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Last updated: April 5, 2017.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1846 to 1850


1846:


1846 // The aerolite at Girgenti / Le Moniteur 1846/2744. [II; 912. (Le Moniteur, 1846/2744).]


1846 // Great numbers of locusts in England / Field, Oct. 3, 1857. [II; 913. (Field, Oct. 3, 1857).]


1846 // within 20 miles of Columbia, S.C. / Stone fell in th. storm. / N.Y.T., Jan. 22-3-4. [II; 914. (1846  

New York Times, January 22, [Year?], p. 3 c. 4). See: 1846 / summer, (II; 982).]


1846 // Biela's Comet / others that divided / Great comet of 1882 / Brooks of 1889 / Mellish's / 1915 / M Notices 1916-334 / (1915a). [II; 915. "Notes on some Points connected with the Recent Progress of Astronomy." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 76 (February 14, 1916): 332-363, at 334. Biela's Comet is also 3D/Biela.]


1846 / Angelique Cottin, "The Electric Girl". When she went near objects they bounded from her. When she had to sit in a chair, it bounded away from her, and a strong man could not hold it. If she touched a chair upon which a man sat, both were upset. A table, weighing 60 pounds, rose from the floor when she touched it with her apron. When she lay on a heavy bed, it rocked. The phe in daylight, witnessed by thousands of persons. I take from Holms, "Facts of Psychic Science," p. 278. The power was intermittent, strong or weak, and ceased after about 10 weeks, For particulars of investigations by Arago and other scientists, see Jour des Debats, Feb., 1846. A cool breeze flowed seemingly from her. [A; 204.1 to 204.4. Holms, Archibald Campbell. The Facts of Psychic Science and Philosophy. Jamaica, N.Y.: Occult Press, 1927, 278. "Académie des Sciences." Journal des Debats, February 18, 1846, pp. 1-2, at p. 1 c. 1-3. "La jeune fille qui s'est présentée à l'Académie des Sciences...." Journal des Debats, February 24, 1846 p. 2 c. 3-4.]


[1846 /] 1848 / Buffalo / Raps in home of the Davenport Brothers. [A; 221. Nichols, Thomas Low. A Biography of the Brothers Davenport. London: Saunders, Otley, 1864, 12.]  


1846 Jan / Hairworms / Zoologist of / Cor tells of three instances at Burton-on-Trent within a few minutes of a hairworm found upon bushes immediately after a fall of rain, one that "had caught upon a piece of stick". [II; 916. Brown, Edwin. "Gordious aquaticus, supposed to fall from the atmosphere with rain." Zoologist, 4 (1846): 1220.]


[1846 Jan 6. Wrong date. See: 1846 Jan 16, (II; 917).]


1846 Jan 13 / Bielas's Comet split. [II; 918.]


1846 Jan 15 — / Polt girl or elec. girl / Angelique Cottin. [A; 202.]


1846 Jan 15 / Begun, at La Perriere, phe of Angelique Cottin. [A; 203.]


[1846 Jan 16 /] 1846 Jan 6 / "Bolide" set fire to house. / C.R. 22/342, 427 / d'Auvissars (Côte d'Or) / See 1840. / 1842? / Nov or Dec. [II; 917. "Sur un météore qui a incendié, le 16 janvier 1846, un bâtiment d'hébergeage à la Chaux (arrondissement de Châlon-Sur-Sâone), dépendant d'une ferme appartenant à Mme, de Berbia." Comptes Rendus, 22 (1846): 342-344. "Lettre de M. Giroux à M. le général de Thiard, sur le météore qui a incendié une ferme." Comptes Rendus, 22 (1846): 427-428. On January 6, a luminous meteoric train, (resembling a comet), was observed at Charette, about 6 P.M., in the direction of Chaux. "Auvissars," (as spelled in the article), should be Auvillars-sur-Saône; and, "Charrette" should be Charette (Isère). See: 1840 Aug 3, (II; 201), and, 1842 Nov. 10 / 18 / Dec 1, about / Dec 8 / 9, (A; 157).]


1846 Jan 16 / Meteor sets fire to a building at Chaux (Chalon-sur-Saône). / C.R. 22-343. [II; 919. "Sur un météore qui a incendié, le 16 janvier 1846, un bâtiment d'hébergeage à la Chaux (arrondissement de Châlon-Sur-Sâone), dépendant d'une ferme appartenant à Mme, de Berbia." Comptes Rendus, 22 (1846): 342-344.]


1846 Jan 21 / Cambrai / podura / Mem. Soc Roy. et Cent d'Agriculture 1845-6/221. [II; 920. Bourlet. "Observations sur une prétendue pluie de podurelles, nouvelle espèce de podura." Mémoires de la Société d'Agriculture, Sciences et Arts Centrale du Département du Nord, Séant a Douai, 11 (1845-1846): 221-225. Bourlet denies that a rain of springtails could have occurred, as reported, in January, at Cambrai. No specific date is given for the rain of these "springtails."]


1846 Jan. 24 and 26 / See Ap. 4. / dates of Courrier de Constantinople, and not of falls. [II; 921. See: 1846 Ap. 3, (II; 940), and, 1846 Ap. 4, (II; 942).]


1846 Jan 26 / Trombe at Moulins / C.R. 22-344, 427. [II; 922. "Sur une trombe qui a exercé ses ravages à Moulins." Comptes Rendus, 22 (1846): 344-345. "Lettre de M. Giroux à M. le général de Thiard, sur le météore qui a incendié une ferme." Comptes Rendus, 22 (1846): 427-428. The latter article reports the luminous meteoric train observed, on January 6, at Charette, (not the whirlwind at Moulins).]


1846 Feb / Mlle Cotti[n] / The Electric Girl / An Reg '46-23. [A; 205. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 88 (1846): pt. 2, 1-204, at 23, cv. "The Electric Girl."]


1846 Feb. 3 / Switzerland and France / great met / BA 60-82. [II; 923. Greg, 83.]


1846 Feb 4 / evening / q. and rumbling sound / Staten island, N.Y. / Niles Nat. Reg, Feb 14. [II; 924. "An Earthquake was felt and heard...." Niles' Weekly Register, 69 (February 14, 1846): 384.]


1846 Feb 9 / 11:05 p.m. / Brilliant meteor / London / Athenaeum 1840-182. [II; 925. "Meteor." Athenaeum, 1846 (no. 955; February 14): 182.]


1846 Feb. 10 / ab. 9 p.m. / Enormous meteor at Caraman, France / C.R. 22-740. [II; 926. Petit, Frédéric. "Incendie causé par la chute d'un bolide; indication de quelques autres bolides remarquables observés en 1846." Comptes Rendus, 22 (1846): 739-740. Greg, 83.]


1846 Feb 11 / Nottingham / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 927. Greg, 83.]


1846 Feb. 21 / Collioure, Dept of East Pyrenees, France / 2 great united fireballs / A. J. Sci 2/32/442 / C.R. 22-740. [II; 928. Haidinger, William. "Notices of Meteoric Masses." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 32 (1861): 440-443, at 441-442. . Petit, Frédéric. "Incendie causé par la chute d'un bolide; indication de quelques autres bolides remarquables observés en 1846." Comptes Rendus, 22 (1846): 739-740. Greg, 83.]


1846 March first / Dvr / rts / L.T., 1846, March 18/5/d. [A; 206. "Appalling Affair." London Times, March 18, 1846, p. 5 c. 4.]


1846 / 1st of March // volc and aurora / Hecla / great volumes of ashes / "Every night vivid streaks of the aurora borealis illumined the sky." / LT, Ap. 30-8-1. [II; 929. "Eruptions of Mount Hecla." London Times, April 30, 1846 p. 8 c. 1.]


[1846 March 1 /] 1846 May 1 / Toulouse / E. to W. / large fireball / BA 60. [II; 954. Greg, 83.]


1846 (March 2) / Venus Inf conj Sol / (Al). [II; 930.]


[1846 March 5 /] 1846 May 5 / Paris / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 955. Greg, 83.]


[1846 March 10 /] 1846 May 10 / Brilliant fireball / Bonn / BA 60. [II; 957. Greg, 83.]


1846 March 15 / Dust shower / Shanghai and at sea / Jour Asiatic Soc Bengal 20/193. [II; 931. MacGowan, Daniel Jerome. "Remarks on Showers of Sand in the Chinese Plain." Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 20 (1851): 192-194, at 193.]


1846 Mar 16 / Powder of fine hairs / Shanghai / D-58. ** [II; 932. The note copies information from page 58 of The Book of the Damned. MacGowan, Daniel Jerome, and, Henry Piddington. "Examination of some atmospheric dust from Shanghae, forwarded to the Asiatic Society of Bengal." Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, 16 pt. 1 (1847): 193-199, at 195. "The dust is an olive grey powder, cohering much together, like the scrapings from a paper filter, and when viewed with the magnifier is evidently mixed with something like hairs of two kinds, black and rather thick white ones." The date of the fall was March 15, 1846.]


1846 March 21 / Toulouse; Arieges / slow met / 1/3 diameter of moon / BA 60. [II; 933. Greg, 84-85.]


1846 March 21 / 6:45 p.m. / Met in Haute-Garonne and Ariege—as if from Sirius / C.R. 23/704. [II; 934. Petit, Frédéric. "Sur le bolide du 21 mars 1846, et sur les conséquences qui sembleraient devoir résulter de son apparitition." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 704-709.]


1846 March 21 / (Ch) / "Petit's Moon" / C. Rendus 23/704. [II; 935. Petit, Frédéric. "Incendie causé par la chute d'un bolide; indication de quelques autres bolides remarquables observés en 1846." Comptes Rendus, 22 (1846): 739-740. Petit, Frédéric. "Sur le bolide du 21 mars 1846, et sur les conséquences qui sembleraient devoir résulter de son apparitition." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 704-709. As the director of the Toulouse observatory, Petit did not let the poor quality of the observational data interfere with his astronomical calculations. For examples, the diameter of this "bolide" was provided by Petit to within a centimeter, (87.04 meters), tho it was not observed  by anyone who was any closer than 13 kilometers to it; the period of its revolution about the Earth was calculated to within a thousandth of a second, (9898.724 seconds); and, the perigee of its orbit descended into the stratosphere, (11,458 meters above the sea-level, or, about 37,600 feet). Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1848, 1-11, at 3, cv. 1846, March 21. Lowe, 136. See: 1846 July 23, (II; 1000).]


1846 March 22 / Bagnères-de-Luchon (St. Paul) / "bolide" set fire to house. / C.R. 22-739. [II; 936. Petit, Frédéric. "Incendie causé par la chute d'un bolide; indication de quelques autres bolides remarquables observés en 1846." Comptes Rendus, 22 (1846): 739-740. Lowe, 136. Greg, 84. Saint-Paul-d'Oueil is the village about 5 kilometres from Bagnères-de-Luchon.]


1846 March 31 / Upper Silesia / quick meteor / BA 60. [II; 937. Greg, 84.]


1846 April / Hecla / Recorded under April, in An Reg, 1846, that Hecla had been in eruption some time with great discharge of ashes "Every night [vivid] streaks of [the] a.[urora] bor.[ealis] illumined the sky." [II; 938. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 88 (1846): pt. 2, 1-204, at 69, cv. "Eruptions of Mount Hecla." "Eruptions of Mount Hecla." London Times, April 30, 1846 p. 8 c. 1.]


1846 April / Timbs' Year Book, 1848-235—In the district of Jenischehir fell covering places on ground 3 or 4 inches thick—Grayish white, "rather hard, and irregular in form, inodorous and insipid." [II; 939. "Fall of Manna." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1848, 235-236.]


1846 Ap. 3 / manna / C.R. 23/452. not 542 / See Jan 24. / Manna that fell near where the writer lived, at Zaiviel, in Sievienciany on River Wilna, 54° 45' Lat, and Long 44. In the evening a heavy warm rain fell and continued all night. Next morning thought that hail was on the ground but little balls of an unknown substance were found. Swelled up to double size—appeared gelatinous when soaked 24 hours in water. [II; 940.1, 940.2. Tyzenhauz, Konstanty. "Note sur une substance tombée de l'atmosphere." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 452-454. The fall took place on a farm, (Zaiviel's), near Smorgon, (now identified as Smarhon', Belarus). See: 1841 Jan 24 and 26, (II; 245), and, 1846 Jan. 24 and 26, (II; 921); (the latter note is only a reference dates of a newspaper's reports of falls of manna in 1841 and 1846).]


1846 Ap. 3 / Zaiviel (Wilna), bank of the Wilna (54° 45' Lat, 44° Long) / calm weather / C.R. 23-452 / Came a great cloud with tremendous electric displays in the evening. Torrents fell. Next morning found great numbers of little balls of different sizes, from hazelnut to walnut, unknown substance, almost gelatinous. The dried specimens were spongy, pasty and fibrous, grayish—having a taste slightly like flour, from which a white meal or flour could be made. Spread a sweetish odor when burned. Swelled into double volume in water and looked gelatinous. [II; 941.1, 941.2, 941.3. Tyzenhauz, Konstanty. "Note sur une substance tombée de l'atmosphere." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 452-454.]


1846 Ap. 4 / Gelat / Lithuania / (D-48). [II; 942. The note copies information from page 48 of The Book of the Damned. Tyzenhauz, Konstanty. "Note sur une substance tombée de l'atmosphere." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 452-454. The fall took place at Smorgon, Belorussia, (Smarhon', Belarus); and, the substance was discovered on the ground following a thunderstorm with heavy rain, starting April 3 and lasting all night.]


1846 Ap. 4 / = Manna. [II; 943.]


1846 // Gelat like Wilna / Asia Minor. / D-48. ** [II; 944. The note copies information from page 48 of The Book of the Damned. Tyzenhauz, Konstanty. "Note sur une substance tombée de l'atmosphere." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 452-454.]


1846 April 4 / Gelat. / See June 17, 1890. [II; 945. See: (1890 June 17).]


1846 April 13 / Hecla still going strong—from Sept. 2. "Each night, the sky was brilliant with the northern lights."  YB '47/275. [II; 946. "Eruptions of Hecla."  Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1847, 275.]


1846 Ap. 15 / Hecla still continuing. / L.T., July 1-8-d. [II; 947. "Iceland." London Times, July 1, 1846, p. 8 c. 4.]


1846 Ap. 22 / (B. rain) / North of Worcestershire / 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. / Black rain that turned the waters of 4 rivers black. / Thomson, Intro to Met, p. 155 / See Hecla, Sept 5, 1845. [II; 948. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 155. Thomson says that the water smelled of soot and suggests its origins in coal-fields. Fort refers to the black dust that fell in the Orkneys, after an eruption of Hecla. There is no note dated September 5, 1846. See: 1845 Sept 2, (II; 869).]


1846 // early in ///See Ap. 30. / Dry fogs Eng and Scotland, particularly in the Highlands of Scotland / "half putrefaction, half sulphurous stench" / Chambers' Journal 9-308. [II; 949. "Dry Fogs." Chambers' Edinburgh Journal, n.s., 9 (1848): 307-310, at 308.]


1846 Ap. 25 / Eclipse sun / Amer Jour Sci 2/1/289. [II; 950. "Note on the Eclipse of the Sun of April next." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 1 (1846): 289-292.]


1846 Ap. 30 / [LT], 8-a / Hecla / See July 1. [II; 951. "Eruptions of Mount Hecla." London Times, April 30, 1846 p. 8 c. 1. See: 1846 July 1, (II; 989).]


1846 May / (volc) / (aurora) / (dust) / Hecla / "Every night vivid streaks of the aurora borealis illumined the sky." / An Reg. [II; 952. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 88 (1846): pt. 2, 1-204, at 69, cv. "Eruptions of Mount Hecla." "Eruptions of Mount Hecla." London Times, April 30, 1846 p. 8 c. 1.]


1846 May [8] / Metites / On both banks of river Potenza, 8 miles N.E. of Macerata, Italy, 9 a.m., violent detonations.  Like Sept 16, 1843, near Nordhausen. / A J Sci. 2/3/142. [II; 953. "Fall of Meteorites." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 3 (1847): 142-143.]


[1846 May 1. Wrong date. See: 1846 March 1, (II; 954).]


[1846 May 5. Wrong date. See: 1846 March 5, (II; 955).]


1846 May 8 / (F) / 9:30 a.m. / Macerata, Ancona, Italy / Metite / BA 60-84. [II; 956. Fletcher, 101. This is the Monte Milone, (or Pollenza), meteorite. Greg, 84.]


[1846 May 10. Wrong date. See: 1846 March 10, (II; 957).]


1846 May 10 / Intense darkness and a hurricane of dust at Nottingham followed by th. storm, ab. 1 p.m. / Timbs'  '47-281. [II; 958. "Hurricane in Nottinghamshire." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1847, 281. Lowe, Edward Joseph. A Treatise on Atmospheric Phenomena. London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1846, 193-194.]


1846 May 11 / [LT], 4-a / Fossil. [A; 207. "Discovery of a Plesiosaurus." London Times, May 11, 1846, p. 4 c. 1.]


1846 May 15-16 / night / off Algeria / Dust / La Nature 8-103. [II; 959. Tissandier, Gaston. "Les Pluies de Poussière." La Nature, 1877 pt. 1 (no. 189, January 13): 102-106, and, (no. 190, January 20): 115-118, at 103.]


[1846 May 15-16 /] 1847 / night, May 15-16 // Algeria / Shower dust / C.R. 24/566 / Is this 1846? [II; 1115. "M. Leps, lieutenant de vaisseau...." Comptes Rendus, 24 (1847): 566. The date of this phenomenon was in 1846, (not 1847).]


1846 May 15 / Mediterranean / fall of sand / C.R. 83/1185. [II; 960. Tissandier, Gaston. "Sur une pluie de poussière tombée à Boulogne-sur-Mer, le 9 octobre 1876, et sur le mode de formation des pluies terreuses en général." Comptes Rendus, 83 (1876): 1184-1186, at 1185.]


1846 May 16 / (Ref) / Rain yellowish-brown at Syam (Jura) and Chambery / Mems. Ac. Sci. Lyon, N.S., 13-185 / Ac. 364/2. [II; 961. Fournet, Joseph Jean Baptiste Xavier. "Sur les Pluies de Terre Observées Depuis Quel-ques Années dans le Bassin du Rhone." Mémoires de l'Académie des sciences, belles-lettres et arts de Lyon. Classe des Sciences, s. 2 v. 13 (1863): 185-245, at 186-188, 214. "Ac. 364/2" is the shelfmark at the British Library.]


1846 May 16 / (+) / Pollen / Dust at Genoa / Dust, pollen in the dust. / Am J. Sci 2/4/423 / Many organic forms in it. [II; 962. "Ehrenberg on the Sirocco-dust that fell at Genoa on the 16th May, 1846." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 4 (1847): 423.]


1846 May 16 / Dust / a ferruginous dust / Genoa / Edin N. Ph. J. 42-375. [II; 963. "Note on the Atmospheric Dust which fell at Genoa on 16th of May, 1846." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 42 (1846-1847): 375-376.]


1846 May 22, about / Montreal Gazette of copied in London D. News, July 1 / Considerable number of shad flies in Montreal. [II; 964. "Natural History." London Daily News, July 1, 1846, p. 4 c. 2. The article simply notes the coincidence of the appearance of the "shad fly," (or mayflies), with the appearance of the anadromous shad fish in rivers, with the suggestion that the hatching of the fly larvae occurs at the same water temperature that triggers the spawning of the shad, (or, Alosinae fish). (Montreal Gazette, May-June, 1846, the next Daily News article refers to May 21 issue).]


[1846 May 30, July 10, Sept 12, Oct 29, 31, Dec 2 /] 1848 May 30, July 10, Sept 12, Oct 29, 31, Dec 2 / Q's / New Eng. / See Nov 9, 1810. [II; 1188. Brigham, William T. "Volcanic Manifestations in New England." Memoirs Read Before the Boston Society of Natural History, 2 (1871/1878): 1-28, at 18. See: 1810 Nov 9, (I; 308).]


1846 June -  July / England / Spon Comb green trees / Times, 1846, July 17/8/d. [A; 208. "Spontaneous Combustion." London Times, July 17, 1846, p. 8 c. 4.]


1846 June 3 / Great det met / Moreton Bay, Australia / BA 60. [II; 965. Greg, 84. Lowe, 136.]


1846 June 7 / Darmstadt / Stonefall, ac. to Poggendorf's Annalen, 4-377 / BA 60. [II; 966. Greg, 84. Boguslawski, Georg von. "Zehnter Nachtrag zu Chladni's Verzeichnisse der Feuermeteore und herabgefallenen Massen (Wien 1819)." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, Ergänzungsband, 4 (1854): 1-155, 353-456; at 377.]


1846 June 7 / Darmstadt / "not a stonefall, only slag / BA 67-416 / D-69. [II; 967. The note copies information from page 69 of The Book of the Damned. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 416.]


1846 June 8-16 / Great q. / Greece / BA '11. [II; 968. Milne, 708.]


[1846 June 9 /] 1847 June 9 / Volc eruption / Vavau group islands, near Samoa / Niles Nat Register, Sept 25, 1847. [II; 1118. "Volcanic Eruption in the Pacific." Niles' Weekly Register, 73 (September 25, 1847): 64. Spennemann, Dirk H.R. The June 1846 Eruption of Fonualei Volcano, Tonga: An Historical Analysis. Albury, N.S.W., Australia: Johnstone Centre, Charles Sturt University, 2004. Spennemann clarifies from old newspapers and ships' logs that the erupting volcano was Fonualei and that the date of the eruption was in 1846.]


1846 June 14 or 7 / Ext. whirlwind at Greenheys, ac to Manchester Guardian before 20th / Ac to Notts Mercury before 27th / another peculiar whirl near Derby / hay taken up and held suspended half an hour. [II; 969. ("Extraordinary Atmospheric Phenomenon." Manchester Guardian, June (betw. 7 and 18, 1846.) (London Morning Post, gives story from MG on 18th) "A Whirlwind." Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, June 17, 1846, p. 4 c. 7. "Sunday evening, near six o'clock...." (Ac to Notts Mercury before 27th: not at BNA.) The Derby whirlwind was on June 16, 1846. See: 1846 June 16, (II; 971).]


1846 June 16 / at least to // Shocks in Greece, though less violent, still continuing. / D. News, July 4. [II; 970. "Greece.—The Late Earthquakes." London Daily News, July 4, 1846, p. 4 c. 2.]


1846 June 16 / 2:30 p.m. / Derby / Several waggon-loads of hay caught up from a field and held suspended nearly 1/2 hour. / Times 20-7-6. [II; 971. "Singular Phenomenon." London Times, June 20, 1846, p. 7 c. 6. "Singular Phenomenon." Derby Mercury, June 17, 1846, p. 3 c. 1. "Yesterday (Tuesday), about half-past two o'clock in the afternoon, a sudden whirlwind carried away several waggon loads of hay from a field belonging to Miss Clay, on the Osmaston-road, Derby. The hay was held suspended in the air for nearly half an hour, and gradually fell, spreading over the neighbouring fields and gardens. With the exception of the particular locality, not a breath of air was stirring. Many persons witnessed the phenomenon."]


1846 June 19 / Rhenish Provinces / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 972. Greg, 84.]


1846 June 20 / 8:30 p.m. / Autun, France / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 973. Greg, 84. Lowe, 136. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 305. "On June 20, 1846, about 8.5 p.m., a bolis was witnessed at Marieux near Autun, Saone et Loire; it was of a violet colour, and seemed a yard in circumference. It continued visible about a minute, and descended perpendicularly to the horizon, giving off five other balls, each nearly one-fourth the size of the parent mass, which nevertheless preserved its original volume; before disappearing it burst into
sparks spreading far and wide." "A very curious meteor was observed...." London Standard, July 3, 1846, p. 2 c. 3.]


1846 June 21 / Belgium, Baden, Bavaria / Large met / N to S / BA 60. [II; 974. Greg, 84.]


1846 June 21 / Smyrna, Asia Minor / q / II [medium] / BA '11. [II; 975. Milne, 708.]


1846 June 25 / q. / Smyrna / L.T., July 20-8-a. [II; 976. "Earthquake at Smyrna." London Times, July 20, 1846, p. 8 c. 1.]


1846 June 27 / Vesuvius especially violent. / Leeds Times, July 25. [II; 977. "A letter from Naples of the 27th ultimo...." Leeds Times, July 25, 1846, p. 6 c. 2.]


1846 June 29 / Parma / Fireball / BA 60. [II; 978. Greg, 84. Lowe, 136.]


1846 / last of June // frogs / River Humber, England / MWR 45/221 / L. Times, July 7/1846. [II; 979. McAtee, Waldo L. "Showers of Organic Matter." Monthly Weather Review, 45 (May 1917): 217-224, at 221. "A Shower of Frogs!" London Times, July 7, 1846, p. 7 c. 2.]


1846 June 25 / "Hull Packet," July 3 / Little frogs fell upon vessels in the Humber. The seacoast was "covered with myriads of them". Near Hull. [II; 980. "A Shower of Frogs." Hull Packet, July 3, 1846, p. 5 c. 6. "During the heavy thunderstorm of yesterday week a shower of frogs fell from one of the surcharged clouds over the Humber, several dropped on the decks of vessels navigating the river, and a portion of the coast near Killingholme Lights was for a time covered by myriads of the strange arrivals."]


1846 // summer / Dumfrieshire / great numbers of the rare Convolvulus [Hawk-]moth / Symon's Met 27-144. [II; 981. Mathiason, John. "Butterflies." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 27 (October 1892): 144.]


1846 / summer / (th. stone) / "A very peculiar meteoric stone which was seen to fall at Richland, South Carolina, during a violent thundergust in the summer of 1846," ac to Prof. Shepard. / A. J. Sci 2/10/127 / almost perfectly round, 2 1/10 inches in diameter / glazed outside—inside, the appearance of firebrick. [II; 982.1, 982.2. "Prof. C.U. Shepard on Meteorites." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 10 (1850): 127-129.]


1846 // summer /// Great numbers of a rare hawk moth / Symon's Met. 27/144. [II; 983. Mathiason, John. "Butterflies." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 27 (October 1892): 144.]


