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Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1886


1886:


1886 // Frankfort, Kansas—See May 5, 1888. [B; 678. See: (1888 May 5).]


1886 // Body of Mrs. W.I. Peters / Frankfort, Ind. / See Dec. 22, 1888. [B; 679. See: 1888 Dec 22, (B; 993).]


1886 // Wem—northern Shropshire / Polt—Nov., 1883 / Murders ab. Jan. 1, 1888. [B; 680. See: 1888, (B; 832).]


1886 // Tingwick, Mass / Josephine Bedard / Fasting girl / See Ap. 20, 1889. [B; 681. See: 1889 Ap. 20, (B; 1024).]


1886 // q's record stops in M.W.R. [VI; 336.]


1886 Jan or before / Electric boy of Edinburgh—See The Electrician before Jan 22. / See somewhere around here before—elec-polt, Dec. 24, 1885. [B; 682. Johnstone, James. “The Electric Boy.” Electrician, 16 (December 25, 1885): 131. “He was exhibited in Edinburgh for a long time, and advertised in the newspapers. When I first saw the advertisement I considered it a trick of some showman, therefore did not go near the exhibition; but after meeting with a friend, a scientist, who had seen the boy, I went to see him. He was then exhibited in one of the small stalls in the gallery of the market in Princes-street. I found there a little black boy in charge of a white man. There was no furniture in the stall but a couple of wooden seats and a small piece of carpet to keep the boy’s bare feet off the floor. There was therefore nothing wherewith to conceal any electrical apparatus. As I was at that time the only visitor I had the boy stripped naked and was satisfied there was nothing outside of his skin that could produce electricity. While thus naked he walked in my presence, and also sat on the wooden seat with his feet off the ground. In every position in which I tried him I found electricity proceeded freely from his body when I touched it with one finger. The electricity came with the greatest freedom from the upper half of his body, and especially from his tongue. Although I felt a slight shock in my finger when I touched his tongue he did not seem to feel any; his tongue did not quiver and he did not offer to withdraw it. I thereon asked him if he did not feel anything unpleasant when I touched his tongue. He replied, No! This surprised me much, because when an ordinary person is placed on an insulated stool and there surcharged with electricity and then touched by an uninsulated person, both parties feel the passage of the electricity unpleasant; but not so this boy. He seemed to be so full of electricity that the passage of it from his body gave him no more uneasiness than the passage of perspiration from him.” Johnstone, James. “The Electric Boy.” Electrician, 16 (February 26, 1886): 311. “I forgot to state that there were two electric boys publicly exhibited in this city; one of them was admittedly electrified by external means, the other, I maintain, was not electrified by external means.” “A Fake That Paid.” Los Angeles Daily Herald, October 22, 1887, p. 7 c. 1. Johnny Norton, the “Electric Boy” at Bunnell's Museum in New York City, explained the trickery, thus: “When I was on exhibition I was inclosed in an oblong stall about seven or eight feet long, the front of which was like a narrow counter. Opposite the counter was a rail which only allowed the visitors to pass in single file. A little strip of cocoa matting served as a carpet for the passage way and also as a cover for a sheet of zinc which extended beneath it, running the length of the stall. My box was similarly invested with zinc matting. Attached to the sheets of metal, but hidden from view, were the two poles of a galvanic battery, one under my feet and the other in the passage. Now, anyone passing over the zinc and touching me, behind the counter, completed the circuit aud received a shock. So did I. The matting, of course, had to be kept damp, water beiug the conductor. It was surprising what intelligent people were duped hy this trick. Why, I was kept shaking bands and being fingered from morning until night.”]


1886 Jan 1 / or Dec 31 // See Jan 21. / New Year's Eve / q in central Norway / See Jan. 5 / See March 11. / Nature—33-397. [VI; 337. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (February 25, 1886): 396-397, at 397. See: 1886 Jan 5, (VI; 342); 1886 Jan. 21, (VI; 370); and, 1886 March 11, (VI: 404 & 405).]


1886 Jan. 2 / Norway / Shocks / Norway and Sweden / Nature 33-591. [VI; 338. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (April 22, 1886): 589-592, at 591.]


1886 Jan 3 / Fall of a meteor which killed a horse at Tschembar, Siberia and concussions and strong q-shocks which broke ice in a lake—in C.R. 104-961, C.V. Zenger points out it coincides with time of meteor swarm. [VI; 339. Zenger, Václav Karel Bedřich. “La parallélisme des phénomènes sismiques en février 1887 et des perturbations atmosphèriques électriques, magnétiques et des éruptions volcaniques.” Comptes Rendus, 104 (1887): 959-961. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (April 22, 1886): 589-592, at 591. Tschembar is now identified as Belinsky, Russia.]


1886 Jan 4 / Bristol / Quadrantids missing / Observatory 49-65. [VI; 340. Denning, William Frederick. “Meteor Notes.” Observatory, 49 (1926): 65-66.]


1886 Jan 4 / 1 a.m. / Tschembar, Siberia / Detonating meteor / Shock—several houses fell. / Nature 33-591. [VI; 341. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (April 22, 1886): 589-592, at 591.]


1886 Jan 5 / 5:20 p.m. / at Aas-Norway / Fireball / Nature 33-375 / See Jan 1 and 16. / It appeared in Taurus. / p. 397. [VI; 342. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (February 18, 1886): 374-376, at 375. Aas is now identified as Ås, Norway.]


[1886 Jan 6 /] 1886 Jan 16 / [LT], 9-f / q / Devonshire. [VI; 362. “Earthquake in Devonshire.” London Times, January 6, 1886, p. 9 c. 6.]


1886 Jan 7 / Sunspot seen in Brooklyn. A rectangular active spot rather above medium size about on the meridian. / Sun 16-2-5. [VI; 343. “Sun Spots and Storms.” New York Sun, January 16, 1886, p. 2 c. 5.]


1886 Jan. 7 / 1 a.m. / (Rondont.) / Brilliant display of aurora from a crescent of silvery light in northern horizon. / Sun 8-2-6. [VI; 344. “Brilliant Display in the Heavens.” New York Sun, January 8, 1886, p. 2 c. 6.]


1886 Jan / Norway series / See March 31, 1888. [VI; 345. See: 1888 March 31, (VI; 1299).]


1886 Jan 4 / [LT], 3-f / Butterflies / See March 13-4-c. [VI; 346. Morris, Francis Orpen. “Butterflies.” London Times, January 4, 1886, p. 3 c. 6. “A Butterfly's Wanderings.” London Times, March 13, 1886, p. 4 c. 3.]


1886 Jan 7 / [LT], 6-c / q / Kent. [VI; 347. Brent, A. “The Earthquake.” London Times, January 7, 1886, p. 6 c. 3.]


1886 Jan 8 / 6:10 p.m. / South coast of France / bolide twice the size of Venus in space between Cassiopeia and Aldebaran / La Nat 26/115. [VI; 348. Zurcher, Frédéric. “Bolide Observée à Toulon.” La Nature, 1886 pt. 1 (no. 660; January 23): 115.]


1886 Jan, etc. / Norway Series / See 1888, Jan. to Ap. 2. [VI; 349. See: 1888 Jan 3, (VI; 1222); 1888 Jan. 5, (VI; 1227); 1888 Jan. 8, (VI; 1228); 1888 Jan 13, (VI; 1239); 1888 March 27, (VI; 1297); 1888 March 31, (VI; 1299); and, 1888 Ap. 2, (VI; 1300).]  


1886 Jan 9 / Norway Series / Fine display of aurora in southern Norway / Nature 33-397. [VI; 350. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (February 25, 1886): 396-397, at 397.]


1886 Jan 9 / Great magnetic perturbations / C.R. 102-83. [VI; 351. Mascart. “Perturbation magnétique du 9 janvier 1886.” Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 83-84.]


1886 Jan. 8-9 / q / Greece / I = small / BA '11. [VI; 352. Milne, 733.]


1886 Jan 12 / Guayaquil / Sky red and detonations. Supposed q at Cotopaxi. / Nature 33-396. [VI; 353. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (February 25, 1886): 396-397, at 396.]


1886 Jan 11 / Shower of earth at Guayaquil. 12th, loud rumbling sounds. 14th, fall of ashes. At first attributed to Cotopaxi, but then learned that been eruption of Tunguragua. / Sun 26-2-5. [VI; 354. “A Volcano in Full Blast.” New York Sun, January 26, 1886, p. 2 c. 5. The Cotopaxi and Tungurahua volcanoes both erupted in January, (the latter beginning on January 11, 1886).]


1886 Jan 11 / 5 to 6 p.m. / Showers of earth at Chimbo, Ecuador / Jan 11—9 p.m.—quake at Guayaquil / Jan 12—noon—loud rumbling sounds / 14th—night—Guayaquil—fall of ashes / From eruption of Tunguragua / N.Y. World 26-4-6. [VI; 355. (New York World, January 26, 1886, p. 4 c. 6.) The Tunguragua volcano.]


1886 Jan 14 / Phil Pub Ledger of / Polts in Cinncinnati. [B; 683. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 14, 1886.)]


[1886 Jan 14, ab. Wrong date. See: 1886 March 14, (B; 684).]


1886 Jan 14 / Guayaquil rumblings and shower of earth and ashes—Cotopaxi supposed in eruption. / Sun 15-3-5 / See June 26, 1877. [VI; 356. “Shaken by Earthquakes.” New York Sun, January 15, 1886, p. 3 c. 5. See: 1877 June 26, (IV: 2160, 2161, & 2162). The Cotopaxi volcano.]


1886 Jan 15 / 5:15 p.m. / Shock as if of earthquakes / Bordentown, N.J. / Phil Pub Ledger, 18th. [VI; 357. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 18, 1886.)]


1886 Jan 15 / 11:30 p.m. / Nyack, N.Y. / 2 distinct shocks / Sun 17-9-2. [VI; 358. “Earthquake Shocks at Nyack.” New York Sun, January 17, 1886, p. 9 c. 2.]


1886 Jan 15 / 2 q's reported near N.Y. due to dynamite explosions. / MWR '86/23. [VI; 359. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 1; January 1886): 22-25, at 23.]


1886 Jan. 15 / Met at (on 16th) 5° in west / 9 p.m. / M.W.R.—1886/23 / and explosions in N.J., 5:15 / and explosion, midnight. / near NY reported as qs. [VI; 360. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 1; January 1886): 22-25, at 23.]


1886 Jan 17, Feb 4, Mar 4, July 17, Nov 13 / Explosions or accidents near NY at Aqueduct / Trib. [VI; 361. “Shaken Up by Dynamite.” New York Tribune, January 17, 1886, p. 1 c. 4. “Annihilated by Dynamite.” New York Tribune, February 4, 1886, p. 1 c. 4. “Leaping from a Burning Bucket.” New York Tribune, July 17, 1886, p. 1 c. 5. “Two Men Killed in the Aqueduct.” New York Tribune, November 13, 1886, p. 1 c. 4.]


[1886 Jan 16. Wrong date. See: 1886 Jan 6, (VI; 362).]


1886 Jan 16 / 9:49 p.m. / Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin / Met from Zeta Andromedae. Detonations like distant thunder. / M.W.R., Jan. [VI; 363. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 1; January 1886): 22-25, at 23.]


1886 Jan 16 / Norway Series / See Jan. 5. / 4 a.m. / Shock followed by vivid flashes of lightning, central Norway. At 8:15 a.m., northern Norway, a magnificent meteor. / Nature 33-397. [VI; 364. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (February 25, 1886): 396-397, at 397. See: 1886 Jan 5, (VI; 342).]


1886 Jan 19 / [LT], 6-d / Met. [VI; 365. “Remarkable Meteor.” London Times, January 19, 1886, p. 6 c. 4.]


1886 Jan 19 / [LT], 4-d / Submarine volc. [VI; 366. “A Submarine Volcano.” London Times, January 19, 1886, p. 4 c. 4. The Fonuafo'ou volcano.]


1886 / ab Jan 20 // Began violent spasms and trances of 11-year-old daughter of M.J. Huff, near Sand Hill, Marshall Co., Pa. / N.Y. World, Feb 4-1-2 / Scarcely any food. [B; 685. (New York World, February 4, 1886, p. 1 c. 2.)]


1886 Jan. 20 / 7 a.m. / Shock at St. Austell, Cornwall, preceded by a loud explosive sound. / Chambers' Journal 63-138. [VI; 367. “The Month: Science and Arts.” Chambers's Journal, s. 5 v. 3 (February 27, 1886): 137-143, at 138.]


1886 Jan 20 / Jupiter stationary. [VI; 368.]


1886 Jan 21 / [LT], 6-f / q—Cornwall. [VI; 369. “Earthquake in Cornwall.” London Times, January 21, 1886, p. 6 c. 6.]


1886 Jan. 21 / Norway Series / 9:55 p.m. / Shock at Hernösand on the Baltic and again Jan 22, 5 a.m. / Nature 33-591. [VI; 370. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (April 22, 1886): 589-592, at 591.]


1886 Jan 23 / Rel-Ph-Jour, 5-1 / Home of James W. Pollard, Henry Co., Ky. He and wife seated by fire. A bucket of water lifted and spilled and lifted and spilled several times when Pollard re-filled it. [B; 686. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 39 (no. 22; January 23, 1886): 4, (c. 6), & 5, (c. 1-2).]


