 40 shocks on 19th / L.T., Sept 27-5-a. [III; 2062. "The West India Mail." London Times, September 27, 1869, p. 5 c. 1.]


1869 Aug 17 and 18 / After sunset, like conflagration in western sky / N.Y. Trib 30-2-5. [III; 2063. "General Notes." New York Tribune, August 30, 1869, p. 2 c. 5. "The San Francisco newspapers describe some wonderful phenomena observed in that city on the 17th of August.... Several times during the display large dark clouds arose as from out of the ocean, and passing up through the illumination disappeared through the darkness above. The wonderful phenomenon lasted about half an hour, was was witnessed by thousands, who thronged the streets." No phenomenon was reported for August 18, 1869.]


1869 Aug 17 / San Francisco Bulletin, 18th / In Sacramento, at an early hour, in morning, fire bells ringing. A great glare that appeared suddenly in the eastern sky. The next night a vivid sunset that caused crowds in the streets. [III; 2064. (San Francisco Evening Bulletin, August 18, 1869.) "Pacific Coast Dispatches." Daily Alta California, August 18, 1869, p. 1 c. 4."Singular Phenomenon." Sacramento Daily Union, August 18, 1869, p. 3 c. 1. "About four o'clock yesterday morning, the northeastern sky, from horizon to zenith, was illuminated by a  reddish light, like that reflected from a great conflagration. Acting upon the supposition that such a conflagration was in progress in the eastern portion of the town, the fire bells were rung, and the boys turned out with the machines, only to discover after a run that they were having a wild goose chase. The illumination lasted about half an hour. After it had almost entirely died away, spires of red light shot up in the clouds, similar to the aurora borealis. Finally, the light died away, and a dark cloud took its place, out of which the sun in due time arose. The day which followed was quite warm, and clearer than any we have had since the eclipse. Shortly after sundown the phenomena of the morniug was repeated, with the red glare extending over the entire western half of the sky, and causing a light paintul to the eyes of the observer. It lasted about an hour, fading into a yellow as it grew dimmer." No phenomenon was reported for August 18, 1869.]


1869 Aug 19 / Near Steyer, Austria—land fell in and a lake appeared. / London Ev. Star, 31st. [III; 2065. (London Evening Star, August 31, 1869; not online for this date.)]


1869 Aug 20 / 2:20 p.m. / Folkestone / waterspout / Standard, 24th. [III; 2066. Parnell, J. "A Waterspout." London Standard, August 24, 1869, p. 7 c. 1.]


1869 Aug 20, 21, 24 / Severe q's, Peru, and a seismic wave. / L.T., Oct 15-7-f. [III; 2067. "West India and Pacific Mails." London Times, October 15, 1869, p. 7 c. 6.]


1869 Aug 20 / 28 spots on sun's disk—cor to the Naturalists' Note Book 1869-317. [III; 2068. "Black Spots on the Sun's Disc." Naturalist's Note Book, 3 (1869): 317.]


1869 (Aug 20) / Disap and hallucinations in Bristol / B. Daily Post, ab Aug. 20 [A; 558. (B. Daily Post, August 20, 1869.) "The 'Tios del Sain'—child stealers—one of whom...." Birmingham Daily Post, August 25, 1869, p. 4 c. 3.]


1869 Aug 20 / N.Y. Times of / Disaps / Chancellor (+) Lansing, etc. / See 1868—Harper's ab April? [A; 559. "Missing." Harper's New Monthly Magazine, 38 (1868/69): 504-511, at 506. John Ten Eyck Lansing, Jr., disappeared on the evening of December 12, 1829. "A Remarkable Disappearance." New York Times, August 20, 1869, p. 4 c. 5.]


1869 Aug 21 / 2 children of a Cork physician lost. / Cork Daily Herald 23-1-1— / 24-1-2—Letter by Thomas H. Allridge that upon the 23rd at the school where his two children were, a man, wearing a military cap, called falsely saying that he had been sent for them, not getting them upon his mere word, however. / 26-2-4—Children of someone else accosted by a woman who offered them sweetmeats if accompany her—they called a policeman—nothing said of her being arrested. [A; 560.1, 560.2. (Cork Daily Herald, August 23, 1869, p. 1 . 1; August 24, 1869, p. 1 c. 2; August 26, 1869, p. 2 c. 4; not online, microfilm only.)]


1869 Aug 21 / Hampshire Chronicle of / At Winchester, the ladybirds "swarming in all directions in great numbers, and [were found] in all imaginable places". / not only went north. [III; 2069. "The extraordinary visit of ladybirds...." Hampshire Chronicle, August 21, 1869, p. 8 c. 2.]


1869 Aug 21 / Ill. London News of / Plague of black caterpillars at Mendrisio, in the Ticino. Caused painful swellings. Prayers for their removal. [III; 2070. "Out of the World." Illustrated London News, 55 (August 21, 1869): 186. See: 1869 Aug 12, (III; 1854).]


1869 Aug 23 / BO / Liv / San Francisco Ev Bulletin. / That at Keokuk, Iowa, after a "recent" shower, Dr Sanderson and other residents of the town had picked up a large number of minnows and crawfish. [III; 2071. (San Francisco Evening Bulletin, August 23, 1869.)]


1869 Aug 24 / 7:25 p.m. / Great det met / (?) / Philadelphia / BA 1870/89. NY Times 26-5-3. [III; 2072. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1869-70." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1870, 76-102, at 88-91, (illustration). "Celestial Phenomena." New York Times, August 26, 1869, p. 5 c. 3.]


1869 Aug 24 / 7:25 p.m. / Pa. / 200 miles W. of Philadelphia, great met exploded. Its cloud seen far. / ab. sunset. / BA 70-90. [III; 2073. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1869-70." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1870, 76-102, at 88-91, (illustration).]


1869 Aug 24 / 7 p.m. / An ascending meteor in western sky, at Philadelphia. Met train for 10 minutes. / Trib 25-5-4 // Was seen at Trenton, N.J.—time ab. 7:30. / 26-3-1 // At N.Y., exploded almost due west—almost directly above Venus—27-5-6. [III; 2074.1, 2074.2. "A Remarkable Meteor. New York Tribune, August 25, 1869, p. 5 c. 4. "That Meteor." New York Tribune, August 26, 1869, p. 3 c. 1. "More News from the Great Meteor." New York Tribune, August 27, 1869, p. 5 c. 6.]


1869 Aug 27 / BO / Common type of phe—large balloon seen at Hastings—unknown. Kentish Express, Aug 28. Note this as myst because kept an eye looking over dozens of newspapers. [III; 2075.  

(Kentish Express, August 28, 1869; not online.) "Epitome of County News." Dover Express, August 27, 1869, p. 4 c. 6. "A large balloon with car attached was seen in the neighbourhood of Hastings on Friday evening. At first it appeared as if the aeronauts meant to descend on Bulverhithe Marsh, but the monster afterwards ascended to a higher current and sailed away westerly."]


1869 Aug 27 / N.Y. Times, 5-4 / Aurora / luminus band from N.Y. to Michigan. [III; 2076. "Celestial Phenomena." New York Times, August 27, 1869, p. 5 c. 4.]


1869 Aug 28 / Birmingham Gazette—a "flying toad" recently caught at Cape Henry, near Washington. [III; 2077. "Foreign." Birmingham Daily Gazette, August 28, 1869, p. 4 c. 3. "A flying toad was recently captured at Cape Henry, near Washington. It is of 'beautifully variegated hues, sin [sic] inches in length, has flat bony back, and fins large as wings about the centre of the body on each side.' What a haul for Barnum!" "Miscellaneous Items." Brooklyn Eagle, August 9, 1869, p. 1 c. 8. "A flying toad has been brought to Washington and placed on exhibition.This curious reptile (or fish) was captured in a seine off Cape Henry a few days since. It is of utmost singular conformation, and of beautiful variegated hues, measuring about six inches in length, with perfectly flat bony back, eyes wide apart and in the centre of a circle, capacious mouth, and fins as large as wings about the centre of the body on each side."]


1869 Aug 28 / On a farm on the Holmwood at night flock of 50 geese killed. Their necks bitten. Several nights before lambs killed on another farm. Supposed by dogs. / West Surrey Times, Sept. 4. [A; 561. "Wholesale Destruction of Geese." West Surrey Times, September 4, 1869, p. 3 c. 2. "Slaughter of Lambs at Holmwood." West Surrey Times, September 18, 1869, p. 3  c. 5.]


1869 Aug 29 / Repeats / Exeter—1 p.m., shock felt, and sound. 1:15 p.m., similar sound heard and no shock felt. / (See May 3, '09.) [III; 2078. Parfitt, Edward. "On Earthquakes in Devonshire." Report and Transactions of the Devonshire Association, 16 (1884): 641-661, at 654. See: 1809 May 3, (I; 265).]


1869 Aug-Sep. / An outbreak of a group of spots in Plato—by W. R. Birt. / E Mec 12/374. [III; 2079. Birt, William Radcliffe. "Lunar Activity." English Mechanic, 12 (no. 302; January 6, 1871): 374.]


1869 Aug, Sept / Plato . Birt, in E Mec 12/374 / Well marked outbreak of the spots—mostly Group I but a very distant spot was effected. "The fact of intermittent variations of the visibility of the small spots on Plato now well-established." [III; 2080. Birt, William Radcliffe. "Lunar Activity." English Mechanic, 12 (no. 302; January 6, 1871): 374.]


1869 Aug. 30 / (Tropical Fish) / Cork Daily Herald / During the past week large quantities of fish which are peculiar to the tropical regions have been seen along our coasts. Shoals of bonita, the dolphin, swordfish, and other species are observed. This visit is to be attributed to the unusual warmth of the weather in this latitude. [III; 2081.1, 2081.2. (Cork Daily Herald, August 30, 1869; not online, microfilm only.) "An Unusual Visit." London Evening Standard, August 31, 1869, p. 4 c. 4.]


1869 Sept, first week / "Extraordinary flight of landrails" at Wingham, Kent. Cor knew of someone who had killed 50. Formerly he had seen 2 or 3 to a season. "All these birds were lean and poor." / Zoologist 1869-1951. [III; 2082. Hammond, W.O. "Extraordinary Flight of Landrails." Zoologist, s. 2 v. 4 (1869): 1951.]


1869 Sept 1 / Dover Telegraph of—People at Llangollen thought a comet, but a lantern on a kite. [III; 2083. (Dover Telegraph, September 1, 1869; not online.) "Kite-Flying." Wrexham Advertiser, August 21, 1869, p. 6 c. 2. "Several of the inhabitants of the town have during the week been greatly perplexed by the sight of what appeared to be a comet, speeding its erratic course in the heavens. The would-be-wise asserted that the luminous body could not be a comet, but from its redness they would conclude that it bore great resemblance to the planet Mars. It was ultimately found that the object seen was a Chinese lantern fixed to a large kite, which was sent every evening to the ethereal regions by a young gentleman residing in the town."]


1869 Sept 2 / [LT], 4-d / Ext. change in atmosphere. [III; 2084. Tibbits, J. Borlase. "Extraordinary Change in the Temperature." London Times, September 2, 1869, p. 4 c. 4.]


1869 Sept 3 / A flight of locusts at Sadra, on the Sabarmati—7 miles long. / Gardener's Magazine, Nov. 13, p. 513. This Mag of 20th tells more of these locusts in India. Says that no such visitatioon, in numbers, had ever been known before. [III; 2085.1, 2085.2. (Gardener's Magazine, November 13, 1869, p. 513. Gardener's Magazine , November 20, 1869.)]


[III; 2086. Pabst: "Void—due to T.T. typo, The Fortean, #57, p. 13, c. 2."]


1869 Sept 4 / (ghst) / Weekly Budget of / Crowds around an unoccupied house near the Blackheath road, Greenwich. Reported that a luminous ghost been seen in it. [A; 562. (Weekly Budget, September 4, 1869.)]


1869 Sept 5 / Aurora / CR 69-642. [III; 2087. Chapelas. "Aurore boréale du 5 septembre." Comptes Rendus, 69 (1869): 642-643.]


1869 Sept  [5] / Aurora / La Sci Pour Tous 14-330. [III; 2088. ("Aurore Boréale du 5 Septembre." La Science Pour Tous, 14 (no. 41; September 11, 1869): 330. Page missing at NRC Library.)]


1869 Sept. 7 / flies. / That some peasants planting trees on the heights of Esperon, France, were startled by a dull sound. It came from a dark cloud enveloping a low hill—came from a cloud of flies estimated ab 500 yards long, fifty wide, 30 deep. "This monstrous phalanx was slowly moving in a westerly direction. / Sci Gos., 1870-65. [III; 2089. "Something Like a Swarm of Flies." Science Gossip, 6 (no. 63; March 1, 1870): 65. The size of this swarm was estimated in meters, (not yards).]


1869 Sept 8 / 7 p.m. / Germany / Det met / Zeit Met 4/510. [III; 2090. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 4 (1869): 508-511, at 510-511.]


1869 Sept 8 / Great fireball / s.w. Europe / BA 70-76 / LT 24/10 / 28/9/b. [III; 2091. (BA 70-76.) Taylor, Joseph. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, September 24, 1869, p. 10 c. 4. Michael, W.H. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, September 28, 1869, p. 9 c. 2.]


1869 Sept 8 / meteor / 7 p.m. / Near Salzburg, Bavaria, brilliant slow meteor. / L.T.—28-9-b // At Lucerne, Switzerland 24-10-d // at Venice / Oct 1-4-d. [III; 2092. Michael, W.H. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, September 28, 1869, p. 9 c. 2. Taylor, Joseph. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, September 24, 1869, p. 10 c. 4. Alford, Henry. "To the Editor of the Times."  London Times, October 1, 1869, p. 4 c. 4.]


1869 Sept 9 / 3 to 4 p.m. /Extraordinary high tide in Thames. Parts of London under water. / Ev. Standard 10-5-4. [III; 2093. "Extraordinary High Tide." London Evening Standard, September 10, 1869, p. 5 c. 4.]


1869 Sept 10 / (Aug. 1) / (Flesh) / LLangollen (Wales) Advertiser of—shower of flesh at Los Nietos, California, upon area of about 200 square feet. Said that the phe was attributed to disgourging vultures. / (Not in BO). [III; 1836. (Llangollen Advertiser, September 10, 1869.; not online.) See: 1869 Aug 1, (III; 1835).]


1869 Sept 11 / Tarbes, etc. / 5:05 a.m. / q / rolling sound ending with sound of an explosion / Cosmos 3/5/361. [III; 2094. "Tremblement de terre dans les Pyrénées." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 5 (October 2, 1869): 361.]


1869 Sept. 12 / 10:08 p.m. / Cheltenham / remarkable meteor e. to w. / Standard 15-3-7. [III; 2095. Bullock, F.S. "A Splendid Meteor." London Standard, September 15, 1869, p. 3 c. 7.]


1869 Sept. 13 / 8:40 p.m. / Cor saw object like Mars only redder and brighter—turned his telescope upon it. It was moving fast but he was able to keep it in telescopic field—disappearing, having lasted ab 2 minutes. / E Mec 10/47. [III; 2096. "Rhomboid.—Meteor." English Mechanic, 10 (no. 236 ; October 1, 1869): 47. "It assumed the appearance of a comet with a very short tail pointing upwards, reminding me of a very full electrical brush discharge. I expected to see it explode, but it gradually diminished in brightness and speed till it finally disappeared. It lasted about two minutes, and moved in that time 20°. It was near Capricornus."]


1869 Sept 17 / q / St Thomas, W.I. / BA '11 / (II) / [Medium]. [III; 2097. Milne, 721.]


1869 Sept 17 / Severe q / island of St. Thomas, W. Indies / L.T., 29-10-a. [III; 2098. "Earthquake at St. Thomas." London Times, September 29, 1869, p. 10 c. 1.]


1869 Sept 18 / Weekly Budget of / Ac to N.Y. Trib, a ghost light in Brooklyn like that of Woburn, but had form. [A; 563. (Weekly Budget, September 18, 1869.)]


1869 Sept 19 / (F) / Tjabe, Java / Metite / C.R. 105-205. [III; 2099. Fletcher, 104. Daubrée. "Météorite tombé le 19 mars 1884, à Djati-Pengilon (île de Java)." Comptes Rendus, 105 (1887): 203-205. This is the Tjabé meteorite.]


1869 Sept 19 / Tjabé (Pandangan), Java / metite / Les Mondes 29-723 / See Dec 10, 1871. [III; 2100. "Sur une météorite tombée dans l'île de Java, près Bandong, le 10 décembre 1871...." Les Mondes, 29 (1872): 722. This is the Tjabé meteorite. See: 1871 Dec 10, (IV; 565 & 566).]


1869 Sept. 20 / Streak of light on floor of Plato first seen by Elger. / B Assoc 72/262 / (Then often). [III; 2101. Webb, T.W., and Robert Harley, and Edward Crossley. "Report of the Committee for discussing Observations of Lunar Objects suspected of Change." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1872, 245-301, at 262-263, (illustrations).]


1869 Sept 20 / Vamp / Inquest / Henry Hamshire / [LT] 21-4-f. [A; 564. "Singular Death." London Times, September 21, 1869, p. 4 c. 6.]


1869 Sept 27 / at Maryport (near Carlisle) / 8 p.m. / Cor saw a fiery red glare in northern sky for 10 minutes. Then obscured by clouds. Carlisle Journal, Oct 5-3-6. [III; 2102. (Carlisle Journal, October 5, 1869, p. 3 c. 6; not available for this date at BNA.)]


1869 Sept 27 / Aurora magnificent, Worcester, between 8 and 9 p.m. / L.T., Oct 2-10-d. [III; 2103. "The Weather.—Aurora Borealis." London Times, October 2, 1869, p. 10 c. 4.]


1869 Sept 28 / [LT], 10-a / Etna. [III; 2104. "Sicily." London Times, September 28, 1869, p. 10 c. 1.]


1869 Sept. 29 / 10 a.m. / Exmouth / an immense wave / L.T., Oct 2-10-d. [III; 2105. Haill, Will. J.V. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, October 2, 1869, p. 10 c. 4.]


1869 Sept 29 / Wave ran 20 feet beyond high water mark at Exmouth and Plymouth / Tiverton Times, Oct. 5 / See Oct 8. [III; 2106. (Tiverton Times, October 5, 1869; not at BNA.) Malet, H.P. "Storms and Tides." London Times, October 6, 1869, p. 8 c. 3. See: 1869 Oct 8, (III; 2131).]


1869 Sept 29 / 5 p.m.—9:30 / Hungerford, Berks / Great display of lightning / The Field, Oct 9—p. 307. [III; 2107. (Field, October 9, 1869, p. 307.)]


1869 fall / The Woodward hypnotized by Downs case of Auburn, Maine / Religio-Phil Jour, Nov 27-2-4. [A; 565. Fahnestock, William B. "Phenomenal." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 7 (no. 10; November 27, 1869): 2, (c. 4-5). (Lewiston Evening Journal (Maine), September 27, 1869. Not online nor on microfilm.) ]


1869 / In Auburn, Maine, man named Downs bewitched or hypnotized 2 others—who acted as if violently drunk or hysterical. / N.Y. Times, Oct 1-2-1, 1869. [A; 566. "A Bewitched Blacksmith." New York Times, October 1, 1869, p. 2 c. 1.]


1869 Oct 1 ab / Rel-Ph. Jour., Jan 29, 1870—a young girl, daughter of De Loss Lyon, formerly a resident of Richland Co., Wis., then living west of the Kickapoo river, in Crawford Co., came under strange influences—went 6 or seven days at a time with neither food nor sleep—at times had violent convulsions. These times she was very profane, She talked to an invisible young man who, she said, dictated to her, and made her obey. If she resisted she was mauled by this being, and thrown into convulsions. In this story convulsions are described as struggles with a demon. Said that a medium drove out the evil spirit. / Young girls, themselves, may be very profane. [A; 567.1, 567.2, 567.3. Eastland, H.A. "Interesting Particulars." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 7 (no. 19; January 29, 1870): 6, (c. 4).]


1869 Oct 1 / 8:12 p.m. / Kent to Brussels / Great Met / BA 70-78. [III; 2108. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1869-70." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1870, 76-102, at 78.]


1869 Oct. 2 / 11 p.m. / Liége, Belg. / q. / C. et T 8/38. [III; 2109. Lancaster, Albert Benoît Marie. "Les Tremblements de terre en Belgique." Ciel et Terre, 8 (March 16, 1887): 25-43, at 38.]


1869 Oct 2 / little before midnight of 2-3 / Severe shocks and alarm / Coblentz / Nature 1-26. [III; 2110. "Notes." Nature 1 (November 4, 1869): 25-26, at 26.]


1869 Oct 2 / [LT], 10-d / Aurora. [III; 2111. "The Weather.—Aurora Borealis." London Times, October 2, 1869, p. 10 c. 4.]


1869 Oct 3, 5 / Algiers and Oran / mets / BA 74-292. [III; 2112. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 292-293.]


1869 Oct. 3 / 6:50 p.m. / Utah / violent shock and rumbling / Trib 4-1-3. [III; 2113. "Earthquake in Utah." New York Tribune, October 4, 1869, p. 1 c. 3.]


1869 Oct. 4 / Eruption of volc Pucrace, U.S. Columbia / Cosmos 3/5/632. [III; 2114. "Eruption volcanique en Colombie." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 5 (December 4, 1869): 632. The Purace volcano.]