1846 // summer /// Stone was seen to fall at Richland, S.C., during a violent thundergust / described in A. J. Sci 2/10/127 by Prof. Shepard / almost perfectly round, 2 1/10 inches in diameter / glazed outside—inside, the appearance of firebrick. [II; 984. "Prof. C.U. Shepard on Meteorites." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 10 (1850): 127-129.]


1846 // summer /// Etna / See back, May 9. [II; 985.]


1846 // summer /// See to birds, Oct 1-18, 1846. [II; 986. See: 1846 Oct 16-17, (II; 1053).]


1846 June / Frgs / Brief mention / L.T., July 7-7-b. [II; 987. "A Shower of Frogs!" London Times, July 7, 1846, p. 7 c. 2. See: 1846 June 25, (II; 980).]


1846 June 25 / In heavy th storm, ac to Hull Packet, July 3, frogs dropped upon vessels in the river Humber, and the coast near Kilingholme Light was "covered with myriads of the strange arrivals". [II; 988. "A Shower of Frogs." Hull Packet, July 3, 1846, p. 5 c. 6.]


1846 July 1 / [LT], 8-d / Hecla. [II; 989. "Iceland." London Times, July 1, 1846, p. 8 c. 4.]


1846 July 3 / Clouds of gnats at Manchester / Zoologist 4-1444. [II; 990. Webster, Thomas. "Immense swarm of Gnats." Zoologist, 4 (1846): 1444.]


1846 July 5 / Great thunderstorms in England. (See Times.) At Sholver, near Oldham, "large quantities of hay were carried up by the whirlwind, and entirely disappeared. Similar phe in another place. / Leeds Times, July 11-8-1. [II; 991. (London Times, July, 1846.) "Oldham.—Singular Storm." Leeds Times, July 11, 1846, p. 8 c. 1.]


1846 July 5 / Tremendous migration of Painted Lady, at Dover. Supposed from Calais. / LT, 1879, Aug 15-12-4. [II; 992. Morris, Francis Orpen. "The 'Painted-Lady' Butterfly." London Times, August 15, 1879,  p. 12 c. 4. Morris, Francis Orpen. A History of British Butterflies. London: Groombridge, 1853, 21. The butterflies migrating in 1846 were the small white, (not the painted lady).]


1846 July 5 / From France to Dover—vast swarms of painted lady butterflies / L.T., Aug 15, 1879 / Darkening the air and / after them, an hour or so, a gale from their direction. [II; 993. Morris, Francis Orpen. "The 'Painted-Lady' Butterfly." London Times, August 15, 1879,  p. 12 c. 4. Morris, Francis Orpen. A History of British Butterflies. London: Groombridge, 1853, 21. The butterflies migrating in 1846 were the small white, (not the painted lady).]


1846 July 7 / Invasion of coast of Kent, by white butterflies. / Zoologist, 4-1443. [II; 994. "Extraordinary Flight of Butterflies." Zoologist, 4 (1846): 1443. "Extraordinary Flight of Butterflies." Canterbury Journal, Kentish Times and Farmers' Gazette, July 11, 1846, p. 3 c. 5. "Such was the density and extent of the cloud formed by the living mass, that it completely obscured the sun from the people on board our continental steamers, on their passage, for many hundreds of yards, while the insects strewed the decks in all directions." "New Romney." Kentish Gazette, July 14, 1846, p. 3 c. 2. "Swarms of white butterflies are now to be seen in every direction. From an account in the Dover Telegraph, it appears that a flight of them was seen over the seas a few days since having the appearance of a snow cloud." "Extraordinary Flight of Butterflies." Taunton Courier and Western Advertiser, July 15, 1846, p. 3 c. 4.]


1846 July 9 / Extraordinary flight of butterflies across the Channel from France to England—a cloud of them that obscured the sun. / An. Reg. [II; 995. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 88 (1846): pt. 2, 1-204, at 105, cv. "Extraordinary Flight of Butterflies."]


1846 July 12 / Paris / 10:15 p.m. / Meteor / BA 60. [II; 996. Greg, 84.]


1846 July 13 / Between Cologne and Ostend, prodigious numbers of butterflies of the Pontia rapae. / Gardeners' Chronicle, Aug 1. [II; 997. "Butterflies." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1846 no. 31 (August 1): 517.]


1846 July 13 / 9:30 p.m. / Va., Del., N.J., N.Y., Conn / great met / full details in Am. J. Sci 2/41/347. [II; 998. Kirkwood, Daniel. "On the Meteoric Fireball of July 13th, 1846." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 41 (1866): 347-351.]


1846 July 17 / [LT, 8-d / Spon. Comb. [A; 209. "Spontaneous Combustion." London Times, July 17, 1846, p. 8 c. 4.]


1846 July 18 / Leeds Times of / A black swan and an African horned owl shot in dif. parts of England. Also a great flight of butterflies over the Channel. An hour after their arrival in England, though it was calm when they came, came a great gale in the direction they travelled in. [II; 999.1, 999.2. "A Black Swan Shot." Leeds Times, July 18, 1846, p. 6 c. 5. "Remarkable Occurrence." Leeds Times, July 18, 1846, p. 5 c. 2. The "great horned or eagle owl" was captured, (not shot). "Extraordinary Flight of Butterflies." Leeds Times, July 18, 1846, p. 8 c. 4.]


1846 July 23 / Bolide at Toulouse / C.R. 25-259. [II; 1000. Petit, Frédéric. "Sur le bolide du 23 juillet 1846." Comptes Rendus, 25 (1847): 259-262. Petit thought that this bolide was the same one observed on January 5, 1837, (I; 2163 and 2164), and on March 21, 1846, (II; 935), and, that it was in orbit about the earth. Lowe, 136. "M. Pettit, of Toulouse, states that he has identified a meteor which is 3000 miles distant from the earth, and which revolves around our globe in 3h. 20m." Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1848, 1-11, at 3, cv. 1846, July 23. Greg, 84. The next time that Petit's meteoric "Moon" was observed was when it interfered with the trajectory of the spaceship in a science fiction novel. Verne, Jules.  Autour de la Lune. Paris: Hertzel, 1872, 19. Impey Barbicane says: "Oui, mon ami, deux Lunes, bien qu’elle passe généralement pour n’en posséder qu’une. Mais cette seconde Lune est si petite et sa vitesse est si grande, que les habitants de la Terre ne peuvent l’apercevoir. C’est en tenant compte de certaines perturbations qu’un astronome français, M. Petit, a su déterminer l’existence de ce second satellite et en calculer les éléments. D’après ses observations, ce bolide accomplirait sa révolution autour de la Terre en trois heures vingt minutes seulement, ce qui implique une vitesse prodigieuse."]


1846 July 25 / Gardeners' Chronicle of / Black swan shot on the river Eden, near Niddie Mill. Believed to be the only occurrence in Great Britain. [II; 1001. "Black Swan." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1846 no. 30 (July 25): 503.]


1846 July 25 / B. swan / Chronicle, Aug 1, said should be Niddie Mill. Cor had written believed it was an escaped black swan—said that on a previous evening it been seen on river near Clayton, "perfectly tame". [II; 1002. "Black Swan." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1846 no. 31 (August 1): 518.]


1846 July 25 / [LT], 5-3 / Many meteors /// 181 / 646. [II; 1003. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, July 25, 1846, p. 5 c. 5.]


1846 July 25 / (Ch) / (Cut) / Gloucester / Opening cloud—thing size of moon falls and returns to cloud. / Brit Assoc 1852/188 / C-29+. [II; 1004. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 188. "According to her account, it seemed as though it proceeded downwards from an opening cloud, and was instantly withdrawn into the cloud again; but probably this retrograde motion may have been a deception." Lowe, 136. Greg, 84. See: (Notes for "C-29+").]


1846 July 29 / q. / Bel / C. et. T 8/38. [II; 1005. Lancaster, Albert Benoît Marie. "Les Tremblements de terre en Belgique." Ciel et Terre, 8 (March 16, 1887): 25-43, at 38.]


1846 Aug 1 / N.M. / Great hail / London / Symons' Met M. 12-82. [II; 1006. Symons, George James. "Hailstorm in North London." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 12 (July 1877): 82-83.]


1846 Aug 1 / One of the most terrific th. storms in Kent, England. / Galignani's Messenger, May 7-3-3, 1849. [II; 1007. "Tremendous Thunder and Hail Storm." Galignani's Messenger, May 7, 1849, p. 3 c. 3.]


1846 Aug 1 / Day of tremendous th storm in London and other parts of England / a tidal wave several feet high at Penzance, Cornwall / D. News—Sept 10. [II; 1008. "Extraordinary Agitation of the Sea." London Daily News, September 10, 1846, p. 3 c. 4.]


1846 Aug 3 to Sept / q's / China / 7-9, 14—Italy / 17—Switzerland / 18—Siberia / q's / BA '11. [II; 1009. Milne, 708.]


1846 Aug 3—to Sept / China / q's / 7-9—Italy / 14—Italy / 17—Switzerland / 18—Siberia / q's / BA '11 / Sim q's / Feb. 18, 1889. [II; 1010. Milne, 708.]


1846 Aug 10 / Few mets / at Dijon / 14 in one hour / BA 47-16. [II; 1011. Powell, Baden. "On Periodic Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 15-16, at 16.]


1846 Aug 10 / 5 p.m. / Met. iron / Co. Down, Ireland / A. J. Sci 2/11/37. [II; 1012. Shepard, Charles Upham. "On Meteorites." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 11 (1851): 36-40, at 37. Greg, 84.]


1846 Aug 12, 13 / Sept 12, 19 / Oct 24, 28 // It / Sounds / Sound phe / Italy / See 1816. [II; 1013. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 37. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


[1846 Aug 13. Wrong date. See: 1846 Sept. 13, (II; 1014).]


1846 Aug 14 / q—Italy / BA '11. [II; 1015. Milne, 708.]


1846 Aug 14 / Leghorn / qs to 21st / D. News, Sept. 1 // At Pisa before the q., heat was suffocating. / D. News-Sept.4. [II; 1016. "The Earthquake at Pisa." London Daily News, September 4, 1846, p. 2 c. 5.]


1846 Aug 14 / q. / Tuscany / preceded by suffocating heat / details of q. in Niles Nat Register, Oct. 3. [II; 1017. "The Earthquake in Italy." Niles' Weekly Register, 71 (October 3, 1846): 68-69. "I felt a suffocating heat, accompanied by an inexpressibly painful sensation. I attributed this phenomenon to the air of Pisa, which is heavy for my constitution, and which made me say several times to the keeper of the museum, 'The air of Pisa is on fire to day.' Never prophecy was more suddenly realized."]


1846 Aug 14 / 12:50 p.m. / q. / Leghorn. / boiling water cast up from earth / "There was a thick haze, which did not fail to make a sinister impression." / D. News, 25th. [II; 1018. "Italy.—Earthquake in Tuscany." London Daily News, August 25, 1846, p. 3 c. 4.]


1846 Aug 14 / q in Tuscany / had been preceded by a great drought all summer. C.R. 23/476 / 468 / especially in Naples and Tuscany. [II; 1019. "Extrait d'une Lettre de M. L. Pilla à M. Arago, sur le tremblement de terre qui vient de bouleverser une partie de la Toscane." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 468-477.]


1846 Aug, Sept / Many locusts in England / Zoologist 5/1678. [II; 1020. Sherwood, William. "Occurrence of the Locust near Hull." Zoologist, 5 (1847): 1678. "Locusts." Hull Packet, September 11, 1846, p. 5 c. 6. "Locusts." Hull Packet, September 25, 1846, p. 8 c. 5. (Mark Lane Express, September 14, October 12, 1846. Stirling Observer, 1846.) Bold, T.J. "Occurrence of the Locust at Newcastle-on-Tyne." Zoologist, 5 (1847): 1900. Bond, Frederick, "Occurrence of the Locust near York." Zoologist, 5 (1847): 1900. Rudd, T.S. "Occurrence of the Locust at Redcar." Zoologist, 5 (1847): 1900. Newman, Edward. "Reappearance of the Locust." Zoologist, 5 (1847): 1900-1901.]


1846 Aug 14 / The Red Sea volc / smoke from Zebayer Islands / Red Sea / Athenaeum 1846-1226. [II; 1021. "Volcano in the Red Sea." Athenaeum, 1846 (no. 996; November 28): 1226.]


1846 Aug 14 / 12:50 p.m. / Leghorn, Italy / disastrous shock / sky clear but a thick mist / L.T., Aug 25-5-e. [II; 1022. "The Late Earthquake at Leghorn." London Times, August 25, 1846, p. 5 c. 5.]


1846 Aug 14 / Men in mines felt no shock. / [LT, Sept 1-6-e / But fissures opened in the ground. [II; 1023. "The Late Earthquakes in Italy." London Times, September 1, 1846, p. 6 c. 5.]


1846 Aug 14 / Smoke from supposed extinct volc on Saddle Island, Red Sea, time of squally weather, thunder and lightning. / L.T., Sept. 23-3-d. [II; 1024. "Volcano in the Red Sea." London Times, September 23, 1846, p. 3 c. 4. There is no mention of an earthquake, only smoke from the summit of the island.]


1846 Aug. 14 / Cape Girardeau, Missouri / Met / (F). [II; 1025. Fletcher, 101. This is the Cape Girardeau meteorite.]


1846 Aug. 14 / It / Pisan Hills / great q / [BA '11. [II; 1026. Milne, 708.]


1846 Aug. 17 / Dijon / N.W. to S.E. / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1027. Greg, 84.]


1846 Aug 18 / Irkutsk / q / BA '11. [II; 1028. Milne, 708.]


1846 Aug 24 / Aurora / brilliant / Boston, Mass / D. News—Sept. 16. [II; 1029.  "Earthquake." London Daily News, September 16, 1846, p. 2 c. 5.]


1846 Aug 24 / Dordogne / E to W / great met. / BA 60. [II; 1030. Greg, 84.]


1846 Aug / great q's. in China / [BA] ' 11. [II; 1031. Milne, 708.]


1846 Aug 25 / 5 a.m. / q / Mass. / Niles Nat Reg., Aug 29. [II; 1032. "Earthquake." Niles' Weekly Register, 70 (August 29, 1846): 416.]


1846 Aug 25 / 2:30 a.m. / Meteor / Dordogne / C.R. 23-549. [II; 1033. "Sur un météore lumineux." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 549-550.]


1846 Aug 26 / 4:55 a.m. / Boston and other parts Mass / q. / D. News, Sept 16. [II; 1034. "Earthquake." London Daily News, September 16, 1846, p. 2 c. 5.]


1846 Aug. 27 / 9:50 a.m. / Another damaging shock / Leghorn / D. News—Sept. 5. [II; 1035. "Leghorn." London Daily News, September 5, 1846, p. 2 c. 4.]


1846 Sept / About three pages of records of captures of locusts in various parts of England / Zoologist 4-1518. [II; 1036. (Numerous articles regarding locusts.) Zoologist,  4 (1846): 1518-1521.]


1846 Sept / About 20 captures of Vanessa antiopa (C. Beauty), various parts of England. / Zoologist 4-1506. [II; 1039. (Numerous articles regarding Vanessa Antiopa.) Zoologist, 4 (1846): 1505-1507.]


1846 Sept 1 / [LT], 6-b / Wild man of the prairies. [A; 210. "The Wild Man of the Prairies." London Times, September 1, 1846, p. 6 c. 2.]


1846 Sept 10 / D. News of / Russia? / Immense swarms of locusts in the districts of Cherson and Tauris. / D. News, Sept 10. [II; 1037. "A Plague of Locusts." London Daily News, September 10, 1846, p. 2 c. 6. "Accounts from different parts of the districts of Cherson and Tauris state that immense swarms of locusts had made their appearance, advancing like a mighty host, leaving devastation behind them, eating up the grass as they progressed without leaving a vestige of it behind." Kherson and the Taurida Governorate are in the Ukraine and Crimea.]


1846 Sept 12 / Gardeners' Chronicle of / Large flight of locusts over Hendon. Settled on hedges and attracted a crowd to watch them. [II; 1038. "A Large Flight of Locusts...." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1846 no. 37 (September 12): 615.]


[1846 Sept. 13 /] 1846 Aug 13 / 10:47 p.m. / Paris / meteor from B of Cygnus / C.R. 23-550. [II; 1014. "Sur une étoile filante observée à Paris le 13 septembre 1846, à 10h 47m." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 550.]


1846 Sept. 19 / Ap of Madonna, La Salette / France / L Times, 1873, Aug 22/3/[note crumbling]. [A; 211. "A French Pilgrimage." London Times, August 22, 1873, p. 3 c. 3-4.]


1846 Sept 23 / [LT], 3-d / Volc in Red Sea. [II; 1040. "Volcano in the Red Sea." London Times, September 23, 1846, p. 3 c. 4. See: 1846 Aug 14, (II; 1024).]


1846 Sept 25 / London, etc. / Met. det. / BA 60. [II; 1041. Greg, 84. Lowe, 136.]


1846 Sept 25 / 10 p.m. / London—meteor light so powerful like daylight / 30 seconds / D. News, 26th. [II; 1042. "Extraordinary Meteor." London Daily News, September 26, 1846, p. 3 c. 2. "Extraordinary Meteor." Athenaeum, 1846 (no. 988; October 3): 1023.]


1846 Sept 26 / Gardeners' Chronicle of / At Stowmarket, 4 specimens of Sphinx convolvuli, an exceedingly rare moth at Stowmarket. [II; 1043. "Rare Moths and Butterflies." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1846 no. 39 (September 26): 645-646.]


1846 Sept 27 / City in sky over Liverpool—supposed to be mirage of Edinburgh. There was at the time a panoramic mod[el] of City of Edinburgh and a party at Liverpool, perhaps suggesting the "identification". / Rept B. Assoc 1847/2/39. [II; 1044. Thomson, David Purdie. "On an extraordinary Mirage witnessed at Birkenhead in Cheshire." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1847, Notices and Abstracts, 39. "The author states that, during an exhibition of a panoramic model of Edinburgh, in the Zoological Gardens at Liverpool, on Sept. 27, 1846, about 3 P.M., an erect image of Edinburgh, depicted on the clouds over Liverpool, was seen by two residents in the Great Park at Birkenhead, for a period of forty minutes."]


1846 Oct / Russia / polt in pile of logs. [A; 212.]


[1846 Oct 1. Wrong date. See: 1846 Dec 1, (II; 1045).]


1846 Oct 9 / 8:05 p.m. / bolide at Dijon / C.R. 23/986. [I; 1046. "Globe lumineux observé à Dijon, dans la soirée du 9 novembre 1846." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 986.]


1846 Oct 9 / 8:45 p.m. / 10th,  8 p.m. / great mets at Ferté-sous-Jouarre / CR 23-718. [II; 1047. "M. Rigault adresse...." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 718.]


1846 Oct. 9 / 9 p.m. / Great detonating meteor at Chartres / C.R. 23-814 / and Troyes / Said that at Loiret, ab 10 p.m., great met. [II; 1048. Charles. "Sur le bolide du 9 octobre 1846." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 814-815.]


1846 Oct. 9 / Paris, Orleans, etc. / Met. det. / B.A. 60. [II; 1049. Greg, 84. Lowe, 136.]


1846 Oct. 9 / 9:15 p.m. / Paris / bolide size of moon / C.R. 23-718. [II; 1050. "M. Rigault adresse...." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 718.]


1846 Oct 10 / It / Sounds / Orciana (Toscana) / "subterranean rumblings" / See 1816. [II; 1051. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 39. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1846 Oct 11 / Destructive hurricane / Cuba / N.Y. Herald, Nov 23-2-3+. [II; 1052. "Intelligence from Cuba and Yucatan." New York Herald, November 23, 1846, p. 2 c. 3.]


1846 Oct 16-17 / Many birds with the dust storm. / C.R. 24-625. [II; 1053. "Notice sur une pluie de terre, tombée dans les départements de la Drôme, de l'Isère, du Rhône et de l'Ain, les 16 et 17 octobre 1846." Comptes Rendus, 24 (1847): 625-626.]


1846 Oct 16 and 17 / Southeastern France / Rain of organic substances./ Details in La Sci Pour Tous, 1-127. Came all at once, after an uninterrupted rain of several days—like drops of blood and decomposed like separation in a drop of blood of the serum from the red corpuscles. According to analysis by a chemist, it was earthy matter. [II; 1054.1, 1054.2. Lecouturier. "Substances Organiques Tombées de l'Atmosphere." La Science Pour Tous, 1 (no. 16; March 27, 1856): 127-128. Fournet, Joseph Jean Baptiste Xavier. "Sur les Pluies de Terre Observées Depuis Quel-ques Années dans le Bassin du Rhone." Mémoires de l'Académie des sciences, belles-lettres et arts de Lyon. Classe des Sciences, s. 2 v. 13 (1863): 185-245, at 188-192, 214.]


1846 Oct 16, 17 / Vast red rain and birds fell in streets. / France / D-239.** [II; 1055. The note copies information from page 239 of The Book of the Damned. Seignobos, Charles. "Sur une pluie colorée en rouge, observée dans le départment de l'Ardèche." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 832-833. Dupasquier, Alph. "Notice sur une pluie de terre, tombée dans les départements de la Drôme, de l'Isère, du Rhône et de l'Ain, les 16 et 17 octobre 1846." Comptes Rendus, 24 (1847): 625-626. Lewy. "Sur la pluie terreuse tombée dans la partie sud-est de la France, pendant les grands orages des 16 et 17 octobre 1846." Comptes Rendus, 24 (1847): 810-812. Lewy found 11.82 per cent organic matter in his sample; and, Dupasquier found 3.5 per cent organic matter in his sample from Meximieux, France. The observation given in this article upon the corpuscular matter was made by Decaisne, (not by Dupasquier).]


1846 Oct 16 and 17 / Fr / Drôme and Isere / fall of sand / C.R. 24-625, 810. [II; 1056. Dupasquier, Alph. "Notice sur une pluie de terre, tombée dans les départements de la Drôme, de l'Isère, du Rhône et de l'Ain, les 16 et 17 octobre 1846." Comptes Rendus, 24 (1847): 625-626. Lewy. "Sur la pluie terreuse tombée dans la partie sud-est de la France, pendant les grands orages des 16 et 17 octobre 1846." Comptes Rendus, 24 (1847): 810-812.]


1846 Oct 16, etc. / Nothing in Sydney Morning Herald. [II; 1057.]


1846 Oct 17—to Dec 17 / Mets uncommonly abundant at Whitehaven. The most remarkable were bet Oct 17 and 26, and on Nov. 10, 11, 12. [II; 1058. (Refs.???)]


1846 Oct 17 / (S) / At Bourg-Argental (Loire), at ab 11:30 a.m., a fog appeared suddenly. / C.R. 24-811/ Then a red substance in rain. To the touch it was oleaginous. It ceased at 12:30. At 2, fell again. / but other places not current. [II; 1059.1, 1059.2. Lewy. "Sur la pluie terreuse tombée dans la partie sud-est de la France, pendant les grands orages des 16 et 17 octobre 1846." Comptes Rendus, 24 (1847): 810-812.]


1846 Oct 17 / hot winds, etc. / Grenoble / Sky covered with brownish, dusty vapor all day. No rain, but blasts of hot wind with the thunder and lightning, like the sirocco (spell right?). Ab 1 p.m., th. storm of rain. Many water birds thrown into houses by the wind. Found morning of 18th. / Le Moniteur Universel 26-1-3. [II; 1060.1, 1060.2. (Moniteur Universal, 1846 Oct 26-1-3).]


1846 Oct 17 / Ab. 6:15 p.m., at Dijon, met size of Jupiter / C.R. 23-985. [ II; 1061. Perrey, Alexis. "Note sur deux météores observées à Dijon." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 985-986.]


1846 Oct 17 / At Ardeche, reddish matter unlike soil there. / C.R. 23-832 / Also at Isère. In all places, it was the color of blood—said had frightened many. Reported from Burgoin, Said was a ferruginous clay common to that region. [II; 1062. (Comptes Rendus 23-832). Fournet, Joseph Jean Baptiste Xavier. "Sur les Pluies de Terre Observées Depuis Quel-ques Années dans le Bassin du Rhone." Mémoires de l'Académie des sciences, belles-lettres et arts de Lyon. Classe des Sciences, s. 2 v. 13 (1863): 185-245, at 188-192.]


1846 Oct. 17 / Dijon / 6:15 p.m. / through sky covered with clouds / C.R. 23-985 / A great meteor. / Duration said been 5 to 8 minutes. / (verified) / at Hanau. [II; 1063. Perrey, Alexis. "Note sur deux météores observées à Dijon." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 985-986.]


1846 Oct 18 / 2 p.m. / smart shock / Calcutta / Friend of India, Oct. 22 // Severe at Mymensing, Bengal / F of I., Oct 29 / BA '11 = I [minor shock]. [II; 1064. "Monday, October 19." Friend of India, October 22, 1846, p. 676. "The following account of earthquakes which have been felt at Mymensing...." Friend of India, October 29, 1846, p. 693. Milne, 708.]


1846 Oct 17 / (Ardèche) / Isère / several places, rain reddish earth / C.R. 23/832 // Southeast France / 24/625, 810, 822. [II; 1065. Seignobos, Charles. "Sur une pluie colorée en rouge, observée dans le départment de l'Ardèche." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 832-833. Dupasquier, Alph. "Notice sur une pluie de terre, tombée dans les départements de la Drôme, de l'Isère, du Rhône et de l'Ain, les 16 et 17 octobre 1846." Comptes Rendus, 24 (1847): 625-626. Lewy. "Sur la pluie terreuse tombée dans la partie sud-est de la France, pendant les grands orages des 16 et 17 octobre 1846." Comptes Rendus, 24 (1847): 810-812.]


1846 Oct 17-18 / night / Great storm along Loire. Bridge carried away. Many houses overthrown. / Le Moniteur Universel, Oct 20 / See 24th. [II; 1066. (Moniteur Universel, October 20, 1846).]


1846 Oct 17-18 / At Valence (Drôme?), tremendous thunderstorm, Considerable number of birds of different species driven into the town by the storm. Grives, macreuses, canards. / Le Mon,. Un. 27-2-1. [II; 1067. (Moniteur Universel, 1846 Oct 27-2-1.). Thrushes, scoters, ducks.]