1886 Jan 23 / —q, Hungary / 29, Spain and Algeria // BA '11. [VI; 371. Milne, 733.]


1886 Jan 24 / 7:04 p.m. / Southern part Duchess Co, N.Y.—slight shock but loud noise like that of a distant explosion. / M.W.R., Jan. [VI; 372. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 1; January 1886): 22-25, at 23.]


1886 Jan 26 / ab. 4 p.m. / Austin, Texas. / Shower of fine dust. Had been a similar phe 8 years before. / M.W.R., Jan. [VI; 373. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 1; January 1886): 22-25, at 24. “Austin, Travis county, Texas: about 4 p.m. of the 26th. a shower of very fine dust began falling from a clear sky; there was no wind at the time; the shower increased towards evening and continued late into the night.”]


1886 Jan 27 / Trib, 4-4 / Explosion / Newburg / Editorial. [VI; 374. “The Newburg Mine Disaster.” New York Tribune, January 27, 1886, p. 4 c. 4.]


1886 Jan 27 / Metite in Madras / L'Astro, 6/23 / (F) / C.R. 103-726 / See Feb. 19, '84; Ap. 6, '85 / Naimmianthol, Madras / La Nat 28-351. [VI; 375. Fletcher, 105. Daubrée, Gabriel Auguste. "Météorites Récemment Tombées dans l'Inde.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 22-24, at 23-24. "Académie des Sciences." La Nature, 1886 pt. 2 (no. 700; October 30): 351. See: 1884 Feb. 9, (V; 1873), and, 1885 Ap. 6, (V; 1910). This is the Nammianthal meteorite.]


1886 Jan 27 / 7:27 p.m. / Barnstaple / meteor / L.T., Feb 1-8-b. [VI; 376. “Brilliant Meteor.” London Times, February 1, 1886, p. 8 c. 2.]


1886 Jan 29 / Setif, Algeria / Had been other qs. / BA '11. [VI; 377. Milne, 733.]


1886 Jan 29 / q / Malaga / Nature 33-327. [VI; 378. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (February 4, 1886): 325-328, at 327.]


1886 Jan 30 / Det met / Phil Public Ledger of, from the Troy Times—great det in the Adirondacks recently / afternoon / roar like thunder / Ball of fire size of a barrel. [VI; 379. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, January 30, 1886.)]


1886 Feb / Floods / N. England / M. Weather Rev 1886-47. [VI; 380. “Navigation.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 2; February 1886): 45-48, at 47-48.]


1886 Feb 1 / Florida / 11:30 p.m. / A met as if from Aldebaran / MWR '86-53. [VI; 381. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 2; February 1886): 52-54, at 53.]


1886 Feb (?) / Germany / water and lightning. [VI; 382. (Refs.???)]


1886 Feb. 2 / 4 inches of snow near City of Mexico / first snow since 1856 / N.Y. World, Feb 4-1-6 / Snow in southern states, U.S.A. [VI; 383. (New York World, February 4, 1886, p. 1 c. 6.)]


1886 Feb 3 / Suppose q in Conn. at 2 a.m. by explosion of a dynamite magazine at Fordham, N.Y. / M.W.R. 86/53. [VI; 384. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 2; February 1886): 52-54, at 52-53.]


1886 Feb. 4 and Feb 13 / Ala. / q and sounds like discharges of artillery or thunder / M.W.R. '86-53. [VI; 385. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 2; February 1886): 52-54, at 53.]


1886 Feb. 4 / Vesuvius / Nature 33/367, 557. [VI; 386. Johnston-Lavis, Henry James. “Vesuvian Eruption of February 4, 1886.” Nature, 33 (February 18, 1886): 367. (Nature, 33-557; not found here.)]


1886 Feb 4 and 5 / Repeating Meteors / L.T., Feb 27-6-b, at letter by Mr Frank Calvert from the Dardenelles that on the 4th at 6 p.m. a detonating meteor fell, its light seen and sounds reverberating half a minute. On the 5th, at 9:30 p.m. another, its flashes seen and the sounds heard. Some years before the writer had found in this region a metite weighing 12 pounds. He notes that in 4 years before a meteor had detonated there. [VI; 387.1, 387.2. “Aerolites in the Dardanelles.” London Times, February 27, 1886, p. 6 c. 2. Calvert, Frank. “Meteorsteinfälle am Hellespont.” Monatsberichte der Königlich-Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin, 1886, 441-442. The aerolite that Calvert claimed to have found at Renkioi, (now identified as Erenköy, Turkey), is not identified in any meteorite catalogs; and, the Çanakkale meteorite, (from Bayramic, about 30 kilometres away from the city of Çanakkale and from Hisarlik, which Calvert, Schliemann, and others identified as Homer's Troy), fell in 1964.]


1886 Feb 6 / Disastrous floods / Belleville, Ontario / N.Y. World 7-3-2. [VI; 388. (New York World, February 7, 1886, p. 3 c. 2.)]


1886 Feb 13 / La Nature of / That the newspapers of Paris had been publishing false news of a lost balloon off Finistère. No such balloon had sailed from Brest as reported. [VI; 389. “Fausse nouvelle d'un ballon perdu en mer.” La Nature, 1886 pt. 1 (no. 663; February 13): 174.]


1886 Feb 6-7—probably / midnight / Montreal / “...A most remarkable phenomenon was witnessed in the heavens. It appeared on the western horizon and rose to the north 79 degrees, where it assumed the spectacle of the heavens opening and shooting forth a stream of livid rose-colored light.” / Sun, Feb 14-6-7. [VI; 390.1, 390.2. “The Heavens Seemed to Open.” New York Sun, February 14, 1886, p. 6 c. 7.]


[1886] Feb 6-7 / Ac to different accounts there had been a fire in Montreal at each of these times. [VI; 391. (Refs.???)]


1886 Feb. 6-7 / Beam and Venus / night / Montreal / Mont. Daily Witness—8th, as described by Prof McLeod, of McGill College Observatory—a beam of light about half a degree wide, from a point on the horizon, 79 degrees west of due north and in a direct line toward Venus. Sky illuminated ab 15 degrees each side of the beam—which ended abruptly at altitude of 60 degrees. / brightest about midnight / stationary. Almost entirely disappeard at 1:30 a.m. [VI; 392.1, 392.2. (Montreal Daily Witness, February 8, 1886.)]


1886 Feb. 13 / Sounds and q / Alabama / See Feb. 4. [VI; 393. See: 1886 Feb. 4 and Feb 13, (VI; 385).]


1886 Feb 13 and 23 / Catania / “Subterranean” Sounds / See 1816. [VI; 394. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 40. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1886 Feb 18 / Inf conjunction / Venus—Sun. [VI; 395.]


1886 Feb 20 / Field, p. 243, 264, 640 / Myst of a giant caterpillar. Origin not known / in a bottle. [B; 687. (Field, February 20, 1886, pp. 243, 264, 640.)]


1886 Feb 24 / N.Y. Herald, 4-4 / Haunted house—at Killingworth, Conn., on L.I. Sound. Here, ten years before, Mrs Horace Higgins had cut throats of her 3 children. House considered haunted. Mother confined as insane not far away. Family named Ray had taken the house. Had been driven out by apparitions and weird sounds. [B; 688.1, 688.2. (New York Herald, February 24, 1886, p. 4 c. 4; not found in this issue.) “A Haunted House.” St. Paul Daily Globe, (Minnesota), February 26, 1886, p. 1 c. 4. “For many years the house had the reputation of being haunted and it almost continuously remained tenantless until last summer, when the Ray family of Boston took it as a summer residence. The first night they slept there the two tenants were nearly scared to death by the apparition of a woman in white standing at their bedroom window. Loud and unearthly noises echoed through the house. The next night Mr. and Mrs. Ray say they saw the apparition, and they promptly gave up the house. Recently only these facts were learned by the villagers, and since then several weird sights have, it is said, been seen in the old mansion.” History of Middlesex County, Connecticut, with Biographical Sketches of Its Prominent Men. New York: J.B. Beers, 1884, 427. “About a mile and a half north of the Congregational church, in Killingworth, on the old road which runs parallel with tlie main street, is a group of dilapidated houses. In, one of these ancient dwellings there formerly lived a Mrs. Higgins, who was possessed of a most violent temper. October 14th 1779, after having quarreled with her husband, she grasped a common case-knife and cut the throats of her three children. The victims of this bloody tragedy were buried in the old cemetery, in the Union District. There was at that time a belief almost universally indulged in that grass would not grow over the grave of a murdered person; and it is said that for a long time the lot where they laid these children was barren as a desert. The natural sterility of the soil, however, is a sufficient explanation of the phenomenon.” (Continental Journal, Boston, October 28, 1779, p. 3. “The following tragical affair happened at the north parish in Killingworth on Wednesday last [October 13, 1779], viz. the wife of Mr. ___ [Horace?] Higgins of that parish, being disordered in her reason, and being left in the house with three of her children, she called her son of seven years old, to her, telling him she wanted to pin his collar, and immediately cut his throat, she then cut the throats of her daughter of five years old, and her infant which lay on the bed: Mr. Higgins soon after coming into the house, found her on her knees, cutting her own throat with a dull knife, which with some difficulty he wrested from her; but she had wounded herself to that degree she died soon after.” @ newsbank.com.) The husband was Samuel Higgins, (not Horace); the wife's name was Sarah; two of their other children lived to adulthood; and, the mother may have also died in 1779.]


1886 Feb 24 / det. / Wauseon, Ohio / ab 5:15 (not stated a.m. or not) / Thomas Mikesell heard a “crash and a roar” that he thought was meteoric. / Rept. Ohio Met. Bur, Feb, 1886. [VI; 396. “Miscellaneous.”  Report of the Ohio Meteorological Bureau, 1886 (February): 52-55, at 55. “At about 5:15, the 24th, there was a sudden crash and roar in the S.W., as of thunder, but when I got out of the house, I could not hear it any more. I think it was the explosion of a meteor. It was clear at the time.”]


1886 March 1 / Met in gale / U.S. / (D-97). [VI; 397. The note copies information from page 97 of The Book of the Damned. "Miscellaneous Phenomena." Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 3; March 1886): 80-81, at 81. “Brilliant Meteoric Display.” New York Herald, March 2, 1886, p. 4 c. 2.]


1886 March 6 / 7:30 a.m. / Violent shock at Cosenza / Nature 33-450. [VI; 398. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (March 11, 1886): 448-450, at 450.]


1886 March 6 / Op. Mars / (Al). [VI; 399.]


1886 March 7 / Eruption / Kilauea, Hawaii / A.J. Sci 3/33/87. [VI; 400. Emerson, Joseph Swift. “Kilauea after the Eruption of March, 1886.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 33 (1887): 87-101.]


1886 March 8 / Heavy rain / Cape Town / Symons Met Mag 21-57. [VI; 401. “Heavy Rain at Cape Town, March 8th, 1886.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 21 (May 1886): 57.]


1886 March 9 / Venus stationary. [VI; 402.]


1886 March 9 / Protuberance on sun—moderate height but exceptional splendor / R., Sept 26, '79. [VI; 403. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 256.]


1886 March 11 / Norway / See Jan 1. / Aerolite fell at Aastvedt in Bergen, Norway. / See Jan. / Cosmos, Ap. 19, 1886. [VI; 404. (Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.) v. 4 (April 19, 1886.) “Notes.” Nature, 33 (April 8, 1886): 536-538, at 537. Aastvedt is now identified as Åstveit, Norway. See: 1886 Jan 1, (VI; 337).]


1886 March 11 / See Norway series again. / Oct.-Nov., 1886. [VI; 405. See: 1886 Jan 1, (VI; 337); 1886 Nov. 1, (VI; 923); 1886 Nov. 3, (VI; 928); and, 1886 Nov. 5, (VI; 930).]


[1886 March 14 /] 1886 Jan 14, ab. / The Oregon Disaster / March? [B; 684. “The Big Oregon Lost.” New York Sun, March 15, 1886, p. 1 c. 5-6. The Cunard steamship Oregon on its way to New York City collided with a schooner, (which mmediately sank with all hands), in Long Island Sound, but all of its crew and passengers were rescued before the steamship sank. Distress signals failed to alert two other large steamers, which passed it; but, a rescue was begun by a pilot boat, another schooner, and an alert lookout at Fire Island, with many of the passengers transferred to the Bremen steamer Fulda. The Oregon's lifeboats and rafts only had room for about half of its crew and passengers; thus, its proximity to the shore and to other ships, in calm and clear weather, with several hours of time before sinking, helped to avoid a much greater disaster.]


1886 Mar 20 / S / (Dark/Minn.) / Oshkosh / 120 / (D-221) / Trib 22-4-5. [VI; 406. The note copies information from pages 220 to 221 of The Book of the Damned. (Atmospheric phenomenon." Monthly Weather Review, 14 (March 1886): 79.) “The Oshkosh Darkness.” New York Tribune, March 22, 1886, p. 4 c. 4-5.]


1886 March 21 / Jupiter / Opposition. [VI; 407.]


1886 March 23 / Protuberances on sun / R—Sept 26, '79. [VI; 408. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 256-257.]