  

1869 Oct 4 / Obj / "On Monday morning at three o'clock some fishermen lying about 10 miles W.S.W. of Looe, saw a strange light which at first they took to be a ship on fire, until it rose gradually from the sea and disappeared in the clouds. / Western Daily Mercury (Plymouth) 9-3-2-+. [III; 2115.1, 2115.2. (Western Daily Mercury, October 9, 1869, p. 3 c. 2+; not avalable for this date at BNA.)]


1869 Oct 4 / Sudden eruption of volc Purace, U.S. Columbia / L.T. 13-5-b. C.R., 70-503. [III; 2116. "The West Indies and Pacific." London Times, November 15, 1869, p. 8 c. 4-5. "M. Boussingault, à propos des secousses ressenties à Lima...." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 503. The Purace volcano.]


1869 // autumn /// New plants / See March 18, 1872. [III; 2117. See: 1872 March 18, (IV; 697).]


1869 // autumn /// plant / See Oct. 24, 1885. [III; 2118. See: (1885 Oct 24.)]


1869 Oct 4 / Disastrous shock at Kholoom, between Bhokara and Cabul / Keene's Bath Journal, Jan. 14. [III; 2119. (Keene's Bath Journal, January 14, 1870. Not the Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette @ BNA. Kholm, Afghanistan; Bukhara, Uzbekistan; and, Kabul, Afghanistan.)]


1869 Oct 4 / 10 p.m. / Tidal wave 18 feet high, New England coast. Great damage. See N.Y. newspapers. [III; 2120. "The Recent Storm." New York Herald, October 8, 1869 p. 7 c. 2.  "New England." Chicago Tribune, October 10, 1869, p. 2 c. 5.]


1869 Oct 5 / waterspout / 12:45 p.m. / Waterspout at Oundle. It was preceded by a slight rain—Standard 7-2-7—appeared like a hollow tube down from clouds. [III; 2121. "A Waterspout." London Standard, October 7, 1869, p. 2 c. 7.]


1869 Oct 5 / (Fire) / Morning / A house in Holloway / furniture had been removed from it—no fires in grates. "All of a sudden flames were seen to rush out of the first floor windows." But it was the upper part of the building that was destroyed. / Standard—6-7-2. [A; 568. "Singular Fire." London Standard, October 6, 1869, p. 7 c. 2.]


1869 Oct 6 / Lumpkin, Ga / See May 8, 1829. / (F). [III; 2122. Fletcher, 104. This is the Stewart County meteorite. See: (1829 May 8, (I: 1464, 1465, and 1469).]


1869 Oct. 6 / metite / 11:30 a.m. / 12 miles from Lumpkin, Stewart Co., Ga / A. J. Sci 2/50/337. [III; 2123. Willet, Joseph E. "Account of the fall of a Meteoric Stone in Stewart County, Georgia." American Journal of Science, s. 2. v. 50 (1870): 335-338, at 337. This is the Stewart County meteorite.]


1869 Oct 6 / Aurora at Bedfords / 9:50, peculiar glow near horizon in north. 10:15, 3 rays from horizon to zenith / D News, Oct 9-6-6. [III; 2124. Elger, T.G. "Aurora Borealis." London Daily News, October 9, 1869, p. 6. c. 6.]


1869 Oct 6 / Aurora, Paris, rose from horizon to Dragon. / C.R. 69-832. [III; 2125. Chapelas. "Apparition d'une aurore boréale sur l'horizon de Paris, le 6 octobre 1869." Comptes Rendus, 69 (1869): 832.]


1869 Oct 7 / Ab 5 p.m., a waterspout was seen from Sandown, Isle of Wight. / Standard 9-3-7. [III; 2126. Kingsford, F.W. "Waterspout." London Standard, October 9, 1869, p. 3 c. 7.]


1869 Oct 8 / with locust / Standard 19-5-7—that in the Goorgaon district there had been enormous flights of locusts from the 30th of July to the 8th of August. [III; 2127. "A Flight of Locusts." London Evening Standard, October 18, 1869, p. 5 c. 3. "A Flight of Locusts." London Standard, October 19, 1867, p. 5 c. 6.]


1869 Oct, 8 / 7 a.m. / Great tide predicted for, because earth then part of orbit. Nearest earth then part of orbit. Nearest earth, predicted by Lieut. S. N. Saxby R.N. / London Morning Advertiser, Sept. 13. [III; 2128. "The Approaching Great Tide." London Morning Advertiser, September 13, 1869, p. 2 c. 4.]


1869 Oct 8 / with locusts / Tropical insects and climate in England. / Standard 14-2-7 / Someone writes he, at Rugeley, had picked a very fine strawberry in his garden, Oct. 12. [III; 2129. Horton, W.I.S. "The Mildness of the Season." London Standard, October 14, 1869, p. 2 c. 7.]


1869 Oct 8 / (with tropical locusts) / At Lewes, thermometer stood at 77 degrees in the shade. / Standard 12-6-1. [III; 2130. "The Temperature." London Standard, October 12, 1869, p. 6 c. 1.]


1869 Oct 8 / One of the highest tides ever known predicted for Oct 8 in newspapers. I get from Llangollen Advertiser, Sept. 17 / was a tide. See Sept 29, etc. [III; 2131. (Llangollen Advertiser, September 17, 1869; not online.) See: 1869 Sept 29; (III; 2106), and, 1869 Oct 8, (III; 2128).]


1869 Oct 9 / Rel-Ph. Jour., 1-3 / near Tippecanoe, Harrison Co., Ohio. / Mrs Nancy Birney.—(?) / For 23 years, every 2 weeks had been preaching in a state of unconsciousness but the language and thought were inferior to hers when normal. She attributed the spells to injuries once when struck by lightning, but that was 24 years before she took on the spell-character. Her husband, a farmer, was considered wealthy. Said it was as if the spirit of some old-fashioned, uneducated preacher of 40 or 50 years before, possessed her. [A; 569.1, 569.2, 569.3. "A Strange Phenomenon." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 7 (no. 3; October 9, 1869): 1, (c. 3-5). (Cleveland Herald, August 11, 1869. Not online.) Twain, Mark. Mark Twain's Letters: Volume 3: 1869. Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1992, 463. Twain wrote: "A correspondent of the Cleveland Herald reports that a Mrs. Birney, 62 years of age, living near Tippecanoe, Harison county, Ohio, has for twenty years been in the habit of falling into a state of unconsciousness at about ten o'clock on Sunday mornings, during which she delivers ungrammatical religious discourses. Of course, when a woman does anything remarkable, it must be published far and wide, but acres and acres of poor clergymen can go on doing such things all their lives and a subsidized press takes no notice of it. A mean partiality ill becomes journalism." Birney, Nancy. A Sermon While in a State of Somniloquism or Devotional Sleep. Salem, Ohio: Hinchman & Ware, 1847. One of these sermons was recorded on September 6, 1847.]


1869 Oct. 9 / Kentish Express of / Grocer named Huckle at Dartford. His windows broken by stones thrown at them unaccountable. Police were alert but saw no one. When they near the stones ceased—when away begin again. Day after day—finally all windows boarded up. All stones wrapped in papers on which written threats badly spelled. At last police constable caught daughter of Mr. Huckle, a girl aged 13, throwing a stone. She confessed she had thrown all the stones. [A; 570.1, 570.2. (Kentish Express, October 9, 1869; not online.) "Stone-Throwing Extraordinary." Kentish Mercury, October 9, 1869, p. 7 c. 3.]


1869 Oct 11 / 5:39 p.m. / Great meteor / Wiltshire and Wales / Symons Met Mag., 4-155. [III; 2132. "Fine Meteor on October 11th." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (November 1869): 155. "Meteorological Notes on the Month." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (November 1869): 158-160, at 159, cv. "Llandudno."]


1869 Oct 11 / 5:04 p.m. / York and Lancashire / great met / BA 70-78. [III; 2133. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1869-70." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1870, 76-102, at 78-79.]


1869 Oct 11 / ? / Meteor seen from Yorkshire to London. / To all it fell perpendicularly but nearer some than others. At London, size of a large star. At Sheffield, size of the moon. / Standard 16-5-6. [III; 2134. "The Recent Meteor." London Standard, October 16, 1869, p. 5 c. 7.]


1869 Oct 11 / 5:04 p.m. / Sunset meteor / York and Lancashire / BA 70-78. [III; 2135. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1869-70." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1870, 76-102, at 78-79.]


1869 Oct 12 / bet. 7 and 8 a.m. / Camelford. / "Sudden noise like the rattle of musketry, and vibrations. / Western Daily Mercury (Plymouth) 13-2-5. [III; 2136. (Western Daily Mercury, October 13, 1869, p. 2 c. 5; not online for this date.)]


1869 Oct 12 / Aberdeen Free Press of—a whole street of new houses demolished in Belfast by persons unknown. [A; 571. "An extraordinary occurrence...." Aberdeen Free Press, October 12, 1869, p. 4 c. 5. "An extraordinary occurrence took place in Belfast on Wednesday night. A whole street new houses, off Byron Street, was demolished by some persons yet unknown." "A most extraordinary occurrence...." Belfast News-Letter, October 7, 1869, p. 2 c. 6. "The House-Tossing Freak in Byron Street." Belfast News-Letter, October 8, 1869, p. 3 c. 2. "A Street of Houses Knocked Down in Belfast." Ulster Gazette, October 8, 1869, p. 3 c. 7. "The mystery was cleared by the production at the Police Court yesterday morning of a man named Clarke, who with a number other men. was found by two constables, immediately after the fall of building concealed in the immediate vicinity, A subsequent search about tbe premises led to finding of a number of strong ropes, like ships' hawsers, which leads to the supposition that the mischief was done passing the ropes round tbe narrow walls between the lower windows underneath, and 'a long pull, a strong pull, and pull altogether' did the rest. From early morning till late last the scene of the occurrence was visited crowds people to see the result of this extraordinary freak. Eleven homes in one row have been completely demolished; and it was also found that, in another line of buildings behind, the interior walls had likewise been pulled down."]


1869 Oct 13 / [LT], 6-c / Met / Sheffield. [III; 2137. Coombe, C.G. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, October 13, 1869, p. 6 c. 3.]


1869 Oct 13 / 5 mets / Malta / BA 74-292. [III; 2138. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 292-293.]


1869 Oct 14 / 5 p.m. / British Guiana / Sound like report of cannon / N.Q. 5/7-293. [III; 2139. Arnott. S. "Mysterious Mountain Sounds." Notes and Queries, s. 5 v. 7 (April 14, 1877): 293. Brown, Charles Barrington, and, Sawkins, James Gay. Reports on the Physical, Descriptive, and Economic Geology of British Guiana. London: Longmans, Green, 1875, 83. "At 5 p.m. we heard a very loud noise, which sounded like that of a large cannon; such reports are frequently heard by the Indians, who declare they proceeded from the mountains. I heard such reports while on the Mazaruni river, where the Indians have the same ideas regarding them. Sir R. Schomburgk speaks of them." Schomburgk, Robert Hermann. A Description of British Guiana, Geographical and Statistical. London: Simpkin, Marshall, 1840, 9. "Indians of Pirara told me that there was, on the south-western angle of the Sierra Pacaraima, a mountain whence, from time to time, detonations are heard."]


1869 Oct 14 / [LT], 8-d / Met / Darlington. [III; 2140. "Remarkable Meteor." London Times, October 14, 1869, p. 8 c. 4.]


1869 Oct 15 / The Sunday before [Oct 10] // Downpour at Malta, 5 to 6 inches in dif[ferent] places, 6 hours. Symons Met. 4-178 / Town of Cospicua flooded. People in streets saved from drowning by ropes let down from 2nd floor windows. [III; 2141. "Great Floods at Malta." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (December 1869): 178.]


1869 Oct 17 / or 10 // Chester / mock moon (?) / Eng Mec X/187, 205. [III; 2142. Vincent, W. "Curious Phenomenon." English Mechanic, 10 (no. 241; November 5, 1869): 187. "Curious Phenomenon." English Mechanic, 10 (no. 242; November 12, 1869): 205. Vincent, W. "Mock Moon." English Mechanic, 10 (no. 244; November 26, 1869): 262-263. "Mock Moon." English Mechanic, 10 (no. 245; December 3, 1869): 278-279. Denning, William Frederick. "Curious Phenomenon." English Mechanic, 10 (no. 245; December 3, 1869): 281. After a terse response from "A Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society" about the position of the paraselene, (or mock moon), Denning helps to confirm the phenomenon observed by Vincent, on October 17. "Mr. T.P. Barkas, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, informs me that on the evening in question, at 8:30, he observed a paraselene." And, an artist in Newcastle sent drawings of it to Barkas, when he observed the "spectral moon" and the rings of light, at 8 P.M. (Newcastle Journl, October 19, 1869, p. 4;.) "A singular phenomenon was visible at Keelby on Sunday the 17th...." Stamford Mercury, October 22, 1869, p. 5 c. 3.]


[1869 Oct 17-18 /] 1870 Oct 17-18 / S / Lieut Herschel / (D-212). [IV; 254. The note copies information from page 212 of The Book of the Damned. "Dark objects crossing the Sun's disk." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 30 (March 11, 1870): 135-138.]  


1869 Oct 22 / 5:30 a.m. / Severe shock / Conn. / NY Times, Nov 6, 1877. [III; 2143. "The Sunday Morning Earthquake." New York Times, November 6, 1877, p. 2 c. 6.]


1869 Oct. 22 / 5:45 a.m. / Nova Scotia and N. Brunswick / severe shock and rumbling sound / N.Y Trib 25-1-4. BA '11/43. [III; 2144. "The Earthquake." New York Tribune, October 25, 1869, p. 1 c. 4. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 43.]


1869 Oct 26-Nov. 2 / 200 shocks at Gross-Gerau. / See Oct 31, Nov 2. / L.T., Nov. 6-10-c. Preceded by sounds like distant musketry. [III; 2145. "Earthquakes." London Times, November 6, 1869, p. 10 c. 3.]


1869 Oct 26-Nov. 2 / Series / Germany—region of Darmstadt to Stuttgardt. About 200 shocks. In accounts from Frankfort newspapers, copied in the Carlisle Journal 9-4-1, said accompanied by detonations like sound of musketry and tha lights were seen. Not described much. Mentioned several times—upon one occasion were three flashes. [III; 2146.1, 2146.2. (Carlisle Journal, November 9, 1869, p. 4 c. 1; this date not at BNA.)]


1869 Oct 27 / date of report from Galle / Severe q. / Manila / L.T., Nov 9-9-f. [III; 2147. "Earthquake.—Galle." London Times, November 9, 1869, p. 9 c. 6.]


1869 Oct 27 / det met / ab. 3 a.m. / Terrific explosions, Forest, etc., Ohio. Some thought a q. but met was seen. / A. J Sci 2/49/140. [III; 2148. Smith, John Lawrence. "On the flight of a remarkable meteorite across the Western portion of Ohio near Forest." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 49 (1870): 139-141.]


1869 Oct 29-Nov 2 / Nov 8-9 // q's / Rhine / L'Annee Sci 14-356. [III; 2149. "Les tremblements de terre en 1869." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 14 (1869): 351-357, at 356.]


1869 Oct 31 / First shock ab 5 p.m. at Darmstadt. LT 5-10-f. Most severe at Gross Gerau. Then Nov 1—4:30 a.m. [III; 2150. "Earthquakes." London Times, November 5, 1869, p. 10 c. 6.]


1869 Nov. 2 / Darmstadt, Gross Gerau, etc., Germany / evening / q's / LT 4-10-a. [III; 2151. "The Earthquake in Germany." London Times, November 4, 1869, p. 10 c. 1.]


1869 Nov 3 / Great explosion aboard HMS Thistle at island of Sheppey. / near Sheerness I / Standard, Nov. 5. [IV; 1. "The Explosion on Board Her Majesty's Gun Vessel Thistle." London Standard, November 5, 1869, p. 6 c. 1.]


1869 Nov 5 / 10 meteors at Sunderland. / L.T. 9-9-f. [IV; 2. "The November Meteoric Shower." London Times, November 9, 1869, p. 9 c. 6.]


1869 Nov. 5 / (Sea foam) / Ac to Inverness Courier, in London Standard, Nov 23-6-3, about noon the inmates of the Manse of Barvas and several field laborers were astonished to see large masses of sea foam falling from the sky. In about 2 minutes hundreds of acres were dotted with the deposit. "The weather was perfectly calm, the little wind that was blowing at the time having been, moreover, [in a direction,] not from, but toward the sea." Said that there had been "half a gale" the day before and it was thought that foam from the sea had been carried up and held in suspension. / Barvas near coast of the Lewis, Outer Hebrides, Ross-shire. [IV; 3.1, 3.2, 3.3.  "Singular Occurrence—Shower of Sea-Foam." London Standard, November 23, 1869, p. 6 c. 3. "Singular Occurrence—Shower of Sea-Foam." Inverness Courier, November 18, 1869, p. 5 c. 5.]


1869 Nov 6 / L.T. 9-9-f / Great meteor, Bristol—6:55 p.m. Train 15 minutes. One at Stokesy Vicarage, Shropshire, at 6:30. [IV; 4. "The November Meteoric Shower." London Times, November 9, 1869, p. 9 c. 6.]


1869 Nov. 6 / 7 p.m. / Scilly Islands / Met that left a train in Cass and Pers for ½ hour. / L.T. 10-11-e / Other great mets in England. [IV; 5. Banfield, John. "The Meteor." London Times, November 10, 1869, p. 11 c. 5.]


1869 Nov. 6 / At 7 p.m., a similar meteor ab. 7 p.m. at Bilton and Anstruther. Symons 4/171. [IV; 6. "The Fine Meteor of November 6th, 1869." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (December 1869): 163-171, at 171.]


1869 Nov. 6 / ab. 6:50 p.m. / Great meteor and train, central and southern England and isle of Jersey. At Redruth stationary for 7 minutes in Cassiopeia. 6 pages in Symons Met Mag, vol. 4, p. 165. [IV; 7.  "The Fine Meteor of November 6th, 1869." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 4 (December 1869): 163-171, at 165, cv. "Redruth."]


1869 Nov. 6 / Met trail over Eng. 50 minutes.  / (Ball) / Story of the Heavens, p. 374 / Wrong year? [IV; 8. Ball, Robert Stawell. The Story of the Heavens. London:  Cassell, 1885, 332-333. London: Cassell, 1893, 327-328. London: Cassell, 1900, 374-375.]


1869 Nov. 6 / Torquay / 6:45 p.m. / Great met / Train visible ab. 50 minutes / Nature 1-58. [IV; 9. Pengelly, W. "A Meteor." Nature, 1 (November 11, 1869): 58.]


1869 Nov. 6 / Meteor was seen to fall at Fawley, near Southampton. / (Standard, Nov. 18) / On the Wednesday (10th) following, picked up [in a field beyond where thought to have fallen. Object rather less than size of a cricket ball and weight more than a pound. Penetrated ground ½ inch. Piece broken off and seems inside of a brownish flint. A projection that looked like a fossil shell. / Astr. Reg 7-248—also see vol 8. / Seemed been soft when fell. Flattened on side on ground. [IV; 10.1, 10.2, 10.3. Smith, A.T. "To the Editor." London Standard, November 18, 1869, p. 6 c. 2. Payne, R.W. "A Brilliant Meteor." Astronomical Register, 7 (December 1869): 247-248. (Astronomical Register, vol. 8. Nothing found in first check for mets.)]


1869 Nov. 6 / 6:50 / London / Time of fireworks, a rocket and an exceptional meteor cross tracks. / Field, Nov 20—p. 432. [IV; 11. (Field, November 20, 1869, p. 432.)]


1869 Nov 6 / 6:50 p.m. / Great met and 50-minute streak / Cornwall / BA 70-78. [IV; 12. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1869-70." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1870, 76-102, at 79-81.]


1869 Nov 8 / 11:30 p.m. / Wellington meteor / N. Zealand / Trans N.Z. Inst 2-402. [IV; 13. "Sixth Meeting. November 13, 1869." Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 2 (1869): 402-404, at 402.]


1869 Nov 8 / [LT], 10-f / Highclerc / Met. [IV; 14. "A Brilliant Meteor." London Times, November 8, 1869, p. 10 c. 6.]


1869 Nov 10 / At Gross-Gerau (Germany?), 25 rumbling sounds and one shock. Since Oct 30, been 7[00] or 800. On 11th, 23 rumbling sounds and one shock. 12th, 6 violent shocks. 13th, 2 violent. / Nature 1-87. [IV; 15. "Notes." Nature, 1 (November 18, 1869): 86-87, at 87.]


1869 Nov 10, 13, 14 / Mets / Rhodes / BA 74-294. [IV; 16. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 294-295.]


1869 Nov 10 / [LT], 11-e / Met / Cornwall. [IV; 17. Banfield, John. "The Meteor." London Times, November 10, 1869, p. 11 c. 5.]


1869 Nov. 11 / [LT], 9-b / Met / Worcester. [IV; 18. Richards, Thomas. "The Meteor." London Times, November 11, 1869, p. 9 c. 2. At Wincanton, Somersetshire, (not Worcester).]


1869 Nov 13 / Trib of / Oct 6? / That a meteoric stone had fallen recently in Stewart Co., Ga. [IV; 19. "General Notes." New York Tribune, November 13, 1869, p. 4 c. 5. The Lumpkin meteorite. See: 1869 Oct. 6, (III; 2123).]