1846 Oct. 19 / or about // At Bourgoin, a rain of substance colored like blood. Switzerland? Also at Granay, Le Verpillière and several other communes. Usual attempt to explain that probably in a water-spout from the ferrig (what for iron-like) soil around Bourgoin. / Le Moniteur Universel, Oct 26-1-3. [II; 1068.1, 1068.2. (Moniteur Universel, 1846 Oct 26-1-3).]


1846 Nov [11] / A / Am J Sci 2/3/126. [II; 1069. Aurora. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Observations on Shooting Stars, August 10, 1846." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 3 (1847): 126-127.]


1846 Nov. 3 / Deluges from previous rains and 2 shocks of quake / Algeria / D. News, 14th. [II; 1070. "Inundations in Algeria." London Daily News, November 14, 1846, p. 3 c. 6 & p. 4 c. 1.]


1846 Nov. 9 / 7:30 p.m. / Met. train / 15 minutes / Dijon. / C.R., 23-985. [II; 1071. Perrey, Alexis. "Note sur deux météores observées à Dijon." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 985-986.]


1846 Nov. 9 / 7:30 p.m. / Dijon / Meteor with intense light. / Report upon same or another met at Dijon for 8:05 p.m. / C.R., 23-986. [II; 1072. Perrey, Alexis. "Note sur deux météores observées à Dijon." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 985-986. "Globe lumineux observé à Dijon, dans la soirée du 9 novembre 1846." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 986. Greg, 84-85. Lowe, 136.]


1846 Nov 10-12 / Mets / See Oct 17. [II; 1073.]


[1846 Nov 11 /] 1846 / ab Nov 26 // Lowell / Mass (?) / Luminous object fell in sky. Fell "the most fetid jelly, about 4 feet in diameter, which weighed 442 lb." / LT, Dec. 18, 1846 / (See July 28, 1910.) [II; 1081. "Wonderful Meteor." London Times, December 18, 1846, p. 5 c. 1. This meteor allegedly fell at Lowville, Lewis County, New York, on the night of November 11, 1846. Greg, 84-85. Greg identified the location as Lowell, Massachusetts; but, the location was Lowville, Lewis County, New York. "A Wonderful Meteor." Scientific American, o.s., 2 (November 28, 1846): 79. "A Hoax." Northern State Journal, (Watertown, New York), December 2, 1846, p. 3 c. 7. "Some wag has given the editor of the New York Sun an account of a Meteor which fell at Lowville about the middle of last month. The story looks a little too 'moonish' for us to copy." "A few days ago...." Alexandria Gazette, December 22, 1846, p. 3. "A few days ago we published a paragraph from a New York paper giving an account of a wonderful meteor which appeared and fell near Lowville, in that state. The postmaster of that place has been written to, for further information and replies that the statement is a hoax. No such meteor was seen at all."  "Mr. Balicort" was identified as the postmaster. A search of the weekly Northern Journal, (published in Lowville, New York), between November 12 and December 31, 1846, failed to find any news about this meteor. See: (1910 July 28).]  


[1846 Nov 11 /] 1846 Nov 25 / Lowell—obj seen coming as a meteor seemed larger than the sun. Names given in Times are Bostic, Dayer, Balicort, Collins. [II; 1077. "Wonderful Meteor." London Times, December 18, 1846, p. 5 c. 1. This meteor allegedly fell at Lowville, Lewis County, New York, (not at Lowell, Massachusetts).]


1846 Nov. 19, etc. / Nothing in N.Y. Herald. [II; 1074.]


1846 Nov 19 / Novas / M. Jelenski saw, at Avranches, a luminous point in Cassiopeia about the magnitude of Sirius. / C.R. 23-986 / The diameter increased (accroître) but the light diminished. Visible 20 minutes. // At same point in Cas. [II; 1075. "M. Jelenski écrit d'Avranches que, dans la soirée du 19 novembre...." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 986. Greg, 84-85. Greg records the "luminous streak" as a meteor and questions if the date was November 9. See: 1846 Nov. 9, (II; 1072).]


1846 Nov. 23 / [New York Herald]. 2-4—Girl in Wrenham, Mass., sent to jail for attempting to pass herself off upon her employer, a physician, as possessing supernatural powers. [A; 213. "Varieties." New York Herald, November 23, 1846, p. 2 c. 4.]


1846 Nov. 24 / A little before midnight of 24th / Comrie / at Crieff / q / LT, Dec 1-6-f. [II; 1076. "Violent Shock of Earthquake." London Times, December 1, 1846, p. 6 c. 6. Comrie is not mentioned, (only that the shock was felt "here," at Perth, in Perthshire).]


[1846 Nov 25. Wrong date. See: 1846 Nov 11, (II; 1077).]


1846 Nov. 26 / Mrs. Adam's father's name was Joel Powers. / Nature 84-106. [II; 1078. Schlesinger, Frank. "Pwdre Ser." Nature, 84 (July 28, 1910): 105-106. "One evening some years since my father, Mr. Joel Powers, while walking on Lawrence St., Lowell, Massachusetts, saw a brilliant shooting star or meteor flash downward through the atmosphere, striking the earth quite near him. He found it upon investigation to be a jelly-like mass, and almost intolerably offensive in smell." As the location of the fall was given as Lowell, (not Lowville, New York), Powers was obviously not a witness to the gelatinous meteor reported by the Scientific American, London Times, and a few American newspapers, in 1846. See: 1846 Nov 11, (II; 1081).]


1846 Nov. 26 / New volcano in Chile, 30 leagues from alca. / BA 50-82. [II; 1079. Hamilton, Mathie. "Brief Notices of Earthquakes in South America in 1844, 1845, 1846 and 1847." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, Notices and Abstracts, 82-83. The Cerro Azul volcano.]


1846 Nov. 26 / Lowell / Substance / See July 28, 1910. [II; 1080. See: 1846 Nov. 26, (II; 1078).]


[1846 / ab Nov 26. Wrong date. See: 1846 Nov 11, (II; 1081).]


1846 Nov. 26 / Great gale / New England / N.Y. Trib / blizzard. [II; 1082. (New York Tribune 1846 Nov., abt. 26, not found Nov. 26-29).]


[1846 Dec 1 /] 1846 Oct 1 / [LT], 6-f / Comrie / violent. [II; 1045. "Violent Shock of an Earthquake." London Times, December 1, 1846, p. 6 c. 6.]


1846 Dec 11 / [LT], 2-e / Singular delusions. [A; 215. "Singular Delusion." London Times, December 11, 1846, p. 2 c. 5.]


1846 Dec 5 / [LT], 8-e / 10-6-b / 9-5-f / Dif incend. fires. [A; 214. "Incendiary Fire." London Times, December 5, 1846, p. 8 c. 5. "Incendiary Fire." London Times, December 9, 1846, p. 5. c. 6. "The Incendiary Fire at Bottisham." London Times, December 10, 1846, p. 6 c. 2.]


1846 (Dec 5) / Metite / Gergenti, in Sicily / Le Moniteur, p. 2744 / P.P. 9431. [II; 1083. (Moniteur Universel, 1846-2744). Shelfmark.]


1846 Dec 5 / Girgenti, Sicily / At least says "il y a quinze jours". / See Feb. 10, 1853. / Not said was found. / Moniteur Universel, Dec. 14 / Aerolite had fallen. A yellowish cloud marked the place of explosion in the sky. [II; 1084. (Moniteur Universel, Dec. 14, 1846). See: 1853 Feb 10, (II; 1684).]


1846 Dec 12 / Whirl on land and pillar of fire seen at sea. / L.T., Feb 19/1847, 3-f / Edin N. P. J 45/111 / B Assoc 18/41 / See Feb 19. [II; 1085. "Whirlwinds near the Land's-End." London Times, February 19, 1847, p. 3 c. 6. "An account of four Whirlwinds which passed through St Just on the 12th of December 1846." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 45 (1848): 111-112. Sykes, William Henry. "On Atmospheric Disturbances, and on a remarkable Storm at Bombay on the 6th of April 1848." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1848, Notices and Abstracts, 41-47, at 41-42. See: 1847 Feb 19, (II; 1098).]


1846 Dec 21 / (It) / morning / Remarkable met / Parma / B.A. 60-84. [II; 1086. Greg, 85. Lowe, 136.]


1846 Dec 24 / q. / Java / BA 11. [II; 1087. Milne, 708.]


1846 Dec 25 / (F) / Minderthal, Bavaria / Metite / BA 60-84. [II; 1088. Fletcher, 101. This is the Schönenberg meteorite. Greg, 85.]


1847:


1847 // Rain of frogs / Cahors / L'Astro 6-273 / Had been another, ab. 1818. [II; 1089. "Pluie de soufre." Astronomie, 6 (1887): 272-274, at 273. "Nous rappellerons, à cette occasion, qu'une pluie de crapauds a eu lieu à Cahors en 1847 et vers 1818."]


1847/48 // Scotscraig, near Tayport / Charles R. Baxter, in Glascow Herald, July 21, 1894 / small frogs fell / ground covered with / fell on his clothes / NQ 8/6/104. [II; 1090. Wallace, R. Hedger. "A Shower of Frogs." Notes and Queries, s. 8 v. 6 (August 11, 1894): 104-105, at 105. Baxter, Charles R. "A Shower of Frogs." Glascow Herald, July 21, 1894, p. 11 c. 1.]


1847 Jan 8, 11, Feb 2, 14, 19, 21, Ap. 1, June 9, Aug 8 / qs / New England / See Nov 9, 1810. [II; 1091. Brigham, William T. "Volcanic Manifestations in New England." Memoirs Read Before the Boston Society of Natural History, 2 (1871/1878): 1-28, at 18-19. See: 1810 Nov 9, (I; 308).]


1847 Jan. 10 / Vienna / met train / 10 minutes / BA 60-17. [II; 1092. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1859-60." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1860, 1-27, at 17. Greg, 85.]


[1847 Jan 14. Wrong date. See: 1849 Jan 14, (II; 1093).]


1847 Jan 19 / Severe q / Copiapo / BA 50-82. [II; 1094. Hamilton, Mathie. "Brief Notices of Earthquakes in South America in 1844, 1845, 1846 and 1847." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, Notices and Abstracts, 82-83.]


1847 Jan 25 / Fr / Lucon (Vendée) / q / BA '11. [II; 1095. Milne, 708.]


1847 Jan 30 / In the Eifel, mountains near Blankenheim, Bavaria, larvae fell with snow. / Revue et Mag. Zoologie. 1849/75 / B.D.-93). [II; 1096. The note copies information from page 93 of The Book of the Damned. Tyzenhauz, Konstanty. "Notice sur une pluie d'insectes observeé en Lithuanie le 24 janvier 1849." Revue et Magasin de Zoologie, s. 2 v. 1 (February 1849): 72-76, at 74-75. "Raupenfall mit Schnee in der Eifel am 30. Jan. 1847." Allgemeine Deutsche Naturhistorische Zeitung, 2 (1847): 176-177.]


1847 Feb 7 / Volc Java / severe q—Ap. 8 / A. J. Sci 2/5/422 / In March, a mountain sank in a q. [II; 1097. "Earthquake and Eruption in Ternate." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 5 (1848): 422-423. The Gamalama volcano. "Falling in of a Mountain in Timor." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 5 (1848): 423.]


1847 Feb 19 / [LT], 3-f / Whirlwinds / Land's End. [II; 1098. "Whirlwinds near the Land's-End." London Times, February 19, 1847, p. 3 c. 6.]


1847 Feb. 25 / afternoon / Seen in full sunshine, a flash of light all over the State of Iowa. Detonations shook houses. 20 miles north of Iowa City, fell a stone weighing 48 pounds. / BA 1877-102. [II; 1099. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 102-103. This is the Marion meteorite.]


1847 Feb 25 / (F) / Hartford, Linn. Co., Iowa / Metite / Sc Am 62/386 // Afternoon.—BA 77-102 // 2:50 p.m. / A/ J/ Sci 2/4/288. [II; 1100. Fletcher, 101. This is the Marion meteorite. Greg, 85. "The Winnebago County (Iowa) Meteorites." Scientific American, n.s., 62 (June 21, 1890): 386. Shepard, Charles Upham. "Fall of Meteoric Stones in Iowa." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 4 (1847): 288-289. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, George Forbes, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke, Walter Flight. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors during the year 1876-77." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1877, 98-193, at 102-103.]


1847 Feb 25 / [LT], 5-d / Incredible story. [A; 216. "An Incredible Story." London Times, February 25, 1847, p. 5 c. 4.]


1847 March 19 / Holloway / an ascending thing like a fire balloon, but brilliant, etc. / Brit Assoc 1852/188 / See for dets. / (N). [II; 1101. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 188.]


1847 Mar. 19 / Aberdeenshire / Met. det. / BA 60. [II; 1102. Greg, 85.]


1847 March 30 / Comet 1847 (i) visible at noon. / Chambers, Story of the Comet, p. 8. [II; 1103. Chambers, George Frederick. The Story of the Comets.... Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1909, 8, (Figure 8). Comet Hind, (C/1847 C1), was discovered by John Russell Hind on February 6, 1847.]


1847 March 31 / bet 10 and 11 a.m. / Valley of Deffereggen (Tyrol) / q—red rain / Tissandier, Les Poussierés de l'air, p. 72. [II; 1104. Tissandier, Gaston. Les Poussièrés de l'Air. Paris: Gauthier-Villars, 1877, 72. Neither Tissandier nor Oellacher mention any quake associated with this red snow.]


1847 March 31 / Meteor dust in Tyrol / Report Pharm., Neurnb. 1848-212. [II; 1105. Oellacher, Joseph. "Der rothe Meteorstaub, welcher mit Schnee am 31. März 1847 im Puster-thale in Tyrol gefallen ist, chemisch untersucht und mit einem afrikanischen Wustensande verglichen." Repertorium für die Pharmacie..., 98 (1848): 212-225.]


1847 March 31 / Red snow / Puster Valley, in the Tyrol / A.J. Sci 2/11/377. [II; 1106. Ehrenberg, Christian Gottfried. "On the Infusoria and other Microscopic forms in Dust-showers and Blood-rain." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 11 (1851): 372-389, at 377-378.]


1847 March 31 / Milky or clayey substance in rain at Chambery / R—May 16, '46. [II; 1107. Fournet, Joseph Jean Baptiste Xavier. "Sur les Pluies de Terre Observées Depuis Quel-ques Années dans le Bassin du Rhone." Mémoires de l'Académie des sciences, belles-lettres et arts de Lyon. Classe des Sciences, s. 2 v. 13 (1863): 185-245, at 192-194, 214. Refer to: 1846 May 16, (II; 962).]


1847 March 31 / Valley of Gastein, in Salzburg / Meteoric dust / A.J. Sci 2/11/380. [II; 1108. Ehrenberg, Christian Gottfried. "On the Infusoria and other Microscopic forms in Dust-showers and Blood-rain." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 11 (1851): 372-389, at 380.]


1847 Ap. 1-8 / ab. // Volc / island of Fogo (Cape Verde Islands) / A.J. Sci 2/4/146 / Violent detonations. [II; 1109. "Volcanic Eruption at the Cape Verde." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 4 (1847): 146.]


1847 Ap. 7 / Auroral belt / Am J. Sci 2/3/440 / 2/4/145. [II; 1110. "Auroral Belt." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 3 (1847): 440. "Auroral Belt of April 7, 1847." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 4 (1847): 145.]


1847 Ap. 7 / A / Am J. Sci 2/3/440 / [2]/4/145 / [2]/7/126. [II; 1111. "Auroral Belt." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 3 (1847): 440. "Auroral Belt of April 7, 1847." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 4 (1847): 145. "Auroral Bow of April 7, 1847. American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 7 (1849): 126.]


1847 Ap. 7 / [LT], 3-d / Singular discoveries—Ipswich. [A; 217. "Singular Discoveries." London Times, April 7, 1847, p. 3 c. 4.]


1847 Ap. 9 / Violent eruption of volc / Fogo, Cape Verde islands / Niles Nat Reg, Aug 28. [II; 1112. "Africa." Niles' Weekly Register, 72 (August 28, 1847): 407. The Fogo volcano.]


1847 April 5 / 10 a.m. / At Dumfries, shower of flies, darkened the sky. Covered a road 600 to 700 yards long. / M. Post, 7th, last page. [II; 1113. "More Flies." London Morning Post, April 7, 1847, p. 4 c. 5.]


1847 May 11 / See May 11, 1842. / Dumfries / dress lying in a garden—whisked up nearly out of sight but dropped 1/2 mile away / Thomson, Intro to Meteorology, p. 403. [II; 1114. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 403.]


[1847 / night, May 15-16. Wrong date. See: 1846 May 15-16, (II; 1115).]


1847 May 24 / 3 a.m. / Submarine q and tidal wave off coast of Peru. / BA 50-82. [II; 1116. Hamilton, Mathie. "Brief Notices of Earthquakes in South America in 1844, 1845, 1846 and 1847." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, Notices and Abstracts, 82-83.]


1847 June 8 / 9:50 a.m. / Boston, etc. Mass / shock / Niles' Nat Reg, Aug 21. [II; 1117. "An Earthquake, was distinctly felt at Boston...." Niles' Weekly Register, 72 (August 21, 1847): 386.]


[1847 June 9. Wrong date. See: 1846 June 9, (II; 1118).]


1847 June 13 / Spon Com. / Countess Gorlitz. [A; 218.]


1847 June 17-22 / (It) / Parma / many meteors / July 4, 5, 29th, exceptional met / July 4, 5—many / BA 49/9 / 22, 23—many. [II; 1120. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 9.]


[1847 June 21. Meteor. Highfield House. "Increased in brightness when crossing Aurora." Lowe, 136.]


1847 June 28 / Severe q. / Ica, Peru / BA 50-83. [II; 1121. Hamilton, Mathie. "Brief Notices of Earthquakes in South America in 1844, 1845, 1846 and 1847." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, Notices and Abstracts, 82-83. Milne, 708.]


1847 June 30 / in Senegal / Remarkable red glow at sunset. / C.R. 41-116. [II; 1122. (Comptes Rendus 41-116).]


1847 / last of June // (D-192) / Vulcan / Scott and Wray / C.R. / 83. [II; 1119. The note copies information from page 192 of The Book of the Damned. Hind, John Russell. "The Intra-Mercurial Planet or Planets." Nature, 14 (September 28, 1876): 469-470. LeVerrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. "Examen des observations qu'on a présentées, à diverses époques, comme pouvant appartenir aux passages d'une planète intra-mercurielle devant le disque du Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 83 (September 18, 1876): 583-589, 621-624, 647-650, 719-723, at 622. Both Scott and Wray stated that the date of their observations were made at the end of June or early in July, in 1847.]


1847 July 10 / 10:50 p.m. / Fécamp / shock—sound noticed most in upper parts of buildings / CR 25/84. [II; 1123. Marchand. "Tremblement de terre ressenti à Fécamp, le 10 juillet 1847." Comptes Rendus, 25 (1847): 84.]


1847 July 12 / [LT] 6-d / Remarkable hailstorm / N. S. Wales. [II; 1124. "Remarkable Hail Storm." London Times, July 12, 1847, p. 6 c.4. "Remarkable Hail Storm." Sydney Morning Herald, February 10, 1847, p. 2 c. 7.]


1847 July 14 / (F) / Braunau, Bohemia / A. J. Sci 2/5/285 / Met iron. [II; 1125. "Meteorite of July 14, 1847." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 5 (1848): 285. Fletcher, 68. This is the Braunau meteorite. Greg, 85.]


1847 July 22 / (Fr) / [LT], 8-e / q. / Havre. [II; 1126. "Earthquake at Havre." London Times, July 22, 1847, p. 8 c. 5.]


1847 July 25 / 1 p.m. / Morecombe Bay / Waterspout / LT, Aug 6-6-e. [II; 1127. "Waterspout in Morecombe Bay." London Times, August 6, 1847, p. 6 c. 5.]


1847 July 25 / (It) / Near Florence / great met / BA 61/37. [II; 1128. Glaisher, James, and, John Hall Gladstone, Robert Philips Greg, Edward Joseph Lowe. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1860-61." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1861, 1-44, at 37.]


1847 // summer /// Loch Foyle / 1848 case (?) / mirage troops, etc. / B. Assoc 1852/30. [II; 1129. M'Farland, M. "On the Fata Morgana of Ireland." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1855, Notices and Abstracts, 29-30, at 30. See: 1848 Sept 9th, (II; 1232).]


1847 // summer /// (M) / Flammarion, "The Atmosphere," p. 160, tells story by M. Grellois—that he was travelling between Ghlema and Bonn. To the east of Bonn he saw upon a gently sloping hill "a vast and beautiful city, adorned with monuments, domes and steeples." There was no resemblance to any city known to the travellers. [II; 1130.1, 1130.2. Flammarion, Camille. The Atmosphere. London: S. Low, Marston, Low, & Searle, 1873, 160.]


1847 Aug 2 / (etc.) /// Vesuvius / D. News, 23rd. [II; 1131. "Italy.—Naples. Aug. 7." London Daily News, August 23, 1847, p. 2 c. 3.]


1847 Aug 9 / (ladybirds) / First seen, ac to An Reg 1847-102. [II; 1132. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 89 (1847): pt. 2, 1-168, at 102, cv. "Flight of Ladybirds."]


1847 Aug 11 / Near Madrid, enormous hailstones, "several weighing half a pound," killing oxen and sheep. / Morning Post, Aug 19. [II; 1133. "The neighbourhood of Alcobendas...." London Morning Post, August 19, 1847, p. 2 c. 4.]


1847 Aug 12 / evening / L.T., Aug 16—a long black cloud seen over the Channel—like smoke from a steamship—from Ramsgate, seemed several miles long—ladybirds dotted all things—from one pier, 5 bushels swept up. Covered the Kentish coast—at least 5 species. / An. Reg. '47-102 says had been a strong wind from the southwest. / See Aug 13, '69. [II; 1134.1, 1134.2. "Singular Phenomenon.—Ramsgate." London Times, August 16, 1847, p. 8 c. 4. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 89 (1847): pt. 2, 1-168, at 102, cv. "Flight of Ladybirds."]


1847 Aug 12 / L. B. / No mention in Annales Ent Socs of France. [II; 1135.]


1847 Aug 12 (1) / ladybirds / Zoologist 5/1899 / At Ramsgate and Margate—a long cloud observed by hundred of spectators coming from direction of Calais and Ostend, between 4 and 6 o'clock. [II; 1136. "Extraordinary Flight of Coccinellæ." Zoologist , 5 (1847): 1899. "Singular Phenomenon.—Ramsgate." London Times, August 16, 1847, p. 8 c. 4. Pabst combined "II; 1136" and "II; 1142" into one Note, in Pursuit.]


1847 Aug 12 (2) / Thursday evening a great deal of excitement. About ten, it precipitated ladybirds. In the morning, the whole coastline covered with them. "The locality whence they first took flight remains at present unknown. [II; 1142. "Extraordinary Flight of Coccinellæ." Zoologist , 5 (1847): 1899. Pabst combined "II; 1136" and "II; 1142" into one Note, in Pursuit.]


[1847 Aug 13 /] 1840 / ab Aug // lb's / Brighton / D. News / Aug 17, 1847. [II; 197. "Extraordinary Flight of Insects." London Daily News, August 16, 1847, p. 3 c. 5. "On Friday" would indicate August 13, 1847, as the date of this phenomenon. "They consisted of at least five species of lady-bird...."]


1847 August 16, etc. / Times index, for ladybirds. [II; 1137. Only two articles are in Palmer's Index, regarding this subject: "Singular Phenomenon.—Ramsgate." London Times, August 16, 1847, p. 8 c. 4. "Ladybirds in Southend." London Times, August 18, 1847, p. 5 c. 6.]


1847 Aug 12 / bet. 4 and 6 p.m. / Ramsgate and Margate—a long cloud, several miles in extent, coming from the direction of Calais—the L.B.'s / LT 16-8-d. [II; 1138. "Singular Phenomenon.—Ramsgate." London Times, August 16, 1847, p. 8 c. 4.]


1847 Aug / L.B.'s / Dome of St. Paul's reddened by them. / Field, Sept 4, 1869—p. 193. [II; 1139. (Field, Sept 4, 1869, p. 193.)]


1847 Aug 13 / L b—dome St. Paul's / Every quarter hour when bell struck St. Paul's a volcanic flow of them. [II; 1140.]


1847 Aug 13 / Nothing ab L.B. in Jour des Debats. [II; 1141.]


1847 Aug 14 / morn / L b's in dense numbers—at least 5 species seen next morning, [1]4th, at Southend. From the Margate pier about 5 bushels were swept. [II; 1143.]


1847 Aug. 13 / Whole coast around Southend visited by swarms of ladybirds. Dense numbers for miles. / D. News—16th // of the 17th—a peculiarity noted. Some of them were "of very large size". Said that at Brighton been similar invasions ab 1840 and in 1844—said the whole coast of Essex covered with them. [II; 1144.1, 1144.2. "Extraordinary Flight of Insects." London Daily News, August 16, 1847, p. 3 c. 5. (London Daily News, August 17, 1847).]


1847 Aug 13-Sept 1 / Have Standard. [II; 1145.]


[1847 Aug 15 /] 1847 Sept ? / (with Venus) / (Cut) / Sci Am, Oct 23, 1847 / That short time before, at Paris—thing like comet—small, brilliant head and a tail fifteen to twenty degrees long—duration about 30 seconds. [II; 1146. "Curious Celestial Phenomenon." Scientific American, o.s., 3 (October 23, 1847): 35. See: 1847 Aug 15, (II; 1147).]


1847 Aug 15 / At Paris / evening—for ab. 30 seconds—object like a comet, with a tail ab 15 or 20 degrees long and very narrow. / D. News, 20th. [II; 1147. "France.—Curious Celestial Phenomenon." London Daily News, August 20, 1847, p. 2 c. 3. With the exception of  "Sunday evening" at 8:40 P.M., this meteor resembles that observed on August 17 at 8:30 P.M., by Darlu, for 8 seconds with a luminous train that was 10 to 12 ° in length, and by Léon-Michel Desdouits, in Luxemburg. "Lettre de M. Darlu à M. Arago sur les aérolithes du 19 et du 17 août." Comptes Rendus, 25 (1847): 463-464. Desdouits, Léon-Michel. "Sur le météore du 17 août." Comptes Rendus, 25 (1847): 508.]