1886 March 27 / Met iron / Cabin Creek, Johnson Co, Arkansas / (F). [VI; 409. Fletcher, 68. This is the Cabin Creek meteorite.]


1886 March / Washington, D.C. / pollen shower, no pine trees in flower near there / Ala, Georgia and Carolinas / so hundreds of miles in wind / Pop Sci News 29-130. [VI; 410. (Popular Science News, 29-130.)]


1886 March 30 / Rolleville, Fr. / Great light in the northern sky, pulsating white / 9 to after 10 p.m. / CR 102-987. [VI; 411. Maze. “Observation d'une aurore boréale à Rolleville (Seine-Inférieure).” Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 987-988.]


1886 March 30 / General aurora. Then at 8 p.m. flashes about the Pleiades. / Konigsberg, Prussia / Nature 33-559. [VI; 412. Fritsch, H. “Aurora.” Nature, 33 (April 15, 1886): 559. Königsberg, Prussia, is now identified as Kaliningrad, Russia.]


1886 March 30 / Aurora / Ireland / Nature 33-537. [VI; 413. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (April 8, 1886): 536-538, at 537.]


1886 March 31 / Phil P. Ledger of / Unknown malady / in Johnstown, N.Y. / 200 cases / 21 deaths. [B; 689. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, March 31, 1886.)]


1886 Ap. 3 / Rel-Ph-J, 4-5 / Near Athens, N.Y., a partridge attracting attention—trotting along besides vehicles—jumping up on horses—but not let self be caught. [B; 690. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 40 (no. 6; April 3, 1886): 4, (c. 5).]


1886 Ap. 8 / q? / in Gorebridge / Nature 33-559, 611. [VI; 414. Crispin, Alfred Trevor. “Was it an Earthquake?” Nature, 33 (April 15, 1886): 559. “Notes.” Nature, 33 (April 29, 1886): 609-612, at 611. “Earthquake at Gorebridge.” Scotsman, April 19, 1886, p. 4 c. 8.]


1886 April 8 / Comrie / Last I have recorded. / Wm. Roper, “List of Earthquakes” / 1846-7-8 / 1851, 57, 64, 67, 69 / March 31, 1870 / Oct. 14, 1882 / April 8, 1886. [VI; 415. (Roper.)]


1886 April / Sounds of Abbeville, S.C. / See Sept. 15. [VI; 416. See: 1886 Sept 15, (VI; 822).]


1886 Ap. 8 / 5:35 a.m. / Shock / London / Nature 33-559. [VI; 417. Crispin, Alfred Trevor. “Was it an Earthquake?” Nature, 33 (April 15, 1886): 559.]


1886 Ap. 12 / Great meteor / Gulf of Petschili / Met Zeit 3/461. [VI; 418. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 3 (1886): 455-464, at 461-462, (illustration). The “Golf von Petschili” is now identified at the Bohai Sea.]


1886 Ap. 14, May 8, July 27, Nov. 2 / Auroras and meteors of unusual brilliancy in northen heavens. / Nature 35-126 / Lyons, N.Y. [VI; 419. Veeder, Major Albert. “Meteors and Auroras.” Nature, 35 (December 9, 1886): 126.]


1886 Ap. 17 / Blue-red whitish hail / Venezuela / D-41. [VI; 420. The note copies information from page 41 of The Book of the Damned.  Ernst, Adolf. "A Remarkable Hailstorm." Nature, 34 (June 10, 1886): 122. The fall was at El Totumo, near Tinaco.]


1886 Ap. 18 and 22 / Slight shocks at Comrie / Chambers' Journal 63-352. [VI; 421. “Comrie Earthquakes.” Chambers's Journal, s. 5 v. 3 (May 29, 1886): 351-352.]


1886 Ap. 18 / Etna / Ciel et Terre 7-333. [VI; 422. “L'Éruption de l'Etna.” Ciel et Terre, 7 (1886-1887): 332-334.]


[1886 April 18 /] 1886 May 2 / Immense swarm of what appeared to be June bugs / Scott Township, Ind. / Religio-Phil Jour 8-6-5. [VI; 429. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 40 (no. 11; May 8, 1886): 6, (c. 5). “State News.” Indianapolis News, April 20, 1886, p. 1 c. 3.]


1886 Ap. 21 / Eruption, Mt. Tarumai, Yezo, Japan / Nature 35-472. [VI; 423.1. "Notes." Nature, 35 (March 17, 1887): 471-474, at 472. The Shikotsu volcano.]


1886 Ap. 23 / Shadow / Good Friday / morning / Philadelphia / 4 a.m. / Man saw something like a colossal figure of Christ in sky. “The general effect was that of an enormous shadow stretching two thirds of the way to the zenith.” / Sun, June 12-2-7. / Easter, Ap. 25. [VI; 423.2, 423.3. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, June 12, 1886, p. 2 c. 7.]


1886 Ap. 24 / Remarkable sunspot / Monthly Notices RAS, Ap and May, 1886. [VI; 424. (Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, April-May, 1886.)]


1886 Ap. 25 / Leaves / bet. Commentry and Neris, France / (N) / La Nat 1886/1/383. [VI; 425. "Académie des Sciences." La Nature, 1886 pt. 1 (no. 676; May 15): 383-384, at 383.]


1886 Ap. 25 / Leaves / between Commentry and Néris / Weather “superb”. / fall of leaves, coming down from heights of limit of vision. / CR 102-1085 / See ab last May, 1885. [VI; 426. “M. Ch. Brongniart transmet à l'Acadèmie quelques indications....” Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 1085.]


[The following two notes were folded together by Fort. VI: 426 & 427.]


1886 / last of April / Little balloons / In Science, 21-136, Dr Swinnerton, of Cherry Valley, N.Y., writes that toward sunset, last of April, 1886, two men, known to him, Capt. John E. Hetherington and Mr. Marcus Steinberg, of C. Valley, saw near the town what appeared to be innumerable spherical bodies floating in the air like soap-bubbles. They were astonished and questioned each other, finding some reassurance in that they saw alike, The objects seemed to rest on tree boughs and fences, and then roll off and disappear. In color and shape and way of vanishing the objects were like soap bubbles. But the air seemed to be filled with them. The sun was sinking. At sunset they saw no more. / To me looks as if some kids been blowing soap bubbles. / Science, 21-136. [VI; 426.1, 426.2, 426.3. Swinnerton, Henry Ulyate. “Aerial Bubbles.” Science, s. 1 v. 21 (March 10, 1893): 136. “An orchard lay along the lower and northwesterly side of the road, and all in among the apple trees were thick, gently descending multitudes of these bubbles, pretty uniform in size say, 8 or 9 inches in diameter, apparently; none less than six; no small ones being observed.”]


1886 April / little balloons / Science, 21-136. / Dr Henry Swinnerton writes that two men of “unimpeachable character”, names given, saw at Cherry Valley, N.Y., “what appeared to be innumerable spherical bodies floating in the air like soap-bubbles”. Seemed to be 8 or 9 inches in diameter. “The air seemed to be filled with these transparent, floating spheres.” [VI; 427.1, 427.2. Swinnerton, Henry Ulyate. “Aerial Bubbles.” Science, s. 1 v. 21 (March 10, 1893): 136.]


1886 May 1 / [LT], 10-c / 4-5-f // New comet. [VI; 428. “A New Comet.” London Times, May 1, 1886, p. 10 c. 3. “Another New Comet.” London Times, May 4, 1886, p. 5 c. 6. Comets C/1886 H1 and C/1886 J1.]


[1886 May 2. Wrong date. See: 1886 April 18, (VI; 429).]


[1886 April 18 /] 1886 May 2 / Immense swarm of what appeared to be June bugs / Scott Township, Ind. / Religio-Phil Jour 8-6-5. [VI; 429. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 40 (no. 11; May 8, 1886): 6, (c. 5). “State News.” Indianapolis News, April 20, 1886, p. 1 c. 3.]


1886 May 3 (before) // Pub Ledger of / A few days before—a dense cloud that seemed to emit groaning noises. Intense darkness / Yankton, Dakota. [VI; 430. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 3, 1886.) (“The Groaning of the Storm.” Washington Critic, May 10, 1886, p. 1 c. 4.) (Not found in MWR, April or May, 1886.)]


1886 May 2 / Garden whirl / 14. [VI; 431. (Refs???)]


1886 May 4 / Trib, 1-3 / Ohio / q. [VI; 432. “An Earthquake in Ohio.” New York Tribune, May 4, 1886, p. 1 c. 3.]


1886 May 5 / met ship / 1:30 a.m. / Weather fair—sky almost clear. Bark “Vidette” from Cienfuegos—masthead set on fire by a meteor. / M.W.R. '86-142 / See Dec 11, 1885. [VI; 433. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 5; May 1886): 140-142, at 142. “The bark 'Vidette,' Captain Sawyer, from Cienfuegos, reports: 'May 5, at 1.30 a.m., weather fair with a sky nearly clear, and wind from the south, was set on fire in the maintop by a meteor. By prompt action the mates and two men put out the fire in five or six minutes. The meteor seemed like a fire rocket, lighting up the vessel throughout, and in less than ten seconds the mast was in full blaze at the masthead.” “Set on Fire by a Meteor.” New York Times, May 17, 1886, p. 8 c. 2. See: 1885 Dec 11, (VI: 321 & 322), and, 1885 Dec 12, (VI; 323).]


1886 May 6 / Cor writes from Ozark Co, Mo. Hail this day. One piece 18 inches in circumference. Lay in drifts that had not melted 2 weeks later. / Sun, June 20-3-6. [VI; 434. Baker, Samuel. “Tremendous Hailstones in Missouri.” New York Sun, June 20, 1886, p. 3 c. 6.]


1886 May 7 / 1:45 a.m. / 17th, 3:53 a.m. // Small q's / Trinidad. [VI; 435. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 55.]


1886 May 8 / Shower of dead birds of many species during a severe storm, Chicago. / Phil Pub. Ledger, May 14. [VI; 436. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, May 14, 1886.) “Shower of Dead Birds.” New York Sun, May 14, 1886, p. 2 c. 7. “Yesterday when the watchman of the Board of Trade Building made his rounds, he found the sidewalks and streets in front of the tower covered with dead birds of all sorts. A little later the electrician came down, and said the birds had been killed by the electric light at the top of the tower. When he went up to the lantern with several members of the Board of Trade the roof was found to be covered with dead birds, and each of the lamps in the big circle of light was filled with them, one globe having eight birds in it. Those birds are of every known variety, and many unfamiliar species are among the lot. All shades and colors are there, scarlet, blue, pink, red, canary, mottled black and white, and there were some snipe and plover among them. The theory is that they were migratory flocks, going from south to north, and were attracted by the great light, which killed them the moment they touched it. Many persons were on the street with bags and baskets, and in less than two hours the sidewalks were cleared, but the roof of the Board is now covered.”]  


1886 May 9 / q / Brazil / 3:20 p.m. / A comet and exceptional coldness noted. / C.R. 102-1351. [VI; 437. D'Alcantara, Pedro. “Tremblement de terre survenu au Brésil le 9 mai 1886.” Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 1351-1352.]


1886 May 10 / 7:40 p.m. / Great met / Florida and Cuba / Sc Am 55/72. [VI; 438. “The Meteorite of May 10.” Scientific American, n.s., 55 (July 31, 1886): 72.]


1886 May 11 / noon / See May 11, 1889. [VI; 439. See: (1889 May 11).]


1886 May 11 / May 11, 1886 / M. F saw two peaks shining with such a light as he had never seen before nor after, many times surpassing in brilliance, the lighted part of the moon. / South of Plato. [VI; 440. Fauchier, A. “Pics lumineux sur la Lune.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 312-313.]


1886 May 11 / 8 p.m. / M. Fauchier, of Observatory of Marseilles, saw two luminous spots or peaks such as he [note cut off] or since, surpassing by many times the light of the parts of the moon in sunlight—south of Plato. / L'Astro 6/312. [VI; 441. Fauchier, A. “Pics lumineux sur la Lune.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 312-313.]


1886 May 11 / 8 p.m. / (m) / '85—See. / L'Astro 1887-312 / M. Fauchier, of the Observatory of Marseilles, writes that he saw on moon two extraordinary lights such as he had never seen before or since Either mt peaks or something on those peaks. South of Plato. [VI; 442.1, 442.2, 442.3. Fauchier, A. “Pics lumineux sur la Lune.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 312-313.]


1886 May 12 / Cyclone of Madrid / C.R. 102-1160. [VI; 443. Noguès, Alphonse François. “La cyclone du 12 mai à Madrid.” Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 1160-1161.]


1886 May 11-13 / Heavy rains and floods / England / J.R. Met Soc 12/269. [VI; 444. Marriott, William, and, Frederic Gaster. “The Floods of May 1886.” Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 12 (1886): 269-283.]


1886 May 12 / night / Ohio, Ind, N. Car, etc. / great hurricane // Evening—Spain, great hurricane. In Madrid, 32 killed, 620 injured. / Sun 15/1/3, 7. [VI; 445. “Ruin in a Tempest's Path.” New York Sun, May 15, 1886, p. 1 c. 3. “The Hurricane in Spain.” New York Sun, May 15, 1886, p. 1 c. 7.]