1869 Nov 13 or 14 / L.T., Nov 9-9-f / J. R. Hind's prediction that meteors would be seen in unusual numbers "not only possible, but [even] probable." "M. Le Verrier is clearly of this opinion." [IV; 20. "The November Meteoric Shower." London Times, November 9, 1869, p. 9 c. 6.]


1869 Nov 12-13 / 13-14 // In Nature, Nov. 11, Richard Proctor, arguing upon conventional ideas of the streams, predicts shower of meteors, but more scattered than in preceding years. [IV; 21. Proctor, Richard Anthony. "The November Shooting Stars." Nature, 1 (November 11, 1869): 56-57.]


1869 Nov 13 / In Times Nov. 9, Mr Hind says probable be great met display. Says that Le Verrier was of this opinion, and had organized for observation. [IV; 22. "The November Meteoric Shower." London Times, November 9, 1869, p. 9 c. 6.]


1869 Nov 13-14 / Midnight to 4:40 a.m., 439 meteors counted by 3 observers at Port Louis Observatory, Mauritius. / Nature 1-220. [IV; 23. "Notes." Nature, 1 (December 23, 1869): 219-221, at 220.]


1869 Nov 13-14 / In L.T., Nov. 9, the astronomer J. R. Hind advises watch for Leonids, saying that probably be great, and that such was the opinion of Le Verrier, who had organized observers in France, Madrid, Cadiz, Ajaccio, Turin, and Algeria. [IV; 24. "The November Meteoric Shower." London Times, November 9, 1869, p. 9 c. 6.]


1869 Nov. 14 / morning / Sky overcast by a fall of snow "throughout the U.S." / BA 70-77. [IV; 25. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1869-70." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1870, 76-102, at 77.]


1869 Nov 14 / morning / Pensacola, Fla. / Mets very numerous. Occasionally from 2 or 3 to 20 in a minute. BA 70-99 / Many at Santa Barbara, Cal. [IV; 26. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1869-70." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1870, 76-102, at 99.]


1869 Nov. 14 / morning / At Port Said, reported by Capt. G. L. Tupman, most brilliant meteors shots, with astonishing rapidity at the rate of one or two every minute. He notes that his observations confirmed "in an absolute manner" the existing theories of the motion of the meteors. / L.T., Dec 8-4-3. [IV; 27.1, 27.2. Tupman, George Lyon. "The November Meteors." London Times, December 8, 1869, p. 4 c. 3.]


1869 Nov 14 / morning / Port Said, Egypt / Ac to Capt Tupman, brilliant shower of mets. "Shot with astonishing rapidity." / L.T., Dec 8-4-c. [IV; 28. Tupman, George Lyon. "The November Meteors." London Times, December 8, 1869, p. 4 c. 3.]


1869 Nov 14 / Red spot of Jupiter—first seen as an elliptic ring / Observatory 3/279 / See July, 1878. [IV; 29. Gledhill, Joseph. "Jupiter in 1869 and 1879.—The 'Ellipse' and the 'Red Spot.'" Observatory, 3 (1879-1880): 279-281, (illustrations). See: (1878 July.) Altho Robert Hooke reported a spot on Jupiter on May 9, 1664, and tho Giovanni Cassini found it the next year, and sketched the "permanent spot" in the South Equitoreal Belt, (its present location), modern observations of the Spot only began in 1831, when Samuel Heinrich Schwabe sketched it, again. This "Great Red Spot" may have disappeared, in 1713, only to re-appear, in 1831, or it may have faded from view or shrunk down in size; but, it has been continuously observed since 1878.]


1869 Nov. 14 / 4:47 a.m. / Met / Scotland / BA 70-81. [IV; 30. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1869-70." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1870, 76-102, at 81-82.]


1869 Nov 15 / morning / "Sympathetic meteors"? / Port Said / no Leonids / 5 from Orion / See Ref, 14th. [IV; 31. See: 1869 Nov. 14, (IV; 27).]


1869 Nov. 15 / Mr Gledhill's impression of the sharpness, clearness and brightness of the spots in Plato. "I can only liken them to the small round disks of bright stars seen in the transit-instrument." / Rept B.A. 1871/79. [IV; 32. Webb, T.W., and Crossley, Edward. "Report of the Committee for discussing Observations of Lunar Objects suspected of Change." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 60-97, at 79.]


1869 Nov 16 / Gledhill / "The spots 1, 17, 9, and 30 appeared just like small stars in the transit-instrument on a windy night." / B Assoc '71/80. [IV; 33. Webb, T.W., and Crossley, Edward. "Report of the Committee for discussing Observations of Lunar Objects suspected of Change." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 60-97, at 80.]


1869 Nov 16-19 / Biskra, Algeria / qs / C.R. 70/48. [IV; 34. Ollivier, E. "Secousses de tremblements de terre à Biskra (Algérie du Sud), du 16 au 19 novembre inclusivement." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 48-51.]


1869 Nov 16-19 / qs / Algeria / C.R. 70-48. [IV; 35. Ollivier, E. "Secousses de tremblements de terre à Biskra (Algérie du Sud), du 16 au 19 novembre inclusivement." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 48-51.]


[IV; 36. Pabst: "Void—due to T.T. typo, The Fortean, #58, p. 30, c. 1."]


1869 Nov. 20 / Weekly Budget of, 5-2 / Strange light reported in a church in parish of St. Erth, West Cornwall. Then said was reflections from lightin a house other side of valley. Said that this explanation satisfied the incredulous. [A; 572. (Weekly Budget, November 20, 1869, 5-2.)]


1869 Nov. 27 / Gigantic metite said fallen in Table Mt, Cape Town, with an explosion heard 25 miles around. / Sci Op., 3-2. [IV; 37. "The Week." Scientific Opinion, 3 ( January  5, 1870): 2-4, at 2.]


1869 Dec. 1 / Rhodes, etc. / great q / [BA] '11. [IV; 38. Milne, 721.]


1869 Dec 3 / Times, 9-f / Fast / Dr, Phillips of Guy's Hospital had approved idea of having the girl watched by 4 trained nurses. The father, Evan Jacob, had signed an agreement that he would place no impediment in the way of a thorough test. This was with the local Committee of five doctors. // Dec 14-5-f / 4 nurses arrive at the home of the girl. Her room thoroughly searched and she in it, and the watch started with the consent of the parents, they were excluded from the room. // 20-12-4—Girl dead—The father had refused to order the girl to eat but had said that to convince himself whether the girl could swallow or not, he (Davies) might offer her food. This before inquest—This was ac to a deposition by  

one of the doctors named Davies. Ac to this deposition the girl' uncle had offered her food the morning of her last day. "She made no reply but appeared to go off into a fit." // 22-4-e. At inquest testimony of [Rev.] Thomas and [Dr.] Phillips. "The body was plump." In the stomach 3 teaspooonsful of a "semi-gelatinous" substance. Intestines empty. At inquest, ac to the father, she had eaten nothing for 2  years. The coroner called all statements by the father "A hideous mass of nonsense". Verdict of jury charged him with manslaughter for neglect to induce child to take food. // Some indignation also against the doctors. Someone in Times, Dec 28—"Shall the staff of Guy's escape?" But only charge was against parents. However, parents and 5 doctors indicted. // L.T., Feb. 1, 1870 / Evan Jacob still maintaining that the girl had taken no food for more than 2 years. // March 1—Times of / Mr and Mrs Jacob and 5 doctors of the Medical Committee but no one of Guy's Hospital prosecution begun. // 4-9-e / The Rev Evan Jones, the Vicar, had retreated, saying he had warned the parents of the consequences of fraud. Said he had believed at first. / Jacob's testimony was to effect that for 2 years attempts to feed her had made her sick. // 11-10-f—a physician on stand testified he had seen no sign of emaciation until the 7th day. In opinion of one witness, Dr Clifton, so little evidence of starvation that he called it death by exhaustion from want of food. // Evidence of no nervousness of girl and of her sleeping well (March 15-12-b). Had been considerable persectionof the Jacobs. At the trial Dr Pearson Hughes told of a visit to the house, and of an altercation with the Jacobs. He had been summoned for assault, but the case had been dismissed by a magistrate. / More testimony by the doctors who performed the autopsy. "The body was plump"—general appearance of health—"thoroughly healthy in every particular." [A; 574.1 to 574.12. "The Welsh Fasting Girl." London Times, December 3, 1869, p. 9 c. 6. "The Welsh Fasting Girl." London Times, December 14, 1869, p. 3 c. 6. "The Welsh Fasting Girl." London Times, December 20, 1869, p. 12 c. 4. "The Welsh Fasting Girl." London Times, December 22, 1869, p. 4 c. 5. "The Welsh Fasting Girl." London Times, December 28, 1869, p. 5 c. 5. "The Welsh Fasting Girl Case." London Times, February 1, 1870, p. 9 c. 6. "The Welsh Fasting Girl." London Times, March 1, 1870, p. 12 c. 2. "The Welsh Fasting Girl Case." London Times,, March 4, 1870, p. 9 c. 5. "The Welsh Fasting Girl." London Times, March 5, 1869, p. 9 c. 6. "The Welsh Fasting-Girl Prosecution." London Times, March 7, 1870, p. 6 c. 5. "The Welsh Fasting Girl." London Times, March 8, 1870, p. 9 c. 3. "The Welsh Fasting Girl Case." London Times, March 9, 1870, p. 5 c. 2. "The Welsh Fasting Girl Case." London Times, March 11, 1870, p. 10 c. 6. "The Welsh Fasting Girl." London Times, March 15, 1870, p. 12 c. 2. "The Welsh Fasting Girl." London Times, March 16, 1870, p. 12 c. 6.]


[1869 Dec 3 ] / Fast / In his book, "Fasting Girls," Dr William Hammond tells of cases, undertaking to show that all were impostors—the girl Sarah Jacobs, 10 - 12 years old, of whom said that took no food from Oct 10, 1867 [to] Dec 17, 1869—said that "by her perserverence in lying had actually succeeded in inducing an educated gentleman to accept the truth of her statements!" He was the Vicar of Llanfihangel, who published a statement that she had not "partaken a single grain of food of any kind whatever, during the last sixteen months". This the "Welsh Fasting Girl". He tells of a watch upon the girl by 2 men, 12 hours each, from March 22nd to Ap. 5, 1869, and their statement that she took no food. A Committee had been appointed. Seven of them, but several dismissed—one for sleeping and one because he was a neighbor. Dr Hammond says that ac to evidence, occasionally watchers before time had expired and that one of them was drunk on duty—Said face plump and "cheeks and lips of a beautiful rosy color". Case excited great attention. She was taken to Guy's Hospital, London, Dec 9, 1869, and watched by 4 nurses who would give her no food unless it was asked for. She died on 17th of December. "Actually starved to death." Seems queer now, ac to what we know of starvation-endurance, to starve to death in 8 days. Coroner's verdict was died of starvation caused by negligence to induce the child to take food, on the part of the father." Nothing said of nurses neglect to induce the child to eat. Arrested he got hard labor 12 months, Mrs. Jacobs hard labor 6 months. [A; 575.1 to 575.7. Hammond, William Alexander. Fasting Girls: Their Physiology and Pathology. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1879, 13-30. Sarah Jacobs was not taken to Guy's Hospital, as noted by Fort, but had remained in her home, in Llethernoyadd-ucha, Carmarthenshire, watched by the nurses under conditions that prevented food or water to be given to her without it being observed. At the beginning of this more stringent watch, "it was ascertained that the girl had repeated evacuations of urine, and once, at least, of fœces." Fowler, Robert. A Complete History of the Case of the Welsh Fasting-Girl (Sarah Jacob) With Comments Thereon; And Observations on Death from Starvation. London: Henry Renshaw, 1871; 54-55, 84, 239, 247. On December 11, Sarah's night-dress was found to be stained with urine, "very wet," and signs of faeces, (two days after the last watch had begun); and, the last time that urine was found in her bed was December 14. "The Coroner read the whole evidence and summed up ably. He could not understand how rational persons could believe the story of the girl's fasting. The urine and excrement must have come from something." Dr. Thomas Lewis attributed the source of her urine "to the watery vapour suspended in the atmosphere"; and, Sister Elizabeth Clinch of Guy's Hospital suggested the same marvel: "I was surprised she did not ask for water. The room was so damp, that I thought she might absorb the moisture from the atmosphere."]


[1869 Dec 3 / Fast / Welsh / As Dr. Hammond tells it, she was "actually starved to death." [A; 576. Hammond, William Alexander. Fasting Girls: Their Physiology and Pathology. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1879, 27.]


1869 Dec 7 / 7 a.m. and 7:15 p.m. / Shocks / Tacna, Peru / C.R. 70-502. [IV; 39. "M. Le Ministre de L'Instruction Publique transmet à l'Académie les deux documents...." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 501-503, at 502.]


1869 Dec. 11 / A Fancher / Possessed by Devils / Dec 11, 1869 / Copying from the Madison (Wis) State Journal—case at Watertown, Wis.—young man named Seige—a game leg and a withered arm; aged 26. About 20 years before his sister found a duck egg with a pinhole in it. It was eaten by a dog, which was immediately stricken mad and blind. Then the girl was taken with blindness and convulsions. After a year of agony she died. Upon her death the boy Carl was immediately taken with blindness and paralyzing pains that after months, left him deformed. This in Germany. In year 1867 the S family went to Wisconsin. Rest of the story of possession by devils is not of definite characters but of convulsions of the young man. [A; 573.1 to 573.4. Carl Seige. (Wisconsin State Journal, 1869??? Madison State Journal, November 29, 1869??? "Wisconsin," (Milwaukee newspaper), November 27, 1869. Reprinted in Watertown Democrat, December 2, 1869.) (Watertown Daily Times, March 3, 1910. Watertown Gazette, August 17, 1911. "In Times Square," (column) Watertown Daily Times, November 11, 1985. Wallman, Charles. Watertown Daily Times, September 4, 1998.) (Chicago Times, December 22, 1869.) (Olin, William. "Letter to the Editor." Watertown Democrat, December 30, 1869.) (Milwaukee newspapers. Nil at LOC.)  (Gmeiner, John. The Spirits of Darkness. Milwaukee: Hoffman Brothers, 1886, 1888, 1889. Not online.) Riedl, Kenneth M. A Church Built on the Rock. Madison: Omni Press, © 2003, 291-300.]


1869 Dec 12 / 6:13 p.m. / Northamptonshire / great slow met / BA 70-82. [IV; 40. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1869-70." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1870, 76-102, at 82.]


1869 Dec 12 / 6:10 p.m. / Great meteor / Scotland, and Barnet.  L.T. 16-10-d. [IV; 41. Taylor, Wilbraham. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, December 16, 1869, p. 10 c. 4. Rickett, James. "A Brilliant Meteor." London Times, December 15, 1869, p. 7 c. 6.]


1869 Dec 14 // 1870 March 5, West End (London) News. / Parents and 5 physicians—of Sarah Jacobs, "the fasting girl" of Carmarthen. Charged with manslaughter for her death. [A; 577. (West End News, March 5, 1870; on microfilm, Gale Group, Early English newspapers.)]


1869 Dec 14 / (I) / bet. 3 and 4 a.m. / Great spectacle in sky said been a mirage of the Louvre and the Seine in sky. / Scientific News, NS, 1-94. [IV; 43."A Curious Phenomenon." Scientific News for General Readers, n.s., 1 (January 27, 1888): 94. "Paris dans le ciel." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 14 (1869): 176. "Paris, ses palais, ses monuments et son fleuve se montraient sur les nuages qui masquaient le ciel, mais renversés, comme cela aurait eu lieu si au-dessus de Paris on avait placé une immense glace. Le Panthéon, les Invalides, Notre-Dame, les palais du Louvre et des Tuileries, la Seine, les Champs-Elysées et leur grand palais, présentaient une image rosée d'un effet indescriptible." Tissandier, Gaston. "Mirage par Reflexion Observé à Madras." La Nature, 1887 pt. 1 (no. 708, December 25): 53.]


1869 Dec 15 / Time of heavy gales, "magnificent display" of sunspots. / L.T. 17-7-f. [IV; 42. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, December 17, 1869, p. 7 c. 6.]


1869 Dec 15 / Destructuve thunderstorm in Yorkshire / L.T. 18-3-b. [IV; 44. "The Thunderstorm in Yorkshire." London Times, December 18, 1869, p. 3 c. 2.]


1869 Dec 20 / Rawalpinda, India / q I = small / BA '11. [IV; 45. Milne, 721.]


[1869 Dec 21. Wrong date. See: 1869 Dec 25, (IV; 46).]


1869 Dec 21 / 8:15 p.m. / Met. / Leominster / BA 72-69. [IV; 47. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, and Charles Brooke. "Report...on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1871-72." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1872, 57-118, at 69.]


1869 Dec 25 / (Alg) / Metite / Mourzouk, Tripoli / C.R. 70-649. BA '70-93. [IV; 48.  Coumbary. "Astronomie.—Chute d'un aérolithe à Mourzouk (Barbarie), le 25 décembre 1859." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 649-650. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1869-70." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1870, 76-102, at 93.]


[1869 Dec 25 /] 1869 Dec 21 / Details, metite, Mourzouk, Tripoli / La Sci Pour Tous 15-142. [IV; 46."Astronomie: Chute d'un aérolithe à Mourzourk (Barbarie), le 21 décembre 1859." La Science Pour Tous, 15 (no. 18; April 2, 1870): 142. Coumbary. "Astronomie.—Chute d'un aérolithe à Mourzouk (Barbarie), le 25 décembre 1859." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 649-650. The date of the fall and spelling of Murzuk, (Libya), were altered by La Science Pour Tous; however, there was doubt that this meteorite had fallen. "Notes." Nature, 5 (December 14, 1871): 130-132, at 132. "About a year ago many English and foreign scientific journals, following the Bulletino Romano, announced that a large meteorite had fallen near the town of Murzuk, in December 1869. M. Rose has lately made a communication to the Berlin Academy, in which he states that the results of his inquiries made both at Tripoli and Murzuk have shown that no such fall was ever observed, much less that any such meteorite had been found."]


1869 Dec 26 / 6 p.m. / Severe q / E California and Nevada / L.T., 1870, Jan 10-10-b. [IV; 49. "The United States." London Times, January 10, 1870, p. 10 c. 1-2.]


1869 Dec 26 / Caucasia / q / III / [Heavy] / BA '11. [IV; 50. Milne, 721.]


1869 Dec 27 / letter under this date  Stromboli magnificent. / La Sci Pour Tous 15-49. [IV; 51. "L'Éruption du Volcan de l'Île Stromboli." La Science Pour Tous, 15 (no. 7; January 15, 1870): 49.]


[IV; 52. Pabst: "IV-52 = III-1670(a)." See: 1868 / ab last of Dec, (III; 1670).]


1869 Dec 27 / California / q / BA '11 / II / [medium]. [IV; 53. Milne, 721.]


1869 Dec 28 / 5 a.m. / Destructive shock / Santa Maura . L.T., Jan 1-10-a. [IV; 54. "Italy." London Times, January 1, 1870, p. 10 c. 1.]


1869 Dec 28 / Greece / great q / [BA] '11. [IV; 55. Milne, 721.]  


1869 Dec 28 / 8:50 p.m. / Germany / meteor / Zeit Met 5/47. [IV; 56. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 4 (1870): 42-48, at 47.]

1870:


1870 / H.H. / Patchogue / See 1867??. [A; 578. (See: 1865, (A; 456); 1866, (A; 468); 1867, (A; 502); 1868, (A; 520), 1869, (A; 541).]


1870 / Note 1 / Body in Philadelphia burial ground / See Oct 27, 1872. [A; 579. See: 1872 Oct 27, (A; 789).]


1870 / The body at Blandford Churchyard, Peterburg, Va. / See Oct 27, 1888. [A; 580. See: (1888 Oct 27).)]


1870 / Body of Mrs. W. I. Peters / Frankfort, Ind. / See Dec. 22, 1888. [A; 581. See: (1888 Dec 22.)]


1870 / South Bend, Ind. / Body of Anna Rees / See Aug 11, 1872. [A; 582. See: 1872 Aug 11, (A; 776).]


1870 / A. W. Underwood / Negro boy / Paw Paw / fire breath / See May 1, 1880. [A; 583. See: (1880 May 1.)]


1870 / Dymoch Hall, Derbyshire / strange murders / not said this year / See March 15, 1901. [A; 584. See: (1901 March 15.)]


1870 / Sounds and ghosts in a house in Deerfield, Portage Co., Ohio / See Dec 13, 1873. [A; 585. See: 1873 Dec 13, (A; 870).]


1870 / H.H. / Gardner, Kansas / See March 7, 1874. [A; 586. See: 1874 March 7, (A; 909).]


1870 / Mollie Fancher / Cor[ner] Gates Ave and Downing Street, Brooklyn. [A; 587. Dailey, Abram Hoagland. Mollie Fancher, the Brooklyn Enigma. Brooklyn: Eagle Book, 1894, 8.]


1870, 1st part / Lightning—holes / Mass. / Boston Jour Chem. 5/15. * [A; 588. "Freaks of Lightning." Boston Journal of Chemistry, 5 (August 1870): 15.]


1870 / Something like a meteor but watched for 16 minutes over Persia. / Jour. B.A.A., 19-197. [IV; 57. "Report of the Meeting of the Association Held on February 24, 1909...." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 19 (1909): 191-200, at 197.]