1847 Aug 18 / At Gy (Doubs), storm and fall of such masses of water that houses were thrown down and furniture and goods from stores carried away in torrents. Morn. Post, 26th. [II; 1148. "On the 18th a violent storm burst over the town of Gy (Doubs)...." London Morning Post, August 26, 1847, p. 2 c. 4.]


1847 Aug 19 / See 15th. / Met streak / Paris / BA '60-86. [II; 1149. Greg, 86.]


1847 Aug 19, Oct 18, Nov 16, 19, Dec 8, 11 / (Fr) / Bolides / Paris / BA 60-86. [II; 1150. Greg, 86.]


[1857 Sept ?. Wrong date. See: 1847 Aug 15, (I; 1146).]


1847 Sept. 10 / Rain falling all day at Tacna, Peru—this rare. At 3 a.m. of 11th, violent q. Rain continued. / BA 50-83. [II; 1151. Hamilton, Mathie. "Brief Notices of Earthquakes in South America in 1844, 1845, 1846 and 1847." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, Notices and Abstracts, 82-83.]


1847 Sept. 11 / Helsingborg, Sweden / great q. / [BA '11. [II; 1152. Milne, 709.]


1847 Sept 27 / From 8:15 p.m., at Strathpeffer, Scotland, a beam. / Athenaeum 1847-1085. [II; 1153. "Atmospherical Phenomenon." Athenaeum, 1847 (no. 1042; October 16): 1085.]


1847 Sept. 29 / Aurora / Swansea / BA, vol 18/22. [II; 1154. Jenkins, John. "Notices of Auroræ observed at Swansea." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1848, Notices and Abstracts, 22.]


1847 Sept-Oct / Sunspots unusual in number and form, noted in Jour des Debats, Oct 22-3-3. [II; 1155. "Deux groupes très considérables de taches solaires...." Journal des Debats, October 22, 1847, p. 3 c. 3.]


1847 Oct 3 / —4h // Venus Inf conjunction with Sun. [II; 1156.]


1847 Oct 8 / Violent q / Chile / BA 50-83. [II; 1157. Hamilton, Mathie. "Brief Notices of Earthquakes in South America in 1844, 1845, 1846 and 1847." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, Notices and Abstracts, 82-83.]


1847 Oct. 10 / Bermuda / Immense flight of small butterflies (Terias lisa). / Jones, J.M., Naturalist in Bermuda, p. 120 / Had never been seen there before. / Suddenly hundreds were seen in every direction. / Only one other instance. / See Oct 1, 1874. [II; 1158. Jones, John Matthew. The Naturalist in Bermuda. London: Reeves and Turner, 1859, 120. "Terias lisa, of Boisduval, was first observed by Mr. Hurdis on 10th Oct. 1847, on which day it suddenly appeared in great abundance, hundreds being seen in every direction. Previous to that occasion he had never met with this butterfly, although accustomed to keep a good look out. They all disappeared, however, in the course of a few days. In other seasons he considered them comparatively scarce, appearing for a few days only in September, October, or November." See: 1874 Oct 1, (IV; 1522).]


1847 Oct. 11 / (D-193) / Vulcan by Schmidt—little black point rapidly crossing the sun—neither bird nor insect / C.R. 83/623. [II; 1159. The note copies information from page 193 of The Book of the Damned.  LeVerrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. "Examen des observations qu'on a présentées, à diverses époques, comme pouvant appartenir aux passages d'une planète intra-mercurielle devant le disque du Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 83 (September 18, 1876): 583-9, 621-4, 647-50, 719-23, at 622. Schmidt, Johann Friedrich Julius. Resultate aus elfjährigen Beobachtungen der Sonnenflecken. Vienna: Eduard Hölzel, 1857, 26. "October 11. Die Flecken haben sich wieder vermehrt und man sicht sie an 11 Stellen. Die grosse östliche Gruppe zeigte wenig Kernflecken, dagegen bedeutende graue Flächen. Es flog auch (9 U. Morg.) ein kleiner schwarzer Punkt vor der Sonne schnell vorüber. Dies war weder ein Insect noch ein ferner Vogel." Carrington, Richard Christopher. "On some previous observations of supposed planetary bodies in transit over the Sun." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 20 (March 1860): 192-194.]


1847 Oct 2, 8, 17, 23 / Great q's / Mexico / Chili / [BA] '11. [II; 1160. Milne, 709.]


1847 Oct 11 / New comet in Hercules. 4 days later, had moved 34° south. / LT 29-5-d "Cannot be far from earth." // Observation of 15th of Dec / L.T., Dec 28-4-e. [II; 1161. "The New Comet." London Times, December 28, 1847, p. 4 c. 5. (London  Times, October 29, 1847, p. 5 c. 4.) Comet C/1847 T1.]


1847 Oct 16-17 / (Fr) / Frgs / night / In a storm at Vaux, frogs covered the ground of the village. / L.T. 27-7-e. [II; 1162. "Manna of a New Species." London Times, October 27, 1847, p. 7 c. 5. (Journal des Debats, 1847. Not found in search.)]


1847 Oct 22 / [LT], 5-b / Phenomena / ? [II; 1163. "Solar Phenomena." London Times, October 22, 1847, p. 5 c. 2. "At present two very large groups of solar spots are visible at the centre of the sun's disc."]


1847 Oct. 23 / Aurora / Column of red light / Brighton / LT, Oct 26-3-f // Oxford, 24th, Oct. 27 // Astro Reg 7/138 / S 12/4/e. [II; 1164. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, October 26, 1847, p. 3 c. 6. "Oxford, Monday, Oct. 25." London Times, October 27, 1847, p. 6 c. 6. "'Grand Auroral Display,' May 13th, 1869." Astronomical Register, 7 (June 1869): 135-138, at 138. William Lawton gives the date of the aurora as October 24, 1847. (Try: London Times, September 12, 1847, p. 4 c. 5.: S 12/4/e)???]


1847 Oct 24 / Aurora at Oxford, ab 10 p.m., red streaks in west—gradually spreading over sky. / LT 27-6-f // At Brighton, after the gale had subsided—a vapor in a thin line was seen in a column. At 10, this flame colored and with streamers. Seemed like moonlight reflecting on vapor. / LT - 26-3-f. [II; 1165.1, 1165.2. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, October 26, 1847, p. 3 c. 6. "Oxford, Monday, Oct. 25." London Times, October 27, 1847, p. 6 c. 6.]


1847 Oct 24 / Aurora / Paris / CR 25/603, 628. [II; 1166. Darlu. "Sur une aurore boréale observée à Paris, le 24 octobre 1847." Comptes Rendus, 25 (1847): 603. "Aurore boréale du 24 octobre." Comptes Rendus, 25 (1847): 628-629. [II; 1166.]


1847 Oct 24 / Aurora? / Cadix / C.R. 25/764 / 26/147. [II; 1167. Démidoff. "Phénomène produit par la lumière de la lune." Comptes Rendus, 25 (1847): 764-765. "M. Démidoff écrit, de Florence, qu'e adressant les observations faites à Cadix...." Comptes Rendus, 26 (1848): 147-148.]


1847 Oct 24 / Aurora / Ireland / CR 25/906. [II; 1168. Cooper. "Observation de l'aurore boréale du 24 octobre dernier, à Mount-Eagle (Irlande)." Comptes Rendus, 25 (1847): 906-907.]


1847 Oct 24 / Aurora / Swansea / BA, vol 18/22. [II; 1169. Jenkins, John. "Notices of Auroræ observed at Swansea." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1848, Notices and Abstracts, 22.]


[1847 Oct 24 /] 1847 Oct 27 / Aurora / Cambridge / Aurora streamers diverging from a point a little east of meridian and south of the zenith. This point near Beta Andromeda in right ascension and greater Polar distance by 2 degrees. "The azimuth appeared not to vary with the dirunal motion of the heavens." / Timbs 1848-275. [II; 1170.1, 1170.2. "Brilliant Aurora." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1848, 273-275. Challis, James. "The Aurora Borealis of October 24." Athenæum, 1847 (no.1045; November 6): 1151-1152. The date of Challis' observations was October 24, (not October 27).]


1847 Oct.30 / Op Mars / (A 1). [II; 1171.]


1847 Nov 1 / Paris / Aurora / CR 25/629. [II; 1172. "Aurore boréale du 1er novembre 1847." Comptes Rendus, 25 (1847): 629.]


1847 Nov 3 / [LT], 5-a / Sup. / Stourbridge/ [A; 219. "Strange Superstition." London Times, November 3, 1847, p. 5 c. 1.]


1847 Nov. 11 / Benares / Met train / 10 minutes / BA 60-17. [II; 1173. Greg, 86. Greg gives the date as November 11, 1847, (not November 10).]


1847 Nov. 12-13 / Nothing in Friend of India. [II; 1174.]


1847 Nov 12-13 / Mets very numerous at Benares, India. [II; 1175. "Étoiles filantes." Comptes Rendus, 26 (1848): 222. "Il résulte de deux communications faites par M. Arago, que les étoiles filantes so sont montrées très-nombreuses, comme d'ordinaire, en Suisse, vers le milieu du mois d'août, et dans la nuit du 12 au 13 novembre à Bénarès dans l'Inde." Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 46.]


1847 Nov. 12-13 / Ref is not in BA 60. [II; 1176. See: 1847 Nov 12-13, (II; 1175).]


1847 Nov. 12-13 / In Senegal, only 5 mets seen in an hour / C.R. 41-117 / 13-14, 7 in 2 hours. [II; 1177. "Rapport sur un Mémoire de M. Raffenel, sous-comissaire de la Marine impériale, relatif à quelques phénoènes météorologiques observés par l'auteur dans le haut Sénégal." Comptes Rendus, 41 (1855): 114-117.]


1847 Nov 19 / large light stationary few minutes / Oxford, Eng / (D-275).** [II; 1178. The note copies information from page 275 of The Book of the Damned. Lowe, 136. "Twice stationary for seven minutes." Greg, 86-87. Greg gives the date as November 20.]


1847 / about Dec 1 // Increased action of Kilauea, Hawaii / NY Herald, May 18-2-5, 1848. [II; 1179. "Very Interesting from the Pacific—Terrible Suffering at Sea—The Japanese, &c.&c." New York Herald, May 18, 1848, p. 2 c. 4-5.]


1847 Dec 7 / [LT], 8-e / 24-3-e / Ext. Sup. / Rochdale. [A; 220. "Superstition in the Nineteenth Century." London Times, December 7, 1847 p. 8 c. 5. "Extraordinary Superstition." London Times, December 24, 1847, p. 3 c. 5.]


1847 Dec 8 / Metite? / Ac to a letter from the postmaster of Forest Hill, Arkansas, published in Phil. Courier (A. J. Sci 2-5-293) / Sky had been clear. At 3:15 p.m., sudden darkness. Clouds like solid black fleece, lighted from above by a red glare. A deafening explosion and concussion in the ground—a mass of rock ab. 2 feet in diameter fell to the ground. // A. J. Sci 2/6/297 / said story proved to be false—no details of proof. [II; 1180.1, 1180.2, 1180.3. "Fall of an Aerolite at Forest Hill, Arkansas." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 5 (1848): 293. "Meteorite of Arkansas." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 6 (1848): 297. "The account of the meteorite of Arkansas, cited in this Journal, vol. v, p. 293, ii series, from a Philadelphia paper, proves to be false."]


1847 Dec 11-12 / Moonlight on dark part of moon / a bright spot that shone intermittently / M. Notices 8/55 / by Mr. Hodgson, of Eversley. [II; 1181. "Self-luminous Spot in the Moon." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 8 (January 14, 1848): 55.]


1847 Dec 17 / Aurora / Cirey, Toulouse, Bourges / CR 25/51, 934. [II; 1182. "Aurore boréale." Comptes Rendus, 25 (1847): 934. Gasparin. "Observation du méme phénomène." Comptes Rendus, 25 (1847): 934-935. "Il résulte de la correspondance mise aujourd'hui sous les yeux de l'Academie...." Comptes Rendus, 26 (1848): 51.]


1848:


1848 // Year notable for especially large sunspots / Galignanis Messenger, Jan 2, 1849. [II; 1183. (Galignani's Messenger, January 2, 1849; not found here.)]


[1848. Wrong date. See: 1846, (A; 221).]


1848 / Fixes / Margaretta repudiated her confession in N.Y. Press, Nov 20, 1889, ac to Sir A.C. Doyle, History of Spiritualism, vol. 1, p. 106. [A; 222. Doyle, Arthur Conan. The History of Spiritualism. London: Cassell, 1926, v. 1, 106.]


1848 Jan 1 / q's / Nova Scotia and St. Lucia, W.I. / qs / B.A. '11 / Sim q's, Feb 18, 1889. [II; 1184. Milne, 709.]


1848 Jan 2, 3 / Extraordinary number of meteors / Parma and Aix-la-Chapelle / BA 51-2. [II; 1185. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 2-3.]


1848 Jan 3 / March 27, 29 / Ap. 27 / May 2 / June 21 / July 6, 24, 27 - 31 / July 29 / Aug. [4, 9,] 10, 28 / Sept 30 / Oct 20[, 22, 23, 25] / Nov [12, 15] / Dec 11 // Each date. many mets at Aix-la-Chapelle / BA 51-3. [II; 1186. The dates of July 22 and 23 and of November 5 and 6 were for Parma, (not Aix-la-Chapelle, the French name for Aachen, Germany). Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors. Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 21 (1851): 1-52, at 2-5. Heis, Eduard. "Aurores boréales, étoiles filantes et lumière zodiacale, observées à Aix-la-Chapelle en 1848." Bulletin de l'Académie royale des sciences, des lettres et des beaux-arts de Belgique, 16 pt. 1 (1849): 3-5. Heis does not include the dates of January 2 nor of May 24, but he does include the dates of August 4 and 9, of October 22, 23, and 25, and of November 12 and 15, for "beaucoup étoiles filantes."]


1848 Jan 1, Feb 1, May 23, Sept 9, Nov 6, Dec 11 / See Nov 9, 1810. / qs / New England. [II; 1187. Brigham, William T. "Volcanic Manifestations in New England." Memoirs  of the Boston Society of Natural History, 2 (1871/1878): 1-28, at 19 and 28.Only the earthquake of September 9 struck New England. The shocks of January 1 and of February 1 occurred in Nova Scotia; the shocks of May 23 and of December 11 were at Montreal; and, a light shock on November 6 struck Grand Island in the St. Lawrence River. See: 1810 Nov 9, (I; 308).]


[1848 May 30, July 10, Sept 12, Oct 29, 31, Dec 2. Wrong dates. See: 1846 May 30, July 10, Sept 12, Oct 29, 31, Dec 2, (II; 1188).]


1848 // Comrie / shocks in 1846-7-8 / recorded in Wm Roper, "List of Earthquakes" / See Ap. 8, '86. [II; 1189. Roper, 36. O'Reilly, Joseph Patrick. "Alphabetical Catalogue of the Earthquakes Recorded as Having Occurred in Europe and Adjacent Countries, Arranged to Serve as a Basis for an Earthquake Map of Europe." Transactions of the Royal Irish Academy, 28 (1880-1886): 489-708, at 541.]


1848 // several weeks // Wellington, New Zealand / Cor to Daily News, Nov 16, 1858, said myst sounds—found be results of volcanic action. [II; 1190. Forster, James Rumsey. "Mysterious Phenomenon." London Daily News, November 16, 1858, p. 3 c. 2.]


1848 Jan. 20 / 5 p.m. / Rome, N.Y. / met and train / ab 12 minutes / A. J. Sci 2/5/437. [II; 1191. "A Meteor visible for a considerable time." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 5 (1848): 437. The meteor was visible "for a second or two" before it vanished, but its train "remained visible about twelve or thirteen minutes" before floating away as a "white cloud." Greg, 86.]


1848 Jan 24 / Shower of dust in Arabia / A. J. Sci 2/11/380. [II; 1192. Ehrenberg, Christian Gottfried. "On the Infusoria and other Microscopic forms in Dust-showers and Blood-rain." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 11 (1851): 372-389, at 380.]


1848 Jan 25 / At Edinburgh, a haze and a N. eye sunspot or large obscuration "appearing like a good-sized bean in shape and size." / Timbs 49/268. [II; 1193. "Remarkable Solar Spot." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1848, 268-269. Pringle, W. "On a Remarkable Solar Spot." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (March, 1848): 232-233.]


1848 Jan 27 / 3 p.m. / Daylight met / Buckingham / BA 49/10. [II; 1194. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 10. Greg, 86.]


[1800 Jan 29-31. Wrong date. See: 1848 Jan 31, (II; 1195).]


[1848 Jan 31 /] 1848 Jan 29-31 /Meteor dust / Germany / Ber. Mitth. Freund Naturw. 1848/304, 313. [II; 1195. Ehrlich, Franz Carl. "Meterostaubfall vom 31. Jänner in Wien." Bericht über die Mitteilungen von Freunden der Naturwissenschaften in Wien, 4 no. 3 (March 1848): 304-308. Haidinger, Wilhelm Karl Ritter von. "Hrn. Prof. Ehrenberg's Mittheilungen über  die Staubfälle von Gastein und Wien." Bericht über die Mitteilungen von Freunden der Naturwissenschaften in Wien, 4 no. 3 (March 1848): 313-316. The fall of dust, on January 31, is attributed to the sirocco, as Ehrenberg identifies 47 organisms from a sample of this dust, and another from Silesia, on February 2, (see pages 314-315). The identification of the substance as "meteor dust" and the date of January "29" were probably copied from Fassig's Bibliography. Fassig, Oliver Lanard, ed. Bibliography of Meteorology. Part II: Moisture. Washington: Signal Office, 1889, 378.]


1848 Jan 31 / Silesia and Lower Austria / dust / A.J. Sci 2/11/380. [II; 1196. Ehrenberg, Christian Gottfried. "On the Infusoria and other Microscopic forms in Dust-showers and Blood-rain." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 11 (1851): 372-389, at 380.]


1848 Feb / Catherine Fox's confirmation of the confession in N.Y. Herald, Oct 10, 1888. [A; 223. (New York Herald, October 10, 1888.)]


1848 Feb / Confession data in R.B. Davenport's "Death Blow to Spiritualism". [A; 224. Davenport, Reuben Briggs. The Death-Blow to Spiritualism. New York: G. W. Dillingham, 1888.]


1848 Feb / Margaretta Fox's confession in NY Herald, Sept 24, 1888. [A; 225. ("God has not ordered it." New York Herald, Sept 24, 1888).]


1848 Feb / Fox / Long account in Tribune, NY, Dec., 1848. [A; 226. (NY Tribune, Dec. 1848; not found in 1848, phenomenon only beginning then).]


1848 Feb / Fox phe started. The family had moved in, in Dec. / McCabe, "Spiritualism." McCabe, Joseph. Spiritualism: A Popular History from 1847. London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1920, 28. [A; 227.]

https://archive.org/details/spiritualismpopu00mccarich


1848 Feb / It was Kate Fox, not Margaret, ac to McCabe, who recanted the confession. [A; 228. McCabe, Joseph. Spiritualism: A Popular History from 1847. London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1920, 42.]


1848 Feb 2 / Cheshire / great met / BA 50/90. [II; 1197. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 90. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 306. Lowe, 136.]


1848 Feb 7 / 11 p.m. / ac to E J. Lowe / Brilliant meteor "ab[out] twice the apparent size of Jupiter, fell from [about] 2° (degree) below [that planet]" Jupiter. / B Assoc 1848-9. [II; 1198. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1848, 1-11, at 9.]


1848 Feb. 14 / 9 p.m. to eleven // India / streaks of light ascending from horizon—or aurora / Intel Obs. 7/160. [II; 1199. Hooker, John Dalton. Himalayan Journals. London: J. Murray, 1855, v. 2, 385-386. "Meteor Observed at Sea." Intellectual Observer, 7 (March 1865): 159-160..]


1848 Feb. 15 / 1 p.m. / Aerolite / (Dharwar), India / south of Negloor / Trans Bombay Geog. Soc. 9-208. [II; 1200. Buist, George. "Notices of the most remarkable Meteors in India of the fall of which accounts have been published." Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 9 (1849-1850): 197-230, at 208-209. Greg, 86-87. This is the Dharwar meteorite.]


1848 Feb 15 / Negloor, Dharwar / same kind of stone as that of Nov 30, 1842. [II; 1201. See: 1842 Nov. 30, (II; 518).]


1848 Feb. 16 / Java / q. / II [Medium] / BA '11. [II; 1202. Milne, 709.]


1848 Feb. 20 / Aurora / Durham / 8:16 p.m. / Arch suddenly arose near horizon in N.E.—passed a little eastward and southward of Great Bear, directly across Cephella and a little west of Pleiades. Duration

less than a minute. / Timbs 1849/276. [II; 1203. "Magnificent Aurora in February." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1849, 276-277. "Our Weekly Gossip." Athenæum, 1848 (no.1061 February 26): 217-218, at 218. Lowe, 136. Lowe reports a meteor, at Highfield House. "Increased in brilliancy when crossing Aurora."]


1848 early in March / Rappings in house of Fox sisters / Hydesville, N.Y. [A; 229. Doyle, Arthur Conan. The History of Spiritualism. London: Cassell, 1926, v. 1, 58-59.]


1848 March 8 / 4 a.m. / Met shaped like a kite, larger than moon / Slough and Bath / BA 49/10. [II; 1204. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 10 & 37, (illustration). Greg, 87. Lowe, 136.]


1848 March 19 / The slight eclipse / D-219 / See 1849. [II; 1205. The note copies information from page 219 of The Book of the Damned. Forster, Thomas Ignatius Maria. "Remarkable Appearances during the total eclipse of the Moon on March 19, 1848." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 8 (March 10, 1848): 132-133. See: 1848 Mar 19, (A; 257).]


[1848 Mar 19 /] 1849 Mar 19 / Eclipse of moon that failed / See 1848. /// Aug 11, [note cut off]. [A; 257. There was no lunar eclipse on this date in 1849. See: 1848 March 19, (II; 1205).]


1848 March 27, 29 / Aix-la-Chapelle / many mets / BA, 51-2. [II; 1206. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 2-3.]


1848 Ap. 15 / Loud det. met. / night / Whitesville, Miss. / A. J. Sci 2/6/148 / BA-60-102. [II; 1207. Phares, D.D. "Meteor." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 6 (1848): 148. Greg, 102.]


1848 April 28 / New Star, by Mr. Hind, in Ophiuchus, between 4th and 5th mag., where none was noticed Ap. 5. / M. Notices 8-146 / Slowly diminished. About 8th mag, June 30. Very red. [II; 1208. "New Star in Ophiuchus." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 8 (April 14, 1848): 146.  "Mr. Hind says...." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 8 (June 9, 1848): 192. Nova Ophiuchi 1848 is now known as nova V841 Oph.]


1848 Ap. 28 / Hind certain not there on Ap 5th / Todd, Stars and Telescopes, p. 266. [II; 1209. Todd, David Peck. Stars and Telescope. Boston: Little, Brown, 1899, 266.]


1848 Ap? / For N. Opp. in 1921, see M. Notices, Nov., 1921. [II; 1210. Steavenson, William Herbert. "Recent Observations of Novæ." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 82 (November 11, 1921): 49- 53, at 49-50.]


1848 Ap. 30 / morning / Remarkable yellow fog / London / B.A. 1848-10. [II; 1211. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1848, 1-11, at 10.]


1848 Ap. 30-May 10 / Nothing in Jour des Debats. [II; 1212.]


1848 May / Greatest of downpours in Jamaica. / Kingston Budget, Oct 14, 1879. [II; 1213. (Kingston Budget, (Jamaica), October 14, 1879).]


1848 May 2 / Rich display of meteors, by Heis. / Nature 103-174. [II; 1214. (Nature, 103-174). Eduard Heis.]


1848 May 2 / By Heis, at Aachen—many mets with streaks / Observatory 48-119. [II; 1215. Denning, William Frederick. "Meteors of Halley's Comet." Observatory, 48 (1925): 118-119, at 119.]


1848 May 3 / C-214 / Vienne, France / Army in sky and city / Bull Soc Astro de France 27/180. [II; 1216. ("L'étoile du soir, les aéroplanes et les dirigeables." Bulletin de la Société Astronomique de France, 27, (1913): 179-80.)]


1848 May 10 / Louisville, Ky / enormous swarm of insects / like snowstorm / gnats or flies / "black bodied [insects] with white wings" / N.Y. Herald, 19-1-6. [II; 1217. "Miscellaneous." New York Herald, May 19, 1848, p. 1 c. 6.]


1848 May 12 / (hail) / 3 p.m. / Story by Dr Aug Mueller, formerly of Weimar, Saxony, of fall then, there, of masses of ice, some of them six-pounders. / Sun, 1896, May 18-16-7. [II; 1218. (Sun, 1896, May 18-16-7.; not NY Sun).]


1848 May 20 / q's / New England / Jan 1 / Feb 1 / May 23 / See Jan. 1. [II; 1219. See: 1848 Jan 1, Feb 1, May 23, Sept 9, Nov 6, Dec 11, (II; 1187).]


1848 May 20 / 4:15 a.m. / Metite of Castine, Me. / A. J. Sci. 2/6/251 / (F) / resembled March 12, 1811. [II; 1220. Shepard, Charles Upham. "An Account of the Meteorite of Castine, Maine, May 20, 1848." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 6 (1848): 251. Fletcher, 101. This is the Castine meteorite. Greg, 87.]


1848 May 23 / Shock at Montreal. Next day a torrent of rain. / See Nov 9, 1810. [II; 1221. Brigham, William T. "Volcanic Manifestations in New England." Memoirs Read Before the Boston Society of Natural History, 2 (1871/1878): 1-28, at 198. See: 1810 Nov 9, (I; 308).]


1848 May 22, 23, 24 / (It) / Sound / Val di Cecina / like cannon fire / 1816. [II; 1222. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 39. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


[1848 June 12 /]1849 June 12 / Remarkable hail / Bull. Ac. Sci Brux 16-307. [II; 1296. "Phénomènes périodiques." Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, 16 pt. 1 (1849): 307-310, at 307-309.]


1848 July 4 / Marmande, Avignon, France / Met / (F)/ (See Oct 21, '44.) [II; 1223. Fletcher, 101. This is the Marmande meteorite. See: 1844 Oct. 21, (II; 788).]