1886 May 12 / Cyclone / Madrid / C.R. 102-1160 / (La Nat 27/1). [VI; 446. Alphonse François Noguès. “Le Cyclone du 12 Mai à Madrid.” La Nature, 1886 pt. 2 (no. 679; June 5): 1-3.]


1886 May 12 / College investigated. Workmen dug up a meteorite several feet in circumference and oblong on shape. / Sc Am 68/325. [VI; 447. “Fall of Aerolites.” Scientific American, n.s., 68 (May 27, 1893): 325. “Unearthed an Eighty-pound Aerolite.” New York Sun, April 9, 1893, p. 4 c. 7. The Scientific American article identifies the location was “Washington, Oregon”; but, the New York Sun's article identifies “Washington C.H., O.” in the dispatch from the Cleveland Leader, which would be Washington Court House, Ohio. The story of a “meteorite several feet in diameter” weighing “about eighty pounds” remains a mystery; unless it was composed of the same substance as the other meteorite, that fell at Osawatomie, Kansas, reported in the same article by the Scientific American. “Experts say the aerolite is composed of metal supposed to exist only in the sun.” Helium was discovered to also exist on our planet in 1895. Both of these aerolites were apparently newspaper yarns.]


1886 May 14 and 30 / Solar halos / France / La Nat 27/15. [VI; 448. "Académie des Sciences." La Nature, 1886 pt. 2 (no. 679; June 5): 14-15. Cornu, Marie Alfred. “Sur un arc tangent au halo de 46°, observé le 30 mai 1886.” Comptes Rendus, 102 (May 31, 1886.): 1210-1211. Vimont, Eugène. “Halo Extraordinaire du 3 May 1886.” La Nature, 1886 pt. 1 (no. 676; May 15): 379-382, (illustration). An extraordinary number of solar haloes, (parhelia), were observed for 9 hours at Boulogne-Sur-Seine, on May 3, 1886.]


1886 May 17 / also May 7 / q. / Trinidad, W. Indies / BA 1911-55. [VI; 449. Turner, H.H., et al. "Seismological Investigations." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1911, 30-67, at 55. See: 1886 May 7, (VI; 435).]


1886 May 17 / 8 a.m. / Solar halo and mock suns at Dönnaes, Norway / Nature 34-174 / (See June 21.) [VI; 450. “Notes.” Nature, 34 (June 24, 1886): 173-176, at 174. See: 1886 June 21, (VI; 517).]


1886 May 18 / NY Times, 1-3 / Huge aerolite found in Pa. [VI; 451. “The Largest Aerolite on Record.” New York Times, May 18, 1886, p. 1 c. 3. (“Aerolite Liar.” Statesville Daily Landmark, (North Carolina), June 24, 1886, p. 1; @ newspaperarchive.com.)]


1886 May 18 and 19 / May and June // Etna / C.R. 102/1221, 1589 / 103-420. [VI; 452. Daubrée, Gabriel Auguste. “Note accompagnant le Rapport de M. Silvestri, sur l'èruption de l'Etna, des 18 et 19 mai 1886.” Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 1221-1223. Silvestri, Orazio. “Sur l'èruption de l'Etna de mai et juin 1886.” Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 1589-1592. Riccò, Annibale. “Phénomènes atmosphériques observés à Palerme pendant l'éruption de l'Etna.” Comptes Rendus, 103 (1886): 419-421.]


1886 May 19 / [LT], 7-c / 21-5-d / 28-5-e / 29-14-f / 31-6-b / June-2-5-c / 3-6-b / 5-14-d. [VI; 453.  Etna eruptions. “Mount Etna in Eruption.” London Times, May 19, 1886, p. 7 c. 3. “Mount Etna.” London Times, May 21, 1886, p. 5 c. 4. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, May 28, 1886, p. 5 c. 5. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, May 29, 1886, p. 14 c. 6. “The Eruption of Mount Etna.” London Times, May 31, 1886, p. 6 c. 2. “The Eruption of Mount Etna. London Times, June 2, 1886, p. 5 c. 3. “Mount Etna.” London Times, June 3, 1886, p. 6 c. 2. “Mount Etna.” London Times, June 5, 1886, p. 14 c. 4.]


1886 May 18 (etc.) / 11 a.m. / Etna / Nature 34-59 / by 5 p.m. alarming—34-82. [VI; 454. “Notes.” Nature, 34 (May 20, 1886): 59-60, at 59. “Notes.” Nature, 34 (May 27, 1886): 82-84, at 82-83.]


1886 May 19, etc. / After series of outbreaks, a terrific eruption of Etna/ Pop. Sci Mo 46-580. [VI; 455. Packard, Alpheus Spring, Jr. “The Birth of a Sicilian Volcano.” Popular Science Monthly, 46 (March, 1895): 577-585, at 580. ]


1886 May 20 / Cl, burst / upper part S. Carolina / Sun 22-1-3. [VI; 456. “Great Floods in South Carolina.” New York Sun, May 22, 1886, p. 1 c. 3.]


1886 May 22 / New comet in Virgo / Science 7/481. [VI; 457. “Notes and News.” Science, s. 1 v. 7 (May 28, 1886): 479-481, at 481. Comet D/1886 K1 was first observed in 1886, despite its alleged period of about 5.5 years.]


1886 May 22 / Trombe / Bar-sur-Aube / La Nat 1886/2/47. [VI; 458. “Une trombe extraordinaire.” La  Nature, 1886 pt. 2 (no. 681; June 19): 47.]


1886 May 23 / afternoon / at Stonehaven (Scotland?) / Just before and after high tide, water along coast rose and fell from 10 inches to 18 inches at a time, from ab 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.—no wind. / Nature 34-108. [VI; 459. “Notes.” Nature, 34 (June 3, 1886): 107-110, at 108. “Curious Tidal Phenomenon at Stonehaven.” Scotsman, May 25, 1886, p. 7 c. 2.]


1886 May 23 / Jupiter / Stationary. [VI; 460.]


1886 May 24 / evening / House struck by something said been a waterspout and a woman drowned in the deluge. / Abingdon, Va. / Sun 26-3-4. [VI; 461. “Drowned by a Waterspout.” New York Sun, May 26, 1886, p. 3 c. 4.]


1886 May 24 and 28 / qs and eruption at Etna / May-July / BA '11. [VI; 462. Milne, 733. See: 1886 May 24, (VI; 465), and, 1886 May 28, (VI; 468).]


1886 May 24-29 / Ashes or cinders fell as far as Reggio, Calabria, from Etna. / C.R. 103-420. [VI; 463. Riccò, Annibale. “Phénomènes atmosphériques observés à Palerme pendant l'éruption de l'Etna.” Comptes Rendus, 103 (1886): 419-421, at 420.]


1886 May 23-June 3 / Dry fog at Palermo from Etna—sun reddish yellow, sometimes pale or grayish. / C.R. 103-421. [VI; 464. Riccò, Annibale. “Phénomènes atmospherériques observés à Palerme pendant l'éruption de l'Etna.” Comptes Rendus, 103 (1886): 419-421, at 421.]


1886 May 24 / Time of Etna / Assisi, Perugia, Italy / (F). [VI; 465. Fletcher, 105. This is the Assisi meteorite.]


1886 May 24 / Volcano Mayon, Luzon, Philippines, in eruption / Nature 34-275. [VI; 466. “Notes.” Nature, 34 (July 22, 1886): 274-278, at 275.]


1886 May 28 / at Barntrup, Lippe, Germany / Metite / 2:30 p.m. / Nature 34-439. [VI; 467. Haepke, L. “A New Aerolite.” Nature, 34 (September 9, 1886): 439. This is the Barntrup meteorite.]


1886 May 28 / See Etna this period. [VI; 468. See: (Etna, ca. 1886.)]


1886 May 29 / Augs / France / L'Astro 1887/36. [VI; 469. Schmoll, A. “Passage de Corpuscles devant le Soleil.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 36.]


1886 May 30 / Cashmere Series / See Oct 20. [VI; 470. See: (1886 Oct 20).]


1886 / last of May and in June // Ruddy sunset glows at Palermo from Etna / C.R. 103-421 / But less than in 1883. [VI; 471. Riccò, Annibale. “Phénomènes atmospherériques observés à Palerme pendant l'éruption de l'Etna.” Comptes Rendus, 103 (1886): 419-421, at 421.]


[1886 May 30. Wrong date. See: 1885 May 30, (VI; 472).]


1886 May 31 / Greatest of the eruptions of Etna / See May 19. Eruption cease June 7. / C.R. 102/1221, 1589. [VI; 473. Daubrée, Gabriel Auguste. “Note accompagnant le Rapport de M. Silvestri, sur l'èruption de l'Etna, des 18 et 19 mai 1886.” Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 1221-1223. Silvestri, Orazio. “Sur l'èruption de l'Etna de mai et juin 1886.” Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 1589-1592. See: 1886 May 18 and 19, (VI; 452); 1886 May 19, (VI; 453); 1886 May 18 (etc.), (VI; 454); and, 1886 May 19, etc., (VI; 455).]


1886 June / Ghost / Orange Mts, N.J. / Phil P.L., June 17. [B; 691. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, June 17, 1886.)]


1886 June / Corlett / Fishes / [Letter to Fort from Mrs H Corlett, Kingfisher, Okla, Aug 8, 1924]. [VI; 475. Corlett, H. Letter. August 8, 1924.)]


1886 / early June // Chicago / migration of the Ajax butterfly / Amer Naturalist 20-976. [VI; 474. Hancock, Joseph L. “Migrations of the Ajax Butterfly.” American Naturalist, 20 (no. 11; November 1886): 976-977.]


1886 June 1, about / Norfolk / peculiar whirl / Leisure Hour 35-503. /// E 36. [VI; 476. “Whirlwind Extraordinary.” Leisure Hour, 35 (July 1886): 503. Nelson, Thomas G. “Whirlwind in Norfolk.” London Times, June 5, 1886, p. 16 c. 2.]


1886 June 1 / See May 18-19. [VI; 477. See: (May 18-19).]


1886 June 2, 3, 13, 16, 22, 23 / Luminous night clouds / Sunderland / Nature 34-239. [VI; 478. Backhouse, Thomas William. “Luminous Clouds.” Nature, 34 (July 15, 1886): 239.]


1886 June 5 / Shocks / Chios and Smyrna / Nature 34-130. [VI; 479. “Notes.” Nature, 34 (June 10, 1886): 129-131, at 130.]


1886 June 5 / Solar halo and sun pillar / Oxford / Nature, 34-193 / See June 21. [VI; 480. Bellamy, Frank Arthur. “Solar Halo and Sun Pillar seen on June 5, 1886.” Nature, 34 (July 1, 1886): 193-194, (illustration). See: 1886 June 21, (VI; 517).]


[1886 June 6. Wrong date. See: 1885 June 6, (VI; 481).]


1886 June 9 / See Etna in May. / afternoon / Black rain—“very dark” / Stonyhurst Observatory reported from / Nature 34-143. [VI; 482. Perry, Stephen Joseph. “Black Rain.” Nature, 34 (June 17, 1886): 143. See: 1886 May 19, (VI; 453).]


1886 June 9 / B. rain and distant volc / like Martinique and France / May, 1902. [VI; 483. (Refs.???)]


1886 June 10 / (Oct 26) / F 1 / other note / A cor to New Zealand Herald (Auckland) (Oct. 13, 1886) says that the Maoris had seen, or said had seen, on the Lake several days before the eruption, "a strange canoe, curiously constructed, differing from any canoe known to be on the lake". Said that it was propelled by "a ghostly crew of tatooed warriors". / Cor says that in the volc mud he came across footprints of a horse. no other trace of which was findable. / See F 2. [B; 692.1, 692.2. “The New Wonderland of New Zealand.” New Zealand Herald, September 13, 1886, p. 12 c. 1-7 & p. 13 c. 1-6; at p. 13 c. 2. See: (F2).]


1886 (June 10) / F 2 / This near the lake. / Even far away, vegetation covered with dust so that cattle were starving, but here all desolation all mud—picture desolation. One drab uniformity—bushes were lumps—trees were drab and featureless projections—lake and terraces all same color—flatness from fury. [B; 693.1, 693.2. (New Zealand Herald, October 13, 1886.)]


1886 June 10 / F 3 / (Footprints / See other note.) / New Zealand Herald, Sept 13-5-3+ / Something else upon the unknown animal wandering upon the scene—that some Maoris had seen a strange looking object and had approached it—They saw antlers upon it and fled, never having seen such an animal before. It is said that the animal was a stag. [B; 694.1, 694.2. “The mystery of The Phantom Horse....” New Zealand Herald, September 13, 1886, p. 5 c. 3. “The mystery of 'The Phantom Horse' (writes our Rotorua correspondent) is at last cleared up. Some natives belonging to the Ngatiamaniwa observed a curious looking object moving on the distant ranges behind Rotomahana. On a nearer approach it was noticed to rear up and display a couple of immense full grown antlers. The natives fled from fright, and scattered in all directions, never having seen such a thing before. However, some of the bravest determined to run for guns and all sorts of implements of destruction and then face the object of their horror. They got to within about a mile of it, when, with a series of leaps and bounds, the stag, for such it was, almost flew through the air. Those on horseback followed as best they could over hill and dale. On coming to the Whirinaki Creek the animal appeared to clear it and shortly disappeared from view leaving its pursuers miles behind.” See: 1886 June 10, (B; 692).]