1870 // Auroras at Vendome in 1870. / C.R. 72/253. [IV; 58. Renou, E. "Aurores boréales observées à Vendome en 1870." Comptes Rendus, 72 (1871): 253-256.]


1870 // Mets of Malta. / BA 74-294. [IV; 59. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1873-74." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1874, 269-359, at 294-297.]


1870 // Winter /// Black mold / Sweden. * [IV; 60. See: 1870 Jan 31, (IV; 76). The black snow that fell at "Arlovetz," in the vicinity of Smila, Ukraine, (not in Sweden).]


1870 Jan / A light that had been seen upon the Boston and Lowell railroad, as if someone were swinging a lantern. Some laborers upon a handcar had seen it, and threw their car from track thinking an unexpected train was coming. N.Y. Times, Jan 30. [A; 589. "Ghostly Signals at Woburn." New York Times, January 30, 1870, p. 1 c. 5.]


1870 Jan - Feb / Disap "City of Boston" ship / An Reg 1870/22 ///. [A; 590. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 112 (1870): pt. 2, 1-198, at 21-22, cv. "Loss of the Inman Steamer 'City of Boston.'"]


1870 Jan 1 / [London Times of], 10-a / 5-7-d / 11-10-c / 22-5-e // q. / Santa Maura. [IV; 61. "Italy." London Times, January 1, 1870, p. 10 c. 1. "Earthquake at St. Maura." London Times, January 5, 1870 p. 7 c. 4. "The Earthquake at Santa Maura." London Times, January 11, 1870, p. 10 c. 3. "Naval and Military Intelligence." London Times, January 22, 1870, p. 5 c. 5.]


1870 Jan 1 / Mauna Loa / See June, 32. [IV; 62. See: 1832 June 20, (I; 1700). Wood, Harry Oscar. "The Seismic Prelude to the 1914 Eruption of Mauna Loa." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 5 (1915): 39-51, at 47.]


1870 Jan 3 / [LT], 9-c / Hailstorms / Rome. [IV; 63. "The Œcumenical Council." London Times, January 3, 1870, p. 9 c. 3-4.]


1870 Jan 3 / (It) / Aurora and other phe / Piedmont / C.R., Feb 28, 1870 / Chem News 21-119. [IV; 64. Denza, F. "Aurore boréale et autres phénomènes météorologiques observés dans le Piémont, le 3 janvier 1870." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 465-468. "Chemical Notices from Foreign Sources." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 21 (March 11, 1870): 118-120, at 119.]


1870 Jan 3 / Auroral display / England / L.T., Feb 5-5-f. [IV; 65. "Auroral Display." London Times, February 3, 1870, p. 5 c. 6. "The Auroral Display." London Times, February 4, 1870, p. 4 c. 4.]


1870 Jan 3 / 6:20 p.m. / by Elger, at Bedford / Glow in northern sky and streamers shooting up. "A very bright and persistent ray extended as far as B. Draconis." / Astro Reg 8-61 / A 6:31, another traced to Gamma Ursae Minoris. [IV; 66. Denning, William Frederick. "The Observing Astronomical Society."Astronomical Register, 8 (March 1870): 59-62, at 60-61.]


1870 Jan 3 / Halifax, England / by Gledhill / Beam—7:10 / through Delta Aurigae Geminorum to Dust Zeta Persei to N of Alpha Pegasi through Aquarius / down to w. horizon / ab 5 degrees wide // At 7:20, beam had fallen toward s. horizon and lay through Pleiades, Aries, Androm to the W. / Astro Reg 8-40. [IV; 67.1, 67.2. Gledhill, Joseph. "Observations Made at the Observatory of Mr. E. Crossley, Park Road, Halifax." Astronomical Register, 8 (February 1870): 40-41. "This fine object lay nearly east and west, and extended nearly from horizon to horizon. Its east end did not extend beyond the Twins. Its path lay through δ  [Delta] Geminorum, ι [Iota] Aurigae, ζ [Zeta] Persei, just to north of α [Alpha] Andromedae, through α [Alpha] Pegasi, through Aquarius down to the west horizon."]


1870 Jan 7 / [LT]. 10-a / Abandoned Ship. See / Jan 22 / See Feb 7. [A; 591. "Plymouth, Thursday." London Times, January 7, 1870, p. 10 c. 1. See: 1870 Jan 22,  (A; 602), and, 1870 Feb 7, (A; 593).]


1870 / Great year for missing and abandoned vessels / got nothing from look-ups however. [A; 592.]


1870 Jan / Missing Vessels / [LT], [Jan] 3-4-d / 19-10-e / 20-7-b / 12-10-a / 24-6-c / 29-11-f / 27-4-e(2) / 23-5-a / 6-7-d. [A; 601. "Missing Ships." London Times, January 3, 1870, p. 4 c. 4. "Missing Ship." London Times, January 6, 1870, p. 7 c. 4. "Missing Ship." London Times, January 12, 1870, p. 10 c. 1. "Missing Ship." London Times, January 19, 1870, p. 10 c. 5. "Missing Ship." London Times, January 20, 1870, p. 7 c. 2. "Missing Steamer." London Times, January 24, 1870, p. 6 c. 3. "Missing Ships." London Times, January 27, 1870 p. 4 c. 5. "Missing Ship." London Times, January 29, 1870, p. 11 c. 6. (Sunday Times, January 23, 1870, 23-5-a.)]


1870 Jan 13 / [LT], 4-f / 31-10-c // State of the sun. [IV; 68. "State of the Sun." London Times, January 13, 1870, p. 4 c. 6. (London Times, January 31, 1870, p. 10 c. 3; not here.)]


1870 Jan. 14-15 / night / Shocks / France / Sci Op. 3-82. [IV; 69. (Scientific Opinion, 3-82.)]


1870 Jan 15 / [LT], 11-f / Venus visible daytime. [IV; 70. "The Planet Venus." London Times, January 15, 1870, p. 11 c. 6.]


1870 Jan 15 / Finsbury / Mdr attrib to devil / An Reg 1870/8. [A; 604. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 112 (1870): pt. 2, 1-198, at 6-8, cv. "Murder in Finsbury."]


1870 Jan 17 / July 16 // Sun and moon above horizon in eclipse? [IV; 71. (Refs???)]


1870 Jan 19 / Sci Op of / Vesuvius active partly. [IV; 72. "The Week." Scientific Opinion, 3 ( January  19, 1870): 55-58, at 56. "Vesuvius is in a state of partial eruption, belching out smoke and cinders."]


1870 Jan 20 / [LT], 7-e / A myst. hair-cutter in London. [A; 605. "A New Kind of Robbery." London Times, January 20, 1870, p. 7 c. 5.]


[1870 Jan] / BO / Field, Jan. 22, 1870 /Two cors reported capture of humming-bird hawk moths in January. / Feb. 26—butterfly caught at Oxford on Feb. 17th. /March 12—two cors with one from Eitharn and one from New Wandsworth, telling of very large numbers of ladybirds, "similar in size and color" to those of preceding summer. Editor says that mild weather had brought them out of hibernation and that no extraordinary. [IV 73.1, 73.2. (Field, January 22, 1870. Field, February 26, 1870. Field, March 12, 1870.)]


1870 Jan 22 / (+) / [LT], 9-e / Strange case abandoned vessel // Other cases / See June 6. / See May 3. / Jan 7 / See March 1. // Missing Ship—City of Boston— / Feb. 16-11-c / 26-8-a / March 3-9-c / 4-9-e / 19-8-d / 24-9-e / Ap. 1-8-c / 4-12-c / 5-11-d / 5-10-f / 14-9-c / 28-11-f / 26-12-e. [A; 602.1, 602.2. "Strange Case of Abandonment." London Times, January 22, 1870, p. 9 c. 5. "No news has yet been received of the Long-overdue City of Boston screw steamer...." London Times, February 16, 1870, p. 11 c. 3. "The City of Boston Steamship." London Times, February 26, 1870, p. 8 c. 1. "The City of Boston Steamship." London Times, March 3, 1870, p. 9 c. 3. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 4, 1870, p. 9 c. 5. "The Missing Steamers." London Times, March 19, 1870, p. 8 c. 4. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 24, 1870, p. 9 c. 5. Belcher, Edward. "The City of Boston." London Times, April 1, 1870, p. 8 c. 3. "The City of Boston." London Times, April 4, 1870, p. 12 c. 3. "The City of Boston." London Times, April 5, 1870, p. 10 c. 6. Baker, Charles. "The City of Boston." London Times, April 5, 1870, p. 11 c. 4. "The City of Boston." London Times, April 14, 1870, p. 9 c. 3. "The City of Boston." London Times, April 26, 1870, p. 12 c. 5. Ransford, Henry. "The City of Boston. London Times, April 28, 1870, p. 11 c. 6.]


1870 Jan. 23 / Vizagapatam District, Madras, India / metite / R—Ap. 18, '38 / Met iron—(F). [IV; 74. Brown, J. Coggin. A Descriptive Catalogue of the Meteorites Comprised in the Collection of the Geological Survey of India, Calcutta (On August 1st, 1914)." Memoirs of the Geological Survey of India, 43 (1916): part 2, 149-287, at 244-245. Fletcher, 68. This is the Nedagolla meteorite. Refer to: 1838 Ap. 18, (I; 2306).]


1870 Jan 30 - Feb 1 / Munster and Westphalia / Aurora / C.R. 70/243. [IV; 75. Heis. "La lumière zodiacale observée à Münster, en Westphalie le 30 janvier et le 1er février." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 243-244.]


1870 Jan 31 /Arlovetz, Russia / bet 2 and 4 p.m. / powdery black substance with snow in a gale / Chem News 21-191. Said by M. Feltz, who collected some, that it was arable soil carried from a great distance by the wind. / But it fell like one discharge upon a surface of less than 4 sq. miles. Estimated weight 650 tons. [IV; 76.1, 76.2. "Chemical Notices from Foreign Sources." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 21 (April 22, 1870): 190-192, at 191. Feltz, Eugene. "Neige Noire." Les Mondes, 22 (April 7, 1870.): 610-611. The black snow that fell at "Arlovetz," in the vicinity of Smila, Ukraine, (then part of "Southern Russia").]


1870 Jan 30 / Ice in Sicily. Coldest in 20 years. / Standard, Feb 17-5-2 / Also ice in Malta. [IV; 77. "Winter in the Sunny Mediterranean." London Standard, February 17, 1870, p. 5 c. 2.]


1870 Jan 31 / Queensland / A cyclone and floods—a river rose five feet in one hour at Clermont—"appalling—houses swept away—bridges swept away. / Sydney Morning Herald, Feb. 14, 1870. [IV; 78. "Clermont." Sydney Morning Herald, February 14, 1870, p. 3 c. 1.]    


1870 Feb / Missing Vessels / [LT], [Feb] 3-12-c(2) / 1-5-f / 3-12-c / 4-10-e(2) / 4-10-c / 23-5-a / 12-5-b. [A; 598. "Missing Ship." London Times, February 1, 1870, p. 5 c. 6. "Missing Ships." London Times, February 3, 1870, p. 12 c. 3. "Missing Ships." London Times, February 4, 1870, p. 10 c. 5. "Missing Ship." London Times, February 12, 1870, p. 5 c. 2. (London Times, February 23, 1870, p. 5 c. 1; not found here.)]


1870 Feb, March / Fires in churches and schools. [A; 607.]


1870 Feb 1 / Aurora / broad band of light / England / L.T. 3-5-f / appeared in motion from E.N.E. to W.S.W. [IV; 79. "Auroral Display." London Times, February 3, 1870, p. 5 c. 6.]


1870 Feb. 1 / 8 p.m. / Luminous clouds, London / bright aurora south of Ireland / Lloyds' W. Newspaper—6th. [IV; 80. "Town and Country Talk." Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, February 6, 1870, p. 11 c. 5. "A bright aurora was observed in the south of Ireland on Tuesday night, and luminous clouds were visible in London at about eight p.m."]


1870 Feb-March / Moon / Another / second outbreak of another group of spots in Plato by W. R. Birt / E Mec 12/374. [IV; 81. Birt, William Radcliffe. "Lunar Activity." English Mechanic, 12 (no. 302; January 6, 1871): 374.]


1870 Feb 2 / ac to Standard of Feb 3 / Met train, Woolich / related to mark ab in Pegasus / Astro Reg 8-62. [IV; 82. "An Extraordinary Meteor." Astronomical Register, 8 (March 1870): 62. Kettle, C.E. "An Extraordinary Meteor." London Standard, February 4, 1870, p. 6 c. 2. Kettle, C.E. "An Extraordinary Meteor." London Evening Standard, February 4, 1870, p. 3 c. 6. "About seven o'clock, the evening being very clear and the stars bright, a brilliant white meteoric tail shot across the sky, from west to east, but, unlike ordinary meteors, this remained visible for about twenty minutes, and when the first tail began to grow dim a second tail shot out at an angle towards the north, of equal length with the first, but, instead of the light being in one continuous stream, it had a mottled appearance, like a 'mackerel sky.'" "The first tail commenced just underneath Markab, tbe bottom star in the square of Pegasus, which was then near the horizon, and passed considerably beyond the zenith; and, passing through Cygnus, reached as far as Cor Caroli."]


1870 Feb 3 / [LT], 5-f / 4-4-d / 5-5-f / 14-5-f // Aurora. [IV; 83. "Auroral Display." London Times, February 3, 1870, p. 5 c. 6. "The Auroral Display." London Times, February 4, 1870, p. 4 c. 4. "Auroral Display." London Times, February 5, 1870, p. 5 c. 6. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, February 14, 1870, p. 5 c. 6.]


1870 Feb 7 / [LT], 5-f / Abandoned Vessels. [A; 593. "Abandoned Vessels." London Times, February 7, 1870, p. 5 c. 6.]


1870 Feb 8 / Ancona (It?) / probable det met / See 1805. [IV; 84. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448.)  See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146). Ancône, France.]


1870 Feb 8 / q—snow / from external / 5:20 p.m. / Ancone (?), Peru, shock; preceded by the almost unknown sight of a fall of snow. It fell all day, until 4 p.m. / C.R. 70-502. [IV; 85. Ancône, France, (not in Peru). "M. Le Ministre de L'Instruction Publique transmet à l'Académie les deux documents...." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 501-503.]


1870 Feb. 8 / 5 a.m. / Cairo, Ill. / Heavy shock of earthquake. / N.Y. Tribune 9-1-3. [IV; 86. (New York Tribune, February 9, 1870, p. 1 c. 3; not found here.)]


[1870 Feb. 10. Wrong date. See: 1870 Feb 14, (IV: 87).]


1870 Feb 11 / Village of Charlestown, Rhode Island / Religio-Phil Jour, Ap. 9, copying from N.Y. Tribune, Feb. 21. / This girl, aged 23, thought to have died—but physicians and members of family not convinced and thought she was lying in a trance. People around excited. Said that 2,500 had visited the house, to look at the body or the entranced girl. [A; 606.1, 606.2. "Is It a Trance?" Religio-Philosophical Journal, 8 (no. 3; April 9, 1870): 8, (c. 1-2). "Is It a Trance?" New York Tribune, February 21, 1870, p. 5 c. 3. (Not included in "Charlestown, Rhode Island: Deaths 1850-1930."]


1870 Feb 11 / 8:30 p.m. / Auroral arch / Cambridge, England / L.T. 14-5-f. [IV; 88. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, February 14, 1870, p. 5 c. 6.]


1870 Feb 12 / (N) / like wood ashes in Vermont / Proc. Ac. Nat. Sci. Phil 1876/biol./10. or 1870? ** [IV; 90. "November 7th, 1870." Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, 1870, "Biological and Microscopical Department," 10.]


1870 Feb 12-14 / I find no q in Italy. Was one on 8th—Peru? [IV; 98. Milne lists the minor earthquake at Ancona, Italy, (not in Peru), on February 8, 1870. Milne, 721. See: 1870 Feb 8, (IV: 84, 85.)]


[1870 Feb 12-13. Wrong date. See: 1870 Feb 13-14, (IV; 99).]


1870 Feb. 13 / N. eye sunspots / C.R. 70-340. [IV; 89. Tremeschini. "Sur deux taches solaires actuellement visibles à l'œil nu." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 340.]


1870 Feb 13 / Very Large sunspot / Ast. Reg 8-93. [IV; 91. "The Observing Astronomical Society." Astronomical Register, 8 (April 1870): 93-96, at 93.]


[1870 Feb 13 /] 1870 Feb 24 / Cornwall / met same as Feb 24, 1871 / Eng Mec 12/540, 570. [IV; 108. "Meteor." English Mechanic, 12 (no. 309; February 24, 1871): 540. "Extracts from Correspondence." English Mechanic, 12 (no. 310; March 3, 1871): 570, cv. "Meteor." George Stedham provides his own observations upon the meteor of February 13, 1871, reported in the previous issue. He adds: :A meteor of great brilliancy was also seen this time in the same position last year." See: 1871 Feb 13, (IV; 320).]


[1870 Feb 13-14 /] 1870 Feb 12-13 / Comet, Met, Q, sand / Italy / D-231 / C.R. 70/534, 1326. [IV; 99. The note copies information from page 231 of The Book of the Damned. "Correspondance." La Science Pour Tous, 15 (no. 20; April 16, 1870): 159. Denza. "Pluie de sable arrivée en Italie, du 13 au 14 février 1870." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 534-537.  "M. Le Secrétaire Perpétuel fait hommage à l'Académie...." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 1326.]


1870 Feb 13 / Sand and animal matter / Adriatic / Les Mondes 22/516. [IV; 92. "Le P. Denza transmet l'observation suivante...." Les Mondes, 22 (1870): 516.]


1870 Feb 13-14 / BO / night/ Genoa—raid of red, earthy substance, containing considerable animal matter. / Cosmos 3/6/318. [IV; 93. "Pluie contenant des matières organiques." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 6 (March 19, 1870): 318.]


1870 Feb. 13-14 / Dustfall / Italy / Zeit Met 5/186. [IV; 94. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 5 (1870): 186-192, at 186-189.]


1870 Feb 13-14 / Rain and snow mixed with diverse substances fell in Liguria and Piedmont and other parts of Italy. / C.R. 70/1326. [IV; 96. "M. Le Secrétaire Perpétuel fait hommage à l'Académie...." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 1326. "Nella notte del 13 al 14 del passao mese un vento impetuoso...." Rivista Scientifico-Industriale, 2 (1870): 29-30.]


1870 Feb. 13-14 / At Mondovi, when the yellow snow fell, Denza saw lightning and heard thunder. / An. Soc Met de France 1903-77. [IV; 97. Chauveau, Amyr Benjamin. "Notes sur les Chutes de Poussières." Annuaire de la Société Météorologique de France, 51 (May 1903): 69-82, at 77.]


1870 Feb 14 / Yellow rain / blue spherates / Genoa, Italy. / D-29. ** [IV; 95. The note copies information from page 29 of The Book of the Damned. Boccardo, Gerolamo. "(Lettera intorno ad una pioggia terrosa caduta in Genova.)" Atti della Reale Accademia delle scienze di Torino, 5 (March, 1870): 459-462. "A Rain of Solid Matter." Journal of the Franklin Institute, s. 3 v. 60 (1870): 11-12. "A fall of yellow rain." Nature, 2 (June 30, 1870): 166. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 5 (1870): 186-192, at 186-189.]


[1870 Feb 14 /] 1870 Feb. 10 / Substance akin to starch with dustfall / Genoa / Chem News 21/251 / See Feb. 14. [IV; 87. "Chemical Notices from Foreign Sources." Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 21 (May 27, 1870): 250-252, at 251. "Sur une pluie de substance jaunâtre tombée à Gênes dans la matinée du 14 février 1870." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 6 (May 14, 1870): 537-538. See: 1870 Feb 14, (IV; 95). Under the microscope, some pearl-coloured matter resembled "petits grains de fécule," (starch).]


1870 Feb 15 / Great spot told of in Times and dated 10th was on 15th—however, other spots on 10th. / L.T., March 28-5-4. [IV; 100. Howlett, Frederick. "The Sun." London Times, March 28, 1870, p. 5 c. 4.]


1870 Feb 15 / Great sunspot described in London Times of 21st as 10 of Feb was 15th. However, were great ones on 10th. / L.T., March 28-5-d. [IV; 101. Howlett, Frederick. "The Sun." London Times, March 28, 1870, p. 5 c. 4. Howlett, Frederick. "Solar Surface." London Times, February 23, 1870, p. 11 c. 2. Howlett's correction of sunspot dates refers to the date of his letter of February 21, which was published on February 23.]


1870 Feb. 16 / morning / n.e. sunspot / Glascow / Nature 1-431. [IV; 102. M'Clure, Robert. "Solar Spots Visible to the Naked Eye." Nature, 1 (February 24, 1870): 431.]


1870 Feb/ 17 / ab. noon / Severe shock, San Francisco, but no damage. / L.T., March 4-4-d. [IV; 103. "The United States." London Times, March 4, 1870, p. 4 c. 4.]


[1870 Feb 18 /] 1871 Feb 18 / At Newsham, in evening—sound as if of explosion and concussions / Standard 22-6-3 / Near Newcastle. [IV; 314. "Supposed Earthquake at New Delaval." London Standard, February 22, 1870, p. 6 c. 3.]


1870 Feb 18 / East End (London) News of / Report upon inquests upon 4 person[s] dead of exposure to the excessive cold. Said that at Ramsgate, outdoor work had been abandoned, the cold was so intense. [IV; 114. (East End  News, (London), February 18, 1870.)]