1848 July 5 / Pontine Islands, Italy / q / I [Light] / BA '11. [II; 1224. Milne, 709.]


1848 July 19 / q. / Spain / BA '11. [II; 1225. Milne, 709.]


1848 July 27 to Aug 7 / Small q's / Java / BA '11. [II; 1226. Milne, 709.]


1848 Aug 9 / Meteors and flashes of lightning / St. Leonards, Sussex / B Assoc 1849-12. [II; 1227. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 12.]


1848 Sept 4 / England and Fr / met 2/3 diameter of moon / E to W / BA '60-86. [II; 1228. Greg, 87. Lowe, 136.]


1848 Sept 4 / 9 p.m. / Isle of Wight  Hampshire and Sussex / met / BA 51/38. [II; 1229. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52. at 2-3 & 38.]


1848 Sept 4 / 9 p.m. / Met leaving a mark from Altair / BA 49/15 / Worthing, Sussex / seen also at Fecamp, in France. [II; 1230. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 14-15.]


1848 Sept 8 / Phe and q / Hudson River / See 1805. [II; 1231. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 360.) See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1848 Sept 9th / Scotland / Mirages in sky, ships, soldiers, etc. / L.T. 5/c, Sept 13, 1848 / C-211+. [II; 1232. "Extraordinary Phenomenon." London Times, September 13, 1848, p. 5 c. 3. "Extraordinary Phenomena in the Air." Dublin Evening Post, September 12, 1848, p. 4 c. 5.]


1848 Sept 19 / [LT], 4-e / Inverness / Stars / (Seems nothing to this). [A; 230. "Astronomical Discovery." London Times, September 19, 1848, p. 4 c. 5. Two bright stars purportedly claimed as discovered by a correspondent who was obviously unfamiliar with astronomy.]


[1848 Sep 20. Wrong date. See: 1843 Sep 20, (I; 1233).]


1848 Sept 25 / 2:15 p.m. / Portsmouth / detonation and shock / Athenaeum 1848-988. [II; 1234. Lake, John J. "Meteorological Phenomena." Athenaeum, 1848 (no. 1092; September 30): 988.]


1848 Oct 1, etc. / Large sunspot / visible again on 13th / Times 16-7-a / 19-6-c. [II; 1235. "Spot on the Sun." London Times, October 16, 1848, p. 7 c. 1. "The Solar Spots." London Times, October 19, 1848, p. 6 c. 3.]  


1848 Oct 2-3 / Phe-q / Spain / See 1805. [II; 1236. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 361.) See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1848 Oct 18 / Liverpool / great aurora / crown maintaining same altitude [and] azimuth against shifting stars / Timbs, 1849-279. [II; 1237. "Magnificent Aurora in October." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1849, 278-279. Weld, Alfred. "Account of the Aurora Borealis as seen at Stonyhurst Observatory, October 1848." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 33 (November, 1848): 376-378.]


1848 Oct 18 / Kremsmünster / Aurora / C.R. 27/561. [II; 1238. "Il résulte d'une lettre de M. Littrow à M. Le Verrier...." Comptes Rendus, 27 (1848): 561.]


1848 Oct 19 / 5 a.m. / Disastrous q / Wellington, N.Z. / Galignani's Messenger, May 2, 1849, p. 1 / On night of 18th, a fiery glare in sky toward south, ab 4 hours. On Oct 24th—four severe shocks; and 25th—slighter shocks. [II; 1239. "New Zealand Earthquakes." Galignani's Messenger, May 2, 1849, p. 2 c. 1.]


1848 Oct 19 and 20 / q / New Zealand / The aurora was very bright. / BA 50-74. [II; 1240. Mallet, Robert. "First Report on the Facts of Earthquake Phenomena." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 1-89, at 74.]


1848 Oct 20 / Aurora / quake then at Azores? / See Nov. 4. [II; 1241. See: 1848 Nov. 4, (II; 1246).]


1848 Oct 20 / 7 a.m. / q / Belg / C et T / 8/38. [II; 1242. Lancaster, Albert Benoît Marie. "Les Tremblements de terre en Belgique." Ciel et Terre, 8 (March 16, 1887): 25-43, at 38.]


1848 Oct 20 / Many mets / Aix-la-Chapelle / 22-23, considerable number / BA 51-2. [II; 1243. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 2-3.]


1848 Oct 21 [or 24] / Sky fire like that of Oct. 24, 1870 / Timbs' Y.B. 1871/251 / Great Aurora / Look elsewhere. [II; 1244. "The Aurora Borealis." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1871, 249-255, at 251.]


1848 Nov. 4 / night / Violent q. / Azores / Others, and on one of the nights was seen "at the west end of the island" an aurora, "a thing quite unknown in these latitudes". / Galignani's Messenger, Jan 2, 1848. [II; 1246. "Earthquakes in the Azores." Galignani's Messenger, January 2, 1849, p. 4 c. 2.]


1848 Nov. 9 / Trans Merc. [II; 1245.]


1848 Nov 17 / A / Am J. Sci 27/127, 293. [II; 1247. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Aurora Borealis. Nov. 17, 1848." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 7 (1849): 127. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Aurora Borealis of Nov. 17, 1848." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 7 (1849): 293.]


1848 Nov. 17 / (It) / Parma / Aurora / C.R. 27/560. [II; 1248. Colla. "Sur la dernière comète et sur une aurore boréale." Comptes Rendus, 27 (1848): 560-561.]


1848 Nov. 17 / 9:30 - / Light as if of a fire, towns around Dieppe and in Dept of Calvados. In each town thought a neighboring town on fire in the s.-s.w./ C.R. 27-529 / Also at Orleans. [II; 1249. Nell de Bréauté. "Phénomène lumineux observé à Dieppe et dans les environs, le 17 novembre." Comptes Rendus, 27 (1848): 529-530. "M. Elie de Beaumont annonce que le météore du 17 novembre...." Comptes Rendus, 27 (1848): 530-531.]


1848 Nov 17 / met and aurora / 11:12 p.m. / Met exactly along an auroral beam, Oxford / Bath—fell from Capella / BA 49/17. [II; 1250. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 17.]


1848 Nov. 17 / Aurora / A. J. Sci 2/7/127, 293. [II; 1251. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Aurora Borealis. Nov. 17, 1848." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 7 (1849): 127. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Aurora Borealis of Nov. 17, 1848." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 7 (1849): 293.]


1848 Nov. 17 / Cuba, Asia Minor, California, etc. / Aurora / In western NY, everywhere in sky except a circular spot south of the zenith toward which ran streamers from N and S. / An Sci Disc 1850-348. [II; 1252. "Aurora Borealis, November 17th, 1848." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1850, 347-348.]


1848 Nov. 17 / at Pisa / Aurora accompanied by a stream of meteors / C.R. 49-401. [II; 1253. Fournet. "Aperçu météorologiques relatifs aux aurores boréales du 29 août 1859 et du 17 novembre 1848." Comptes Rendus, 49 (1859): 397-402, at 401.]


1848 Nov. 17 / Red light, sky, France / C.R. 27-530, 562. [II; 1254. "M. Elie de Beaumont annonce que le météore du 17 novembre...." Comptes Rendus, 27 (1848): 530-531. Pascal. "Sur un météore lumineux observé à Bayonne, dans la soirée du vendredi 17 novembre 1848." Comptes Rendus, 27 (1848): 562-563.]


[1848 Nov 21. Meteors. Oxford. "Four fell into an Aurora, and disappeared." Lowe, 137.]


1848 / ab Dec 1 // (Stat) / Glascow / Det met / 30 minutes later, another. [II; 1255. (Not in Greg.)]


1848 Dec. 1 / Metite—Fisherton—near Salisbury—Observatory 4/183. [II; 1256. Heineken, Nicholas Samuel. "Fall of Aerolite." Observatory, 4 (1881): 183. "In the 'Lady's Paper,' Dec. 30, 1848, an account was given of the fall of an aerolite, of which fragments amounting to 2 lbs. were picked up. 'The aerolite fell, on the evening of the 1st of Dec. 1848, in the yard of Mr. Atkins, plumber &c., Fisherton, near Salisbury.'"]


1848 Dec 4, about / Appearance great sunspot / On Dec 25, was a N.E. spot. / Galignani's Messenger, Jan 2, 1849. [II; 1257. (Galignani's Messenger, January 2, 1849; not found here.)]


1848 Dec 11 / From 5:38 p.m. to 6:50 p.m., many large mets with trains at Parma. / BA 51-4. [II; 1258. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 4-5. These meteors were observed at Aix-la-Chapelle, (not at Parma).]


1848 Dec 13 / by Lord Rosse / 3 new stars in neb. of Andromeda / Nature 32/465. [II; 1259. "The New Star in Andromeda." Nature,  32 (September 17, 1885): 465-466.]


1848 Dec 25 / Sunspot / See Dec. 4. [II; 1260. See: 1848 Dec 4, (II; 1257).]


1848 Dec 27 / [LT], 3-f / Aurora / Dec alone / B.M. [II; 1261. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, December 27, 1848, p. 3 c. 6.]


1848 Dec. 27 / (F) / Shie, Krogstadt, Norway / Metite / BA '60. [II; 1262. Fletcher, 101. This is the Ski meteorite. Greg, 87.]


1849:


1849 ab / Started Sleeper / Susan C Godsey — See Oct 27, 1873. [A; 231. See: 1870 Oct 15, (A; 633), and, 1873 Oct 27, (A; 861).]


1848-49 winter / The cemetery ravager of Paris told of by S. Baring-Gould in The Book of Werewolves. [A; 246. Baring-Gould, Sabine. The Book of Were-wolves. London: Smith, Elder, 1865.]


1849 // Great year for mets in India / BA '50/-130-. [II; 1263. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 130. "Sir,—On opening your paper of this morning I was astonished at not see any mention made of another very brilliant meteor that burst last night."]


1849 [June 30] // Red / Wales / (22). [II; 1275. The date of the red rain in Wales was June 30, 1849. "Fall of Red Rain." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1850, 278. "Fall of Red Rain." Athenæum, 1849 (no.1136; August 4): 796. "Red rain." Cambrian (Swansea), July 13, 1849, p. 3 c. 4.]


1849 // Fishes / Ceylon / Tennent, Hist Ceylon 1/212. [II; 1264. Tennent, James. Ceylon. London: Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts, 1860, v.1, 211-212, footnote 2.]


1849 // Famine / Ireland. [II; 1265.]


1849 / I find nothing of Court Martial of Bertrand in Galignani's Messenger up to July 1. [A; 250. Lunier, L. "Examen Médico-Légal d'un cas de Monomanie Instinctive: Affaire du sergent Bertrand." Annales Médico Psychologiques, s. 2 v. 1 (July, 1849): 351-379. This article provides a detailed interrogation of sergent François Bertrand, (age 25).]


1849 Jan / Vesuvius active / A. J. Sci 2/7/437. [II; 1266. "Vesuvius." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 7 (1849): 437.]


1849 Jan / (AR) / In Wallace's Miracles and Modern Spiritualism, p. 284, taken from La Gazette des Tribunaux of Feb. 2, 1849, the official organ of the French police, that a house near the Pantheon, Paris, had been assailed every evening by a hail of projectiles that fell with great violence for 3 weeks. / Watchmen engaged but the objects continued to fall as if from a great height. [A; 252.1, 252.2. Wallace, Alfred Russel. Miracles And Modern Spiritualism. London: G. Redway, 1896, 284-5. (La Gazette des Tribunaux, February 2, 1849; not online @ Gallica).]


1849 Jan 4 / [LT], 7-c / Monster snake / Mass. [A; 232. "A Monster Snake." London Times, January 4, 1849, p. 7 c. 3. A 30-foot boa constrictor is brought to Massachusetts from Africa.]


1849 Jan 9 / Met seen 1/3 diam. of moon / Edinburgh / BA 50-90. [II; 1267. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 90.]


1849 Jan. 14 / Aurora / C.R. 28/89. [II; 1268. Coulvier-Gravier, Remi Armand. "Aurore boréale du 14 janvier." Comptes Rendus, 28 (1849): 89.]


[1849 Jan 14 /] 1847 Jan 14 / Aurora / C.R. 24-89. [II; 1093. Coulvier-Gravier, Remi Armand. "Aurore boréale du 14 janvier." Comptes Rendus, 28 (1849): 89.]


1849 Jan 14 / q and aurora / q / Liege, Belg / C. et T 8/38. [II; 1269. Lancaster, Albert Benoît Marie. "Les Tremblements de terre en Belgique." Ciel et Terre, 8 (March 16, 1887): 25-43, at 38.]


1849 Jan. 24 / Larvae / D-93 / In the Revue et Mag Zool. 1849/72, Count Tyzenhauz writes of phe that had occurred near his home in Wilna, Lithuania. Jan 24—fall of black larvae 7 to 9 millimeters long. In vast numbers on the snow—seemed dead but after sunrise crawled around. Great numbers of birds attracted by them. / Said were larvae of a beetle of the family Telephorus and resembled but wth some differences a larvae figured in Mag de Zoologie, "sur la planche" 168, year 1836. Also ac to description a little different. [II; 1270.1, 1270.2. The note copies information from page 93 of The Book of the Damned. (Revue et Mag Zool. 1849/72; Mag de Zoologie, "sur la planche" 168, year 1836.) Albert Müller. "On the dispersal of non-migrating insects by atmospheric agencies." Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, 1871, 175-186, at 184. Correct quote: "Snow, together with larvæ, fell in the Eifel," and, "Count C. Tyzenhaus records a fall of Telephorus fuscus in Lithuania."  C. Tyzenhauz. "Notice sur une pluie d'insectes observeé en Lithuanie le 24 janvier 1849." Revue et Magasin de Zoologie, s.2, 1 (February 1849): 72-76.]


1849 Jan 30 / Galignani's, 5-3 / Date not given Land thought to be over an extinct volcano at Honfleur, sinking, 1,00 metres by 1,000 metres. [II; 1271. "Great surprise has been occasioned at Honfleur...." Galignani's Messenger, January 30, 1849, p. 5 c. 3.]


1849 Feb 2 / Missiles / Galignani's Messenger, 4-1 / Windows in shops in the Chausée d'Autin broken. No trace of depredators. [A; 253. (Galignani's Messenger, February 2, 1849, p. 4 c. 1; not found here.)]


1849 Feb. 3 / At Sellières (Jura), smart shock. Felt also at Lons-le-Saulnier. Galignani's Messenger, Feb 15-3-1. [II; 1272. (Galignani's Messenger, February 15, 1849, p. 3 c. 1; not found here.)]


1849 Feb. 5 / (3) / Two dark bodies seen by Mr. Brown, of Deal, crossing sun. Rec. Sci, 1/138. [II; 1273. Lowe, 138.]


1849 Feb 9 / Galignani's Messenger, 3-3 / Projectiles ceased, Feb 4, falling on the house in Rue Neuve-Cluny. Said that the attacks had ceased because boards had been placed over the zinc roof to protect it. [A; 251. (Galignani's Messenger, February 9, 1849, p. 3 c. 3; not found here.)]


1849 Feb 15 / Galignani's, 3-2 / At Lille—a street woman murdered by stabbing by a young man who disappeared. They took a room at a lodging house. [A; 244. (Galignani's Messenger, February 15, 1849, p. 3 c. 2; not found here.)]


1849 Feb. 19 / Fireball / Bombay / Edin N. P. J. 47/370. [II; 1274. "Fire-Ball at Bombay." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 47 (1849): 370-371. (Bombay Monthly Times, March 1849).]


1849 Feb. 24 / March 19 / March 23 / Ap 4, 10, 13, 30 / May 2, 6 / June 25 // Mets / India / BA 50. [II; 1276. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 127-131.]


1849 March [28] / Red / Sicily / (22). [A; 260. Ehrenberg, Christian Gottfried. "On the Infusoria and other Microscopic forms in Dust-showers and Blood-rain." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 11 (1851): 372-389, at 380. "In March there was a reddish dust fell at Catania in Sicily, during a south wind." Ehrenberg, Christian Gottfried. Passat-staub und Blut-Regen ein grosses organisches unsichtbares Wirken und Leben in des atmosphäre. Berlin: Koniglichen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1849, 151-152. "Am 28. März 1849 regnete es in Catania in Sicilien unter starkem Südwinde einen feinen blutrothen Sand."]


1849 March / See back for psycho—falling stones in Paris. [A; 254. See: 1849 Jan, (A; 252).]


1849 March / Myst assault? / Galignani's, Jan 22-5-2 / A dairy man crossing a Paris bridge—seized by a man of great strength. Both went into the river together. Not known what became of assailant.[A; 234. (Galignani's Messenger, January 22, 1849, p. 5 c. 2; January??? Not found in January.)]


1849 March / Galignani's Messenger, Jan 6-4-2—Several days before, the body of the Abbé Denhaygues, Curé of Reyrevignes (Lot), found lying on a road, considerable distance from the parsonage. Body taken to parsonage, where found that a female servant had been killed. Abbé's body —"His face was much torn by either dogs of wolves." [A; 235.1, 235.2. (Galignani's Messenger, January 6, 1849, p. 4 c. 2; 1849 or 1850??? Date of publication precedes event.)]


1849 March / Ripper /Sabine Baring-Gould, in "The Book of Were-wolves", tells of a French Infantry officer named Bertrand, who in winter of 1848-49 dug corpses from Paris cemeteries, tore them to pieces and rolled in the fragments. In March, 1849, a spring gun set for him in the Cemetery of St. Parnasse. Shot him and he was traced by his wound and a part of his uniform shot away and left behind. He confessed. / He mutilated only female corpses. [A; 236.1, 236.2. Baring-Gould, Sabine. The Book of Were-wolves. London: Smith, Elder, 1865, 255-260.]


1849 March / Le Moniteur Universel, May 3, 1849, p. 1654 / *SGD / Again a profanation of (de sepulture au cimetière de Est). Most of the tombs are covered with flowers, which friends and relatives kept renewed. They had been despoiled by an ouvrier fondeuz named Bertrand, "qui on a surpris se livrant a de tels larcins", Sentenced to three months in prison. / This all I find ac to index "Bertrand" in Le Moniteur. / (Mysterious other Bertrand not in index.) / Anybody looking up Bertrand, "profanation de sepulture," and finding only this, would have the impression that it was only a minor offense. [A; 240.1, 240.2, 240.3. (Le Moniteur Universel, May 3, 1849, p. 1654 ).]


1849 March / This is a clear case of Possession, but may been by Atavism. It was not only wolfish. Sex must be considered. [A; 241.]


1849 March /File of Galignani's incomplete. [A; 242.]


1849 March / In Galignani's Messenger, Jan. and Feb., I find nothing of the Bertrand case. [A; 243.]


1849 March / The other Francis Bertrand (make sure of this case) may have been under suggestion by similarity of name. [A; 247. François Bertrand was his name.]


1849 March / All winter // Dug up the bodies, ripped them in a frenzy. Fragments of flesh scattered even up in trees. [A; 237.]


1849 (March) / Vampire / The cemetery robber told of by Baring-Gould—Francis Bertand. In San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, June 27-2-2, 1874—"Bertrand, the Ghoul, is still alive; he is now perfectly cured of his hideous disease, and is cited as a model of gentleness, propriety, and behavor." Had been sentenced to one year's imprisonment, the maximum that could be made to fit. / After his atrocities he would seek shelter in a trench, anywhere and fall into a cataleptic trance. /  Bertrand was a Sergeant-Major of Infantry. "He bore a good name in his regiment and was accounted a man of gentle disposition and an excellent soldier." [A; 248.1, 248.2, 248.3. "The ghoul of Montparnasse." San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, June 27, 1874, p. 4 c .2.]


1849 March / Galignani's not done before last of Feb. [A; 249.]


1849 March 6 / 6:08 p.m. / London / met a little below and S of the moon / BA 49/18. [II; 1277. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 18. Lowe, 137. Greg, 88.]


1849 March 6 / P / Met from somewhat below and to southward of the moon / B. Assoc 1849-38 / A Jupiter note a little before. [II; 1278. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 38. See: 1848 Feb 7, (II; 1198).]


1849 March 7 / B. rain / Northampton Herald, Feb 2, 1850. / John T. Tryon, of Bulwick Rectory, writes of shower at his place, other places, in Northamptonshire and part of Rutlandshire. Particles harder than gunpowder. About two years before, been a shower of black insects, like these particles, here. [II; 1279.1, 1278.2. (Northampton Herald, Feb 2, 1850; not @ BNA. Chelmsford Chronicle, April 16, 1849, p. 4, & Bristol Times and Mirror, June 8, 1850, p. 2. "past few days"? both @ BNA. Rev. John Thomas Tryon.). See: 1850 July 16 / and 19, (II; 1432).]


1849 March 10 / Galignani's  Messenger 15-2-4 / "On the 10th in the evening, a working man, names Lecomte, returned to his lodging in the Rue Travisière Saint Antoine, in a complete state of intoxication. Not being seen afterward his apartment was entered yesterday morning, when he was found dead in his bed, with his face shockingly gnawed and disfigured by his little favorite dog, which had been driven, no doubt, by deprivation of food for three days to satisfy its hunger on the body of its master." [A; 233.1, 233.2, 233.3. (Galignani's  Messenger, March 15, 1849, p. 2 c. 4; not found here.)]


1849 March 10 / Galignani's Messenger, 5-2 / "It will be remembered that several horrible profanations of the dead, consisting chiefly of ripping up the bodies, and carrying off the intestines, from the graves in the cemeteries on Mont Parnasse, took place some time ago. The night before last, a man was seen scaling the wall, probably to repeat this horrible act. He was fired at, but made his escape. [A; 238.1, 238.2. (Galignani's Messenger, March 10, 1849, p. 5 c. 2.)]


1849 March 12 / ab. 4 p.m. / Vulcan / Joseph Sidebotham / C.R., 83/622 / watch 1/2 hour / D-192. [A; 256.The note copies information from page 192 of The Book of the Damned. LeVerrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. "Examen des observations qu'on a présentées, à diverses époques, comme pouvant appartenir aux passages d'une planète intra-mercurielle devant le disque du Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 83 (September 18, 1876): 583-589, 621-624, 647-650, 719-723, at 622. Sidebotham, Joseph. "Note on an Observation of a small black spot on the Sun's disc." Proceedings of the Literary and Philosophical Society of Manchester, 12 (1872-1873): 105. "As there is again some speculation as to the existence of an intra-mercurial planet, and every little fact bearing on the subject may be of value, I have referred to my diary and find that on Monday, March 12th, 1849, our late member Mr. G.C. Lowe and I saw a small circular black spot cross a portion of the sun's disc. We were trying the mounting and adjustments of a 7-inch reflector we had been making, and used an ink box between the eye-piece and the plane speculum. At first we thought this small black spot was upon the eye-piece, but soon found it was on the sun's disc, and we watched its progress across the disc for nearly half an hour. The only note in my diary is the fact of the spot being seen—no time is mentioned, but if I remember rightly it was about 4 o'clock in the afternoon." "Les planètes entre le Soleil et Mercure...." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 20 (1876): 6-11, at 9.]  


[1849 Mar 19. Wrong date. See: 1848 Mar 19, (A; 257).]


1849 March 19 / Aurungabad, India / Met from a little south of and above Venus / B/. Assoc — 1849-44 / Cut. [A; 258. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 38-40. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 127. Greg, 88-89. Lowe, 137.]


1849 March 19 / Great meteor / Bombay / Ref / Trans Bombay Geog Soc 9-197. [A; 259. Buist, George. "Notices of the most remarkable Meteors in India of the fall of which accounts have been published." Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 9 (1849-1850): 197-230, at 209-211.]


1849 March 27 / White spots on Jupiter / by Lassell / Jour Roy Soc N.S. Wales 10/88. [A; 261. Hirst, G.D. "Some Notes on Jupiter during His Opposition of 1876." Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 10 (1876): 83-98, at 88.]


1849 March 23 / Galignani's Messenger, 2-4 / Bertrand—25 years old "when in a garrison near Tours, he was caught in a cemetery with the body of a woman, which he had dug up, but this affair was hushed up. His strange monomania was displayed only with respect to the bodies of women." / Strange how he had eluded. Cemetery guarded not only by keepers but by dogs. [A; 239.1, 239.2. "Bertrand, the non-commissioned officer of the 74th regiment...." Galignani's Messenger, March 24, 1849, p. 5 c. 2. This article does not refer to these details.]


1849 March 24 / Galignani's 2-3 / That at Strasburg, Metz, and Tours, bodies in cemeteries had been violated, while Bertrand was stationed there. / Here it is said that the arrest came about because a grave digger heard soldiers tell of a sub-officer who had been shot by assailants in a field, and wounded with nails and bits of iron, and the grave digger knew that the trap-guns had been so loaded. [A; 245.1, 245.2. (1849 March 24 / Galignani's 2-3).]


1849 March last week / Atmosphere in the Saugor and Nerbudda territories, India, so filled with fine dust that the sun could be looked at. / BA 50-131. [A; 262. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 131.]


1849 April / dry fog / Dry fog / S. Russia / Zapiski / Russk-Geog. Obsht. 3/132 / (Fassig). (To Box II from Box B). [II; 1279.a. Renumber this item. Fassig, v. 2, 82. Fassig lists the following article: "Lapschine, W.J. (On the dry fog of April 1849 in South Russia.) Zapiski russk. geogr. obsht., St. Peters., iii, 1849, 132-141." This article does not appear in Zapiski Russkoe Geograficheskoe Obshchestvo, in volumes 1 to 8, nor  in volumes 11 to 13; and, if it is not this publication, the original article by "Professor Lapschine, of Kharkof" may prove very difficult to locate. Lapschine visited Kew Observatory, in BA 62; Zapiski Russkoe Geograficheskoe Obshchestvo, 3 (1849): 132-141. Not the correct citation. Checked vols. 1-8, 11-13, from NYPL @ Hathi)]


1849 April / See May 14. / Black rain reported by Prof Barker to Roy. Dublin Soc. [A; 263.]


1849 April / Dry fog in South Russia / Zapiski / russ. geogr. obsht. 3-132 / I get from Fassig, pt. 1—p. 82. [A; 265. See: 1849 April, (II; 1279).]