1886 June 10 / 2 a.m. / Phe of New Zealand began. / Symons Met Mag 21/97 / 2000 sq miles covered 3 inches deep with dust. [VI; 484. “The Volcanic Phenomena in New Zealand.” Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 21 (August 1886): 97-101, at 101.]


1886 June 10 / Up from the Lake a White Terrace and a Pink Terrace. One a silicate with the appearance of snow and the other pink with oxide of iron. / envelope in smoke / smashed / sillicates spell right? [VI; 485. (Refs.???)]


1886 June 10 / New Zealand Herald, 21st—“storm of fireballs” / southern part of the Auckland district / An abacia grove became a mound. / The Terrace from the Caldron or the Black Crater. / Balls of fire that set fire to distant houses like those of Nov., 1912. / June 21. [VI; 486.1, 486.2. (Refs.???)]


1886 June 10 / A mud volc / See Feb. 19, 1843. [VI; 487. See: 1845 Feb 19, (II: 558 & 821).]


1886 June 10 / Analysis of the ash. / Nature 34-595. [VI; 488. Joly, John. 'Volcanic Ash from New Zealand.” Nature, 34 (October 21, 1886): 595.]


1886 June 10 / early morning / at Nelson / “Vivid lightning” / N.Z.H., June 21. [VI; 489. “The Explosions Heard South.” New Zealand Herald, June 21, 1886., p. 12 c. 5.]


1886 June 10—morning, early / Volc / N.Z. / violent th. storms and heavy rains. [VI; 490. (Refs.???)]


1886 June 12 / Volc Rotomahana / Out of sky, blue shining water, silicious deposits, shelved into terraces. [VI; 491. (Refs.???)]


1886 June 10 / The terraces at Lake Rotomahana / Terraces of white and pink silica / sloped to margin of the lake / a few miles from the volc. [VI; 492. (Refs.???)]


1886 June 9 / N.Z. volc / LT, July 30-12-d / (q)—3cols. / Midnight at Rotorua, Hot Lakes district—qs and Mt. Tarawera burst into flames for first time recorded. / Hot water springs and mud volcanoes everywhere—sulphurous flames and gases from the earth. Sunrise but impenetrable darkness. / Great electrical disturbances in the air. / Weather became bitterly cold. / A cloud over the mt—from which “meteors [on all sides] shot [out from the cloud] in every direction”. [VI; 493.1, 493.2. “The Volcanic Outbreak in New Zealand.” London Times, July 30, 1886, p. 12 c. 4. The Okataina volcano.]


1886 June 10 / N.Z. Herald, Aug 16-3-3 / An account of a house struck by lightning in the volc storm and coins in a coin-box fused. / Also an account of people near the volc who over a large fire could not boil water—water in a pot at end of ¾ hour as cold as at first. [VI; 494.1, 494.2. “Singular Phenomena.” New Zealand Herald, August 16, 1886, p. 3 c. 3.]


1886 June 10 / morning / At Dunedin, electrical disturbances, fire alarm signals ringing. NZ Herald, June 21. [VI; 495. “The Explosions Heard South.” New Zealand Herald, June 21, 1886., p. 12 c. 5.]


1886 June 10 / Action of lightning from volc. denied—as fusing coins—in Jour and Proc Roy Soc NS. Wales 1886-295. [VI; 496. “Wednesday, 3 November, 1886.” Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales, 20 (1886): 293-296, at 294-295. ]


1886 June 10-24 / The eruption / Ref, Aug 6, 1868. [VI; 497. Refer to: (1868 Aug 6).]


1886 June 10 / The Terraces of Rotomahana / Covered with mud / The hot springs—but no record of volcanic outburst of Tarawere Mt. before. / New Zealand Herald, June 21 / The account opens with sounds mistaken for signals of distress from a vessel. “Vivid flashes as if from the firing of guns” were seen at Auckland. Then a telegram of darkness and mud and the sounds of stampeded horse and cattle, and of escaping human beings—magnificent heavens and a storm of fireballs. / “Vivid streams of electric fire which seemed to be lightning” from a distance. Not a green thing visible, all covered with mud or sand—trees “struck by lightning” blazing like torches. [VI; 498.1, 498.2, 498.2, 498.4. “Terrific Volcanic Outburst in the Lake District,” and “Graphic Descriptions by Survivors.” New Zealand Herald, June 21, 1886, p. 10 c. 1-7 & p. 11 c. 1-3.]


1886 June 10 / Volc / Loud 1766 / 383. [VI; 499. (Refs.???)]


1886 June 10 / New Zealand eruption / (good) / Sun, July 19-3-5. [VI; 500. “New Zealand's Upheaval.” New York Sun, July 19, 1886, p. 3 c. 5. The Okataina volcano.]


1886 June 10 / Hundreds of new boiling springs broke out. Several in roads. / N.Z. Herald. [VI; 501. “Terrific Volcanic Outburst in the Lake District.” New Zealand Herald, June 11, 1886, p. 5 c. 6-7. The Okataina volcano.]


1886 June 9 / (July 13-1-2), Trib / Volcanic outburst, New Zealand, in June. / qs and flashes in sky. [VI; 502. “The Great New Zealand Earthquake.” New York Tribune, July 13, 1886, p. 1 c. 2.]


[1886 June 10 /] 1886 June 11 / Schooner Julia Pryce / 35.08 S / 178.48 E / Shower of mud. The vessel thickly coated. / See the volc. / N.Z. Times, Oct. 26, 1886. [VI; 503. “Shower of Mud at Sea.” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), October 26, 1886, p. 3 c. 1.]


1886 June 12 / Pall Mall, London / “met. assault” / Ch 55+. [VI; 504. "Struck by a Meteor." Scientific American, n.s., 55 (July 31, 1886): 65. “A Remarkable Accident.” London Times, June 17, 1886, p. 10 c. 2. "As a gentleman, a well-known public official, was passing from St. James's Park into Pall-mall by the garden wall of Marlborough House, on Saturday last, at a quarter to 5 in the afternoon, he suddenly received on the right shoulder a violent blow, accompanied by a loud crackling noise, which caused him great pain and to stumble forward as he walked. On recovering his footing, and turning round to see who had so unceremoniously struck him, he found that there was no one on the pavement but himself and the policeman on duty at the park end of it. On reaching home the shoulder was submitted to examination, but nothing was first discovered to account for the pain in it. But in a little while the servant who had taken the coat to brush brought it back to point out that over the right shoulder the nap was pressed down flat in a long, straight line, exactly as if a hot wire had been sharply drawn across the cloth. The accident is therefore explained as having been caused by the explosion of a minute falling star or meteor. It is an unprecedented and most interesting occurrence and deserves, I think, to be placed on public record."]


1886 June 11 / q's, Friendly Islands, where volc Aug 31 / A.J. Sci 3/33/311. [VI; 505. “Volcanic Eruption in Niua-fu, Friendly Islands.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 33 (1887): 311. Bonney, Thomas George. “Volcanic Eruption in Niua-Fu, Friendly Islands.” Nature, 35 (December 9, 1886): 127-128. The Niuafo'ou volcano.]


1886 June 11 / “A shock of earthquake was felt Friday night (11th) at Sandy Hook and Coney Island,” USA. / Nature 34-153. [VI; 506. “Notes.” Nature, 34 (June 17, 1886): 153-155, at 153.]


1886 June 12 / Supposed q along northern coast of N Jersey due to gun drill aboard the Juanita near Long Beach. / Ph. Pub. Ledger, June 15. [VI; 507. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, June 15, 1886.)]


1886 June 13 / N.Y.T., 2-6 / q. / Sandy Hook. [VI; 508. “The Earthquake Plainly Felt.” New York Times, June 13, 1886, p. 2 c. 6.]


1886 June 13 / 10:12 p.m. / London—extremely brilliant meteor. “It must have been a minute or two in view.” Cor to Nature 34-143. [VI; 509. Strachan, R. “Meteor.” Nature, 34 (June 17, 1886): 143.]


1886 June 13 / Observatory of Trocadéro / 10:35 p.m. / Bolide from between Polaris and Gamma Caphei toward Cocher. / CR, 102-1414. [VI; 510. “M. L. Jaubert adresse la Note suivante relative à l'observation d'un bolide.” Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 1414. “Cocher” is the constellation Auriga.]


1886 June 14 and 23 / Solar halos at Lewes / 15, 23, 30, July 1, 2, 3, afterglows / Nature 34-217. [VI; 511. Jenner, James Herbert Augustus. “Halos.” Nature, 34 (July 8, 1886): 217.]


1886 June 15 / Sun, 2-4, from Utica Herald—that a huge mineral mass had fallen from the sky into Spring Pond near St Regis Falls, casting out mud and water and fish and boiling fish remaining. / See Aug 7, 1887. [VI; 512. “A Meteor in a Pond.” New York Sun, June 15, 1886, p. 2 c. 4. “The Dickinson Centre correspondent of the Norwood News does not believe in the meteor story....” Chateauguay Record, (New York), June 18, 1886, p. 1 c. 4. “And yet how many papers publish just such articles through their columns when the first reading would show one that they are nothing more than the writers imagination.” See: 1887 Aug 7, (VI; 1127).]


1886 June 16 / In 50 hours ending on 16th, 28 inches of rain fell at Alexandria, La. / NY Trib 1889, June 3-6-3. [VI; 513. (New York Tribune, June 3, 1886, p. 6 c. 3; not found here, obvious wrong date; also try New York Times.) (“Heavy Rains in the South.” New York Tribune, June 20, 1886, p. 1 c. 5.)]


1886 June 18 / Lat 36° / Long 18 / 18 or 180? / (W or E?) / Trib, Sept 4-5-4 / Capt of a ship from New Zealand that for 4 hours had sailed through a dense, yellow dust supposed volcanic. [VI; 514. “Volcanic Dust in the Sea.” New York Tribune, September 4, 1886, p. 5 c. 4. “Captain Auckland reports that on June 18 in latitude 36° 31' and longitude 18° the bark sailed for four hours through a dense yellow dust.”]


1886 June / New Zealand volc. / That a cloud burst and showered ashes. / World, July 12-5-1. [VI; 515. (New York World, July 12, 1886, p. 5 c. 1.)]


1886 June 20 / Sarajevo / met / Met Zeit 3/370. [VI; 516. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 3 (1886): 356-372, at 370.]


1886 June 21 / Solar halo at Great Yarmouth / See June 14. / See June 5. / See May 17. / Nature 34-168. [VI; 517. Tizard, Thomas Henry. “Solar Halo.” Nature, 34 (June 24, 1886): 168. (illustration). See: 1886 May 17, (VI; 450); 1886 June 5, (VI; 480); and, 1886 June 14 and 23, (VI; 511).]


1886 / ab June 23 // Yarn of a man carried 70 miles by a kite / W. Va. / Sun, July 4-10-4. [B; 695. “Seventy Miles by Kite.” New York Sun, July 4, 1886, p. 10 c. 4.]


1886 June 26 / Sun, 2-4 / A Color to Case? [B; 696. “An Ocean Mystery.” New York Sun, June 26, 1886, p. 2 .c. 4.]


1886 June 29 / Sun, 1-7 / Story of a burning mountain in Northwest Territory. [VI; 518. “A Smothered Volcano.” New York Sun, June 29, 1886, p. 1 c. 7. In this newspaper yarn, a hunting party claimed to have found a mountain which was heating up the air, earth, and Manitou River, in northern Minnesota, which if not explained by volcanism was theorized to be a burning coal seam, “making a mighty cauldron of the Manitou River's bed.”]


1886 June 30 / Stones / Sun, 4-7 / That autumn of 1885, windows in a vacant house in Danbury, Conn., were broken by stones thrown from unseen origin. Thrown with "such precision" that often 2 or 3 would go through same hole in glass. "It is presumed they are fired from a gun operated by compressed air." / These windows boarded up. Had been unboarded and the stones started again. [B; 697.1, 697.2. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, June 30, 1886, p. 4 c. 7.]


1886 June 30 / Danbury / Sounds / See Jan. 14, 1888. [B; 698. See: 1888 Jan. 14, (B; 845).]


1886 // summer /// Poole / butterflies / Symons Met 21/147. [VI; 519. Wallis, Herbert Sowerby. "Remarkable Showers." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 21 (November 1886): 144-147, at 147.]


1886 // summer /// Shower of flies / Cupar, Fife. / Symons Met 21/147 / ac to the Standard. [VI; 520. Wallis, Herbert Sowerby. "Remarkable Showers." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 21 (November 1886): 144-147, at 147. “An extraordinary phenomenon....” London Standard, August 9, 1886, p. 2 c. 3. “An extraordinary phenomenon was on Saturday witnessed at Cupar Fife. About eight o'clock in the morning an immense shower of flies fell, completely covering the road near the railway station to the extent of some 600 yards. The flies were dead when they fell, and were larger than the ordinary house fly.”]