1870 Feb 19 / BO / Galignani's Messenger. of / In Germany "all outdoor labors entirely suspended". 20th—very rigorous winter in Roumelia—peasants frozen to death in Spain. [IV; 118. "A letter from Cuxhaven...." Galignani's Messenger, February 19, 1870, p. 4 c. 1. (No reference was found regarding Roumelia, Turkey in Europe, nor Spain.)]


1870 Feb. 21 / 6 a.m. / Tide in Thames to unusual height—overflowing banks. / Lloyds' Weekly Newspaper, Feb. 27. [IV; 104. "Town and Country Talk." Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, February 27, 1870, p. 11 c. 5. " On Monday morning, about six o'clock, the tide in the River Thames rose to an unusual height, overflowing the lower grounds upon the banks, and flooding several of the cellars and underground stores."]


1870 Feb. 22 / Eruption / Ceboruco, Mexico / Y.B. '71-224. [IV; 105. "Eruption of Ceboruco." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1871, 224. The Ceboruco volcano.]


1870 Feb 23 / [LT], 11-b / Solar surface. [IV; 106. Howlett, Frederick. "Solar Surface." London Times, February 23, 1870, p. 11 c. 2.]


1870 Feb. 23 / Venus Inf Conjunction Sun / (A1). See far back on white paper. / Obj—like March 22? / Also time of Conj. Venus. [IV; 107. See: 1870 Mar. 22, (IV; 123).]


1870 Feb. 23 / [LT], 11-b / Sun. [A; 594. Howlett, Frederick. "Solar Surface." London Times, February 23, 1870, p. 11 c. 2.]


1870 Feb. 23 / B / Standard, 7-2—a polar bear that was shot in the Mediterranean between Sardinia and Sicily. Circumstantial story—small boat putting out to capture the bear—bear attacked—tried to board the boat—hunter cut its front paws off and then shot it. [A; 608. "A White Bear in the Mediterranean." London Standard, February 23, 1870, p. 7 c. 2. "A small Mediterranean vessel making the voyage from Sardinia to Sicily a few days ago, came upon a white bear swimming about in the water. The bear made for the boat to the great consternation of tbe men on board. As the vessel was very heavily laden, it was feared that the mere attempt of the animal to climb on board would capsize it. On came the bear, and the captain armed himself with a hatchet with which he chopped off both the animals paws as it seized the boat. The bear fell back into the sea, and was soon finished by a musket ball or two. The animal was a true Polar bear, though how it came there was a puzzle. It will hardly do to take it as an illustration of the Darwinian theory of the development of species, the result of the recent severe weather, and it appears more probable that the brute must have escaped from some menagerie on shore and gone out to sea."]


[1870 Feb 24. Wrong date. See: 1870 Feb 13, (IV; 108).]


1870 Feb 26 / (Cut) / (Paris) / 9:43 p.m. / Met explosion and train, Paris horizon. / Les Mondes 22/431. p. 568 / was seen at Mâcon 9:33 local time = 9:43 Paris. [IV; 109. "Bolide du 26 février." Les Mondes, 22 (1870): 430-431. "Bolide du 26 février." Les Mondes, 22 (1870): 567-568.]


1870 Feb 26 / [LT], 8-a / Missing Vessels. [A; 595. "The City of Boston Steamship." London Times, February 26, 1870, p. 8 c. 1.]


1870 Feb 28 / 0:22 p.m. / Began series of Fiume q's lasting throughout year. / Nature—269. [IV; 110. "Earthquakes at Fiume during the Year 1870." Nature, 3 (February 2, 1871): 269.]


1870 Feb. 28 / 12:20 p.m. / Trieste, somewhat violent shock. Following day, 8:56 p.m., again. / Nature 1-539. [IV; 111. "Notes." Nature, 1 (March 24, 1870): 538-540, at 539.]


1870 Feb / BO / Final days not so cold; but no genial invitation to hibernating insects. [IV; 112.]


1870 Feb / BO / All reports upon weather for Feb., in March number of Symons Met Mag, were upon [u]nusual coldness in England. Also March, except first few days, was cold. [IV; 113. "Meteorological Notes on February." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 5 (March 1870): 30-32.]


[1870] / BO / End up fireflies that seen in 1870. Presumably not descended from the Surrey flies. So rare that Mr Webb knew of no other occurence except in summer of 1822. Looks as if persisting current and stragglers the next year. [IV; 115. Webb, Thomas William. "Entomological Inquiries, etc." Nature, 2 (August 11, 1870): 297-298.]


[1867] / BO / 1869 / In 1870, flies like the Italian fireflies appeared again, this time at Hardwick, ac to the astronomer T.W. Webb. [IV; 116. Webb, Thomas William. "Entomological Inquiries, etc." Nature, 2 (August 11, 1870): 297-298.]


1870 / BO / summer / Webb's fireflies I think in Nature 2-98. [IV; 117. Webb, Thomas William. "Entomological Inquiries, etc." Nature, 2 (August 11, 1870): 297-298.]


1870 / Feb / 1869 / March 3, 1870, Nature of—noted that at Wandsworth large numbers of ladybirds had appeared. "So early an appearance will surprise most of us, who have been wont to regard these visitors as summer guests." In own notes, nothing like this any other time. Seems unaccountable in terms of terrestrial ladybirds. [IV; 119.1, 119.2. "Notes." Nature, 1 (March 3, 1870): 462-464, at 463. "We hear that the 'Ladybirds' which excited so much curiosity last autumn, have reappeared in large numbers in the neighbourhood of New Wandsworth. So early an appearance will surprise most of us who have been wont to regard these visitors as summer guests."]


1870 March about / Began fast of a girl at Walton, Eng—See Sept 15, 1871. [A; 609. See: 1871 Sept 15, (A; 699).]


1870 March / Miss[ing] V[essels] / [LT], [March] 1-5-b / 2-5-c / 5-12-c / 7-12-a / 8-12-a / 11-10-a / 12-10-f / 14-8-a / 14-11-e / 15-10-f / 16-12-b / 17-5-a / 17-9-d / 18-12-b / 22-9-f / 23-12-e / 31-7-f / 22-9-f. [A; 596. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 2, 1870, p. 5 c. 3. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 5, 1870, p. 12 c. 3. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 7, 1870, p. 12 c. 1. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, March 7, 1870, p. 12 c. 1. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 8, 1870, p. 12 c. 1. "The City of Boston Steamship." London Times, March 11, 1870, p. 10 c. 1. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 12, 1870, p. 10 c. 6. "The City of Boston Steamer." London Times, March 14, 1870, p. 8 c. 1. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 14, 1870, p. 11 c. 5. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 15, 1870, p. 10 c. 6. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 16, 1870, p. 12 c. 2. "Missing Steamships." London Times, March 17, 1870, p. 5 c. 5. "Latest Shipping Intelligence." London Times, March 17, 1870, p. 7 c. 6. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 17, 1870, p. 9 c. 4. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 18, 1870, p. 12 c, 2. "Shipwreck in the Channel." London Times, March 18, 1870, p. 12 c. 2. "Plymouth, Thursday." London Times, March 18, 1870, p. 12 c. 2. "The Steamer Samaria." London Times, March 18, 1870, p. 12 c. 5. "The Missing Steamers." London Times, March 19, 1870, p. 8 c. 4. "A  Ship Abandoned." London Times, March 21, 1870, p. 9 c. 6. "The Missing New Zealand Ship Matoaka." London Times, March 22, 1870, p. 9 c. 6. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 23, 1870, p. 12 c. 5. "American Mails." London Times, March 24, 1870, p. 5 c. 5. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 24, 1870, p. 9 c. 5. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 31, 1870, p. 7 c. 6. The Cunard steamer Samaria was not lost.]


1870 March / Missing Vessels / [LT], [March] 18-12-e / 19-8-d / 21-9-f / 23-12-e. [A; 597. "The Steamer Samaria." London Times, March 18, 1870, p. 12 c. 5. "The Missing Steamers." London Times, March 19, 1870, p. 8 c. 4. "A  Ship Abandoned." London Times, March 21, 1870, p. 9 c. 6. "The City of Boston." London Times, March 23, 1870, p. 12 c. 5.]


1870 March 6 / At Malta, sea suddenly rose 2 or 3 feet, subsided and rose again. / West End (London) News, March 26. [IV; 120. (West End News, (London), March 26, 1870; not online.)]


1870 March 12 / [LT], 5-2 / Polt. Home of James and Frely Wright, brother and sister—at Poplar Grove, ab 4 miles from Jamestown, Va. Polt Phe. Their little niece, aged 8 or 10, said to be the medium. [A; 610. (London Times, March 12, 1870, 5-2; not found here.)]


1870 March 18 / Most brilliant aurora recorded, up to 1902, at Dunedin, N. Zealand. Trans. N.Z. Institute 1902-405 / Other auroras on nights of 12, and 22nd, and N.S. Wales, 22nd. [IV; 121. Skey, Henry. "Notes on the Aurora in the Southern Hemisphere." Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 35 (1902): 405-408, at 405. "The most brilliant display was witnessed on the 18th March, 1870, at Dunedin, New Zealand, at 8.30 p.m. From recorded observations at that time, arches of clear white light were first observed extending from east to west, and stretching like bands across the whole of the southern portion of the sky, the summit of the highest and largest arch being somewhat south of the zenith. This highest arch then appeared gradually to enlarge by moving in a lateral direction until it crossed over the zenith, when by continuing this motion it formed a lower arch on the northern side of the zenith. These arches were then observed to gradually increase in number until they formed symmetrical bands of light across the whole sky, the eastern and western points of the horizon forming as it were pivotal centres. This display lasted fully two hours; no coruscations were detected, the bands remaining perfectly steady with the exception of the slow lateral movement alluded to. The moon, which had a small halo round it, was near full at the time, and not far from the eastern extremity of the bands, but higher and more to the northward. The sky was free from clouds, and the air calm. On this occasion the ordinary characteristics of auroral light were entirely absent, there being no polar illumination nor coruscations radiating there-from (but aurora was generally observed in New Zealand on the 12th, 18th, and 22nd, and in New South Wales on the 22nd)."]


1870 March 22 / Brilliant aurora in N. Zealand, Tasmania, N.S. Wales. Not mentioned in Melbourne newspapers. / Otago Witness (Dunedin, N.Z.), Ap. 9. [IV; 122. "News of the Week." Otago Witness, April 9, 1870, p. 14 c.1. "The brilliant display of Aurora Australis witnessed in Dunedin and other parts of New Zealand on the night of the 22nd ult., was also seen in Sydney and Hobart Town. The Melbourne papers, however, do not mention its having been seen in that city."]


1870 Mar. 22 / (D 267). [IV; 123. The note copies information from page 267 of The Book of the Damned. Banner, Frederick William. "Extract from Log of Barque `Lady of the Lake.'" Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 1 (1872-1873): 157. "22nd March, 1870. Lat. N. 5° 47', long. W. 27° 32' W."]


1870 March 25 / Again conspicuous spots on sun /L.T. 28-5-d. [IV; 124. Howlett, Frederick. "The Sun." London Times, March 28, 1870, p. 5 c. 4.]


1870 March 25 / Conspicuous sunspot / L.T. 28-5-d / See 31-10-c. Error made in estimate of size. [IV; 125. Howlett, Frederick. "The Sun." London Times, March 28, 1870, p. 5 c. 4. "The Sun's Surface." London Times, March 31, 1870, p. 10 c. 3.]


1870 March 25-28, 30 / Sunspot, n. eye, by Knobel and others / Ast. Reg. 8-108. [IV; 126. Denning, William Frederick. "The Supposed Planet Vulcan." Astronomical Register, 8 (May 1870): 108-109.]


1870 March 26 / Sunspots sketched by E. Knobel / from 10:40 to 11 a.m.—clouds—at 11:15, a bright patch seemed to have broken out in the group. / E Mec 11/84. [IV; 127. Denning, William Frederick. "The Supposed Planet Vulcan." English Mechanic, 11 (April 15, 1870); 84.]


1870 March 28 / [LT], 5-d / Sunspots. [IV; 128. Howlett, Frederick. "The Sun." London Times, March 28, 1870, p. 5 c. 4.]


1870 March 31 / Denning at sunset, when through mist saw n. eye. spot. / Ast Reg 8-108. [IV; 129. Denning, William Frederick. "The Supposed Planet Vulcan." Astronomical Register, 8 (May 1870): 108-109.]


1870 March 31 / Comrie / q / Wm Roper, List of Earthquake / See Ap. 8, '86. [IV; 130. (Roper, ???) See: (1886 Ap. 8).]


1870 Ap 1 / [LT], 12-c / 2-5-c / Ext affar near Ryton. [A; 611. "Extraordinary Affair." London Times, April 1, 1870, p. 12 c. 3. "The Strange Affair near Malton." London Times, April 2, 1870, p. 5 c. 3. Two thieves fleeing from a policeman fell into the Rye River and drowned.]


1870 Ap. 3-4 / Cor, Astro Reg 8-109, writes that looking up at sun watched a large black spot on disc of setting sun. Also on 4th. [IV; 131. Jeffries, Richard. "Spots on the Sun." Astronomical Register, 8 (May 1870): 109-110. ]


1870 Ap 4 / 9:50 p.m. / Shock at Bogota. A night before, for 2 hours after sunset, a column of light in the west. / A. J. Sci 2/50/409. [IV; 136. Hurlbut, Stephen Augustus. "On a recent Earthquake at Bogota." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 50 (1870): 408-409. The column of light was observed after the quake, (not before). "Some nights since we noticed for two hours after sunset in the west, and nearly in the range of Tolima, a well defined column or line of light, on the Cordillera. This bore about due west."]


1870 Ap. 5 / Aurora / Little Bear / 7:45 p.m. / C.R. [IV; 132. "Aurore boréale du 5 avril 1870." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 818-821.]


1870 April 5 / 9:10 / Time of aurora, at Auvers (Manche), great met from Great Bear. / C.R. 70-820. [IV; 133. "Aurore boréale du 5 avril 1870." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 818-821, at 820.]


1870 Ap. 5, May 20, Nov 16, Nov 22 / Germany / Zeit Met 5 /Index nordlicht. [IV; 134. Auroras. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 5 (1870): 186-192, at 189-191. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 5 (1870): 313-315, at 313-314. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 5 (1870): 609-616, at 615. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 5 (1870): 636-643, at 642.]


1870 April / Shower pollen / Yokohama, Japan / Sci Gos 1871-189. [IV; 135. "Yellow Rain." Science Gossip, 7 (no. 80; 1871): 189.]


1870 Ap. 5 / Aurora / Paris / Manche / Vendome / Indre et Loire / Moselle / Saint Lô / C.R. 70/822, 869, 1008. [IV; 137. "Aurore boréale du 5 avril 1870." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 818-821. Sonrel, L. "Note sur l'aurore boréale du 5 avril 1870." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 869-873. Lacoine. "Observation des effets de l'aurore boréale du 5 avril sur les lignes télégraphiques ottomanes." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 1008.]


1870 Ap. 5 / At time of brilliant auroral displays N. and S., earthquake shock in volcanic region of N. Zealand, and soon afterward began eruptions of Tongariro. [IV; 138. "Latest Telegrams." Star, (Christchurch), April 8, 1870, p. 2 c. 3. "There have heen singular tidal disturbances in the harbour all day, similar, but; slighter, than those on the occasion of the South American earthquake 1868." "Tidal Disturbance." Wellington Independent, April 9, 1870, p. 4 c. 6. "Some speculation was occasioned on Thursday morning by the discovery that the waters of the harbor were repeating, on a small scale, the irregularities which were so remarkably developed at the time the great earthquake of 1868 occurred in South America and the West Indies. The water was as smooth as glass on Thursday, but at frequent intervals, a heavy ripple was observed some distance from shore, and the water would then rush in some twenty or thirty yards, and as rapidly recede, in some cases quite as far below, the proper water line. The perpendicular rise and fall was probably never more than from six inches to a foot, but the alterations were exceedingly rapid and continued during the whole day. Some individuals attempt to account for the phenomena by attributing it to a heavy southerly sea setting in at the heads, but the idea scarcely affords a sufficient or satisfactory explanation. Others ascribe the disturbance to the occurrence of another tidal wave somewhere, and news from the localities exposed to such disagreeable visitations will be awaited with some interest." "Latest Telegrams." Canterbury Press, (New Zealand), April 26, 1870, p. 2 c. 4. From Nelson, April 25, 1870: "Slight earthquake between four and fove yesterday morning." "Eruption of Tongariro." Taranaki Herald, July 30, 1870, p. 6 c. 2. "The Hawke's Bay Herald of the sth July, says—"Tougariro continues in a state of violent eruption, throwing up large stones and emitting flame, visible after nightfall. But the most remarkable fact connected with these phenomena is that they are accompanied by great noises, distinctly heard at intervals in the neighbourhood of Napier, probably eighty miles distant, and resembling the sound of a distant cannonade. The noises in question were at once put down to the proper cause...." The Tongariro volcano erupted from April to August, 1870.]


1870 Ap. 5 / Aurora / La Sci Pour Tous 15-175. [IV; 139. "Aurore Boréale du 5 Avril." La Science Pour Tous, 15 (no. 22; April 30, 1870): 175.]


1870 Ap. 6 / Sunspots / Two cors under this date call attention to great spots on sun. / L.T. 8-11-b / 8th, another writes (11-11-a). In Times (15-4-d), cor writes of enormous N.E. blotch he saw, at sunset. [IV; 140. "Spots on the Sun." London Times, April 8, 1870, p. 11 c. 2. Howlett, Frederick. "Something the Matter with the Sun." London Times, April 11, 1870, p. 11 c. 1. "Spots on the Sun." London Times, April 15, 1870, p. 4 c. 3.]


1870 Ap 8 / [LT], 11-b / 11-11-a / 15-4-d / 19-8-c // N.E. Sun Spots. [IV; 141. "Spots on the Sun." London Times, April 8, 1870, p. 11 c. 2. Howlett, Frederick. "Something the Matter with the Sun." London Times, April 11, 1870, p. 11 c. 1. "Spots on the Sun." London Times, April 15, 1870, p. 4 c. 3. "Spots on the Sun." London Times, April 19, 1870, p. 8 c. 3.]


1870 Ap 8 / Another enormous iregular spot transversing sun noted pass off disk ab 14th. Also other groups. / L.T. 11-11-a. [IV; 142. Howlett, Frederick. "Something the Matter with the Sun." London Times, April 11, 1870, p. 11 c. 1.]


1870 Ap. 11 / Avignon, France. At sunset large "blotch" n. eye on sun. / L.T. 15-4-4. [IV; 143. "Spots on the Sun." London Times, April 15, 1870, p. 4 c. 3.]


1870 Ap. 11 / Incip Volc / L.T., July 6-9-e, 1871 / Q, translation of Chinese Governors report. Q. at Bathang, 260 miles west of Li-tang. 2000 persons killed—Flames burst out of ground in 4 places. Heavens dark with the smoke. Also black, fetid water spurted out. [IV; 144. "Earthquake in China." London Times, July 6, 1871, p. 9 c. 5. No volcanic eruption has been associated with the earthquake at Batang, in the Chinese province of Sichuan.]


1870 April 11 / Wheel / Gulf Siam. [IV; 145. "Illumination of the Sea." Nature, 2 (June 30, 1870): 165.]


1870 Ap. 13 / [LT], 5-f / Singular catastrophe at New Brunswick. [IV; 146. "Calamity in New Brunswick." London Times, April 13, 1870, p. 5 c. 6.]


1870 April 14 / Mr Gledhill records Nos. 1, 3, 4, 17, 9, 11 and 30 as "bright round disks". / B Assoc '71/81 / Plato. [IV; 147. Webb, T.W., and Crossley, Edward. "Report of the Committee for discussing Observations of Lunar Objects suspected of Change." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 60-97, at 81, (illustration).]


1870 Ap. 15 / Polt / Medium and Daybreak of / Polt in a house ab. 2 miles from E. St. Louis, Missouri. Coats and things drop from pegs and they return. A child in house said ghost of a little girl aged about 12 was visible to her. Investigated by reporter from St. Louis Republican who said that every movable things in house had been affected. [A; 612.1, 612.2. "A Queer Ghost." Medium and Daybreak, 1 (no. 2;  April 15, 1870): 10-11. "An Interesting Sensation." Missouri Republican, January 30, 1870, p. 2 c. 4.]


1870 Ap 16 / Godsey trance / Religio-Phil Jour., 1-5 / Caroline Godsey, at her home, eleven miles from Union City, Tenn, still living and sleeping as usual. Arouses and remains awake 9 minutes, 11 times, in 24 hours. / This keeping of time looks to me like instances of hypnotic direction. [A; 613.1, 613.2. "Miss Caroline Godsey...." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 8 (no. 4; April 16, 1870): 1, (c. 5).]


1870 Ap 19 / [LT], 7-b / Supposed castways on Auckland Islands. [A; 614. "Supposed Castaways on the Auckland Islands." London Times, April 19, 1870, p. 7 c. 2.]


1870 April 19 / 11:02 p.m. / Paris horizon illuminated by meteor from Hercules / C.R. 70-950. [IV; 150. Chapelas. "Le bolide du 19 avril." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 950.]


1870 April 20 / Jones Co., Ga. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 151. Finley, 4.]


1870 Ap. 21 / [LT], 9-b / Aurora. [IV; 152. Allnatt, R.H. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, April 21, 1870, p. 9 c. 2.]