1849 April 1 / ac to E. J. Lowe / At 11:18 a brilliant blue meteor "fell from Jupiter". 1 1/2 minutes later a smaller one "fell from Jupiter. / B Assoc 1848-9. [A; 264.Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1848, 1-11, at 9.]


1849 Ap 4, 19, 13 / Great mets / India / BA 50-130. [A; 266. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 129-130.]


1849 Ap. 4 / 7:15 p.m. / Delhi / N.W. - SE / 10th, Ahmednuggur, ab time and direction of met of 19th of March, which was ab 6:30 p.m., and 3 other meteors on at 7:30 p.m. / 13th, ab 9:15 at Bombay // Great Meteors / India / BA 1850-130 / See May 6. [A; 267. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 129-130. Greg, 88.]


1849 Ap 6 / Venus greatest brill. [A; 268.]

 

1849 Ap 9 / [London Times], 3-f / Ghst. [A; 269. "A Ghost in Love." London Times, April 9, 1849, p. 3 c. 6. At Yvetot, France, a widower discovers a future wife, when she masquerades as the match-making ghost of his recently deceased wife.]


[1849 Ap. 14 /] 1849 May 14 / See April / black / Ireland / (11) / (D-30). [II; 1292. Black rain. The note copies information from page 30 of The Book of the Damned. "Black rain in Ireland." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1850, 348. The Annual of Scientific Discovery erroneously gives the date as the "14th of May." "Chronicle." Annual Register, 91 (1849): pt. 2, 1-183, at 39-40, cv. "Curious Phenomenon." "Royal Dublin Society." Dublin Freeman's Journal, May 1, 1849, p. 3 c. 2-3.]


1849 Ap 14 / Date of the b. rain in Ireland, in Galignani's Messenger, May 16, p. 4 / Preceded by hailstorm and lightning, but no thunder. [II; 1280. (Galignani's Messenger, May 16, 1849, p. 4; not found here).]


1849 Ap. 14 / B. rain of Ireland / Timbs'  50-277. [II; 1281. "Black Rain in Ireland." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1850, 277-278. "Professor Barker, M.D., made some observations on rain which fell on the evening of the 14th of April...." Reports of the Proceedings of the Meetings Held for the Discussion of of Subjects Connected with Practical Science and Art, Royal Dublin Society, 1848-1855, 28-30. "It had been conjectured that the black particles were composed of some species of fungus, but that supposition was negatived by the investigations of Drs. Harvey and Steele, who found that they were not of an organic nature."]  


1849 Ap 18 or 19 / (D-52) / (Sci Amer., 1/5/66) / near Byazid, not far from Mt. Ararat. Had appeared upon land where they had not appeared the night before and were not indigenous, so thought to have fallen. On 19th of June, another deposit found in a well-frequented place. Quantities were very great. [II; 1282.1, 1282.2. The note copies information from page 52 of The Book of the Damned. "Fall of Manna." Scientific American, o.s., 5 (November 17, 1849): 66. "Manna." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1850, 241-242. (Hubbard, Oliver P. "Notices of Koordistan." American Journal of Science, s. 2, v. 3 (May 1847): 347-54. Nothing is said that the three different vegetable species, identified as the manna, were not indigenous; it is only said that they suddenly appeared in large quantities.]


[1849 Ap 18 or 19 /] 1850 // ab /// Shower of manna said been lichens at Erzeroum. / Sci Gos. 1872-60. [II; 1284. Braithwaite, R. "Manna of the Desert." Science Gossip, 8 (no. 87; 1872): 60-61.]


1849 Ap. 18 or 20 / In the Gardeners' Chronicle, Sept 15, 1849, Editor writes that having heard of a fall of manna near Byazid, he had applied for information to Dr. Heinig, the only European resident of B, and had received data and specimens. Ap 18-20, in period when been rains and strong winds, shepherds and villagers saw in several places near B. lichens scattered over tracts measuring from 5 to 10 miles in circumference. No one had ever seen anything of the kind before, and Dr Heinig, who had often rambled around the region, had not. The year before, locusts had so greatly injured crops that a famine was threatened, and so was confirmed that this subtance which was edible was unknown there, or it would have been collected and sold. On June 19th, another quantity discovered, "and as the spot was a well-frequented one, it seems likely that the fall had occurred only a few days previously." It was made from flour into bread or eaten in the raw state. / Sept 29th—said that seemed impossible that a substance eagerly devoured by the natives could exist and not be known. In masses up to an inch in diameter. Here several specimens are figured, and are convoluted like those in Le Naturaliste. This Lecanora esculenta is fibrous. [II; 1285.1 to 1285.7. "Manna.—Miraculous Fall of Food from Heaven!!" Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1849 no. 37 (September 15): 581. "The natural world is full of real mysteries and marvels...." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1849 no. 39 (September 29): 611-612. (Le Naturaliste, 1849).]


1849 Ap. 20 / 54 meteors in an hour at New Haven / Observatory 20/174. [II; 1286. Denning, William Frederick. "The April Meteors." Observatory, 20 (1897): 174-175.]


1849 Ap 23 (?) / Galignani's Messenger (Paris) of May 5, p. 3, quoting Hull Packet / "On night of Monday last (Ap. 23?) sloop George and Mary near Scarborough. Weather very thick, no wind, slight rain, a fireball struck vessel. No lightning seen before, but afterward several flashes seen. Vessel destroyed by fire. [II; 1283.1, 1283.2. (Galignani's Messenger, May 5, 1849, p. 3; not found here.). "Extraordinary Loss of a Vessel." Hull Packet, April 27, 1849, p. 4 c. 6.]


1849 Ap. 24 / [LT], 7-f / Myst outrage / Glascow / 20 bullets fired in house // 7-5-f  / Elizabeth Hughes / Impostor // May 5-[note cut off] / b. rain / [note cut off] / 22-6-f / Ap 20-8-e. [A; 255. "Mysterious Outrage." London Times, April 24, 1849, p. 7 c. 6. In Glascow, a sniper shoots 20 bullets, thru the windows of a house; and, an air gun is suspected, "as no sound was heard." "Death of an Impostor." London Times, April 7, 1849, p. 5 c. 6. Elizabeth Hughes, who, in 1804, claimed to have a miraculous healing touch, died. "Black Rain in Ireland." London Times, May 5, 1849, p. 7 c. 2. See: 1849 Ap. 14, (II; 1281). Hind, John Russell. "Two New Comets." London Times, April 20, 1849, p. 8 c. 5. Hind, John Russell. "Two New Comets." London Times, April 22, 1849, p. 6 c. 6. Comets  C/1849 G1 and C/1849 G2.]


[1849 Ap. 29, 30 /] 1840 Ap. 29, 30 / Cloud of dust that obscured the sun 2 days in Russia. / Am J. Sci 2/10/287. [II; 172. "On a cloud of dust which obscured the sun for two days in Russia, on the 29th and 30th of April, 1840, during a clear sky and quiet weather." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 10 (1850): 287. "Ehrenberg believes that there is reason for concluding that this meteoric powder is neither a terrestrial powder nor simple volcanic cinders." Ehrenberg, Christian Gottfired. "Über einen die Sonne zwei Tage lang truebenden Staub-Nebel in Russland am 29 und 30 April 1849 bei heileren Himmel und ohne Sturm." Bericht über die zur Bekanntmachung geeigneten Verhandlungen der Königlich-Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin, 1850: 9-12. Fort copied the date as "1840," (probably a typographical error in the American Journal of Science).]


1849 May / Mauna Loa / See June, '32 [II; 1287. See: 1832 June 20, (I; 1700). Wood, Harry Oscar. "The Seismic Prelude to the 1914 Eruption of Mauna Loa." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 5 (1915): 39-51, at 46.]


1849 May 3 / I / Venezuela. [II; 1288. Milne, 709. A "smaller" destructive earthquake, (a value of "I" on Milne's scale).]


1849 May 3 / 1-2 p.m. / One of the most tremendous th. storms remembered in Kent, England. Pieces of ice, some 6 inches long, fell. Galignani's Messenger, May 7-3-3. [II; 1289. "Tremendous Thunder and Hail Storm." Galignani's Messenger, May 7, 1849, p. 3 c. 3.]


1849 May 6 / 6:45 p.m. / Sunset great met Kurrachee, India / BA 50-130 / May 2—Bombay / Ap. 30—Poona / Great mets / See Ap. 4. [II; 1290. See: 1849 Ap 4, 19, 13, (A; 266). (BA 50 -130). Greg, 88.]


1849 May 12 / -5h / Venus Inf. conjunction sun. [II; 1291,]


[1849 May 14. Wrong date. See: 1849 Ap. 14, (I; 1292).]


1849 May 26 / 10 p.m. / Brest / A rolling sound / C.R. 28-743. [II; 1293. Leras. "Sur un tremblement de terre observé à Brest." Comptes Rendus, 28 (1849): 743.]


1849 June 8 / [Lond Times], 3-e / Land waterspouts.[II; 1294. "Land Waterspouts." London Times, June 8, 1849 p. 3 c. 5. Flooding in Somersetshire and Worcestershire, (between Wells and Mendip, and at Kemerton), was due to two waterspouts.]


1849 June 12-18 / Smoke / White mist or smoke enveloped Bermuda. / J. M. Jones—The Naturalist in Bermuda, p. 177 / He finds that there were great forest fires in British North Amer Colonies and quotes from a newspaper of Prince Edward Island. [II; 1295. Jones, John Matthew. The Naturalist in Bermuda. London: Reeves and Turner, 1859, 177-178.]


[1849 June 12. Wrong date. See: 1848 June 12, (II; 1296).]


1849 June 17 / Venus greatest brilliancy. [II; 1297.]


1849 June 19 / More manna / See Ap. 18. [II; 1298. See: 1849 Ap. 18 or 19, (II; 1282 and 1283).]


1849 June 25 / Meteor / Kurrachee / R—March 19, 1849. [II; 1299. Greg, 88. Refer to: 1849 March 19, (A; 259).]


1849 June 30 / The rain "as red as blood" at Bonvilstone, etc., told of in the Cambrian, July 13th. /Swansea Cambrian / No more then told in the Athenaeum. [II; 1300. "Fall of Red Rain." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1850, 278. "Fall of Red Rain." Athenæum, 1849 (no.1136; August 4): 796. "Recently a shower of rain as red as blood fell near the village of Bonvilstone, and extended thence in a westerly direction over Llandtrithyd, Flemington, &c. towards Lantwit-Major. It was so manifest that it impregnated the clods of earth, many of which were like ruddle. Several country people who witnessed it were dreadfully alarmed, imagining it to be some omen of coming misfortune; and many, who did not see it fall, came in the course of the day to see the discoloured soil.—Cambrian." "Red rain." Cambrian, (Swansea), July 13, 1849, p. 3 c. 4.]


[1849 June 30 /] 1849 Aug 4 / Red rain / Athenaeum of, copying from the Cambrian—that recently red rain had fallen in Wales near village of Bonvilstone and then over Llantruthyd, Flemington, etc., toward Lantwit-Major. [II; 1306. "Fall of Red Rain." Athenæum, 1849 (no.1136; August 4): 796.]


1849 July / Substance resembling plaster with crystals and sulphur in it, near Montargis, France / LT, July 10/7/c. [II; 1301. "Fall of an Aërolite." London Times, July 10, 1849, p. 7 c. 3. "The Presse of Sunday records the fall of an aërolite of five kilogrammes in weight, at Triguènes, near Montargis, at the close of a violent storm. It was composed of crystal, sulphur, and a substance resembling plaster." "Un aérolithe...." La Presse, July 8, 1849, p. 3 c. 4. "Un aérolithe, pesant cinq kilogrammes environ, et composé, en majeure partie, de cristal, de soufre et d'une matière assez semblable à du plâtre, est tombé à Triguènes, non loin de Montargis, à la suite d'un violent orage." "Triguènes" should be Triguères (Loiret), France; but, apart from falling in a violent storm, this object could be a dubious reference to the Château-Renard meteorite, (which fell eight years earlier, but not in a storm). See: 1841 June 12, (II; 308).]


1849 July 17 / Great met / Maryland / 9:12 p.m. / Timbs '50-276. [II; 1302. "Meteor in the United States." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1850, 276.]


1849 July 23 / Many mets / polar constellations / BA 49/22 / Highfield House. [II; 1303. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 21-22.]


1849 July 24 / Same as 23. [II; 1304.]


1849 July 27 / Meteor / Porebunder / R—March 19, 1849. [II; 1305. Greg, 88. Refer to: 1849 March 19, (A; 259).]


1849 Aug / Kumadau / det met, ac to Dr. Livingston / B.A. 60-88. [II; 1308. Greg, 88-89. Livingston, David. Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa. London: John Murray, 1857, 596. "I have been in the vicinity of the fall of three aërolites, none of which I could afterward discover. One fell into the lake Kumadau with a report somewhat like a sharp peal of thunder. The women of the Bakurutse villages there all uttered a scream on hearing it. This happened at midday...." Kumadau is now identified as Lake Xau, in Botswana. Livingston, David. Missionsreisen und Forschungen in Süd-Afrika. Leipzig: Costenoble, 1858, v. 2, 257.]


[1849 Aug 4. Wrong date. See: 1849 June 30, (II; 1306).]


1849 Aug 8 / Small augs. / Switzerland / D-210. ** [II; 1307. The note copies information from pages 210 to 211 of The Book of the Damned. "Letter from Sir Robert H. Inglis...." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, Notices and Abstracts, 17-18.]


1849 Aug 10 / 5 hours / 254 mets at Aix-la-Chapelle—none at Parma / BA 51-4. [II; 1309. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 4-5. Immediately below this entry for Aix-la-Chapelle in the catalog, Colla reports "22 falling stars, some = 1st mag." at Parma.]


1849 Aug 10-11-12 / About same as July 23 / Not one relates to Perseus. [II; 1310.]


1849 Aug 11 / ab. 12:15 a.m. / Chinese Tartary / S to N / great det met— / BA '60-88. [II; 1311. Greg, 89.]


1849 / 12, 13, 14 August // Great number of meteors as if from Pegasus / at Midhurst / CR 29-269. [II; 1312. "Bolides et étoiles filantes partant d'un point particulier du ciel." Comptes Rendus, 29 (1849): 269-270.]


1849 Aug 13 / Ice / Scotland / 98 / D-178. [II; 1313. The note copies information from page 178 of The Book of the Damned. "Phenomenon in Rossshire." London Times, August 14, 1849, p. 7 c. 1.]


1849 Aug 20 / Great met / Derbyshire / BA 50-104. [II; 1314. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 104.]


1849 Aug 21 / "Extraordinary and unheard of" flood of Red River / Trib. to Mississippi / N.Y. Herald, Sept 7-1-6. [II; 1315. "The Flood in Red River." New York Herald, September 7, 1849, p. 1 c. 6.]


1849 Aug 28—to Sept 24 / E. Mec. 51-94 / Ac to David Packer, ac to a manuscript that had been in possession of R.A.S., observations by W. G. Lettsom, F.R.A.S., new star near Alpha Herculis. [II; 1316. Packer, David Elijah. "On a New Star Seen Near Alpha Herculis in the Year 1849." English Mechanic, 51 (no. 1305; March 28, 1890): 94-95, (illustration).]


1849 Aug 28 / (Ver) / (Cut) / Nova near Alpha Herculis / disco then by W.G. Lettsom / It gradually diminished. / E Mec (Eng Soc) 51/94, 159, 200. [II; 1317. Packer, David Elijah. "On a New Star Seen Near Alpha Herculis in the Year 1849." English Mechanic, 51 (no. 1305; March 28, 1890): 94-95, (illustration). Sadler, H. "The Supposed New Star Near Alpha Herculis." English Mechanic, 51 (no. 1308; April 18, 1890): 159. "...I came to the conclusion that the object seen was simply a 'ghost.'" Packer, David Elijah. "On the New Star Seen Near Alpha Herculis in 1849...." English Mechanic, 51 (no. 1310; May 2, 1890): 200, 202.]


1849 Aug 30 / Slight rains in Maryland, but drought unprecendented / NY Herald 31-3-5. [II; 1318. "Our Baltimore Correspondence." New York Herald, August 31, 1849, p. 3 c. 5.]


1849 Sept 2 / near Alpine, Chattanooga Co., Georgia / Great fall of water, said been a waterspout. Made a hole 30 feet deep and 40 or 50 wide. Said that not long before another had fallen, making a hole 3 feet deep by 18 or 20. Sc. Amer, first series, 4-414. [II; 1319. "A Great Water Spout." Scientific American, o.s., 4 (September 15, 1849): 414.]


1849 Sept 14 / Eruption of Merapia, in Java, in a hurricane. Lasted till 17th. / Athenaeum, 1849-1217. [II; 1320. "Eruption of a Volcano in Java." Athenæum, 1849 (no.1153; December 1): 1217-1218. The Merapi volcano.]


1849 Sept 17 / [LT], 7-c / Waterspouts. [II; 1321. "Singular Phenomenon at Llanelly." London Times, September 17, 1849, p. 7 c. 3.]


1849 / ab middle Sept // Floods in Mexico / N.Y. Herald 29-2-5+. [II; 1322. (New York Herald, September 29, 1849, p. 2 c. 5; not found  in ths issue, nor a search.) A hurricane moved into the Rio Grande area on September 13, 1849.]


1849 // about the latter end of /// Western-super-Mare, Somersetshire / augs by C.B. Chambers / See B.D. / B Assoc '52/237. [IIl 1323. The note copies information from page 208 of The Book of the Damned. (BA 32-237) Baden Powell. "Report on observations of luminous meteors, 1851-52." Annual Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, 178-239, at 235-7. Fort takes this data from Charles B. Chalmer's letter to Read, except for Read's denial of the objects being seeds.)]


1849 Sept 26 / Began eruption of Mt. Merapia / Java. / Athenaeum 1849-1217. [II; 1324. "Eruption of a Volcano in Java." Athenæum, 1849 (no.1153; December 1): 1217-1218. The Merapi volcano.]


1849 Sept. 30 / Trombe / Calvados / C.R. 29-451. [II; 1325. Artur. "Note sur la trombe qui a ravagé, le 30 septembre 1849, la commune de Douvre, près Caen (Calvados)." Comptes Rendus, 29 (1849): 451-452.]


1849 Oct 14 / Schmidt / similar to Oct 11, '47 (?) / Observatory 3/137. [II; 1326. Ledger, Edmund. "Observations or supposed observations of the Transits of Intra-Mercurial planets or other Bodies across the Sun's Disk." Observatory, 3 (1879-80): 135-8, at 137. Schmidt, Johann Friedrich Julius. Resultate aus elfjährigen Beobachtungen der Sonnenflecken. Vienna: Eduard Hölzel, 1857, 31. "October 14. Um 11 Uhr sah ich einen etwa 15" grosser dunklen wohl 30" grosser Körper sehr schnell von  O.—W. vor der Sonne vorüberfliegen. Es war weder ein Vogel noch ein Insekt." See: 1847 Oct. 11, (II; 1159).]


1849 Oct 22 / Commander Island, Alaska / violent q. / BA 1911-42. [II; 1327. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 42. Milne, 709.]


1849 Oct 26 / Le Moniteur Universal / In the department of the Ain, between Rosy and Chavannes, after lightning without thunder, a luminous globe the size of a little balloon. / --il s'est eleve' de la terre masque d'abord a l'observateur par un buisson / It divided into ten or a dozen little ones that sparkled and fell. [II; 1328.1, 1328.2. (Le Moniteur Universal, October 26, 1849.)]


1849 Oct 31 / 3 p.m. / Charlotte, N.C. / tremendous explosion / rock reported fallen from sky / "bluish gritty rock["] bearing marks of recent fracture, blackened as if by smoke and pitted. It had splintered a pine log. in Cabarrus Co. / A.J. Sci, 2/9/143/ It would seem that luminous objects had been seen moving toward a common center. / BA 60-88. [II; 1329.1, 1329.2. This is the Monroe meteorite. "Meteorite in North Carolina." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 9 (1850): 143-146. Greg, 88.]


1849 Oct. 31 / (Cut) / Sound 3 / 3 quick explosions [nea]r Charlotte, N. Car. / Am J. Sci 2/9/143 / Said like of heavy artillery. Said that a stone had fallen at Cabaras, 25 miles away. / (F) / BA 50-92 / 60-88. [II; 1330. "Meteorite in North Carolina." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 9 (1850): 143-146. Fletcher, 101. This is the Cabarras County meteorite. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 92-93. Greg, 88.]


1849 Nov 1 / (+) / (on Oct 31) / "Several meteoric explosions and meteors this day. / South Carolina / BA 60-88 / See Silliman's account in Am J. Sci. [II; 1331. Greg, 89. "Meteorite in North Carolina." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 9 (1850): 143-146.]


1849 Nov 1 / Brilliant met, Tampa, Florida, in the evening. / BA '60-88. [II; 1332. Greg, 88.]


1849 Nov. 2 / 5:30 p.m. / Swansea / met / BA 50/105. [II; 1333. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 105-106. Greg, 88.]


1849 Nov. 7-8 / Bombay / A large met, and all night "the air was filled with shooting stars of lesser magnitude." / BA 50-107. [II; 1334. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 107.]


1849 Nov 7, 8, 9 / A great met, Bombay, 7, 8 / at Asseerghur, 9th / BA 50-107. [II; 1335. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 107. Lowe, 137. Greg, 88.]


1849 Nov. 8 / Bombay / 6:30 p.m. / Met in Pleiades, which were 20 degrees above horizon. / BA 50-107. [II; 1336. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 107.]


1849 Nov 13? / ab. Nov. 25 // Algeria (?) / (See Jan 25, '50.) / Stones fell in Tunis. / Timbs 1851-269. [II; 1337. "Aerolites." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1851, 269-270. "A letter from Jerbah, dated Jan. 25, 1850, records, about two months previously, the Fall of a Shower of Aerolites...." "Letter from Mr. Richardson to Viscount Palmerston on the Fall of Aerolites at Tunis." Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 5 (1843-1850): 932-933. See: 1850 (Jan 25), (II; 1360).]


1849 Nov. 13 / (Algiers) Tripoli / Stones fell. Seen in Italy. BA 60-88. [II; 1338. Greg, 88.]


1849 Nov 15 / near Brazil? / 7:20 p.m. / Cometary object large as Mars / from a ship / lat 13°-22' / long 24° 50' W. / An Sci D, 1851-367. [II; 1339. "Comet Discovered in 1849 at Sea.." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1851, 367. "Extract of a Letter from Mr. J. Curley, of Georgetown College, Washington." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 10 (1850): 122-123. Gould, Benjamin Apthorp. "Southern Comet of November 1849." Astronomical Journal, 1 (1850): 79. Gould provides a correction of the details from the ship's captain. "It was on November 15, sea account. The true time of the ship was 7h. 30m. P.M. Latitude 13° 32' south, and longitude 34° 50' west of Greenwich. Its bearing from the ship was west-northwest; its course was southeast and northwest; height of head from the horizon, 48°; in sight about one hour."]


1849 Nov 16 / Meteor / England / "Ascending slowly." / B Assoc 1852/194. [II; 1340. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 194.]


1849 Nov 19 / 4:40 a.m. / q. / Brest / See May 26. / C.R. 29/638 / Rolling sound. [II; 1341. Leras. "Tremblement de terre ressenti à Brest le 19 novembre 1849." Comptes Rendus, 29 (1849): 638-639. See: 1849 May 26, (II; 1293).]


1849 Nov. 27 / [LT], 5-1 / Volc in Java / See also 19-4-f. / bound one month. [II; 1342. "Eruption of a Volcano in Java." London Times, November 29, 1849, p. 5 c. 1. The Merapi volcano. "America." London Times, November 19, 1849, p. 4 c. 6. Earthquakes shook Cordova, on September 25, and Mexico City, on September 28, 1849.]


1849 Nov. 28 / (It) / Parma / q / BA '11. [II; 1343. Milne, 709.]


1849 Dec. 12 / Meteor / Shorapore / R—March 19, 1849. [II; 1344. Greg, 88. Refer to: 1849 March 19, (A; 259).]


1849 Dec. 17 / Op Mars / (Al). [II; 1345.]


1849 Dec 19 / 5:15 p.m. / Durham / great met / BA 50/108. [II; 1346. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 108-113. Lowe, 137. Forbes, James David. "Account of a Remarkable Meteor, seen 19th December, 1849." Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 2 (January 1851): 309-316. Greg, 88.]


1849 Dec 21 / New Haven, Conn / met / BA 60-88. [II; 1347. Greg, 88.]


1849 / latter part // Augs / Weston-super-Mare. [II; 1348.]


1850:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     


[1850 // ab . Wrong date. See: 1849 Ap 18 or 19, (II; 1282).]


1850 / Sleeper Susan C. Godsey, near Hickman, Ky. / See Oct 27, 1873. [A; 270. See: 1870 Oct 15, (A; 633), and, 1873 Oct 27, (A; 861).]


1850 / Waterford, near Troy, N.Y. / Polt / 10-year old daughter of Anson At[t]wood / Mrs. Hardinge, History of Amer. Spiritualism, p. 77. [A; 271. Britten, Emma Hardinge. Modern American Spiritualism. 4th ed. New York: Hardinge, 1870; 77-79.]


1850 // Slag / (Maine). [II; 1349.]


1850 / about // BO / In the Daily News, April 1, 1924, Dr. F.E. Weiss, Pro of Botany, University of Manchester, tells of Canadian pondweed that infested the canals and slow-moving rivers of England, ab 1850, saying that the spread and exuberant growth had never been satisfactorily explained. [II; 1350.1, 1350.2. (Daily News, April 1, 1924). Weiss, Frederick Ernest. "A Preliminary Account of the Submerged Vegetation of Lake Windermere as affecting the Feeding Ground of Fish." Memoirs and Proceedings of the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society, 53 no. 11 (1909): 1-9. Weiss, Frederick Ernest. "On the Occurrence and Distribution of some Alien Aquatic Plants in the Reddish Canal." Memoirs and Proceedings of the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society, 53 no. 14 (1909): 1-8. The Canadian pondweed Elodea canadensis is native to North America; but, it appeared in County Down, Ireland, in 1836, and was first noticed in Great Britain, in 1841 or 1842.]