1886 // summer /// 2 showers of frogs / Symons Met 21/147. [VI; 521. Wallis, Herbert Sowerby. "Remarkable Showers." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 21 (November 1886): 144-147, at 147.]


1886 // summer /// Drought in Dakota and Minnesota / M. Weather Rev 1886-326. [VI; 522. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 11; November 1886): 325-328, at 326.]


1886 // summer /// Several Cors. noticed immense numbers of house-flies. / Sci Gos 1886-281. [VI; 523. “House-Flies.” Science Gossip, 22 (no. 264; December 1886): 281.]


1886 // summer /// Lincolnshire / remarkable absence of wasps / D News, Sept. 14-6-5. [VI; 524. “Wasps.” London Daily News, September 14, 1886, p. 6 c. 5.]


1886 // summer /// D. pulchella in England / not known capture again till 1892 / See summer, 1892. [VI; 525. See: 1892 // summer, (VII; 540).]


1886 / summer, ab. 1886 // Figure in a graveyard seen to disap / Jour Soc 6-138 / At Balne Vicarage, Snaith R.S.O., Yorkshire. [B; 699. "Cases Supplied to the Literary Committee." Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 6 (October 1893): 129-139, at 137-139.]


1886 July 1 / 11:35 p.m. / Steamer Thessaly / 3 or 4 shocks / Lat 0.55 (sic) / Long 29.34 W. / L.T., Sept 2-4-f. [VI; 526. “Submarine Earthquake.” London Times, September 2, 1886, p. 4 c. 6.]


1886 July 2 / London (Ont) Advertiser of / Big bugs, ab 3 inches long, and one inch wider, and armed with formidable-looking claws, had appeared in Buffalo. [VI; 527. (London Advertiser, (Ontario), July 2, 1886.)]


1886 July 4 / Man in Colorado / lightning / killed crossing a mt. / Sci Amer 55/58. [B; 700. “Lightning Stroke in the Rocky Mountains.” Scientific American, n.s., 55 (July 24, 1886): 58. “Struck by Lightning.” Salt Lake Herald, July 8, 1886, p. 1 c. 2. “George S. Edwards, who was struck by lightning while crossing Iron Hill on the 4th instant, is slowly recovering.” “This is the first authentic record of a person being injured by a stroke of lightning at an altitude of over 10,500 [feet] and where persons, affected internally, as Mr. Edwards was, were not instantly killed. ]


1886 July 7 / morning / Severe shock / Malaga, Spain / See later. / [LT], 8-5-c. [VI; 528. “Spain.” London Times, July 8, 1886, p. 5 c. 3. See: 1886 Sept 1, (VI: 761, 766, & 769); 1886 Sept 1 and morning of 2nd, (VI; 762); and, 1886 Oct 22, (VI; 908).]


1886 July 8 / (Redruth) / Shells fall. / (D-89) / Cornwall / N / See July 19. [VI; 529. The note copies information from page 89 of The Book of the Damned. Connock, R.J. "Shower of Shells." Science Gossip, 22 (no. 262; October 1886): 238. “After a rather prolonged period of dry hot weather, a heavy thunder-shower fell on the north side of the parish of Illogan, about three miles from Redruth, Cornwall, about 9 P.M. on Thursday, July 8th, the wind being N.N.W. On the following morning, a farmer resident in the district, going to his work about 6 A.M., noticed that the road and fields in the track over which the shower extended were strewed with small snails of a kind quite different to any previously observed in the district. They were then, he states, lying about in such numbers that he could gather them together in handfuls. At this time (August 4th), they are thickly strewn among the grass of the meadows, upon which they are apparently feeding. It is unfortunate that attention was not directed earlier to the phenomenon, that it might have been observed whether there were any on the roofs of the cottages in the vicinity; this cannot be done now, as the abundant rains that have subsequently fallen would have washed them away. Similar shells have been observed in very small quantities on the sands skirting the sea beach about two miles to the north-west; but it is stated that none of this sand has for very many years been placed on the meadows where the creatures are now found in the greatest abundance. Probably some of your readers may be interested in hearing of the occurrence, and may be able to suggest an explanation. The shells sent enclosed have been placed in hot water to preserve them from decay.” "A Shower of Shells." Redruth Independent, August 13, 1886, p. 3 c. 3. "Shower of Shells." Redruth Independent, August 20, 1886, p. 4 c. 5. "Shower of Shells." Redruth Independent, August 27, 1886, p. 4 c. 3. "Shower of Shells." Redruth Independent, September 10, 1886, p. 4 c. 2. "Shower of Shells." Redruth Independent, September 17, 1886, p. 4 c. 1. "Shower of Shells." Redruth Independent, September 24, 1886, p. 4 c. 2. See: 1886 July, (VI; 539), and, 1886 / ab. July 19, (VI; 541).]


1886 July 8 / and on 10 March, 1887 // Mayon Volc, Philippines / Ref, Feb 1, 1884. [VI; 530. Refer to: 1814 Feb 1, (I; 479). Masó, Miguel Saderra. Report on the Seismic and Volcanic Centers of the Philippine Archipelago. Manila: Bureau of Public Printing, 1902, 14.]


1886 July 11 / 8:15 p.m. / St. Johnsbury, Vt. / Meteor 6 times max. Venus / Science 8-58 / at Salem, Mass, p. 102. [VI; 531. Brackett, S.H. “A Bright Meteor.” Science, s. 1 v. 8 (July 16, 1886): 58. “A Bright Meteor.” Science, s. 1 v. 8 (July 30, 1886): 102.]


1886 July 13 / 3:50 p.m. / Pensacola, Florida / a revolving column of smoke in sky—not said how so determined / MWR '86-201. [VI; 532. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 7; July 1886): 198-201, at 201.]


1886 July 14 / Toronto Globe of / Aerolite had fallen in a street of Pana, Ill., about the size of a large cocoanut. [VI; 533. “Round the Globe.” Toronto Globe, July 14, 1886, p. 6 c. 1. “An aerolite fell in the streets of Pana, Ill., near a man driving along with a horse and buggy. The man alighted and dug out the prize, which had imbedded itself in the ground about a foot. The aerolite proved to be about the size of a large cocoanut.”]


1886 July 14 / Sun protub. / R, Sept 26, '79. [VI; 534. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 255 & 257, (figure 94).]


[1886 July 14 / frogs. My Note. “A Taste of the Hereafter.” Daily Alta California, July 15, 1886, p. 5 c. 6. “About 3 o'clock this morning a shower of frogs and sulphur fell on the State Prison daring a thunder-storm. The sulphnr was pure, and in some places fell an inch and a half thick.”]


1886 July 15, 16 / Vulc. / Augs / by M. Jacquot, of Havre—saw a round black body traverse disk of the sun. Shining after leaving the sun. On 16th saw 2 such bodies. / L'Astro 1886/71. [VI; 535. “Passage d'un essaim de corpuscles devant le Soleil.” Astronomie, 5 (1886): 70-71.]


1886 July 15 / Terrific gale and hailstones of enormous size / great damage / Greece, Province of Elis / Malta Standard 22-1-4. [VI; 536. (Malta Standard, July 22, 1886, p. 1 c. 4.)]


1886 July 15 / Nevada / frgs and sulphur / [Letter to Fort from John T. Reid, Lovelock, Nevada, July 19th, 1926 / Enclosure—typed copy from Carson City (Nevada) Appeal, July 15th, 1886]. [VI; 537. Reid, John T. Letter to Fort. July 19, 1926.) “Sulphur and Frogs.” Carson City Appeal, July 15, 1886, p. 3 c. 3. “A Shower of Both Fell at the States Prison.” “Yesterday morning the States Prison was visited by a deluge of rain and the heaviest part of the thunder storm.” “In the morning the officers of the Prison were astonished to find the ground covered with sulphur left after the rain had dried or soaked in the ground. The deposit varied from a sixteenth of an inch to an inch and a half thick and was everywhere. It was swept off the stone walk like snow and was also found in quantities on the roof. It was as fine as flour and of a pure yellow color. There were also millions of young frogs about half an inch long.” “Quite a number of parties went out to the Prison yesterday to verify the story and all were satisfied that it was sulphur.” “The explanation of the phenomenon is that a water spout scooped up the frogs and sulphur from some lake aud deposited it at the Prison.” “The Sulphur Shower Explained.” Carson City Appeal, July 20, 1886, p. 3 c. 2. The Truckee Republican stated that the sulphur was “nothing except the pollen from pine trees and that, on July 14, “the surface of Donner Lake was covered with it.” “The Prison authorities insist that the shower contained sulphur.”]  


[The following two notes were clipped together by Fort. VI: 538 & 539.]


1886 July [8] / BO / In the Redruth Independent, Aug 13, the Editor writes of shower of shells. “The shells are genuine, and the fishes they contain are alive, and the fields where they are found are two miles from the sea, and thousands of persons have seen them in the spots, and thousands of the shells have been carried away and thousands remain. / (snails) / The shower was at Illogan. / Issue Aug 27, cor asserts were only snails—how got these he not try to explain—had put some in salt water where they had soon died. / Aug 27—cor had put some in salt water and not died. [VI; 538.1, 538.2, 538.3. “A Shower of Shells.” Redruth Independent, August 13, 1886, p. 3 c. 3. “Shower of Shells.” Redruth Independent, August 27, 1886, p. 4 c. 3.]


1886 July [8] / In the Redruth Cornubian, Aug 27, tells that shells fell so upon a man at work in a field that he had to put his jacket around his head and seek shelter. /// 1600. [VI; 539. “The Shower of Shells.” Cornubian and Redruth Times, (Redruth), August 27, 1886, p. 2 c. 6. “A correspondent, signing himself 'X.Y.Z.,' writes as follows:—It is stated that a man at work in one of the fields at Illogan, in which the shells fell, not only saw but unmistakably felt the shower about his ears and face, until he enveloped his head in his jacket and thus sought shelter.”]


1886 July middle, ab / Stones / Began phe / Religio-Phil Jour, Sept 25-6-5 / Peoria, Ill., home of Frank M. Sanborn, a carpenter, Fourth Street. Stones and other missiles coming through windows—strange whistling sounds—doors opening and shutting. People who investigated said been hit by missiles "without being hurt". [B; 701.1, 701.2. "Peoria in the Throes of a Haunted-House Scare." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 41 (no. 5; September 25, 1886): 6, (c. 5). A City and Its Ghosts.” Chicago Tribune, September 14, 1886, p. 3 c. 3.]


1886 July 19 / (+) / Strange lizards / Public Ledger 23-3-last col. / Ac to a dispatch from Hobdy's Mills, Pa., on morning of 19th, after a hard rain storm night before, the ground was covered with bright, red lizards—roads, fields, woods scarlet with them. [VI; 540.1, 540.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, July 23, 1886, p. 3.) “A Shower of Red Lizards” Hillsboro News-Herald, (Ohio), July 28, 1886, p. 2 c. 4. “Early yesterday morning, after the hard rain-storm of the night before, the ground in all directions around the settlement was covered thickly with bright red lizards. The roads, fields and woods were alive with them, giving the entire country the appearance of having been painted red. It was impossible to step without crushing them. They were an inch and a half long, and had a row of small black spots on each side, extending to the tail. The sun came out in the forenoon, and in two hours not one of the lizards was to be seen.”]


[The following two Fort. VI: 541 & 542.]


1886 / ab. July 19 [July 8] // (Snails) / Symons 21/123 / Jenkin says occurrence ab 3 weeks before his investigation of Aug 9. Says that ac to a cor. to a local paper, ground been covered to a depth of 3 inches. Says are plentiful on coast of Cornwall, but not where found, nor within many miles of. / Aug 9 / date of letter / by A.H. Jenkin, in Symons' Met Mag 21/102—Having heard that a fall of snails had occurred a few miles from Redruth, he visited the place and learned from a man who lived upon the spot, that at 9 p.m. when almost dark, what appeared to be a very black thunder cloud rose from the west. The man then sought shelter. Next morning, roads, fields, and hedges, but confined to about 3 acres, were strewn with the shells of living snails. Mr. J says that he found the fields thickly covered. He had never seen such snails in the neighborhood before. He thinks them Helix Virgata and Bulimus Acutus. / See July 8. / See late in 1885 for list. [VI; 541.1 to 541.4. See: 1886 July 8, (VI; 529), and, (later 1885, list).]


1886 Aug 9 / before // Symons 21/102, 123 / Cor writes, “I never saw shells of the kind in the neighborhood before, though I have known it well for many years.” Says that when he visited the place. Ab 3 weeks before he visited it—his letter dated Aug 9—many crawled away but still one to two thousand shells to the square yard, all within small area, (“small acreage”). [VI; 542.1, 542.2. Jenkin, Alfred Hamilton. "A Shower of Snails." Symons' Meteorological Magazine, 21 (August 1886): 101-102. "A Shower of Snails." Symons' Meteorological Magazine, 21 (September 1886): 123. See: 1886 July 8, (VI; 529).]


[The following six notes were clipped together by Fort. VI: 542 to 548.]