1870 Ap. 22 / Violent shock / Dacca, India / L.T. 25-5-6. [IV; 153. "India." London Times, April 25, 1870, p. 5 c. 6.]


1870 Ap. 23 / Chile / q. / I / [Light] / BA '11. [IV; 154. Milne, 722.]


1870 May 2 / Solar halo / Clifton, England / Ref, Ap 10, 1872. [IV; 155. Cubitt, James. "The Aurora Borealis by Daylight." Nature, 3 (December  8, 1870): 104, (illustration). Burder, George F. "Can Aurora be Seen in Daylight?" Nature, 3 (December 15, 1870): 126. See: 1872 Ap 10, (IV; 730).]


1870 May 2 / Rel. Ph.-J, Aug 27-8-1 / In Louisville, Ky., man kills a woman—said spirit of his dead brother had persuaded him to do this. [A; 615. "A Singular Story." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 8 (no. 23; August 27, 1870): 8, (c. 1).]

  

1870 May 3 / [LT], 11-a / 9-12-c / Missing ships / See Jan 22. / 14-12-c. [A; 599. "The City of Boston." London Times, May 3, 1870, p. 11 c. 1. "The City of Boston." London Times, May 9, 1870, p. 12 c. 3. "A Ship Abandoned at Sea." London Times, May 14, 1870, p.12 c. 3.]


1870 (May 5) // May 28, Clapham Observer of / That excitement in town of Cheltenham—"myst disap." of schoolboy James Craumer, of Windsor Terrace. On 5th of May been home at noon. Returned to school—not seen afterward. [A; 617. (Clapham Observer, May 28, 1870; not online.)]


1870 May 6 / Strange shaped sunspots / E Mec 13-413. [IV; 148. "Sun Spots." English Mechanic, 13 (no. 329; July 14, 1871): 413.]


1870 May 9 / Remarkable instance of sunspot revolving around another. / Nature 2-356. [IV; 149. "Societies and Academies." Nature, 2 (July 28, 1870): 265-268, at 267, cv. "The Observing Astronomical Society." Murray, Joseph John. "Solar Spots." Nature, 2 (September 1, 1870): 356.]


1870 May 10-12 / In Plato, an increasing then decreasing light that in Mr. Birt's opinion was independent of sunlight. / E Mec 14/195. [IV; 156. "Selenographical." English Mechanic, 14 (no. 346; November 10, 1871): 194-195. Thayer: "This note used by DeWitt C. Miller, through corresp." Richard DeWitt Miller is the more probable person to have made any use of this note, as he wrote about the lunar crater Plato, in chapter 9 of his book Forgotten Mysteries, (later titled ImpossibleYet It Happened!).]


1870 May 10 / [LT, 12-d / Aurora. [IV; 157. Allnatt, R.H. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, May 10, 1870, p. 12 c. 4.]


1870 May 11 / 11:30 / Shocks / Oaxaca, Mexico / great damage / L.T., July 21-12-b. [IV; 158. "Great Earthquake." London Times, July 21, 1870, p. 12 c. 2.]


1870 May 11 / Heavy shock earthquake / City of Mexico / N.Y. Herald 19-7-2. [IV; 159. "Mexico." New York Herald, May 18, 1870, p. 7 c. 2.]


1870 May 11 and to 20th / q / Mexico / C.R. 71-329 / Heat of the soil caused fear of an eruption from it. [IV; 160. Chassin. "Sur un tremblement de terre survenu au Mexique, le 11 mai 1870." Comptes Rendus, 71 (1870): 329-331. (No "heat of the soil" noticed in this article, despite reports of heat.)]


1870 May 11, 12, 16 / Great q's / Mexico / BA '11. [IV 161. Milne, 722.]


1870 May 13 / Guam / q. / BA '11 / I / [Light]. [IV; 162. Milne, 722.]


1870 May 13 / Mr Pratt notes that though upon this evening the spots were "greatly in excess of their usual brightness," the light effects in Plato showed no such increase—and his view that the spots in Plato are not reflection of sunlight but little volcanoes. [IV; 163. Webb, T.W., and Crossley, Edward. "Report of the Committee for discussing Observations of Lunar Objects suspected of Change." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 60-97, at 89-90.]


1870 May 13 / "Extraordinary display," ac. to Birt—27 spots seen in Plato [by] Pratt and [an extra] on[e] 28th [by] Elger—that only 3 by May 13, 1870 / Gledhill at Brighton—diff in p place—4 have burst in or 27 dim to / B Assoc 71/88. [IV; 164. Webb, T.W., and Crossley, Edward. "Report of the Committee for discussing Observations of Lunar Objects suspected of Change." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 60-97, at 88. Pratt suggested that the difference in the number of spots seen, (27) by him, at Brighton, and (4) by Gledhill, at Halifax, (not at Brighton), was due to observation times, priority of observation, (searching for spots, as a first task).]


1870 May 13 / q—and volc / Violent q. / Japan / 2:30 a.m. / L.T., July 21-12-b / Floating pumice near Vries Island, Gulf of Yedo—so volc. supposed. Also volc Asayama, in prov. of Sinshio, first time in 3 or 4 centuries. [IV; 165. "Great Earthquake." London Times, July 21, 1870, p. 12 c. 2. The Sumisujima volcano, (also known as Smith Rocks, the surface portion of a large submarine volcano, a southerly one of the Izu Islands), erupted in May of 1870, and possibly long before, in 1672. The Izu-Oshima volcano, (on Vries Island, a northerly one of the Izu Islands), erupted in 1870, and had erupted frequently, (certainly, in 1803, from 1822 to 1824, and in 1846). The Asamayama volcano, in Shinano province, was not active in 1870, (between eruptions in 1869 and in 1879), but had erupted several times earlier in the 19th century, (in 1803 and in 1815), and in 1783.]


1870 May 15 / Snake, about a yard long, caught in a street in Huddersfield. / Galignani's Messenger, May. [A; 616. "On Sunday, a snake, about a yard in length...." Galignani's Messenger, May 20, 1870, p. 1 c. 6. "Local and District News." Sheffield Daily Telegraph, May 18, 1870, p. 3 c. 4-5. "On Sunday morning an ordinary snake about a yard in length, was picked up at the corner of one of the streets near Ramsden-street, Huddersfield, and was taken to the police station."]


1870 May 19 / Mirage / Ostend / Nature 2-108. [IV; 166. "Notes." Nature, 2 (June 9, 1870): 107-109, at 108. "Mirage à Ostende." Cosmos, s. 3. v. 6 (June 11, 1870): 654-655.]


1870 May 20 / Aurora / CR 71-451. [IV; 167. Chapelas. "Aurore Boréale du 20 Mai." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 1141. Chapelas. "Aurore boréale du 24 septembre 1870." Comptes Rendus, 71 (1870): 451-452. Chapelas. "Aurore boréale du 24 septembre 1870." Comptes Rendus, 71 (1870): 451-452. The article cited in Fort's note reports an aurora on September 24, 1870. See: 1870 Sept 24, (IV; 230).]


1870 May 20 / Aurora / La Sci Pour Tous 15-215. [IV; 168. "Aurore Boréale du 20 Mai." La Science Pour Tous, 15 (no. 27; June 4, 1870): 215. Chapelas. "Aurore Boréale du 20 Mai." Comptes Rendus, 70 (1870): 1141.]


1870 May 22 / Tynemouth / purplish sun / 22-23, Glouchestershire / Nature 2-89. [IV; 169. "Notes." Nature, 2 (June 2, 1870): 88-90, at 89.]


1870 May 22 / Sun Purple in a pink haze, Dublin. / Nature 2-67. Also at Dunmurry, Co. Antrim. [IV; 170. Murphy, Joseph John. "Meteorological Phenomenon." Nature, 2 (May 26, 1870): 67.]


1870 May 22 / A red haze in Ireland and people in many places astonished by varying colorations of sun and moon through it. / Symons' Met Mag. 5-65. [IV; 171. "Peculiar Cloud Formation." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 5 (June 1870): 65-67.]


1870 May 22 / dry haze / A red haze, England and Ireland. / Symons Met Mag 5-67. Sun had a "strange bright copper color". Through an opera glass 8 spots distinctly visible on lower half of disc. / "A strange lurid light spread over the landscape, and it seemed as though a total eclipse was in progress." [IV; 172.1, 172.2. "Peculiar Cloud Formation." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 5 (June 1870): 65-67, at 65-66.]


1870 May 22 / 5 to 6:30 p.m. / 3 large N.E. spots / also on May 23 / at Norton Radnorshire / M. Notices 30-207. [IV; 173. Hill, A.R. "Note respecting Solar Spots visible to the Naked Eye." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 30 (June 10, 1870): 207-208.]


1870 May 23 / At Rohrbach, on the Moselle, pinkish sun. / Nature 2-190. The mist arrived there 2:20 p.m. [IV; 174. Earwaker, John Parsons. "Pinkish Colour of the Sun." Nature, 2 (July 7, 1870): 190. "Offuscation du soleil." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 6 (June 11, 1870): 654.]


1870 May 23 / Sun effect / La Sci Pour Tous 15-230. Same as Salmon note. [IV; 175. "Offuscation du Soleil." La Science Pour Tous, 15 (no. 29; June 18, 1870): 230.]


1870 May 23 / Atmosphere effects of 22nd at Cambridge, England. [IV; 176. "Peculiar Cloud Formation." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 5 (June 1870): 65-67 at 67.]


1870 May 23 / Philippines / q. / BA '11 / II / [Medium]. [IV; 177. Milne, 722.]


1870 May 30 / [LT], 6-f / Most remarkable storm on record at Philadelphia. [IV; 178. "The United States." London Times, May 30, 1870, p. 6 c. 5-6.]


1870 June 1 / [LT], 12-e / Aurora. [IV; 179. Terry, S.H. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, June 1, 1870, p. 12 c. 5.]


1870 June 1-11 / Great q / Guatemala / BA '11. [IV; 180. Milne, 722.]


1870 [June 2] / q / Japan, etc. / [LT], June 2-6-d / 8-5-a / 10-12-a / 17-10-d / 28-10-a. [IV; 181. "Japan." London Times, June 2, 1870, p. 6 c. 4. "Earthquake in Mexico." London Times, June 8, 1870, p. 5 c. 1. "The West Indies." London Times, June 10, 1870, p. 12 c. 1. "Japan." London Times, June 17, 1870, p. 10 c. 4-5. "Money-Market & City Intelligence." London Times, June 28, 1870, p. 10 c. 1-2.]


1870 June 6 / [LT], 10-d / 8-9-e / 6-10-d (another) / 6-10-d (another) / 24-12-b / Missing Vessels / See Jan. 22. [A; 603. "Missing Ships." London Times, June 6, 1870, p. 10 c. 4. "The Cerealia Steamer."   London Times, June 8, 1870, p. 9 c. 5. "Latest Shipping Intelligence." London Times, June 9, 1870, p. 7 c. 6. "A Missing Ship." London Times, June 24, 1870, p. 12 c. 2.]


1870 June 11 / Religio-Phil Jour, 8-2, copied from the Ohio Democrat—Home of George Fisher, on Stone Creek—medium his daughter, a little girl. At her grandfather's house, 1/2 mile away, she was struck on the face by an invisible. Her grandfather heard the blow and saw her knocked from her chair. Her grandfather, Abraham Walter, other times saw nothing, but girl insisted she saw a woman. [A; 618.1, 618.2. "The Stone Creek Ghost." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 8 (no. 12; June 11, 1870): 8, (c. 2-3). "The Stonecreek Ghost." Ohio Democrat, (Tuscarawas County), April 1, 1870,  c. 2. (Ohio Democrat, March 18, 1870.) Baker, Jon. "Local History: Stone Creek bewitched in 1870." Times-Reporter, (Philadelphia, Ohio), February 18, 2013.]


1870 June 17 / Perforation / Germany / J. F. Inst. 90/384. * [A; 619. "Curious Effects Produced by Lightning." Journal of the Franklin Institute, s. 3 v. 60 (1870): 384. Fischer, Johann Gustav. "Merkwürdiger Blitzschlag." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, s. 2 v. 140 (1870): 654-656.]


1870 June 17 / Ibbenbühren, Westphalia, Prussia / (F) / BA 73-383. [IV; 182. Fletcher, 104. This is the Ibbenbühren meteorite. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1872-73." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1873, 349-403, at 383-384.]


1870 June 21 / Sunspot by T. G. Elger, at Bedford, first seen on 19th—on 21st, cyclonic spot seen. / E Mec 11/397. [IV; 183. Elger, Thomas Gwyn. "Sun Spots." English Mechanic, 11 (July 15, 1870): 396-397.]


1870 June 22 / Great increase of sunspots. 675 counted by a cor in Indiana. / Nature 2-298. [IV; 184. Dawson, W. "The Solar Spots." Nature, 2 (August 11, 1870): 298.]


1870 June 23 and July 3 / Solar Haloes / C.R. 71/47. [IV; 185. "M. W. De Fonvielle transmet à l'Académie...." Comptes Rendus, 71 (1870): 47-48.]


1870 June 24 / Shock widely felt in Asia Minor / Nature 2-301. [IV; 186. "Notes." Nature, 2 (August 11, 1870): 300-302, at 301.]


1870 June 25 / afternoon / slight tremor—NY City / NY Times, Oct 22-4-3. [IV; 187. "The Earthquake." New York Times, October 22, 1870, p. 4 c. 3-4.]


1870 June 25 / Godsey case / Died—See Oct 27, 1873. [A; 620. See: 1870 Oct 15, (A; 633), and, 1873 Oct 27, (A; 861).]


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

1870 June 25 / [LT], 5-2 / Godsey Trance / Susan Caroline Godseybeen in her state 21 yearsfather deadmother poor and to some extent dependent upon contributions by visitors. She usually sleeps soundly from eleven o'clock at night until about six in the morning, and through the day awakes once an hour. Her waking spells are never less than four nor more than twelve, but usually about six minutes duration. Taken ill at age of 4baffled physicianstrance started age of 6. [A; 621.1, 621.2. "The Sleeping Beauty." New York Times, June 25, 1870, p. 2  c. 4-5. The New York Times, (not the London Times), provided the report of the "Medical Committee" that examined Godsey; however, their observations differ from Fort's notations. For example: "First, the conscious periods are thirteen or fourteen in number during the twenty-four hours, and are from four to eight minutes long, averaging six minutes."]


1870 July / mirage / Over the Throndhjem Fiord, Norway. Mirage as if of a large city, which altered into line of cliffs. / Nature 2-435. [IV; 188. "Mirage." Nature, 2 (September 29, 1870): 435.]


1870 July 8 / Published a letter by W. R. Birt, upon observations upons spots of Plato during April, May and June. The observation he emphasizes is opposite effect upon certain spots—that spots with smaller exposure to sunlight showed seemingly independent variations. [IV; 189.1, 189.2. Birt, William Radcliffe. "Lunar Activity." English Mechanic, 11 (no. 302; July 8, 1870): 371-372.]


1870 July 10-12 / 1 p.m. / Great q. / Cuzco, Peru / Nature 3-36. [IV; 190. "Notes." Nature, 3 (November 10, 1870): 34-36, at 36.]


1870 July 10-18 / Eruption of Tongariro, N. Zealand, which began in April, was more marked. / Nature 2-479. [IV; 191. "Eruption of the Volcano Tongariro, New Zealand." Nature, 2 (October 13, 1870): 477-479, at 479. The Tongariro volcano.]


1870 July 12 / qs / Cent. Amer. and Smyrna / Cyprus / BA '11. Sims. / See Feb 18, 1889. [IV; 192. Milne, 722. See: (1889 Feb 18).]


1870 July 12 / Shock / Smyrna / Nature 2-301. [IV; 193. "Notes." Nature, 2 (August 11, 1870): 300-302, at 301.]


1870 July 12 / Salvador / sky overcast / at 4:30 a.m., 13th, several shocks. Nature 2-362. [IV; 194. "Notes." Nature, 2 (September 1, 1870): 361-362, at 362.]


1870 ab middle of July / Religio Phil Jour, Sept 17-6-2, copying from Leavenworth (Ind) Independent—near the Benham Salt Works, ab 15 miles from Leavenworth, home—a new house—of Mr. Benham. Ab middle of July, stones, from 2 to 4 pounds, hurled at the house. Raps heard all times, day and night. As long as watchers on guard no stones thrown. Watchers relax and stones come—said not visible till they struck the house. Grounds surrounding house covered with these stones. All windows broken, but no person had been struck. [A; 622.1, 622.2, 622.3. (Religio-Philosophical  [A; 618.1, 618.2. "A House Destroyed by Invisible Hands." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 8 (no. 26; September 17, 1870): 6 (c. 2).]


1870 July 19 / E Mec XI/468 / Published sketch [by] a cor of object like a cross he had seen on wall [of] Crater Fontenelle. It's the X cross but a detail / not the on[e] near Birt. [IV; 195. "The Crater Fontenelle." English Mechanic, 11 (August 5, 1870): 468, (illustration). The sketch does not compare favourably with images from NASA's LRO / LROC QuickMap. The correspondent questions if this is the same "cross" observed by Webb. Webb, Thomas William. Celestial Objects for Common Telescopes. 4th ed. London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1881, 113. Webb writes: "There are parallel ridges in the interior, and in one place the form of a perfect cross: unfortunately, it lies in such a position that years, as B. and M. observe, may pass without a good view of it. I have often looked for it in vain. Birmingham has been more successful."]


1870 July 19 / Sunset phe / La Sci Pour Tous 15/319. [IV; 196. (La Science Pour Tous, 15-319; not found here.)]


1870 July 21 / [LT], 12-b / Great q. / Oaxaca, Mexico. [IV; 197. "Great Earthquake." London Times, July 21, 1870, p. 12 c. 2. See: 1870 May 11, (IV; 158).]


1870 July 24 and 26 / by Denning, at Bristol. / Augs / Observatory 37/418. [IV; 198. "Showers of Telescopic Meteors seen near the Sun." Observatory, 37 (November 1914): 417-419, at 418. Denning's observation was on July 26, (two days after Grover's observation). "Thw Observing Astronomical Society." Astronomical Register, 8 (1870): 253-255, at 253. "On July 26, when endeavouring to pick up Mercury, he observed several bright, ill-defined objects pass rapidly through the field of the telescope. He is of the opinion that these bodies were nothing more than thistle seeds."]


1870 July 24 / Au[g] / 10:15 a.m. / The Grover ob—"conspicuous but ill-defined" bodies, one after another. / Astro Reg 8-221. Eng Mec 100/236 / Observatory 37/418. [IV; 199. Grover, C. "A Daylight Observation of Meteors." Astronomical Register, 8 (1870): 221-223. Grover, C. "Meteors Near the Sun." English Mechanic, (no. 2585; October 9, 1914): 236. Denning, William Frederick. "Showers of Telescopic Meteors seen near the Sun." Observatory, 37 (November 1914): 417-419, at 418.]


1870 July 25 / evening / Kent, etc. / met / BA 72-69. [IV; 200. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, and Charles Brooke. "Report...on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1871-72." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1872, 57-118, at 69.]


1870 July 25 / evening / Kent, etc., near English Channel / At Dover, seen to rise almost perpendi[cularly] from eastern horizon, increasing in brilliance. Looked like a signal from a ship. / B Assoc 1872/69. [IV; 201. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, and Charles Brooke. "Report...on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1871-72." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1872, 57-118, at 69.]


1870 July 29 / 5:45 o'clock / Lesina / Detonation or q / Zeit Met 5/430 / Others?—p. 456. [IV; 202. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 5 (1870): 428-430, at 430. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 5 (1870): 456-459, at 456-457.]


1870 Aug 1 / ab. 9:55 a.m. / Slight shock / Calcutta / Nature 2-437. [IV; 203. "Notes." Nature, 2 (September 29, 1870): 436-437, at 437.]


1870 Aug 1 / Severe shocks / Greece / Nature 2-361. [IV; 204. "Notes." Nature, 2 (September 1, 1870): 361-362, at 361.]


1870 Aug 3 / 3:45 p.m. / Quake widely felt, S. Af. / Nature 3-15. [IV; 205. "Notes." Nature, 3 (November 3, 1870): 13-15, at 15.]


1870 Aug 5 / [LT], 7-c / Great q / Amphissa. [IV; 206. "Greece." London Times, August 5, 1870, p. 7 c. 3.]


1870 Aug 6 / Sunset / Scotland / brilliant meteor streak / BA 70-89. [IV; 207. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1869-70." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1870, 76-102, at 89.]


1870 Aug 6 / 9:57 p.m. / Isle of "Syke" / met—streak visible 5 minutes / LT, Aug 11-5-d. [IV; 208. Cunningham, Alexander William. "Meteoric Display." London Times, August 11, 1870, p. 5 c. 4. A typo of the Isle of Skye, (not "Syke").]


1870 Aug 7 / 7 p.m. / Near Doo Castle, Co. Sligo, Ireland, 3 waterspouts. Symons Met Mag 5-122. [IV; 209. O'Dowd, D. "Three Waterspouts." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 5 (September 1870): 122.]


1870 / about Aug. 13 // "Remarkable increase of brightness" of Spot No. 22 (Pratt) / [B.] Assoc., '71/93 / Plato. On 12 and 13, decreased. On Aug. 16, no opinion offered, as the spot was not seen. [IV; 210. Webb, T.W., and Crossley, Edward. "Report of the Committee for discussing Observations of Lunar Objects suspected of Change." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 60-97, at 93.]