1850-51 / (Clergy) / Cideville phe / Dale Owen's Footfalls / Home of a clergyman, M. Tinel. Mediums were 2 children who boarded with him. Rappings for 2 1/2 months. Stopped when the children were sent to their homes. Not only rappings but intolerable poundings some times. The sounds beat time to music. When asked would indicate the number of persons in a room. Strong force moved a table when the mayor of Cideville and another visitor were sitting on it and trying to prevent its movement. [A; 282.1, 282.2, 282.3. Owen, Robert Dale. Footfalls on the Boundary of Another World. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1872, 272-283.]


1850 Jan [3]1 / [LT]. 5-f / Spon Comb. [A; 272. "Death by Fire." London Times, January 31, 1850, p. 5 c. 6. A crippled woman was discovered "burnt as scarcely to be recognized" in Hampstead; but, she had fallen against the grate of her fire. No suggestion is made, herein, of any "spontaneous" combustion.]


1850 Jan 2 / 3:45 a.m. / Aix and Bruehl / det met / BA 60-102 / In Prussia, sound shook earth like a q. [II; 1351.1. Greg, 102-103.]


1850 Jan 2 / Aix and Bruehl // 3:45 a.m. / met, great light, and strong detonation / BA '60-102. (To Box II from Box B). [II; 1351.2. Greg, 102-103.]


1850 Jan. 2 / Ice—Australia / Sydney / Mag of Sci 2/166. [II; 1353. (Mag of Sci 2-166. Find. Fix. Volume 2 is from early 1840s, not here, only 11 volumes published and microfilmed).]


1850 Jan 6 / Meteor / England / "Ascending slowly / B Assoc 1852/194. [II; 1352. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 194-195.]


1850 Jan 7 / Beam / for 6 nights / Eng / BA 54/410. [II; 1354. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1853-54." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1854, Reports on the State of Science, 386-415, at 410-412.]


1850 Jan 9 / [LT], 4-f / Sunspots. [II; 1355. Lassell, W. "Spots on the Sun." London Times, January 9, 1850, p. 4 c. 6. "An immense spot, plainly visible to the naked eye, is to-day upon the face of the sun." "On viewing the sun afterwards with a telescope I found a crowd of small spots near the principal one, which doubtless added to the impression made upon the unassisted eye."]


1850 Jan. 9 / Bonn, etc. / 3:30 a.m. / det met / BA 60-88. [II; 1356. Greg, 89.]


1850 Jan 14 / Meteor near Bombay / Ref, March 19, 1849. [II; 1357. See: 1849 March 19, (A; 259).]


1850 Jan 15 / Fr / Meteor at Cherbourg / CR 35/353. [II; 1358. Fleury, L. "Météores ignés observés à Cherbourg, le 15 janvier 1850." Comptes Rendus, 35 (1852): 353-354.]


[1850 Jan 20. Wrong date. See: 1858 Jan 20, (II; 1359).]


1850 (Jan 25) / (Algeria) / stones / Tripoli / An. Sc. Disc 51-373 / See Nov. 25, '49. / Seems to me got same under another date. [II; 1360. "Various Meteors." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1851, 373. See: 1849 Nov 13?, (II; 1337).]


1850 Feb. 5 / Sandwich, Eng / met stationary / 1 3/4 min. / exploded and moved on / Rec Sci 1/137. [II; 1361. Lowe, 137. "Stationary 1 3/4 min., exploded, and moved on." Greg, 89.]


1850 Feb 5 / (Cut) / (broke through) / by W.H. Weekes, at Sandwich, Kent / B Assoc., 51/38/ saw a speck of dull light at a point near Orion. It increased though stationary till 1/3 size of moon. A meteor of this size moved away slowly, visible 45 seconds, but a luminous disk remained stationary, ab. one degree in diameter, then lessening—visible 3 minutes more. / (See March, 1877.) [II; 1362.1, 1362.2. Pabst: "'Broke through' possibly refers to clouds in the sky." Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 38, Appendix, "No. 2." "...glowing through the thin grey mist like a moderately red-hot iron ball, until it had acquired an apparent diameter equal to at least one-third that of the full moon, when, without any noise of an explosion being heard, it suddenly burst, the main body taking a slow rectilineal motion parallel to the horizon and to the eastward; the instant when the motion of the meteorolite commenced many large, glowing, red fragments were thrown off in various directions from the centre, and a brilliant shower of variegated fire descended perpendicularly towards the earth. So beautiful was it that it resembled the coloured rain from a sky-rocket." From its appearance until the object burst was "1 minute 45 seconds." William Henry Weekes was a surgeon and experimenter in electrical devices.]


1850 Feb 6 / Meteor / Bombay / R—March 19, 1849. [II; 1363. Refer to: 1849 March 19, (A; 259).]


1850 Feb. 7 / Meteor near Northampton / See Feb 11. / Northampton Herald, 16th. [II; 1364. (Northampton Herald, 1850 Feb 16). See: 1850 Feb 11, (II; 1369).]


1850 Feb 7 / Vesuvius / An Sci D 51-279. [II; 1365. "Eruption of Vesuvius." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1851, 279-280.]


1850 Feb 8 / meteor / Bombay / R—March 19, 1849. [II; 1366. Refer to: 1849 March 19, (A; 259).]


1850 Feb. 9 / 6:30 p.m. and at 11 / Nottingham / many meteors / BA 50-96. [II; 1367. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 96-97.]


1850 Feb 11 / night / Det met / Padbury / LT, Jan 5-11-f. [II; 1368. "A Meteor." London Times, February 13, 1850, p. 7 c. 1. "The Meteor." London Times, February 14, 1850, p. 6 c. 5. Glaisher, James. "Additional Observations on the Meteor of February 11, 1850, and Deduction of the Results from all the Observations." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 36 (April, 1850): 249-271, at 256. (1850 London Times, Jan 5-11-f. Check in Palmer's Index of the Times.) Greg, 89. Pabst: "Note: Jan 5 of which year?" The "Jan 5-11-f" reference is erroneous.]


1850 Feb 11 / (+) / 10:41 p.m. / Great met / Eng. / BA 50/99 / And, others, some detonating. All from W to E. [II; 1369. (BA 50-99). Glaisher, James. "On the Meteor which appeared on Monday, the 11th of February 1850, at about 10h 45m P.M." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 36 (March, 1850): 221-234. Glaisher, James. "Additional Observations on the Meteor of February 11, 1850, and Deduction of the Results from all the Observations." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 36 (April, 1850): 249-271. Lowe, 131, 137. Greg, 89.]


[1850 Feb 11 /] 1830 Feb. 11 / (F) / Bedfordshire / Met explosion / "Things Not Generally Known, p. 30 / by E. J. Lowe. [I; 1531. No meteorite listed by Fletcher. Timbs, John. Things Not Generally Known, Familiarly Explained. New edition. London: David Bogue, 1857, 30, at: "Height of the Atmosphere," by Edward Joseph Lowe.]


1850 / early in—the writer thinks // Polt and Met / In Times, Dec 29, 1863, Mr. M. P. W. Boulton says one evening in Oxfordshire, early in 1850 he thinks, sounds heard as if in his house, which was searched without avail—then learned that a meteor been seen about this time. / Times, Dec 31, Prof. A. S. Herschel thinks it was met of Feb 11, 1850. [II; 1370.1, 1370.2. Boulton, Matthew Piers Watt, and others. "Meteors." London Times, December 29, 1863, p. 8 c. 4. Herschel, Alexander S, and Charles C. Walker. "Meteors." London Times, December 31, 1863, p. 7 c. 6. Matthew Piers Watt Boulton's manor house was at the Great Tew Estate, in Cotwold Hills, Oxfordshire.]


1850 Feb 11 / Immediately after the meteor a sharp breeze sprang up near Northampton / Northampton Herald, Feb. 16. [II; 1371. (Northampton Herald, Feb 16, 1850).]


1850 Feb 11 / Met / England / details / Timbs 1851-268. [II; 1372. "Splendid Meteor." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1851, 268-269.]


1850 Feb. 13 / [LT], 7-a / Met. [II; 1373. "A Meteor." London Times, February 13, 1850, p. 7 c. 1. "After descending several degrees it burst exactly like a rocket, and then disappeared. Almost immediately afterwards a continuous peal of thunder was heard for about half a minute. The heavens were exceedingly bright, and where the thunder seemed to roll not the least trace of a cloud was visible, as the stars shone there very brilliantly. The power of the light was so great that a man described to me that the street in which he was walking was as clear as in the daytime." The fireball was observed at Bedford and at Lambeth, about 10:45 p.m.]


[1850 Feb 18 or 28 (?). Wrong date. See: 1850 Feb 28, (II; 1374).]


1850 Feb. 20 / [LT], 6-c / Vesuvius. [II; 1375. "Naples." London Times, February 20, 1850, p. 6 c. 3. "A letter from Naples of the 9th gives an account of an eruption of Mount Vesuvius which has just occurred. According to thjs account it was one of the most magnificent ever seen."]


1850 Feb. 22 / Great met / England / Germany? / BA 60-88. [II; 1376. Greg, 89.]


1850 Feb 26 / Meteor / Vingorlah, India / R—March 19, 1849. [II; 1377. Refer to: 1849 March 19, (A; 259).]


1850 Feb 26 / N / Spon Comb. / Times, 1850, Feb. 26-8-e. [A; 273. "Death by Spontaneous Combustion." London Times, February 26, 1850, p. 8 c. 5. "The following extraordinary occurrence is related in the Gazette des Tribunaux:—'A few days ago, in a tavern near the Barrière de l'Etoile, a journeyman painter, named Xavier C——, well known for his intemperate habits, while drinking with some comrades. laid a wager that he would eat a lighted candle. His bet was taken, and scarcely had he introduced the flaming candle into his mouth when he uttered a slight cry, and fell powerless to the ground. A bluish flame was seen to flicker about his lips, and, on an attempt being made to offer him assistance, the bystanders were horrorstruck to find that he was burning internally. At the end of half an hour his head and the upper part of his chest were reduced to charcoal. Two medical men were called in, and recognized that Xavier had fallen victim to spontaneous combustion. This conflagration of the human frame is frightfully rapid in its progress; bones, skin, and muscle, all are devoured, consumed, and reduced to ashes. A handful of dust on the spot where the victim fell is all that remains.'" (Gazette des Tribunaux, ab. 1850).]


[1850 Feb 28 /]1850 Feb 18 or 28 (?) / (N)—op '49 / a Schmidt Vulcan / D-193. [II; 1374. The note copies information from page 193 of The Book of the Damned. Carrington, Richard Christopher. "On some previous observations of supposed planetary bodies in transit over the Sun." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 20 (March 1860): 192-194. Schmidt, Johann Friedrich Julius. Resultate aus elfjährigen Beobachtungen der Sonnenflecken. Vienna: Eduard Hölzel, 1857, 32. "Februar 28. 10 U. 12 M. Morg. Ein dunkler wohl 30" grosser Körper zog von W.—O. vor der Sonne vorüber; ich zweiflte gleich, dass es ein ferner Vogel gewessen sei."]


1850 March 8 / [LT], 3-f / Expected great comet / also Ap. 4-5-a / Visible--July 5-6-d / to me in index 4. [II; 1378. Hind, John Russell. "The Expected Great Comet." London Times, March 8, 1850, p. 3 c. 6. "The revolution assigned to the grand comet of 1680 by Halley (575 years), and copied into nearly all our popular works on astronomy, can hardly be correct, as the testimony of many historians, uknown to that astronomer, has more recently shown. In fact, after a strict search through the history of comets in past times, there does not appear to be any one which affords decisive indications of identity with that rendered celerated by our couuntrymen Newton and Halley. It is tolerably certain, that had Halley been acquainted with the particulars brought to light within the last century, he would not have supposed the comet of 1680 to revolve round the sun in 575 years." Hind, John Russell. "The Expected Great Comet." London Times, April 4, 1850, p. 5 c. 1. " Hind, after reviewing a new set of calculations by Bomme with his own calculations, now predicts the return of the comet observed in 1264 and 1556, as "between 1858 and 1860," with "the time fixed for the return of the comet by my elements (August 2, 1858) must be within two years of the truth, (rather than before "the close of 1851," as stated in is previous letter). "The Comet." London Times, July 5, 1850, p. 6 c. 4. "For some few evenings past the comet discovered by Dr. Peterson, at Altona, on the 1st of May, has been visible to the naked eye in the constellation Bootes." Comet C/1850 J1.]


1850-51 / Polt /Stratford, Conn. [A; 274.]


1850 March 10 / Phe at Stratford, Conn, began. / Spiritualist, Aug 16, and 30, 1878. [A; 275. "Remarkable Spiritual Manifestation in the House of the Rev. E. Phelps, D.D." Spiritualist Newspaper, (London), 13 (no. 312; August 16, 1878): 73-78, and, (no. 314; August 30, 1878): 99-102.]


1850 March 10 / Stratford, Conn., phe began. / To Dec, 1851. [A; 276.]


1850— /Stratford, Conn. / Home of Rev. Eliakim Phelps, D.D. / I take from A. C. Holms' acts of Psychic Science, p. 261. There is a detailed account by E. W. Capron in his book "Modern Spiritualism, published in the year 1855. Family was Mr and Mrs Phelps, 2 daughters, aged 16 and 6; two son, aged 12 and 3, and a house maid. The disturbances began March 10, 1850, two years after the family moved in, and continued more than a year and a half. Coming back from church, this day they found the front door open. Furniture in the nursery was in disorder. Nothing else disturbed. In the afternoon, others went to the church, but Dr. Phelps remained at home. He saw and heard nothing, but on return of the others, many things were found out of place. In a bedroom, a nightgown was laid on a bed, with arms crossed on breast to represent a corpse. There were "cryptic writings" on the walls. Next day articles from a locked trunk were taken out. Small articles were thrown about. Third day increase of throwing about. So each day. On fifth rappings and heavy poundings that "terminated in a frightful scream which was not human in character". A chair rose and violently beat the floor. The disturbances were usually in the day and ended at sunset. / On the 6th day the phe centered upon the son Harry, aged about 12. His clothes torn, while in the house and again while in a carriage with his father. Seventh day effigies skillfully made by stuffing clothes appeared in various parts of the house. Found in locked rooms. About 12 of them. Some placed in attitudes of devotion with an open Bible or prayer book before them. Such skill that one of them was recognized as a representation of Mrs. Phelps. Hats of visitors carried away and hidden. Boy Harry tormented—lifted from floor—once put in the cistern—once suspended from a tree. Several times he was insensible, from 10 to 50 minutes. He was sent away. Phe stopped. He returned. Phe returned. About the 4th week damage began. Panes of glass broken by household articles thrown against them.Spirits angered by something? Water from pitchers poured on beds. Furniture damaged—$200. April 13th especial violence, and poundings so that no sleep in the house. Mrs Phelps, while in bed, was pinched and pricked as if by pins. A spiritualist is said to have got into communication, with raps, and the spirit rapped out a long story of a transaction by which members of the family were defrauded. This story was not published. Damage increased. Dr Phelps noticed that presence of strangers affected phe. With some greater violence; with other phe stopped. Communications continued. According to these more than one spirit. One spirit would accuse another of lying. One would pound to confuse a message of another. To the question as to why such damage was done, the answer was "For fun." This is a typical boy's answer. I remember that when I was a boy and was questioned as to why I had been mischevious I answered, as a standardized answer—"For fun." The language was often orifane, but rarely obscene. Found that diplomacy had effect upon the spirits. During a disturbance, some one commanded them or it to stop. Disturbances went on. Someone else asked them to be so kind as to stop. Phe. stopped Other such instances. In Nov., 1851, boy Harry was sent to a boarding school in Philadelphia, though the spirits had warned Dr Phelps not to send him, because harm would befall him. Two days later he was sent home. Loud raps had disturbed the school and his clothes had been torn to ribbons. Piano was heard to play. There were mysterious fires. Papers on which were direct spirit writings were burned. In July, 1851, Harry was sent away for two months, and while away was entranced and clarvoyant. Said that his sister too was a medium. All phe ceased Dec 15, 1851. [A; 277.1 to 277.21. Holms, Archibald Campbell. The Facts of Psychic Science And Philosophy. Jamaica, N.Y.: Occult Press, 1927, 261-267. Capron, Eliab Wilkinson. Modern Spiritualism. Boston: Bela Marsh, 1855; 132-171. "Family was Mr and Mrs Phelps" was given as "Capron" on the note, (given as such by Thayer and Pabst).]


1850 March 21 / [LT], 6-c / Meteor. [II; 1379. Law, William. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, March 21, 1850, p. 6 c. 3. Law observed "a remarkable beam of light" on the nights of March 10, 12, and 13, "stretching from the horizon to a point midway between Aries and the Pleiades"; and, tho his first impression was that of an auroral light, he thought afterwards that it was either the zodiacal light or a comet.]


1850 March 25 / This day cor in LT, Aug 27, 1859, saw sunspot as a notch on edge of sun. [II; 1380. Newall, Robert Stirling. "Solar Spots and the Weather." London Times, August 27, 1859, p. 5 c. 6.]


[1850 April 1 /] 1850 (Sept 30) / Met rocket / One seen on Sep. 30, 1850, mistaken for an alarm rocket, at Aden, by a sentry, who discharged his gun and summoned garrison of 3000 men to arms. / B As. 51/43. [II; 1462. Fort confuses two meteors into one in this note. The meteor observed at Aden occurred on April 1, 1850; and, the other, "Jenny Lind's meteor," was observed on September 30, 1850. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 43-44. For the account of "Jenny Lind's meteor": Powell, Baden. "Report on observations of luminous meteors, 1854-55." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1855, Notices and Abstracts, 79-100, at 95.]


1850 Ap. 10 / Bombay / meteor / R—March 19, 1849. [II; 1381. Refer to: 1849 March 19, (A; 259).]


1850 Ap. 13 / Waterspout strikes vessel in Bristol Channel—vessel towed to Bristol. / L.T. 16-5-f / N.M. [II; 1382. "A Waterspout.—Bristol." London Times, April 16, 1850, p. 5 c. 6. "As the Fanny and Jane brig, 118 tons, from London to Bristol, with a cargo of wines and general merchandise, was proceeding up channel, when about 12 miles off Padstow she had her masts, bowspit, and everything above deck carried away by a waterspout."]


1850 Ap. 14 / Phe / See 1805. [II; 1383. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448.)  See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1850 Ap 15, 16, 17 / Meteors / India / R—March 19, 1849. [II; 1384. Refer to: 1849 March 19, (A; 259).]


1850 April 17 / Pollen / 11 a.m. / At Mumbles, near Swansea, yellow rain. Colored by pollen / Gardeners' Chronicle, June 1. [II; 1385. "In the autumn of 1845...." Gardeners' Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 1850 no. 22 (June 1, 1850): 339. "A yellow rain fell on the 17th of last April, at 11 o'clock A.M., at the Mumbles, near Swansea, the sky being at the time bright and free from clouds. The spots of rain when fresh were of an ochre yellow, and the colour remained for many days, notwithstanding heavy rains, where the spots had fallen."]


1850 Ap. 18 / At Dublin, perhaps most terrific th storm known in northern latitudes. / A. Reg. 1850-58. [II; 1386. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 92 (1850): pt. 2, 1-160, at 58-59, cv. "Awful Storm and Destruction of Property at Dublin."]


1850 / 19th April, and others up to 21st // (q and hail) / Anatolia / The strongesr shocks followed shortly after heavy storms of hail. / Timbs 1851-266. [II; 1387. "Earthquake in Anatolia." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1851, 266-267.]


1850 Ap. 20 / Extraordinary display of meteors, various parts of India / Observatory 20/174. [II; 1388. Denning, William Frederick. "The April Meteors." Observatory, 20 (1897): 174-175.]


1850 Ap. 29 / [LT], 3-d / Singular case of an eagle at Crathy. [A; 278. "Singular Story of an Eagle." London Times, April 29, 1850, p. 3 c. 4. A captive eagle escaped its cage, but, two days later, she descended with a few yards of her former owner and submitted to her recapture.]


1850 May 5 / Hailstorm / Phil Mag 1850-420. [II; 1389. Birt, William Radcliffe. "On the Hail Storm of May 5, 1850, as observed at the Kew Observatory." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 36 (June, 1850): 420-423.]


1850 May 13 / Shock / California / during eruption of Mauna Loa / List of recorded earthquakes in California, Lower California, Oregon and Washington Territory, by Edward S. Holden. [II; 1390. Holden, Edward Singleton. List of Recorded Earthquakes in California, Lower California, Oregon and Washington Territory. Sacramento: State Office, J.D. Young, Supt. of State Printing, 1887, 22.]


1850 May 21 / 9:30 p.m. / det met / Bonn / BA 60-90. [II; 1391. Greg, 90.]


1850 June 4 / (d-fog and mets) / France / Dry fog and many falling stars / strong odor of sulphur / June 5, evening—great bolide / " 6, "—another / All these recorded together by M. Goldschmidt / Cosmos 15/36. [II; 1392. "Faits de science." Cosmos, 15 (July 8, 1859): 36-38, at 36-37.]


1850 June 4 / d. fog and mets / France—Dry fog with a sulphurous odor—considerable number of falling stars / in the evening—5th, a great bolide seen in a great part of France / 6th, a daylight meteor at Dijon / Cosmos 15-36. [II; 1393. "Faits de science." Cosmos, 15 (July 8, 1859): 36-38, at 36-37.]


1850 June / Series / 4-d fog and mets / 5—9 p.m.—met / 5—electric—electric / 6—11 a.m.—det met / [6]—9 p.m., again / See June 16. [II; 1394. See: 2850 June 4, (II: 1392 & 1393); 1850 June 5, (II: 1395 to 1400); 1850 June 6, (II: 1401 to 1409); and, 1850 June 16, (II; 1414).]


1850 June 5 / 9:23 p.m. / Great meteor / Caen / C.R. 30/781 / BA 60-90. [II; 1395. "Météore lumineux observé à Caen, dans la soirée du 5 juin." Comptes Rendus, 30 (1850): 781. Greg, 90.]


1850 June 5 / evening / At Wingerworth, Derbyshire—"lightning flashes terminating in squares and balls of fire." / BA 50-102. [II; 1396. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 102-103.]


1850 June 5 / between 9 and 10 p.m. / Havre and Rouen / meteor size of moon / BA 50-118 / Rouen, ab 9:15, detonating. [II; 1397. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 117-118. Greg, 90.]


1850 June 5 / ab. 10 p.m. / An extraordinary meteor at Amiens fell in a northwesterly direction and was visible a minute. / Le Moniteur Universel, June 8 / p.1972 / June 10—2000—at Havre and Rouen—said was 9:15 at Rouen when detonation was heard. / Also at Auxerre / See 6th. / Le Mon—16—2070-2+ / visible a minute. [II; 1398.1, 1398.2. (Le Moniteur. June 8, 1850, p. 1972; June 10, 1850, p. 2000; June 16, 1850, p. 2070, 2+).]


1850 June 5 / 9:23 p.m. / at Caen / The meteor during stormy weather / C.R. 30-781. [II; 1399. "Météore lumineux observé à Caen, dans la soirée du 5 juin." Comptes Rendus, 30 (1850): 781.]


1850 June 5 / Some math. of this bolide in C.R. 36-1022. [II; 1400. Petit, Frédéric. "Note sur le bolide du 5 juin 1850." Comptes Rendus, 36 (1853): 1022-1027.]


1850 June 6 / At Tonnerre and at Auxerre (Côte d'Or), 11 a.m., 2 loud detonations and a trembling of the earth—at Auxerre, several times during the day. [II; 1401.]


1850 June 6 / (11 a.m.) / Le Moniteur Universel, June 21-2125-2, says that ac to the Courrier de Lyon there had been heard in Côte d'Or a great commotion of unknown origin, but that the mystery had been cleared up. A cor. had written telling of having been in his garden at 11:15. Had seen in the sky a red globe making a trail of fire. He had heard that a dark object had been seen falling. [II; 1402. (Le Moniteur Universel, June 21-2125-2,).]


1850 June 6 / 11:25 a.m. / France / great det met / BA 60-90. [II; 1403. Greg, 90. Lowe, 137.]


1850 June 6 / 11 a.m. / Montbard, Chatillon, Dijon, Semur (Côte d'Or), Tonnerre (Yonne) Loud detonations like discharge of artillery and severe q of earth / CR 30-784. [II; 1404. Luquet. "Détonation entendue, par un temps serein, à Montbard, à Châtillon, à Dijon, à Semur (Côte-d'Or) et à Tonnerre (Yonne)." Comptes Rendus, 30 (1850): 784-785.]


1850 June 6 / 11:15 a.m. / At Bretenières (Côte d'Or), luminous meteor and 2 detonations. / C.R. 31-11 // Luminous meteor seen at Dijon—31-178. / Perrey writes that seems "we" were in a path of remarkable meteors; but not "we" France? [II; 1405. "M. Arago, à l'occasion de ces deux communications...." Comptes Rendus, 31 (1850): 11. Perrey, Alexis. "Note sur une détonation aérienne, entendue à Dijon le 6 juin 1850, et qui a coincidé sensiblement avec l'apparition d'un bolide." Comptes Rendus, 31 (1850): 177-179.]


1850 June 6 / 9:28 p.m. / Near Orly (Seine), met. Also in the Oise, where detonation heard and quaking of earth reported. / C.R. 30/782 / Verify this. [II; 1406. Bourdin. "Observation d'un météore lumineux à Choisy-le-Roi (Seine) dans la soirée du 6 juin." Comptes Rendus, 30 (1850): 781-782. Beauvais is the capital of the Oise département. See: 1850 June 6, (II; 1408).]


1850 June / News date June 11—"avant-hier" concussions felt at Hornberg (Saxe-Altenbourg) / Le Mon. Univ., June 19-1-2* / Crater few yards long found on the mt. and a gush of water sprang from it and fell in Juisseau de Zschapabad. / warm water of a "gout doucereux". [II; 1407. (Le Moniteur. 1850 June 19-1-2).]


1850 June 6 / 9:35 p.m. / After disap of the met, a shock felt at Beauvais. / C.R. 30-783 / Detonations heard. [II; 1408. Maillard. "Apparition d'un météore lumineux suivi d'une détonation, observé le 6 juin 1850, vers 9h 30m du soir, sur plusiers points du département de l'Oise." Comptes Rendus, 30 (1850): 782-783.]