1886 July 19 / (Liv) / (BO) / “Strange” / (List) / Ext. bird, Aug 8, 1889 / 1885 / Oct 28 / (Strange) Birds // Lizards—July 19, 1886 / Insects—July 28, 1886 / birds—May 24, 1888 / fish—Aug 8, 1888 / fish—Feb 6, 1890 / birds—May 23, 1890 / worm—July 13, 1891 / fish—May 18, 1892 / fish, several falls—July 26, 1893. [VI: 543.1, 543.2. See: (1886 July 19 / (Liv) / (BO) / “Strange” / (List) / Ext. bird, Aug 8, 1889); 1885 Oct 28, (VI; 196); 1889 July 19, (VI; 540); 1886 July 28, (VI; 572); 1888 May 24, (VI; 1335); 1888 July 30, (VI; 1420); 1890 Feb 6, (VI; 1966); 1890 May 4, (VI; 2010); 1891 July 13, (VII; 133); 1892 / ab. May 18, (VII; 487); and,  1893 July 26, (VII; 915).]


1886 July / Strange / Strange worms / Feb 4, 1892. [VI; 544. See: 1892 Feb 4, (VII; 394).]


1886 July 19 / Strange / See snakes, July 29, 1892. [VI; 545. See: 1892 July 29, (VII; 624).]


1886 July 19 / Strange and unseasonable / Jan 3, 1924 / winter, 1884 / Argentine wrms, ab Sept 1, 1883 / With q in Spain and phe in U.S. / worms, N.Y. / Dec 25, 1884. [VI; 546. See: 1883 Sept. 19, (V; 1618), (in Canada, not Argentina); (1883 Sept 1; not found here); 1884 Dec 25-26, (V; 2079); and, (1924 Jan 3).]


1886 July 19 / Strange bird / See Sept. 23. [VI; 547. See: 1886 Sept 23, (VI; 836).]


1886 July 19 / Strange / See Red wrms, Jan., 1924. [VI; 548. See: (1924 Jan 3).]


[The following eleven notes were clipped together by Fort. VI: 549 to 559.]


1886 July / Living, Oct 21, 1876 / Strange Insects, July 24, 1837; May, 1867 / wrms, July 25, 1872. [VI; 549. See: (Oct 21, 1876 / ; 1837, (I; 2210); 1867 May, (III; 1048); and, 1872 July 25, (IV; 881).]


1888 // Unknown worms / Ap. 24, 1837. [VI; 550. See: 1837 Ap. 24, (I; 2196).]


1888/ July / Strange list / See May, 1867. [VI; 551. See: 1867 May, (III; 1048).]


1886 July / “Strange” list / See July, 1818. / Bath, Ap., 1871. [VI; 552. See: 1818 July, (I; 657); 1871 Ap. 22, (VI: 378, 380, 381, 382, 384, 385, 386, 389, 390, & 395); 1871 Ap. 22-23, (IV; 382); 1871 Ap 22, 28, (IV; 387); 1871 Ap. 23, (IV: 391, 393, & 394); 1871 Ap 24, (IV; 396); 1871 April 28, (IV; 397); and, 1871 Ap. 29, (IV: 377, 379, & 398).]


1886 July / (BO) / Unknowns / Ap. 22, 1871 / See col, Feb, 1892. [VI; 553. See: 1871 Ap. 22, (VI: 378, 380, 381, 382, 384, 385, 386, 389, 390, & 395); 1871 Ap. 22-23, (IV; 382); 1871 Ap 22, 28, (IV; 387); 1871 Ap. 23, (IV: 391, 393, & 394); 1871 Ap 24, (IV; 396); 1871 April 28, (IV; 397); 1871 Ap. 29, (IV: 377, 379, & 398); 1892 Feb 11, (VII: 389, 392, 394, & 395), and, 1892 Feb 14, VII; 393).]


1886 July / List of unknown / Fishes—see May 18, 1892. [VI; 554. See: 1892 / ab. May 18, (VII; 487).]


1886 // Unknown list / Flies? / May, 1905. [VI; 555. See: (1905 May).]


1886 July / Strange list / See all wrms and larvae. [VI; 556. See: (cols. wrms & larvae).]


1886 July / Strange bugs repeating / May 19, 1888. [VI; 557. See: 1888 May 19, (VI; 1325).]


1886 // early /// Norway Series / See March 31, 1888. [VI; 558. See: 1888 March 3, (VI; 1299).]


1885 Aug 19 / Change in Andromeda / Sept 7-15, 1890. [VI; 559. See: 1890 Sept 7-15, (VII; 16).]


1886 July 19 / Destructive hailstones / Italy / D. News 20-5-6. [VI; 560. (London Daily News, July 20, 1886, p. 5 c. 6; not found here.)]


1886 July 17 / Turtle / Sun, 2-7, under “Sunbeams” / “A black cloud emptied itself in the 'piney woods' of Laurens county, Georgia, on a space not exceeding half an acre, and miles from any pond or creek; and with the water were deposited over fifty soft-shell turtles and striped-head terrapins, nearly all as large as the bottom of a peck measure.” [VI; 561.1, 561.2. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, July 17, 1886, p. 2 c. 7. See: 1885 May 7, (V; 2168.2).]


1886 July-Aug / For successive falls of living, see Aug 10, 1894. [VI; 562. See: 1894 Aug 10, (VII; 1094).]


1886 July 21 / First rain in five weeks at Centralia, Indiana / hoped for rain in Missouri / NY Graphic 22-166-2. [VI; 563. “Welcome Rain in the West.” New York Daily Graphic, July 22, 1886, p. 166 c. 2.]


1886 July 22 / N.Y. Graphic / No rain in Colorado for weeks. [VI; 564. (New York Graphic, July 22, 1886; not found here.)]


1886 July 22 / evening / “M. Ch. Mousette addresses a note upon a luminous meteor having the appearance of a diffuse aurora. / N.M. / C.R. 103-293. [VI; 566. “M. Ch. Mousette adresse une Note sur un météor lumineux....” Comptes Rendus, 103 (1886): 293.]


1886 July 23 / Drought / NY Daily Graphic / Streams of wagons passing through Fort Worth, Texas. People fleeing from the drought in western Texas. In some of the counties not rained in a year. Hundreds of families abandoning their cattle. [VI; 565. “The Drought in Texas.” New York Daily Graphic, July 23, 1886, p. 174 c. 2.]


1886 July 23 / Destructive q / Shinano, Japan / Trans Seis Soc Japan 11-80. [VI; 567. Sekiya, S. "The Severe Earthquake of the 15th of January, 1887." Seismological Journal of Japan, 11 (1887): 79-89, at 80.]


1886 July 24 / Large snake killed / Arcanum, Ohio / 13 feet long / Sun, Aug. 1-5-7. [B; 702. “Ohio's Prize Snake.” New York Sun, August 1, 1886, p. 5 c. 7.]


1886 July 25 / Sun, 5-6 / Story of owl in England that often attacked persons. It or one was later, shot. [B; 703. “An Owl Attacks Men.” New York Sun, July 25, 1886, p. 5 c. 6. “A Tall Story of a Pugnacious Owl.” Dundee Evening Telegraph, July 6, 1886, p. 2 c. 1.]


1886 July 25 / Terrific th. storm at Schweinfurt, Bavaria. Many houses destroyed by wind and lightning. / NY D. Graphic 26-198-3. [VI; 568. “A Disastrous Storm in Bavaria.” New York Daily Graphic, July 26, 1886, p. 198 c. 3.]


1886 July 26 / Stones (Chico) / Phil. Public Ledger, July 30-3-last col. / Said that at Mundy's Landing, Woodford Co., Ky., on the Kentucky river, showers of stones had been falling at intervals since the 26. That they "descended perpendicularly". "Several persons have been severely hurt and roofs of houses made to rattle like musketry." [B; 704.1, 704.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, July 30, 1886, p. 3 c. (last.)) “Showers of Stones.” Orangeburg Times and Democrat, (South Carolina), August 5, 1886, p. 1 c. 5. “The inhabitants of Mundy's Landing, on the Kentucky River, Woodford County, are considerably worked up over showers of stones which have descended in their midst. Several persons have been severely hurt and roofs of houses made to rattle like musketry. The scene and location of these mysterious visitations are at and near the house of Mrs. Lucretia Mundy, widow of Lowry Mundy, who died from the effects of poison administercd, as charged, by his wife and Dr. Davis, the latter now serving a life sentence in the peniteniary for being guilty of poisoning, and Mrs. Mundy being under indictment as accessory to the murder. The first notice taken of the falling stones was on Monday last, when parties picking blackberries in a patch some distance from the Mundy mansion were surprised at the drooping [sic, dropping] of small stones in their midst and continuing to drop at intervals. Their surprise changed to alarm, and with buckets and berries they beat a hasty retreat from the patch. The next day Mrs. Dr. Davis, when about 100 yards from her house, was struck severely on the arm by a stone from some unknown direction. Miss Annie Mundy was also hurt, and very severely, by a descending stone upon her head. Miss Eva Mundy the next day was hit and slightly hurt. A negro, Henry, was struck and knocked over a cliff, which came near ending his career. Saturday and Sunday several negroes were struck, one or two of them being severely injured. The people of the neighborhood of course are stirred up. Some think it the work of some malicious individual or individuals who are creating the sensation. Others think it of the supernatural order. But whether from natural or unnatural causes all are of the opinion that it is a very strange affair. Several houses besides the Davis Mundy mansion have been struck and the stones descend perpendicularly and not horizontally as if thrown by the hand of an individual.” The “Monday last” from a dispatch dated “July 28” suggests that the date, (when the phenomenon was first noticed), was July 19, (not July 26).]


1886 July 27 / Aurora / Scotland but especially Ireland / Nature 34-312. [VI; 569. “Aurora.” Nature, 34 (August 5, 1886): 312.]


1886 July 27 / N.Y. D Graphic, 206-4 / Drifts of starving cattle in Texas advancing from the parched regions. Men organizing to turn them back. [VI; 570. “The Drought in Texas.” New York Daily Graphic, July 27, 1886, p. 206 c. 4.]


1886 July 27 / Aurora / Mass. / Science 8-124. [VI; 571. Clayton, H. Helm. “A Brilliant Aurora.” Science, s. 1 v. 8 (August 6, 1886): 124.]


1886 July 28 / Strange Insects / Phil Public Ledger. 31-3-  / “The village of Patchogue, L.I., was invaded by a novel species of flying bug Wednesday night (28th). The insects swarmed in such quantities that all the stores in the principal business block were compelled to close an hour before the usual time. The bugs were about an inch long and ¾ inch wide, with hard-shell backs. No one in the village remembers such a visitation before. [VI; 572.1, 572.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, July 31, 1886, p. 3 (no col. #).)]


1886 July 29 / bet 12 and 2 p.m. / Carthage, N.Y.—objects in northern sky said been mirage of islands or steamers in the St. Lawrence River. River is 36 miles from C. / Sun, Aug 1-11-5. [VI; 573. “A Mirage of the Thousand Islands.” New York Sun, August 1, 1886, p. 11 c. 5. “ A spectacle which in this country greets the eye seldom more than once in a lifetime was enjoyed by the people of Carthage on Thursday between the hours of 12 and 2 P.M. On elevated points about the village, looking directly north and no[r]thwest, could be seen in a mirage the St. Lawrence River and the inviting and picturesque Thousand Islands. Thes eobjects were plainly visible to the naked eye as though they were only a half mile distant. The water, the islands, and, at times, steamers plying on the river, the village of Clayton, the Round Island House, and the city of Ogdensburgh were plainly outlined against the sky. One party recognized the cottage of Thomas G. Alvord, situated opposite Clayton, and pointed out to bystanders points in the vicinity by which he recognized it. This rare spectacle was presented to the view of hundreds of excited and eager persons, who were entranced by it for several hours.”]


1886 July 29 / Nature of / “A little unknown insect” was destroying fir and spruce cones in western Norway. [VI; 574. “Notes.” Nature, 34 (July 29, 1886): 299-301, at 300.]


1886 July 30 / Graphic, p. 230 / 8 weeks since rain in N. Missouri. [VI; 575. (New York Daily Graphic, July 30, 1886, p. 230; not found here, in Second Edition copy.)]


1886 July 31 / Religio-Phil Jour, 4-4 / Hillsboro, Ill / House had been vacant—people moved in—then groans and rappings. [B; 705. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 40 (no. 23; July 31, 1886): 4, (c. 4).]


1886 July 31 / Series / See June 5, 6, etc.—July, 1850. [VI; 576. See: (1850???).]


1886 Aug / Woodstock phe. Mistaken date by Holms. Should be 1887. [B; 706. See: 1887 Aug, (B; 805).]


1886 Aug, early / On coast of Lincolnshire, cor saw several times a line of green flies cast up by waves. Once he followed such a line 3 miles. Another cor that swarms of them on Isle of Wight in 2nd and 3rd weeks July. / Sc Gos 1886/238. [VI; 577. (Science Gossip, 1886-238; not found here.)]


1886 Aug / Sounds / Sun of Aug 3-2-6, copying from Albany Argus—hollow reverberating sounds at Bainbridge said to come from the north side of a hill. [VI; 578. “Strange Sounds from the Earth.” New York Sun, August 3, 1886, p. 2 c. 6. (Albany Argus, ca. August 1, 1886.)]