1870 Aug 15 / At Broughton-in-Furness, ac to the vicar, F. A. Malleson, in the N.N.W., about 9 p.m. appeared a bright star-like light, a tail ab. 5 degrees long pointed downward but rose gradually westward till horizontal. The nucleus equalled Venus at brightest. Slowly faded and disappeared at 9:30. L.T. 18-8-e. [IV; 211.1, 211.2. Malleson, F.A. "A Meteor." London Times, August 18, 1870, p. 8 c. 5.]


1870 Aug 15 / At Obau—ab. same time in N.N.W. a meteor, which left a train. This shortly afterward became horizontal and then was like an ellipse with a nucleus in one extremity. Clearly visible but then faded away in 7 or 8 minutes. / L.T. 19-8-d. [IV; 212.1, 212.2. Campbell, Donald. "A Meteor." London Times, August 19, 1870, p. 8 c. 4.]


1870 Aug 15 / 8:50 p.m. / n. England, Ireland, Scotland/ Meteor / page in Nature 2-357. [IV; 213. "The Meteor of August 15." Nature, 2 (September 1, 1870): 357, (illustrations).]


1870 Aug 15 / 8:50 p.m. / Met train / Dunbar, Gt. Brit / MWR '07/391. Ireland and Scotland / Nature 2/357. [IV; 214. (Trowbridge, C.C. "On Atmospheric Currents at Very Great Altitudes." Monthly Weather Review, 35 (September 1907): 390-397, at 391.) "The Meteor of August 15." Nature, 2 (September 1, 1870): 357, (illustrations).]


1870 Aug. 16 / Belfast / Met train (?) ½ hour / Symons' Met 5/132. [IV; 215. M'Clure, Edmund. "Meteoric Phenomenon." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 5 (September 1870): 132. "Strange Phenomenon." Belfast News-Letter, August 16, 1870, p. 3 c. 3. ""Last night, about nine o'clock, a very extraordinary phenomenon was observed in the Northern part of the heavens. At first it assumed the appearance of a circle of bright light, but gradually expanded into something resembling the shape of a serpent, and in about twenty minutes vanished. Its beauty and changing hues and shape attracted a good deal of notice...." M'Clure, Edmund. "The Meteoric Phenomenon." Belfast News-Letter, August 18, 1870, p. 3 c. 5. "Strange Meteor." Belfast News-Letter, August 19, 1870, p. 4 c. 3.]


1870 Aug 18 / Cabeza de Mayo, Murcia, Spain / (F). [IV; 216. Fletcher, 104. This is the Cabeza de Mayo meteorite.]


1870 Aug 20 / (D-68) / Salt / Switz. / (31). [IV; 217. The note copies information from page 68 of The Book of the Damned. "Salt and Pyrites in Hail-stones." Annual Record of Science and Industry, 1871, 36-37. "According to Professor [Gustav Adolph] Kenngott, of Zurich, a hail-storm lasting five minutes occurred at eleven o'clock in the morning of the 20th of August, 1870, the stones from which were found to possess a salty taste. Some of them weighed twelve grains. They were found to consist essentially of true salt, such as occurs in North Africa on the surface of the plains, mainly in hexadedric crystals or their fragments, of a white color, with partly sharp and partly rounded grains and edges." "Salthagel am St. Gotthard." Das Ausland, 44 (June 26, 1871): 618.]  


1870 Aug. 20 / 9:25 p.m. / Meteor half diameter of moon, Linton, Cambridge. / L.T. 23-6-e / 24-9-d—cor in London saw it disap almost over Alpha Cassiopeiae. Also, other cor seen near Woodstock. / Ac to lat cor at Linton, it disappeared very near a star, probably alpha Cass. [IV; 218. "Meteors." London Times, August 23, 1870, p. 6 c. 5. Field, Hamilton. "The Meteor." London Times, August 24, 1870, p. 9 c. 4.]


1870 Aug 20 / bet 6 and 7 p.m. / Calais / waterspouts or funnel-like projection from a cloud, gradually reaching the sea. / L.T. 23-6-d. [IV; 219. Allen, Charles H. "Waterspouts in the Channel." London Times, August 23, 1870, p. 6 c. 4.]


1870 Aug 20 / Face / NY Herald, Aug 30, copied in Religio Phil Jour., Sept 17-6-1 / In a house in Broadway, Lawrence, Mass on window glass representation of a woman's face had appeared. The day before a woman visiting one of the tenants of the house had died—it was her face on the glass. So pestered by crowds were the people in the house that they removed the window sash. [A; 623.1, 623.2. "Ghostly Phenomenon in Lawrence, Mass." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 8 (no. 26; September 17, 1870): 6, (c. 1). "Ghostly Phenomenon in Lawrence, Mass." New York Herald, August 30, 1870, p. 5 c. 3.]


1870 Aug 31 / W. spout, Irrawaddy River. / Nature 3-92. [IV; 220. "Notes." Nature,  3 (December 1, 1870): 92-94, at 92-93.]


1870 Sept / Religio Phil Jour, Nov. 26, p. 2 / House at Cadereyta, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. Stones falling on it, night and day—cobblestones, bits of soft rock, dried mortar. The father and one of the grown sons having gone to the City of Mexico to dispose of property acquired by inheritance. Account by Dr. M. K. Knapp, their family physician. He was shown a pile of cobblestones, some of them weighing 12 or 15 pounds each. The phe began with loud knockings. These 3 days and then the stones began to fall. Dr. Knapp tells of having seen stones fall. Stones started Sept. 3. / Issue of June 10, Dr K writes that the father and son returned from their journey and that the phe stopped. He learned that 4 or 5 times in the preceding 10 years there had been similar phe. [A; 626.1, 626.2, 626.3, 626.4. Knapp, Moses Lowman. "Falling Stones in Mexico." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 9 (no. 10; November 26, 1870): 2, (c. 1-2). Knapp, Moses Lowman. "Falling Stones in Mexico." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 10 (no. 12; June 10, 1871): 6, (c. 1-3). No specific dates are given for these phenomena, but the "Sept. 3" date was estimated, by Fort, from Knapp's letter of September 12.]


1870 Sept 1 / ab 9 a.m., for 4 hours / Battle of Sedan at Arlon, 64 kilometres away. Bull Soc Belge D'Astro 5/184. [IV; 221. Hoffman. "Phénomènes acoustiques." Bulletin de la Société Belge d'Astronomie, 5 (1900): 184. Traveling from Martelange to Luxembourg City, a rolling sound like thunder was heard from 9 a.m. and continued to 2:30 p.m., (while the sky was cloudless from 10:30 a.m., onwards from Rambrouch), Hoffman questioned if some geological or topographical phenomenon was communicating the sounds of the artilleryat the Battle of Sedan, 64 kilometres away, (where intense bombardments by the Krupp C64 field guns countered French infantry and cavalry charges until 3 p.m.). Hoffman, an infantry officer, was accompanied on this journey by Prof. Sander, from Arlon.]


1870 Aug, Sept / 3rd outbreak, bit of a third group of spots in Plato, by W.R. Birt. / E Mec 12/374. [IV; 222. Birt, William Radcliffe. "Lunar Activity." English Mechanic, 12 (January 6, 1871): 374.]


1870 (Sept. 10) / Sci Gos of Oct, p. 233 / Town of Leicester besieged by little brown beetles. At about the same time (Sept. 10), such a swarm at Beaumaris—both said be an Aphodius. [IV; 223. Mott, T.T.  "Swarm of Beetles." Science Gossip, 6 (no. 70; October 1, 1870): 233. "Swarm of Beetles." Science Gossip, 6 (no. 71; November 1, 1870): 263. Aphodius contaminatus.]


1870 Sept 16 / E Mec of— // Birt's obs and Pratt's, Elger, Neisen and others, upon Plato spot[s] of July and Aug and [Sept]. "There is great reason to believe that while the sites of the markings are permanent, the manifestations of markings themselves are variable." [IV; 224.1, 224.2. Birt, William Radcliffe. "Summary of Observations.—Spots on Plato, August, 1870." English Mechanic, 11 (September 16, 1870): 613-614.]


1870 Sept. 18 / Piece of meteoric iron fell in a barn yard, Santa Clara, Cal., setting debris afire. / Nature 3/36. [IV; 225. "Notes." Nature, 3 (November 10, 1870): 34-36, at 36.]


1870 Sept 19 / NY Times, 5-5 / Drouth. [IV; 226. "The Late Drouth." New York Times, September 19, 1870, p. 5. c. 5-6.]


1870 Sept 23 / [LT], 4-b / Great q / Batang. [IV; 227. "India." London Times, September 23, 1870, p. 4 c. 2. See: 1870 Ap. 11, (IV; 144).]


1870 (September) / Obs on spots in Plato / Birt—E Mec., 14/123 / great rise of No. 14 and great fall of No. 16—increase of No 22, etc. [IV; 228. Birt, William Radcliffe. "Recent Observations on the Moon's Surface." English Mechanic, 14 (no. 343; October 20, 1871): 123. "In the notes which Mr. Neison has sent me he mentions the great advance which spot No. 13 has made in visibility, while spot No. 16 has fallen quite out of sight. Spots Nos. 13, 19, and 16 are situated on the broad N.W. streak, and it is noteworthy that the two former declined considerably in visibility during the two years above mentioned [1869 April to 1871 April]. While spot No. 16 has declined, No. 22 has been increasing in visibility."]


1870 Sept, ab 20th / Siege of Paris. [IV; 229. The Siege of Paris began on September 19, 1870, and lasted until January 28, 1871.]


1870 Sept 24 / ab 9 p.m. / North Wales and Southampton / Aurora / Good description / LT, Sept 27-10-c / (C.R. 71/451) / was seen in Heidelberg—L.T., Sept 28-11-c. Canada—Nature, 3/7 / M Notices 31/16. [IV; 230. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, September 27, 1870, p. 10 c. 3. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, September 28, 1870, p. 11 c. 3. Chapelas. "Aurore boréale du 24 septembre 1870." Comptes Rendus, 71 (1870): 451-452. Dawson, George M. "The Aurora of  Sept. 24"  Nature, 3 (November 3, 1870): 7. Ommanney, Erasmus. "Aurora Borealis of 24 Sept., 1870." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 31 (November 11, 1870): 16-17.]


1870 Sept 24 / Mets more than usually frequent in England, time of brilliant aurora. / BA 71-26. [IV; 231. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 26.]


1870 Sept. 24 / J / Dark spots on Jupiter noted by Mr. Gledhill. / Observatory 15-148. [IV; 232. Denning, William Frederick. "Jupiter." Observatory, 15 (1892): 147-148.]


1870 Sept 24 / BO / Religio Phil Jour, 4-5 / Food. / Bullets / House of a wealthy widow of Memphis, Tenn., bombarded with apples, biscuits, buttons, crackers, crusts of bread, and leaden bullets. [A; 624. "Personal and Local." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 9 (no. 1; September 24, 1870): 4, (c. 5).]


1870 Sept 24 / Spiritualist, named Stewart Chamberlain, age 68, died at Le Roy, N.Y. / Rel-Phil Journ., Nov 5-6-5, 1870. [A; 625. Shaver, J.W. "Stewart Chamberlain." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 9 (no. 7; November 5, 1870): 6, (c. 5).]


1870 Sept 24-25 / Great aurora, mostly N.W., at 1:30 a.m., burst out in east, Halifax, Eng. / Ast Reg, 8-236. [IV; 233. "Aurora Borealis." Astronomical Register, 8 (November 1870): 235-237, at 236.]


1870 Sept 24 and 25 / Aurora / Tasmania / LT, 1870, Nov 29-11-b. [IV; 234. "An Aurora Borealis in Tasmania." London Times, November 29, 1870, p. 11 c. 2.]


1870 Sept 25 / Great sunspots / E Mec 12-153. [IV; 235. Elger, Thomas Gwyn. "Sun-Spots and Faculae"; and, "Sun-Spots." English Mechanic, 12 (no. 293; November 4, 1870): 153, (illustrations).]


1870 Sept 26 / (Lyra) / obj / 12:15 Berlin time (Berlin) / Times, Sept 30—cor was examining constellation Lyra and saw a luminous object apparently start from Vega moving toward Epsilon Lyrae. It occupied 30 seconds in crossing the field of his telescope but he thought it could not be a meteor to move so slowly. [IV; 236.1, 236.2. Brabazon, Reginald. "A Meteor." London Times, September 30, 1870, p. 9 c. 4.]


1870 Sept 28 / 7:25 p.m. / Radcliffe, Oxford / sudden flash of light / no met seen / BA 73/372. [IV; 237. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1872-73." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1873, 349-403, at 372-373.]


1870 Sept 28 / Great sunspot reported by Denning. Visible to N.E. From Aug 24, had been unusual spots. / LT, Sept 30. [IV; 238. Denning, William Frederick. "Spots on the Sun." London Times, September 30, 1870, p. 9 c. 4.]


1870 / last of Sept // Enormous swarms of Aphides, many places in England. / Field, Oct 8, Oct 15. [IV; 239. (Field, October 8, 1870. Field, October 15, 1870.)]


1870 / last of Sept // Great swarms of Aphides at Williton. / Field, Oct. 8. [IV; 240. (Field, October 8, 1870.)]


1870 / last Sept // Great swarms green and black Aphides reported from half a dozen places. / Field, Oct. 8. [IV; 241. (Field, October 8, 1870.)]


1870 Oct / American cuckoo picked up dead in a wood near Aberystwith. / Field, Oct 26, 1895. [IV; 242. (Field, October 26, 1870.)]


1870 / autumn // at Montevideo / Rigging of vessels covered with webs and little spiders. / Amer Naturalist 5-149. [IV; 243. Emerton, James Henry. "Flying Spiders." American Naturalist, 5 (no. 3; May 1871): 148-155, at 149. "In the autumn of 1870 I received a letter from an officer on one of the United States vessels, in which he stated that one day while at anchor near Montevideo, after a strong wind, the rigging was filled with cobwebs, and little spiders dropped down on all parts of the deck."]


1870 Oct / Lum. obj near Gardnerville (N.Y.?) / See Lum. Objs. [A; 627. See: 1870 Oct 29, (A; 636). See: (Lum Objs). Gardnerville is a hamet of Wawayanda, New York.]


1870 Oct 1 / Trance / Religio Phil Jour, 3-1, copying The Kentuckian (Paducah, Ky), that four weeks before date f writing in The Kentuckian, Mrs Pell in her house in Clay street became ill—about 3 weeks later taken with convulsions. She was then unconscious. Mayor Sauner had a friend named Lewis, who died in Paducah about 11 years before. The Mayor visited Mrs Pell. She caught him by the hand and began enacting the dying scenes of Lewis. She repeated utterances which he said were the dying utterances of Lewis. A few days later a woman visited her. A child of this woman had died. Mrs Pell screamed and acted as this child had acted when it died, suffering intensely. Copied from the Paducah Herald. Said that Mayor J.W. Sauner had confirmed the story of Lewis as reproduced by Mrs Pell. [A; 631.1, 631.2, 631.3, 631.4. "A Singular Case." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 9 no. 2 (October 1, 1870): p. 3 c. 1. "The Woman Who Dies." Terre Haute Daily Gazette, September 16, 1870, p. 3. c. 1. "From the Paducah Kentuckian." "A Strange Case of Mesmeric Influence, Or Something Else." "On Sunday evening last, in company with Mayor Sauner and Dr. Brooks, we visited the house of Mrs. Lewis, who lives in one of the Stovall cottages, on Clay street. We there found the wife of Mr. Pell in a singular condition. She is about twenty-five years old, full medium size, was married about eighteen months ago in an adjoining State, and came to Paducah some eight months ago to reside. She was indisposed, and continued so nothing serious was apprehended until last Wednerday night, when she was taken with convulsions, each one lasting from five to ten minutes. She would then have an interval of quiet for fifteen or twenty minutes, and then another convulsion. This condition continued for about twelve hours, and left her in a singular state, being apparently unconscious of every thing and every one around her. She has had lucid intervals at about one o'clock, both in the day and night, which lasts but a few minutes. In the meantime she has slept but very little. She talks, rubs her hands and, at times, looks pleased at other times she has a woe begone expression, and will burst into tears." "Mayor Sauner had a friend, a Mr. Lewis, who died in this city about 11 years ago with consumption. On Sunday evening he sat down by this Mrs. Pell and took hold of her hand, when she immediately commenced acting the dying scenes of Mr. Lewis. She talked just as he did, using the same actions and identically the same language, which it was impossible for her to have heard from any source, as Mr. Lewis could only talk in a whisper, and Mayor Sauner had to put his ear close to his mouth to hear what he said and he declares positively that she repeated the expressions of the dying man, which no person heard but himself, and which he has never repeated. But what adds to the singularity of the case is the fact that she acts in every respect, with the positions of head, hand and body, as the dying Lewis did, and in appearance dies away as he did, her eyes being set and her pulse becoming almost extinct but in a moment afterward she rouses herself up, the color returns to her face and the pulse beomes strong and natural again." "Another case. A woman visited her a few days since who had lost a child that suffered intensely while dying. Mrs. Pell had known nothing of this child, yet when its mother came into her presence she screamed, acted like and apparently died off as the child had done. We were informed of other instances of the same kind, and it is certain that she could not have had any knowledge of any of the cases, as it is less than a year since she first came to Paducah." "We can give no satisfactory solution of this extraordinary case, and if it cannot be accounted for by attributing it to something like mesmerism, we give it up as an inexplicuble mystery beyond comprehension."]


1870 Oct / 2 cases of sheep killed near Reading, England early in Oct. / (+). [A; 630. (Refs???)]


1870 Oct. 3 / 2:20 p.m. / Shock, Taranaki, N. Zealand. Some chimneys damaged. / Otago Witness—15-4-3. [IV; 244. "Taranaki." Otago Witness, October 15, 1870, p. 4 c. 2-3.]


1870 Oct 5 / Italy / III / [Great quake] // Oct 20—Canada, N.Y., Maine / I / [Light quake] // 25—Greece / I / [Light quake] // 28—Sind, India / I / [Light quake] // 30—Italy / II / [Medium quake] // (BA '11). [IV; 247. Milne, 722.]


1870 Oct 6 / 6:30 p.m. / Great met, Germany / 7:45, Slavonia? / Zeit Met 5/616. [IV; 248. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Zeitschrift der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Meteorologie, 5 (1870): 609-616, at 615-616.]


1870 Oct 7 / See 14th. [IV; 245. See: 1870 Oct 14, (IV; 250).]


1870 Oct 11 / [LT], 4-c / 12-11-c / 13-9-d // Mock suns. [IV; 246. Bidder, G.P. "Mock Suns." London Times, October 11, 1870, p. 4 c. 3. Hoare, H. "Mock Suns." London Times, October 12, 1870, p. 11 c. 3.  "Mock Suns." London Times, October 13, 1870, p. 9 c. 4.]


1870 Oct 14 and 25 / Madras / very great mag disturb. / Nature 3/348 / See Read objects. / Read / Sept 4, 1851. [IV; 249. "Aurora Australis." Nature, 3 (March 2, 1871): 348. See: 1850 Sept 4, (II; 1545), and, 1869 Oct 17-18, (IV; 254).]


1870 Oct 14 / Disastrous hurricane, Cuba. 2000 lives lost. / NY Times 18-5-4 / Began on 7th. [IV; 250. "Terrible Hurricane." New York Times, October 18, 1870, p. 5 c. 4.]


1870 Oct 14 / N. Wales / ab. 8:30 p.m. / Aurora / LT, Oct 18-6-b. [IV; 251. "The Aurora." London Times, October 18, 1870, p. 6 c. 2.]


1870 Oct 15 / NY Times, 2-4 / Flood / Va / 100 human beings drowned / 6,000 cattle. [IV; 252. "Losses by the Virginia Floods." New York Times, October 15, 1870, p. 2 c. 4.]


1870 Oct 15 / Godsey / See Hypnosis timed. [A; 632. (See: Hypnosis timed.)]


1870 Oct 15 / + / Sleeper / NY Times, 2-2 / St Louis—case of Susan C. Godsey—sleeping with exception of periods daily, for 21 years—29 years old—fell into torpor Aug 1, 1848, at age of 8—awakes few minutes at dawn every day—convulsive motions and sleep again. From 6 to 12 in morning wakes ab once an hour. Sleeps until 3 p.m. and then at sundown. Night awakes at 9 and 11 and 3 in morning. Eats but is never hungry. / A column in Oct 21-2-4. She was taken to St Louis by interested persons? [A; 633.1, 633.2. "A Sleeping Beauty." New York Times, October 15, 1870, p. 2 c. 2-3."The Sleeping Beauty." New York Times, October 21, 1870, p. 2 c. 4.]


1870 Oct 16 / 8:25 p.m. / 2 mets / York and London / BA 72-69. [IV; 253. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, and Charles Brooke. "Report...on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1871-72." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1872, 57-118, at 69-70.]


[1870 Oct 17] / BO / Croc. / L.T., Oct. 20, 1870, an account of a "huge lizard" that had been seen near St. Asaph, North Wales. Said was killed on 17th Oct by Thomas Hughes of Rhyl, found be 4 feet 7 inches long and looked like a crocodile. / I have read somewhere else—neglected to note at the time—that Hughes was accused of having bought dead body of a croc, from a menagerie. [A; 628.1, 628.2.  "A Strange Discovery." London Times, October 20, 1870, p. 5 c. 3. "Strange Discovery in Wales." Zoologist, s. 2 v. 5 (November 1870): 2388. (Birmingham Daily Post, October 29, 1870, p. 6 c. 5. for hoax story @ BNA) (The Zoologist cites the (London Echo, 1870), as identifying the dead croc as having been bought from menagerie.)]