1850 June 6 / 11:15 / At Montbard, Tonnerre, Semur, Dijon, Chatillon, loud detonation. / C.R. 30-784 / Said was heard again several times during the day, but fainter—detonations. / Heard at Auxerre, where night of 5th, three meteors had been seen. / On 6th, at Tonnerre, strong q. and sound. // June 5 / Meteor at Compiègne at 9:35 p.m. / C.R. 30-832. [II; 1409.1, 1409.2. Luquet. "Détonation entendue, par un temps serein, à Montbard, à Châtillon, à Dijon, à Semur (Côte-d'Or) et à Tonnerre (Yonne)." Comptes Rendus, 30 (1850): 784-785. "M. Préaux donne quelques détails sur le météore lumineux du 5 juin...." Comptes Rendus, 30 (1850): 832.]


1850 June 10 / Meteor / Kishnaghur, India / R—March 19, 1849. [II; 1410. Refer to: 1849 March 19, (A; 259).]


1850 June 11 / [LT], 8-e / Comets and cometic meteors. [II; 1411. Legh, Peter. "Comets and Cometic Meteors." London Times, June 11, 1850, p. 8 c. 5. Legh writes that, in June, 1849, he predicted a "cometic meteor" would appear in late September or early October; and, he claims that it was identified as Encke's comet. He, now, predicts more "cometic meteors" appearing on September 10, October 10, and December 6, in 1850. His "cometic meteors" were supposed to be generated by gases "drawn off" from Mercury and Venus, when in conjunction with the new moon.]


1850 June 12 / Kesen, Rikuzen, Japan / met / (F). [II; 1412. Fletcher, 101. This is the Kesen meteorite.]


1850 June 12 / 10:45 p.m. / From Observatory of Paris / Whole sky illumined by met as if from 2 degrees south of Jupiter to about 8 degrees below. / C.R. 30/758. [II; 1413. Laugier. "Sur le météore du 12 juin 1850." Comptes Rendus, 30 (1850): 758.]


1850 June 16 / 6:25 p.m. / sun shining / brilliant met at New Haven, Conn. / A. J. Sci 2/11/131 / In northern sky. [II; 1414. "Meteor seen in full Daylight." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 11 (1851): 131. Greg, 90.]


1850 June 22 / London / great met / BA 60-90. [II; 1415. Greg, 90.]


1850 June 22 / ab 11 a.m. / At Oviedo, Spain, a strange sound and flaming appearance in sky. / CR 31-74 / Said that aerolite had fallen in direction of Proaza, near O. Sounds like cannon fire at Sison. [II; 1416. Petit, Frédéric. "Observation de deux bolides faite à Toulouse le 6 et le 8 juillet 1850." Comptes Rendus, 31 (1850): 73-74.]


1850 June 22 / Oviedo, Spain / Metite / BA '60. [II; 1417. Greg, 90.]


1850 July 4 / 10 p.m. / Lightning flashes without thunder at Havana / C.R. 41-77. [II; 1418. Poey, André. "Sur les éclairs sans tonnerre observés à la Havane, du 15 juillet 1850 au 11 juillet 1851, dans le sein des cumulo-stratis isolés de l'horizon." Comptes Rendus, 41 (1855): 75-77, at 77.]


1850 July 4 / [LT], 6-b / Sept 30-6-b / Incendiary fires in France. [A; 279. "France." London Times, July 4, 1850, p. 6 c. 1-2. "France." London Times, September 30, 1850, p. 6 c. 1-3.]


1850 July 5 / Bolide / Grantham; Boston / det met / ? / BA 60-90. [II; 1419. Greg, 90. Lowe, 137. Lowe also lists another meteor, at Grantham, on July 14, 1850.]


1850 July 6 / 9:03 p.m. / Toulous / Met N to S. and cast a vivid light. / C.R. 31-73. [II; 1420. Petit, Frédéric. "Observation de deux bolides faite à Toulouse le 6 et le 8 juillet 1850." Comptes Rendus, 31 (1850): 73-74.]


1850 July 8 / Toulouse / 9:23 p.m. / great met / C.R. 31-74. [II; 1421. Petit, Frédéric. "Observation de deux bolides faite à Toulouse le 6 et le 8 juillet 1850." Comptes Rendus, 31 (1850): 73-74.]


[1850 July 15. Wrong date. See: 1860 July 15, (I; 1422).]


1850 July 15 / q in Austria / BA '11. [II; 1423. Milne, 709.]


1850 July 15 / Waterspout burst upon Orleans with great damage. / Northampton herald, 27th. [II; 1424. (Northampton Herald, 1850 July 27).]


1850 July 15 / Heavy th storm at Olney/ 17th, one of the most violent th. storms remembered at O. / Northampton Herald, July 20. [II; 1425. (Northampton Herald, 1850 July 20).]


1850 July 15 / Hot water / Th storm at Bristol / In a panful of the water that fell, a thermometer was placed and it registered 74 degrees. / L.T. 17-7-b. [II; 1426. "Accidents by Lightning." London Times, July 17, 1850, p. 7 c. 2.]


1850 July 15 / Th storm / extreme violence / Bristol / several struck by lightning / M. Post, 18th. [II; 1427. "Thunderstorm at Bristol." London Morning Post,  July 18, 1850, p. 2 c. 3.]


1850 July 15 / Severe th. storm / Chatham / M. Post, 18th. [II; 1428. "Thunder Storm.—Chatham." London Morning Post,  July 18, 1850, p. 6 c. 4.]


1850 July 16 / Wingerworth (June 5), Derbyshire, is ab. 40 miles from Manchester. W is between Manchester and Nottingham. [II; 1429.]


1850 July 16, etc. / Standard / Nothing. [II; 1430.]


1850 July 16 / (Cut) / Manchester / ab. 4 p.m. / peals of thunder in distance / At Bolton, 12 miles away—a heavy th storm until 6 or 7. But at 9, at Manchester frequent flashes of sheet lightning and luminous balls seen moving slowly—repeating frequently. / B Assoc 1850/31. [II; 1431.1, 1431.2. Clare, Peter. "On some extraordinary Electrical Appearances observed at Manchester on the 16th of July 1850." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, Notices and Abstracts, 31-32.]


1850 July 16 / and 19 // hail / B. rain / Rev John T. Tryon, Rector at Bulwick Rectory, writes in Northampton Herald, Aug 3—on 16th, fell hail size of walnuts. On 19th, afternoon, rain "perfectly black" came in one cloud and fell locally. / The year before been a black rain, not soot but hard black particles. [II; 1432.1, 1432.2. (Northampton Herald, 1850 Aug 3).]


1850 July 16 / afternoon / Most terrible thunderstorm remembered at Saffron Walden / Hail 3 or 4 inches circumference / M. Post, 20th. [II; 1433. "Terrific Thunder Storm at Saffron Walden." London Morning Post,  July 20, 1850, p. 8 c. 2.]


1850 July 16 / Terrible storm of thunder, lightning, rain and hail the size of marbles at Melton / M. Post, 20. [II; 1434. "Thunder Storm." London Morning Post,  July 20, 1850, p. 4 c. 6.]


1850 July 16 / Tremendous th. storm at Maidstone / M. Post, 25th. [II; 1435. "The Weather." London Morning Post, July 25, 1850, p. 2 c. 3.]


1850 July 16 and 19 / Sounds / black / Northampton, Eng / D-33. [II; 1436. The note copies information from page 33 of The Book of the Damned. "A Black Shower." Timbs'  Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1851, 270-271.]


1850 July / B. rain and detonation / Feb 7 and 17, 1882. [II; 1437. (See: 1882 Feb 7 and 17.)]


1850 July / Detonations and d. fog / May 16, etc., 1883. [II; 1438. (See: 1883 May 16.)]


1850 July 17 / Village of Woodham Walter, Essex, devastated by deluge that fell, afternoon. Furniture swept from cottages to places a mile away. / M. Post, 25th / All outbuildings of cottages swept away. [II; 1439. "Extraordinary Flood." London Morning Post, July 25, 1850, p. 3 c. 6.]


1850 July 19 / other black rain at Bulwick was March 7, 1849. [II; 1440. See: 1849 March 7, (II; 1279).]


1850 July 21 / Terrific th. storm, Bicester and Banbury, discussed in Northampton Herald, July 27—considerable damage by lightning. [II; 1441.]


1850 July 22 / Northampton Herald, July 27—at Olney, cockchafers on several trees in numbers so great as to be mistaken for a swarm of bees. [II; 1442. (Northampton Herald, 1850 July 27).]


1850 July 22 / Cockchafers / Northampton Herald, July 27—that "after a violent storm near Clifton, Durham Down was visited by a prodigious swarm of cockchafers. [II; 1443. (Northampton Herald, 1850 July 27).]


1850 July 25 / (D-84) / Fish and water / Rajkote, India / All the Year Round 8/255. [II; 1444. The note copies information from page 84 of The Book of the Damned. "Fallen from the Clouds." All the Year Round, 8 (November 22, 1862): 250-256, at 255. Tennent, James.. Ceylon. London: Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts, 1860, v. 1, 227.]


1850 July 29 / Perforating lightning killing boy / Long Island. * [A; 280.]


1850 / last July // (with July 19) /// While a heavy blight upon peas and beans near Northampton, "The atmosphere was charged with a gloomy brood about 3 days." / Northampton Herald, Aug 24. [II; 1445.  

(Northampton Herald, 1850 Aug 24).]


1850 Aug 4 / 7 p.m. / Lightning flashes without thunder at Havana / C.R. 41-77. [II; 1446. Poey, André. "Sur les éclairs sans tonnerre observés à la Havane, du 15 juillet 1850 au 11 juillet 1851, dans le sein des cumulo-stratis isolés de l'horizon." Comptes Rendus, 41 (1855): 75-77, at 77.]


1850 Aug 9 /met shower / At Collingwood, of 75 meteors in an hour or more, all but 4 or 5 from a point somewhere near Beta Camelopardali. / BA 51-39. [II; 1447. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 39.]


1850 Aug. 9 / Stat met / Observatory 2/165. [II; 1448. Denning, William Frederick. "Meteor Notes for September." Observatory, 2 (1878): 163-165, at 165. These stationary meteors begin and end their path through the atmosphere in the line of sight of the observer, (thus appearing not to move across the sky, ie. "stationary"), which can assist in finding the radiant point of a meteor shower.]


1850 Aug 11 / A flight of about 50 meteors over Kettering. / Northampton Herald, 24th. [II; 1449. (Northampton Herald, 1850 Aug 24).]


1850 Aug 15/ [LT], 5-a / Met / S. Claydon. [II; 1450. "To the Editor of the Times. London Times, August 15, 1850, p. 5 c. 1. "A bright flash shone in the west, and from the centre of this was projected a beautiful luminous line running east and west. At first it presented a red hue, but gradually became paler, the light darting backwards and forwards along (what seemed) the line of attraction, very much like the passage of electricity over a metallic chain, as we have seen in the experiments exhibited by lecturers on that science. It continued visible for above 30 seconds, becoming gradually more indistinct till it faded away."]


[1850 Aug 29. Meteor. Highfield House. "...a meteor which suddenly and abruptly changed its path (Fig. 20)." Lowe, 134, 137.]


1850 Aug 20 / [LT], 6-d / Spon. Comb. [A; 281. "Spontaneous Combustion." London Times, August 20, 1850, p. 6 c. 4. An apparatus for extinguishing fires was demonstrated in Newcastle, but the article has no mention of "spontaneous combustion" other than its title.]


1850 Aug 30 / [LT], 7-d / Tidal phe. [II; 1451. "Tidal Phenomenon." London Times, August 30, 1850, p. 7 c. 4. Affidavits were obtained by a whaling captain, from two residents of the Society Islands, stating the "the tides about the Polynesian Islands do not follow the Newtonian law of variation."  "The different phases of the moon have no effect whatever in changing the time of high water. At the full and change the tides are from six to eight inches higher; the full rise being about two feet."]


1850 Aug, last of / Deluges / Jamaica / N.Y. Herald, Sept 12-3-6. [II; 1452. "Our Jamaica Correspondence." New York Herald, September 12, 1850, p. 3 c. 6.]


1850 Aug, last / and Sept 1st // Destructive storms / U.S. / N.Y. Herald, Sept 8-1-4. [II; 1453. "More of the Late Storms and Floods." New York Herald, September 8, 1850, p. 1 c. 4-5.]


1850 Sept, 1st week / Floods / U.S. / N.Y. Herald, 12-3-5. [II; 1454. "The Late Floods in the United States...." New York Herald, September 12, 1850, p. 3 c. 5-6.]


1850 Sept / Th. st / Spain / B. Assoc / 49. [II; 1455. (Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. Find. Fix.).]


[1850 Sept 4 /] 1851 Sept. 4 / S / bodies Read / D-208. See Herschel, Objs and Magnetic disturbances, Oct, 1870. [II; 1545. The note copies information from page 208 of The Book of the Damned. "Letter from the Rev. W. Read, Vicarage, South Mimms." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 11 (December 13, 1850): 48. The date was September 4, 1850, (not in 1851). "Letter from the Rev. William Read respecting the luminous bodies seen on Sept. 4, 1850." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 12 (December 12, 1851): 38-39. Correct quote: "...but I have never witnessed any such appearance before." W.R. Dawes. "On luminous meteor-like bodies, telescopically visible in sunshine." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 12 (April 7, 1852): 183-185. Baden Powell. "Report on observations of luminous meteors, 1851-52." Annual Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, 178-239, at 235-7. Fort takes this data from Charles B. Chalmer's letter to Read, except for Read's denial of the objects being seeds. See: 1870 Oct 14 and 25, (IV; 249), and, 1869 Oct 17-18, (IV; 254).]


1850 Sept 7 / Lit. Gazette of —New star in Little Bear, by M. Calomarde. [II; 1456. "New Star." Literary Gazette, 1850 (September 7, 1850): 656. "New Star." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1851, 374. "M. Guillen Y Calomarde has discovered a new telescopic star between the polar star and Cynosure, near the rise of the tail of the Little Bear; a star, at least, which did not exist in October, 1849." "Monthly Record of Current Events." Harper's New Monthly Magazine, 1 (November, 1850): 849-856, at 854.]


1850 Sept 14 / moon / Rev. T. Rankin saw part of moon (in 8th day) blotted out as if by a shadow. For more than an hour he examined it, and it remained the same. / [B] Assoc 51-41 / B. As. 57-41. [II; 1457. Thomas Rankin's letter is dated "Jan. 23, 1851." Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 41-42. "I do not know whether you observed the singular appearance of the moon in her 8th day on the evening of September 14th. It resembled a capital D with a flat bottom. The southern and eastern sides formed a right angle└. I thought at first that some optical illusion had caused the appearance, but having viewed her through some lenses, I found that the appearance was the same as that by the naked eye. I repeated the examination at different times for more than an hour, with always the same appearance and shape. I could account for the perpendicular line, but not for the horizontal, unless it had been the shadow of a huge mountain."]


[1850 Sept 14 /] 1850 Oct. 9 / Moon D-shaped / Brit Assoc. 1851/41. [II; 1469. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 41-42.]


1850 Sept. 26 / Fluctuations in Zeta Lyrae, by Heis, like—see March, 1856. / J. B. A. A., 13-326. [II; 1458. "Astronomical Publications." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 13 (1902-1903): 324-330, at 326. Hagen, Johann Georg. "Discussion of a Questionable Type of  Temporary Stars." Astrophysical Journal, 17 (1903): 281-285, at 282-283. "A similar fluctuation of light was observed in ζ Lyrae by Heis on Sept. 26, 1850." The instantaneous variations of light observed by Eduard Heis was of Zeta Lyrae, a spectroscopic binary. "'ζ Lyrae became for a moment very bright, and then again faint' (' ζ Lyrae wurde einen Moment sehr hell und hierauf wieder dunkel')."]


1850 Sept 27 / Lumps of ice / destructive fall at Pittsburg, Pa / many 9 to 14 inches in circumference, weighing from 8 ounces to a pound / ac to Pittsburg Gazette, copied in NY Herald, Oct 4-6-6 / Some were irregular shaped, but most round or oval, made up of concentric rings. [II; 1459.1, 1459.2. "The Terrible Hailstorm at Pittsburg." New York Herald, October 4, 1850, p. 6 c. 6.]


1850 Sept 30 / Met train / 8:54. p.m. / from Perseus / great met / New England / A. J. Sci 2/11/131 / The train for more than an hour. [II; 1460. "Meteor of September 30, 1850." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 11 (1851): 131-133.]


[1850 Sept 30 - Oct 1 /] 1851 Oct / about 20th? // Shock in Ohio and same night a great meteor that left a 20-minutes train in eastern states. / Strykers Amer Register, 1851. [II; 1556. "Earthquake and Meteor." Stryker's American Register and Magazine, 5 (1851): 171. "Meteor of September 30, 1850." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 11 (1851): 131-133. "On Monday evening, Sept. 30, 1850, about 8 o'clock, a meteoric fireball of uncommon splendor was seen throughout New England and the adjoining regions." "Earthquake at Cleveland." Republic, (Washington), October 8, 1850, p. 2 c. 6. The earthquake occurred at 5:20 A.M., on October 1, 1850. See: 1850 Oct 1, (II; 1466).]


1850 Sept 30 / Great met train / Mass. / BA 55/94. [II; 1461. Powell, Baden. "Report on observations of luminous meteors, 1854-55." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1855, Reports on the State of Science, 79-100, at 94-96. Lowe, 132, 137, (with 4 figures).]


1850 (Sept 30) / Met rocket / One seen on Sep. 30, 1850, mistaken for an alarm rocket, at Aden, by a sentry, who discharged his gun and summoned garrison of 3000 men to arms. / B As. 51/43. [II; 1462. Fort confuses two meteors into one in this note. The meteor observed at Aden occurred on April 1, 1850; and, the other, "Jenny Lind's meteor," was observed on September 30, 1850. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 43-44. For the account of "Jenny Lind's meteor": Powell, Baden. "Report on observations of luminous meteors, 1854-55." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1855, Reports on the State of Science, 79-100, at 95.]


[1850 Sept 30. Wrong date. See: 1850 April 1, (II; 1462).]


1850 Oct / Small body observed 4 nights. / Smithsonian Miscell. Cols. 20/20 / C-30+ / (Ch). [II; 1465. "151st Meeting. December 7, 1878." Bulletin of the Philosophical Society of Washington, 3 (1878-1880): 20-21; included within: Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, v. 20 art. 3 (1881): i-169, at 20-21. James Ferguson, at the Washington Observatory, noted an object which appeared to be moving during his observations of the asteroid 10 Hygiea. Ferguson, Matthew Fontaine Maury and John Russell Hind had thought this object might be a trans-Neptunian planet. "Recently Professor C.H.F. Peters, Director of the Litchfield Observatory of Hamilton College, has given this matter a critical examination, and has found that the true explanation is that Mr Ferguson made a mistake in observing the difference of declination, and that by making the proper corrections the whole series of observations comes into harmony, and the missing object proves to be a well-known fixed star." "Letter of Lieutenant Maury to Hon. William A. Graham, Secretary of the Navy." Astronomical Journal, 2 no. 8 (October 22, 1851): 53. "The star of comparison with Hygea on the night of October 21, 1850, has disappeared. It is not now to be found where it then was. Hence I infer that it is probably an unknown planet." Ferguson had observed the object, ("9.10 magnitude"), on the nights of "the 16th, 21st, and 22d of October, 1850."  "Letter from Mr. Hind to the Editor." Astronomical Journal, 2 no. 10 (January 1, 1852): 78. "...I am at a loss to imagine how a slow-moving planet of 9.10 magnitude can have escaped me, for since August, 1847, I have never seen any suspicious body in the vicinity. If we assume (as I think we may safely do, on the further hypothesis of circular motion), that Mr. Ferguson's star would be stationary within a day or two before or after October 16, we shall find that a planet in this position must have a distance or more than 137, and a period of above 1600 years." Peters, Christian Heinrich Friedrich. "Investigation of the evidence of a supposed trans-Neptunian planet in the Washington observations of 1850," and, "Letter from Admiral John Rodgers, Superintendent of Naval Observatory at Washington." Astronomische Nachrichten, 94 no. 2240 (1879): 113-116. From John Rodgers: "...Mr. Ferguson actually observed the difference of declination correctly on every occasion, except on that of the two transits of Oct. 16 and the first transit of Oct. 19. At these transits, the wire was recorded 1, but at all the other transits, on Oct. 19 as well as on Oct. 21, the wire was recorded 2. For some unknown reason, Mr Ferguson in his reductions changed all his correct observations to correspond with the erroneous ones." The wires of the micrometer used by Ferguson measured the distances between telescopic objects. Baum, Richard. "Mr. Ferguson's Star Part II: The Record of the Wires." Journal of the British Astronomical Association, 101 (1991): 38. Ferguson's miscalculations thus resulted in a fruitless search for a trans-Neptunian planet, (abandoned on December 11, 1851), which actually was the star known as Lalande 36613.]


1850 Oct. 1 / (Cut) / from 9:10 to 9:30 p.m. / reported from the Observatory of Durham / 3 meteors from an aurora, "not passing through it, but emerging from it". / B As. 1851-23. [II; 1463. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 22-23.]


[1850 Oct 1 /] 1850 Oct 8 / [LT], 8-b / 13-3-f / Auroral Arch. [II; 1467. Gille, Thomas E. "Auroral Arch." London Times, October 8, 1850, p. 8 c. 2. An auroral arch, with a breadth from 2.5 to 3° and extending from Ophiuchus to the Pleiades, was observed north of York, October 1st, from 9:10 until 9:30 p.m. (The issue on October 13 was the Sunday Times, and "13-3-f " was cited in Palmer's Index.) However, the same phenomenon was observed by another correspondent, at the same time, at Esh, six miles west of Durham. Chevallier, Temple. "Auroral Arch." London Times, October 4, 1850, p. 3 c. 6.]


1850 Oct 1 / Q—Cleveland, Ohio. Low rumbling sound like distant thunder—then vibrations felt.  Clear day. / An. Sci. D—'51-278. [II; 1466. "Earthquakes in 1850." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1851, 278-279, at 278.]


[1850 Oct 8. Wrong date. See: 1850 Oct 1, (II; 1467).]


1850 Oct 9 / Large slow met burst. / Rept BA 1860. [II; 1468. Greg, 90. Lowe, 137. At Hereford.]


[1850 Oct. 9. Wrong date. See: 1850 Sept 14, (II; 1469).]


1850 Oct 13 / Met / Toronto, Canada / BA 51/40. [II; 1470. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 24-25, 40. Greg, 90. (Toronto Globe, October 19, 1850.)]


1850 Oct 14 / Ship sunk by waterspout near Malta / Timbs '51-271. [II; 1471. "A Ship Sunk by a Waterspout." Timbs' Year-Book of Facts in Science and Art, 1851, 271.]


1850 Oct 31 / (1st) // Vessel shook like Mik's [or Mile's?] petroleum can / (near England) / Times—or Trans Bombay Geog Soc 13/155. [II; 1472. "Singular Occurrence." London Times, October 31, 1850, p. 6 c. 4. "When the event took place, the vessel was ahout 10 miles S. by W. off Caldy Island. The day was dull and lowering, with the wind fresh. Captain Evans at the moment was below in the cabin, and was startled by the report, which he says sounded to him just like a musket charge, and that he thought the boys were playing upon deck with gunpowder unknown to him; but finding he was mistaken, his attention was drawn to the planking, four of which had been torn out of their places and perforated about 3 inches deep in many spots, which appeared like musket-shot holes, and were all more or less singed. No signs of a thunder storm were to be seen or heard." "Globular Lightning, Fireballs of the glow discharge of Electricity contradistinguished from the Meteorolytes or Fireballs usually composed of solid matter." Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 13 (1856-1857): 148-155, at 155, cv. "Singular Occurrence."]


1850 / after Oct // New Star / An Sci Discov. 1851/374. [II; 1464. "New Star." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1851, 374.]


1850 Nov. 6 / Bombay / Met. streak 20 min. / Rec Sci 1/137. [II; 1473. Lowe, 137. Lowe cites (Buist). Greg, 90.]


1850 Nov. 8 / q. / Malta / I [Light] / BA '11. [II; 1474. Milne, 710.]


1850 Nov 12 / Cut / 5:50 / E J. Lowe / Highfield House / "A brilliant, vivid flash; could it be a meteor?" / B Assoc 1851-26. [II; 1475. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 26-27.]


1850 Nov 14 / morning / In a mountain pass between Bombay and Poonah, 38 mets counted in one hour. / BA 51-46. [II; 1476. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 45-46.]


1850 Nov. 18 / worms in snow / Sangerfield, N.Y. / (D-92). ** [II; 1477.The note copies information from page 92 of The Book of the Damned. "Worms on snow." Scientific American, o.s., 6 (December 7, 1850): 96.]


1850 Nov. 20 / Fr / (Lourdes) St. Pe / q / BA 11. [II; 1478. Milne, 710.]


1850 Nov. 23 / Woodstock / several meteors / BA 51/40. [II; 1479. (BA 51-40).]


1850 Nov. 29 / London / Oxford / met / BA 60-90. [II; 1480. Greg, 90. Lowe, 137. "Stationary for a time."]


1850 Nov. 30 / 3 p.m. / near Bissempore / Metite / BA 51-47. [II; 1481. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1851, 1-52, at 28-29 & 47. Greg, 90.]


1850 Nov. 30 / (F) / Shalka, Bengal / metite / 3 hours before sunset / A. J Sci 2/32/141. [II; 1482. Fletcher, 101. This is the Shalka meteorite. "Calcutta Meteorites." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 32 (1861): 141-143. The meteorite fell "three hours before sunrise."]


1850 Dec 3 / [LT[, 3-f / Met / Devonshire // 4-3-d / at Yalding. [II; 1483. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, December 3, 1850, p. 3 c. 6. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, December 4, 1850, p. 3 c. 4.]


1850 Dec 14 / Near the Bannmouth / aerial troops, etc. / B. Assoc 1852/30 / (See July 15, in the 90's.) / C-212+. [II; 1484. M'Farland, M. "On the Fata Morgana of Ireland." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Notices and Abstracts, 29-30, at 30. See: (July 15 in the '90s.)]


1850 (Dec. 16) / Venus Inf Conj Sun / (Al). [II; 1485.]

 
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