[1870 Oct 17 / BO / Land and Water, Oct 29, 1870, said that Hughes had bought body from a menagerie and pretended to kill it. [A; 629. (Land and Water, October 29, 1870.)]


[1870 Oct 17-18. Wrong date. See: 1869 Oct 17-18, (IV; 254).]


1870 Oct 19 / morning / Tornado / Llanwrtyd, Breconshire / also near Wells, Somerset / Tornado / Timbs 1871-247. [IV; 255. "Tornado." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1871, 246-247.]


1870 Oct 20 / [LT], 5-c / Monstrous lizard / Vale of Clwyd. [A; 638. "A Strange Discovery." London Times, October 20, 1870, p. 5 c. 3.]


1870 Oct 20 / Times of / Animal (?) / Said that been rumored that near the Caifu Caves in the Vale of Clwyd, in Wales, strange animal like a huge lizard—that Thomas Hghrs had killed it. In Zoologist 12-5-2388 said that ac to the Echo, Hughes had bought the animal when it died in a menagerie. [A; 639.1, 639.2. "A Strange Discovery." London Times, October 20, 1870, p. 5 c. 3. "Strange Discovery in Wales." Zoologist, s. 2 v. 5 (November 1870): 2388.]


1870 Oct 20 / 11 a.m. / Shock / Ithaca, N.Y. / NY Trib, 1886, Sept 6-5-3. [IV; 256. "The Earthquake." New York Tribune, October 21, 1870, p. 1 c. 5.]


1870 Oct 20 / ab 11 a.m. / q / Ohio to Maine / 3 columns in NY Times 21-1-4 / people frightened in N.Y. City / 11:20 a.m. in N.Y. / Montreal to Quebec. [IV; 257. "An Earthquake Abroad." New York Times, October 21, 1870, p. 1 c. 4-7. The Charlevoix earthquake centered near Baie-Saint-Paul, Quebec, and was felt over an area of 1,000,000 square miles, extending as far west as Iowa and as far south as Virginia. Milne, 722. See: 1871 May 21, (IV; 411).]


1870 Oct 20 / 7:30 p.m. / Halifax, England / bright red auror[al] cloud in Auriga / a little later in the Lynx / Ast Reg 8-270. /// Dust / Italy via Sahara / came via Germany / Feb 28, March 1, 1866. [IV; 258. "Aurora." Astronomical Register, 8 (December 1870): 270-271.]


1870 Oct 20 / 11:30 a.m. / q / Canada, New York, New England . LT, Oct 22-5-b // rainstorm at time / LT, Nov 3-4-b // met, auroras and storms before it. // At Albany / 11:15 a.m. / N.Y. Times, Nov. 6, 1877 // See Am J. Sci. 101-47. [IV; 259. "Canada." London Times, October 22, 1870, p. 5 c. 2. "The United States." London Times, November 3, 1870, p. 4 c. 2. "The Sunday Morning Earthquake." New York Times, November 6, 1877, p. 2 c. 6. Twining, Alexander Catlin. "Earthquake of October 20th, in Northeastern America." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 1 (1871): 47-53.]


1870 Oct 20 / 7:30 - 11:30 / N. Wales / Aurora / details / LT, Oct 25-4-b. [IV; 260. Allnatt, R.H. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, October 25, 1870, p. 4 c. 2.]


1870 Oct 22 / NY Times, 2-4 / Haunted house / Kinderhook, N.Y. / tramping feet / Skeleton found beneath flooring of a room. After that sounds stopped. [A; 634. "Current Notes." New York Times, October 22, 1870, p. 2 c. 4.]


1870 Oct 22 before / Luminous obj / Gardnerville, N.Y. / See "Owls". [A; 635. See: 1870 Oct 29, (A; 636). (See: Owls.)]


1870 Oct 24 / star—details given / great Aurora / also 25th / Worcester, etc. / Aurora / LT, Oct 26-5-f / 27-8-b / and a met. in Auriga / See Index. / Oct 31—Lowe says nothing like it since 1848, which "strange to say" also was upon Oct 24—See for full dets. [IV; 263. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, October 26, 1870, p. 5 c. 6. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, October 27, 1870, p. 8 c. 2.]


1870 Oct 24, 25 / In A.J. Sci 3/1/126, Prof. A. C. Twining writes that near Philadelphia appeared that the aurora kept nearly one place among the stars for 48 hours . The position as seen in Philadelphia, 25, is given as indicated by a line through Altair, the trapezium of the Dolphin and 2 degrees north of the southeastern star in the square of Pegasus. / (But this not the position in Timbs.) [IV; 261.1, 261.2. Twining, Alexander Catlin. "Auroral Belt of October 24th—25th, 1870." American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 1 (1871): 126-129."The Aurora Borealis." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1871, 249-255, at 250-251. "About a quarter-past eight o'clock splendid streams of auroral light illuminated a vast extent of the heavens, reaching from Aldeboran [sic] in the east to beyond Atair [sic] in the west. Of these streamers two were the most remarkable, one emanating from the east, a few degrees above the horizon, the other from the west in a similar manner." "The auroral band in the east, bounded on the one side by Aldeboran [sic] and on the other by Capella, spread in a fan-like shape over the constellations Perseus, Andromeda, and Cassiopeae, to a star in the head of Cepheus; while the western streamer, spreading in a similar manner over the constellations Aquila, Sagitta, Lyra, and Cygnus, reached also its culminating point at the above-named star in Cepheus, which thus formed at the zenith the point of junction between the two streamers."]


1870 Oct 25 / Aurora / N.B., etc. / Times, Oct 29-6-b / "24 hours later than in London," etc. / Nature 3/727. [IV; 262. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, October 29, 1870, p. 6 c. 2. Grove, W.R. "The Aurora Borealis." Nature, 3 (November 10, 1870): 27-28.]


1870 Oct  24 / Sky fire / London Salvage Corps turned out and Thames bridges crowded with people supposing looking at reflection of a great fire. / Timb Y.B. 1871/250-2 / E.J. Lowe—like that of Oct 24, 1848 / Seen in Italy. [IV; 264. "The Aurora Borealis." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1871, 249-255.]


1870 Oct. 24 / N. Zealand / "Dull lurid" appearance in like reflection of a great fire in southwestern sky, New Zealand. / Otago Witness 29-15-1. [IV; 265. "The people in Wellington...." Otago Witness, October 29, 1870, p. 15 c. 1.]


1870 Oct 24 / Aurora / 5 a.m. / in America / LT, Nov 11-5-e. [IV; 266. "Aurora in America." London Times, November 11, 1870, p. 5 c. 5.]


1870 Oct 24 / Aurora in Italy / Aurora, 8:30, Italian time / Times, Oct 31-6-d / most brilliant 9:20 / See Index, Palestine, etc. [IV; 267. Morgan, T.H. "The Aurora in Italy." London Times, October 31, 1870, p. 6 c. 4. "See Index, Palestine, etc.")]


1870 Oct 24-25 / See same date, 1871. [IV; 268. See: 1871 Oct 24 and 25, (IV; 536).]


1870 Oct / exact date not given // Great aurora / South Africa / Cape Argus, Feb 6, 1872. [IV; 269. "Aurora Australis." Cape Argus, February 6, 1872, p. 2 c. 6.]


1870 Oct 25 / Aurora / O at zenith / Glascow. After violent storm. Aurora like a huge red cloud appeared suddenly from Cygnus southward. Vanished and an arch from horizon to Pegasus. / Eastern horizon then on fire and flaming pyramids rising, all between 6 and 6:30. Columns up toward zenith, where often a black circle, and the columns of light not invade this—lasted till midnight—"dawn" around the whole horizon. / E Mec. 12-155. [IV; 270.1, 270.2. "Aurora Borealis." English Mechanic, 12 (no. 293; November 4, 1870): 155.]


1870 Oct 26-27 / (Spain) / Aurora / Seemed to have travelled south. / LT, Nov 4-5-f. [IV; 271. "The Late Aurora." London Times, November 4, 1870, p. 5 c. 6.]


1870 Oct 27 / noon / q. / Boston / Boston Jour of Chemistry 5/67. [IV; 272. "Earthquakes." Boston Journal of Chemistry, 5 (December 1, 1870): 67.]


1870 Oct 28 / Sind, India / q / BA '11. [IV; 273. Milne, 722.]


1870 Oct 29 / Religio Phil Jour, 2-5 / Luminous obj / See under Luminous Objs. [A; 636. "A Remarkable Phenomenon." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 9 (no. 6; October 29, 1870): 2, (c. 5). A light was once seen to enter a window of a house, and a "ball of fire" was observed "within the radius of half a mile" of the house, near Goshen, New York. "A Remarkable Phenomenon." New York Times, September 25, 1870, p. 3 c. 6. See: (Luminous objs.)]


1870 Oct 30 / q / Italy / BA '11. [IV; 274. Milne, 722.]


1870 Oct. 31 / 8:20 a.m. / Strong submarine shock between Newcastle and Lyttelton, New Zealand. / Otago Witness (Dunedin, N.Z.), Nov 19. [IV; 275. "A shock of submarine earthquake...." Otago Witness, November 19, 1870, p. 5 c. 4.]


1870 Nov / Proc. Asiatic Soc Bengal / Letters upon the Barisal Guns—that they were probab[ly] booming of the surf—another that far from the sea, "the detonations, for [s]o I may call them," [w]ere so distinct one from another—", and not a "booming". [IV; 276. "The following letters were read...." Proceedings of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1870 (November): 289-291.]


1870 Nov 1 / Severe shock / Upper Scinde, India / Nature 3-353. [IV; 277. "Notes." Nature, 3 (March 2, 1871): 351-353, at 353.]


1870 Nov. 1 / 11:30 p.m. / London / met / BA 71-31. [IV; 278. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 31.]


1870 Nov 1 / 10:07 p.m. / Birmingham and 10:27 / 2 mets as if from Pleiades / BA 72-70. [IV; 279. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, and Charles Brooke. "Report...on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1871-72." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1872, 57-118, at 70.]


1870 ab. Nov 1 / Somnambulism in village of Cannington by Richard Dell. / Ac to Somerset Gazette / Copied in Medium and Daybreak, Nov 11, p. 255. [A; 640. "Somnambulism Extraordinary." Somerset Western Gazette, October 14, 1870, p. 5 c. 6. "Somnambulism." Medium and Daybreak, 1 (no. 32; November 11, 1870): 255.]


1870 Nov. 3 / [LT], 7-e / News of City of Boston / See 1871 Index / Ship News. [A; 600. "The City of Boston." London Times, November 3, 1870, p. 7 c. 5.]


1870 Nov. 3 / Light perhaps met train / India / Nature 3/209. [IV; 280. "Extraordinary Meteor." Nature, 3 (January 12, 1871): 209.]


1870 Nov. 4 / ab. 3 a.m. / near Agra, India / Large met train ab. 5 minutes. / BA 71-32. [IV; 281. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 31-32.]


1870 Nov 5. / Field of / Cor writes that the man in Wales had borrowed a stuffed reptile. [A; 637. (Field, November 5, 1870.) See: 1870 Oct 17, (A; 628).]


1870 Nov 8 / afternoon / Republic Co., Kansas / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [IV; 282. Finley, 4.]


1870 Nov. 12 / Otago Witness (Dunedin, N. Zealand) of 12th / The eruption of Tongariro gradually subsiding. / I saw no preceding note of it. [IV; 283. "The eruption of Tongariro is gradually subsiding...." Otago Witness, November 12, 1870, p. 14 c. 3. See: 1870 July 10-18, (IV; 191). The eruption of Tongariro volcano began in April of 1870.]


1870 Nov 13, etc. / Few mets in England / BA 71-40. [IV; 284. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 40.]


1870 Nov 14 / morning / 6 observers counted 153 meteors in 4 hours and 40 minutes at New Haven. / Religio-Philosophical Journal, Nov 26-4-4, copying from N.Y. Post. [IV; 285. "The November Meteor." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 9 (no. 10; November 26, 1870): 2, (c. 4). "The November Meteors." New York Evening Post, November 17, 1870, p. 2 c. 2.]


[Thayer's Notes, in Doubt, ends here, at November 14, 1870.]


1870 Nov. 14 / Persecuting Flames / Lum owl / Polts / [typescript] / Proc. S. P. R. 12-326. [A; 641. A typescript note. "Reviews." Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, 12 (1897): 319-335, at 322.]


1870 Nov. 16 / [LT], 4-d / 2 waterspouts at Newquay. [A; 642. "Waterspouts." London Times, November 16, 1870, p. 4 c. 4.]


1870 Nov. 18 / stones and assault / Med. and daybreak of, from Cincinnati Gazette. / In home of Andrew Streit, farmer near Cumminsville, Ohio. He and wife and mother-in-law out—came home and found their servant girl tied and gagged. She said a man had seized her. They were discussing it when stones rattled against the windows. Repeated attacks but no stone thrower visible. Complained to police and police sent to investigate and surrounded the house. Stones continued to smash windows. The next day the servant girl was sent home to her parents. Phe. stopped. But the hired man who had taken her there returned telling of discharge of stones out in open country where no ambush possible. Said that some time later girl declared had seen the man but he had disappeared. [A; 643.1, 643.2., 643.2., 643.4. "Stones Thrown by Spirits." Medium and Daybreak, November 18, 1870, p. 263.]


1870 Nov. 19 / ab 9 p.m. / Great det met, Scotland / Symons 5-193. [IV; 285.1. "Magnificent Detonating Meteor." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 5 (December 1870): 193-194.]


1870 Nov. 19 / Same spot of Sept 25 / See E Mec 12-257. [IV; 285.2. Purkiss, W. "A Remarkable Sun-Spot." English Mechanic, 12 (no. 297; December 2, 1870): 257, (illustration).]


1870 Nov 19 / Otago Witness of, (Dunedin, N.Z.) reports, with no date, violent volc eruption at least 40 days, at Sunday Island, one of the Kermadec Group, 100 mile, N.E. of N. Zealand. [IV; 285.3. "Sunday Island." Otago Witness, November 19, 1870, p. 4 c. 4. The Raoul Island volcano.]


1870 ab. Nov. 20 / Buchanan ghost begins—told in N.Y. Times, Jan 15-4-7 / Home of Rev. G. C. Thrasher. The corn crib phe. and in house smashing around crockery, opening locked doors and windows, disturbing furniture. All this with neighbors with guns, on watch to shoot. To T's little son a voice spoke—like "a confusion of voices coming from the ground". 3 children—eldest 12. [A; 644.1, 644.2. "A Virginia Ghost." New York Times, January 15, 1871, p. 4 c. 7. "The 'Buchanan Ghost'—So-Called." Staunton Spectator, (Staunton Virgina), January 24, 1871, p. 1 c. 5. "The Buchanan Ghost." Staunton Spectator, (Staunton Virgina), February 14, 1871, p. 2 c. 4. "The Buchanan Ghost." Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, (West Virginia), March 7, 1871, p. 1 c. 7. The Lynchburg Republican reports that the "ghost" stories were part of a swindle to deter others from purchasing the house occupied by Thrasher's family.]


1870 Nov. 23 /  Great aurora / N. Zealand / Trans N.Z. Inst. 1902-405. [IV; 285.4. Skey, Henry. "Notes on the Aurora in the Southern Hemisphere." Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 35 (1902): 405-408, at 405-406.]


1870 Nov. 26 / Brecon County Times of, copied in Med. and D. break of Dec. 9 / Thomas James of Cadoxton had said in his home loud noises and he fallen unconscious. Recovered to find self in the road near a church. Felt self again spirited away. Lost consciousness again and came to in one of the church's vaults. Here a spirit appeared and pointed at some disarrangement of coffin decorations, telling him to restore them to order. This he did and was then spirited away again, finding self in the churchyard. Here he was found and taken to his home. [A; 645.1, 645.2, 645.3. "An Extraordinary Ghost Story." Medium and Daybreak, December 9, 1870, p. 287. (Brecon County Times, November 26, 1870. Not online; a weekly newspaper, this issue may no longer be extant.) Cadoxton is probably Cadoxton-juxta-Neath, Wales.]


1870 Dec / Aurora / Paper read by M. Becquerel before Acad of Sci, of Paris, late in 1871, that year before Paul Rolier in his balloon had seen an aurora, soon after hearing an incomprehensible loud noise roaring. / Boston Jour of Chemistry 6/63. [IV; 285.5. "Sounds from the Aurora." Boston Journal of Chemistry, 6 (December, 1871): 63. Becquerel, Antoine Henri. "Mémoire sur l'origine céleste de l'électricité atmosphérique." Comptes Rendus, 72 (1871): 709-714, at 712. Cartailhac, Émile. Voyage en Ballon de Paris en Norwége du Captaine Paul Rolier. Toulouse: n.p., 1871, 25-26. "De nouveau M. Rolier se laisse descendre; bientôt un son étrange, un mugissement incompréhensible se fait entendre; il l'attribue au tourbillon du Maelstrom qui se trouve au nord de la Norvège." "Le brouillard qui semblait s'être dissipé pendant quelques instants permet de distinguer au milieu de l'eau de grandes tâches grisâtres semblables à des bancs de sable. Bientôt il redevient intense et le bruit cesse complètement. Il s'élève alors une odeur de soufre des plus prononcées, presque asphixiante."]


1870 Dec / Ec. Sun / J. Sci 7-477 / 8-227. [IV; 285.6. Proctor, Richard Anthony. "The Approaching Total Solar Eclipse." Quarterly Journal of Science, 7 (October 1870): 477-484. Proctor, Richard Anthony. "The Eclipse of Last December...." Quarterly Journal of Science, 8 (April 1871): 227-247.]


1870 Dec 4 / 2 a.m. / Severe shock at sea 45 miles off Cape Mendocino, California. / Ref, May 13, 1850. [IV; 285.7. Holden, Edward Singleton. List of Recorded Earthquakes in California, Lower California, Oregon and Washington Territory. Sacramento: State Office, J.D. Young, Supt. of State Printing, 1887, 56.]


1870 Dec 4  4:15 p.m. / Sidney Sussex College / Met from point 2 or 3 diameters from the moon—crossed moon—disappeared below moon. / LT, Dec 6-9-f. [IV; 285.8. Williams-Ellis, J.C. "A Meteor." London Times, December 6, 1870, p. 9 c. 6.]


1870 [Dec 10] / Super. / [LT],, Dec 10-12-d / 16-4-f / Worchestershire / Suffolk. [A; 646. "Superstition in Worcestershire." London Times, December 10, 1870, p. 12 c. 4. "The Consequence of Superstition." London Times, December 16, 1870, p. 4 c. 6.]


1870 Dec. 12 / Sky overcast in England. No record of exceptional meteor. / BA 71-42. [IV; 285.9. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1870-71." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1871, 26-52, at 42.]


1870 / middle of Dec // Volc outbursts in Iceland / Am J. Sci 10/191 / What ser? [IV; 285.10. "Am J. Sci 10/191" is an erroneous reference, and no volcanic eruptions in Iceland  are found for December of 1870 in contemporary or modern catalogs. For example, it is not found in: "Volcanic Eruptions and Earthquakes in Iceland within Historic Times." Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian, 1885, 495-541; nor, is it found in: Thoroddsen, Thorvald. "A List of Destructive Earthquakes in Iceland." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1910, 64-69. See: 1870 Dec. 24, (IV; 285.14).]  


1870 Dec 16 / [LT], 4-c / Wild man of California. [A; 647. "The Wild Men of California." London Times, December 16, 1870, p. 4 c. 3.]


1870 Dec 17 / Malton / Aurora / Times, Dec 20-3-f. [IV; 285.11. "The Aurora Borealis." London Times, December 20, 1870, p. 3 c. 6.]


[1870 Dec 21 /] 1871 Dec 21 / Strong q, Arequipa, Peru / Nature 3-434. [IV; 571. "Notes." Nature, 3 (March 30, 1871): 431-434, at 434.]


1870 Dec 22 / Eclipse / See Ap. 28, 1871. / Patch in sky at time of eclipse of sun / Bath / M Notice 31/183. [IV; 285.12. Hardy, Robert William Hale. "On a Remarkable Appearance during the Solar Eclipse, Dec. 22, 1870." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 31 (April 14, 1871): 182-184, at 183. See: 1871 Ap. 28, (IV; 397).]


1870 Dec 24 / Clinton Co., Indiana / Dustfall / Proc Amer Assoc 20/216. [IV; 285.13. Tingley, Joseph. "Account of a Dust-Storm of December 24th, 1870, in Clifton County, Indiana." Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 20 (1871): 216-218. "During the night of the 24th, there had fallen a light, feathery snow, which, by its collection upon the western side of buildings

and fences, showed that the wind at the time was westerly. The dark-colored substance was evidently a travelling companion with the snow, since it was observed to be commingled therewith throughout; and, in places where the accumulations of snow-drift were greatest, the foreign substance was most abundant."]


1870 Dec. 24 / Find no phe volc or solar to go with this / (See Iceland.) [IV; 285.14. See: (Iceland).]


1870 Dec 25 / Italy / Sand / Les Mondes 27/541 / (N.M.). [IV; 285.15. "Dans une seconde note...." Les Mondes, 27 (1872): 541.]

 
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