1886 Aug 1, ab. / Trance / Religio-Phil. Jour, Dec 11, 1886, copying from San Fran. Chronicle / Jeanie Thomas, daughter of W.R. Thomas, Capt. of the Oakland, Cal., police went into a trance, or cataleptic sleep, for 5 weeks—and again asleep. 19 years old—had, from age of 11, epileptic spasms. [B; 707.1, 707.2. "A Long Sleep." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 41 (no. 16; December 11, 1886): 6, (c. 3). "A Long Sleep." Los Angeles Herald, October 24, 1886, p. 12 c. 1-2.]


1886 Aug 2 / Cloudburst near Fort Keogh, Montana. 800 sheep drowned. / N.Y. D. Graphic 6-286-4. [VI; 579. “Cloud Burst in Montana.” New York Daily Graphic, August 6, 1886, p. 286 c. 4.]


[1886 Aug 2 /] 1886 Sept 1 / S S / Toronto Globe of / Dispatch from St John's, N.F.—That 3 strange fish had appeared in Placentia Harbor, one of which had been killed. "It is 20 feet in length and 5 in diameter. In color, it is nearly all black, with one large white stripe on each side. Its body is covered with a coat of fat resembling whale fat, two and a half inches thick. The strangest thing about the creature is its very large teeth, which fit so closely when its jaws are shut that scarcely any water penetrates through them." [B; 733.1, 733.2. “A Curious Fish.” Toronto Globe, September 1, 1886, p. 1 c. 5. “Three Strange-Looking Fish.” St. John's Evening Telegram, (Newfoundland), August 14, 1886, p. 4 c. 1. The description, (notably of its teeth), suggests that this was a basking shark.]


1886 --- ? / Aug 3 // Aug / D-210. [VI; 580. The note copies information from page 210 of The Book of the Damned.  ("M. Poey cites a similar instance, of Aug. 3, 1886 "  Probably confused with Astronomie, 5 (1886): 391-2.) (“Andrés Poey Aguirre, ” rather than “Auber, Poey”???) (Not in CR 103 (1886) Check others 104+)])


1886 Aug 4 / 10:45 p.m. / Leeds / Isle of Man / Bristol / great met / E Mec 44/61 / 43-527, 576 / size of moon. [VI; 581. Booth, D. “Meteoric.” English Mechanic, 44 (no. 1121; September 17, 1886): 61. Booth, D. “Large Fireball—M 31.” English Mechanic, 43 (no. 1116; August 13, 1886): 527. Davenport, William. “Large Meteor.” English Mechanic, 43 (no. 1118; August 27, 1886): 576.]


1886 Aug 5 / BO / Date of the fall of shell fish in the Torquay / Directory of 11th. [VI; 582. (Torquay Directory, August 11, 1886; not at BNA.) “County News.” Cornish Telegraph, August 13, 1886, p. 7 c. 1. “Many witnesses attest the fact of a shower of shell fish having on Thursday [August 5] fallen upon two or three fields of corn belonging to Mr. Tredinnick, farmer, whose ground is situated about two miles from the sea, in the parish of Illogan. Hundreds of persons are said to have made a pilgrimage from neighbouring parishes to judge for themselves the truth of the report that such an event had occurred. Many brought away with them specimens of the shell fish, which are of a kind often found on the Cornish coast, and which vary from quarter to half an inch in diameter.” Jenkin, Alfred Hamilton. "A Shower of Snails." Symons' Meteorological Magazine, 21 (August 1886): 101-102. See: 1886 July 8, (VI; 529), and, 1886 July, (VI: 538 & 539).]


1886 Aug 5 / Pub Ledger of / That several days before, a farmer near Southington, Conn—his name Tolles—had found a rock new to him on his farm. Though had fallen from the sky. [VI; 583. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 5, 1886.) “A Meteoric Visitor.” Richmond Daily Dispatch, (Virginia), August 5, 1886, p. 2 c. 3.]


1886 Aug 6 / Meteor bei Halle / Met Zeit 3/552. [VI; 584. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 3 (1886): 546-556, at 552.]


1886 Aug 7 / [LT], 10-d / 9-6-f / 10-5-d // Winged Ants. [VI; 585. “Winged Ants.” London Times, August 7, 1886, p. 10 c. 4. “Winged Ants.” London Times, August 9 1886, p. 6 c. 6. “Winged Ants.” London Times, August 10, 1886, p. 5 c. 4.]


1886 Aug 7 / morning—8 a.m. / At Cupar. [VI; 586. (Refs.???)]


[The following two notes were folded together by Fort. VI: 587 & 588.]


1886 Aug. 7 / Repeat / Flies / Fifeshire Journal, 12th / Early morning at Cupar a shower of dead insects along a road, which in places they entirely covered. Whitish wings and somewhat larger than the ordinary gnat. Thick in places along a distance of 500 yards. In Journal, 19th, that morning of 13th been another shower at about same place, near the South Toll. Said the flies were the same species, but this may not be so ac to description—“black and with large and lustrous wings. They were found dead on the ground, exuding a yellow substance. [VI; 587.1, 587.2, 587.3. (Fifeshire Journal, August 12, 1886; not @ BNA.) (Fifeshire Journal, August 19, 1886; not @ BNA.)]


1886 Aug 7 / Specimens of the flies of 13th shown to an Edinburgh scientist, who did not name them but said were probably local flies killed by atmospheric conditions. [VI; 588. (Refs.???)]


1886 Aug 8 / N.Y. Times, 4-2 / Georgia / Ghost Stories. [B; 708. “Georgia Ghost Stories.” New York Times, August 8, 1886, p. 4 c. 2. “Constitutionals.” Atlanta Constitution, July 30, 1886, p. 4 c. 5-6.]


1886 Aug 8 / Town of Lusk in Wyoming, near Montana border line, blown away in a windstorm. / N.Y. D. Graphic 12-334-2. [VI; 589. “A Town Blown Away.” New York Daily Graphic, August 12, 1886, p. 334 c. 2. “The town contained several hundred people and was built of tents and temporary structures of boards. The storm literally swept the earth clear of encumbrances. Tents, boards and canvas were wrenched from their moorings and whirled away.” “There were no casualties, owing to the lightness of the material composing the buildings.”]


1886 Aug 8 / Winged things supposed been birds by M Léotard at Marseilles / L'Astro 5-391. [VI; 590. Léotard, Jacques. "Meme sujet." Astronomie, 5 (1886): 391-392.]


1886 Aug 8 / 8:45 p.m. / Unusual (size) meteor / Watertown, Mass. / Science 8-168. [VI; 591. Ames, C.H. “A Brilliant Meteor.” Science, s. 1 v. 8 (August 20, 1886): 168.]


1886 Aug / Maximum of Perseids / Observatory 46-169. [VI; 592. Denning, William Frederick. "Meteor Notes." Observatory, 46 (1923): 169-170.]


1886 Aug 10 / Sun, 2-7 / Sea Serp in Sandy Lake, Minn. Huge scaly head and two horns pointing forward. [B; 713. "Sunbeams." New York Sun, August 10, 1886, p. 2 c. 7.]


1886 Aug 11 / Fairy ring / Ring in earth / Religio-Phil, Jour, Sept 11-6-1 / 2 miles from the town of Helena, Sandusky Co., Ohio, appeared in a forest a ring of earth—44 feet in diameter, "true as a die". Story was told that 28 years before, a man disappeared—his blood-stained money belt, empty, was found in center of a similar ring. 2 men were suspected but affair died out—14 years later one of them died, and a similar ring appeared. Aug 11—other died and again the ring. Story said vouched for by the Editor of the Belleville Enterprise. [B; 709.1, 709.2, 709.3. "What Does It Means?" Religio-Philosophical Journal, 41 (no. 3; September 11, 1886): 6, (c. 1).]


1886 Aug 12 / evening—7 p.m. / Chambers of Mr. E.T.E. Besley—loud report—window smashed by a pellet—4 Temple gardens, London. / D. News, 14th. [B; 710. “A Mysterious Occurrence.” London Daily News, August 14, 1886, p. 7 c. 2.]


1886 Aug 12 / Coast Mass / S S said been seen by 50 persons / Seen ab 80 feet long / Sun 14-4-1. [B; 714. "They Describe the Sea Serpent." New York Sun, August 14, 1886, p. 4 c. 1. ]


1886 Aug 12 / See Oct. / 6 a.m. / Pabloff Volc in Alaska / Sci Amer 55-309. [VI; 593. “Volcanic Dust.” Scientific American, n.s., 55 (November 13, 1886): 309. See: 1886 Oct., (VI; 855). The Pavlof volcano.]


1886 Aug 12 / Rondout, N.Y. / Scene in sky—cattle, farm house and barn and rural background—not said identified. / MWR '86-232. [VI; 594. “Optical Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 8; August 1886): 232. “Mirage on the Hudson.” New York Herald, August 14, 1886, p. 10 c. 2. “The phenomenon known as mirage was witnessed at seven A.M. Thursday from Woolsey's Commons and from Weinberg, in Rondout. The 'wonder' presented was a rural landscape. In the foreground cattle were seen lazily chewing their fodder, while close by were the farmer's house, barn and other outbuildings. In the background the picture of a pretty rural scene was presented to the eye. The  atmosphere was murky. The spectacle, which was viewed by a number of well known citizens, is said to have been the first of the kind seen in Ulster county within the memory of the oldest inhabitant.”]


1886 Aug 13 / Seventeen head of cattle, unloaded at Chicago stock yards. Almost all mysteriously burned on their blacks. Nobody could explain. / N.Y. Daily Graphic 13-342-1. [B; 711. “Cattle Mysteriously Burned.” New York Daily Graphic, August 13, 1886, p. 342 c. 3.]


1886 Aug 13 / London (Ont) Advertiser of / Reported from Sandy Lake, near Minneapolis. Violent agitation of the water—a huge scaly head with horns on it—Chris Engstein fired at it—it disappeared. [B; 712. (London Advertiser, August 13, 1886.) "Again the sea serpent...." Brockport Republic, (New York), August 19, 1886, p. 2 c. 4.]


1886 Aug. 13 / Repeating flies / See Aug 7. [VI; 595. See: 1886 Aug. 7, (VI: 587 & 588).]


1886 Aug 13 / Violent hurricanes in the center of England. [VI; 596. (Refs.???)]


1886 Aug 14 / NY Times, 1-4 / S S at Rockport. [B; 715. “Surely a Sea Serpent.” New York Times, August 14, 1886, p. 1 c. 4.]


1886 Aug 14 / 8:30 p.m. / q's of Malta begin. / Malta Standard, 19th / Most of them light with rumbling sound said to go from E to W. / Only on East side of Malta—Standard, Sept. 2—all the q's. [VI; 597. (Malta Standard, August 19, 1886.) (Malta Standard, September 2, 1886.)]


1886 Aug 14, 15 / Shocks / Malta / D. News 16-5-4. [VI; 598. “Earthquake Shocks at Malta.” London Daily News, August 16, 1886, p. 5 c. 4.]


1886 Aug 15, ab / Obj sky / venus inf. conj. / Feb. 18. [VI; 599.]


1886 Aug 15, ab. / Venus obj / Transfer from Fiji Times to The Hawke's Bay Herald, Aug. 25, quoting the Auckland Herald. [VI; 600. “The Rotorua correspondent of the Auckland Herald says....” Hawke's Bay Herald, August 25, 1886.p. 2 c. 8. "A curious phenomenon, which is attracting a deal of attention in this part of the country, is nightly to be seen in our southern sky, just over the Hemo Gorge. A star ball of fire or a will-o'-the wisp—I don't know which—makes its regular appearance between 7 and 9 o'clock and commences the most eccentric movements imaginable; darting hither and thither slowly and with a gyratory motion, assuming as it goes the most beautiful colors. There is no illusion. Nearly everyone in the settlement has seen it, and we are all at a loss to know what it really is, or how its appearance is to be accounted for." "Rotorua News." New Zealand Herald, August 9, 1886, p. 5 c. 5. “Mr. James Stewart, C.E., who has seen from here the eccentric movements of our lately reported nocturnal visitor in the shape of a star, thus accounts for its seeming peculiarities, or rather for the optical illusion which has been puzzling so many of us of late: The star was very clearly seen on Thursday evening through the opening of Hemo Gorge, and the explanation of its seeming swaying to and fro and rising and falling in short curved paths, is arrived at from consideration of its horizontal position and being viewed through the rising vapours of the disturbed thermal district. These vapours rise in clouds of varying dimensions and density, and supply a refracting medium also varying in its power and direction of refraction, and cause the apparent position of the star to vary accordingly. The star thus viewed of late is Canopus, the second brightest in the galaxy, and being an extreme circumpolar star now approaching its lower meridian passage early in the evening, together with its exceptional brightness, is thus peculiarly adapted to exhibit the very singular appearance observed.”]  


1886 (Aug 15, ab.) / Sept. 15, Fiji Times (a semi-weekly), copying from Rotorua / correspondence to New Zealand Herald / Say of a date a month before. / That every night in the southern sky a luminous object appeared between 7 and 9 p.m. and then went through the “most eccentric motions imaginable”, changing fron one color to another. [VI; 601.1, 601.2. (Fiji Times, September 15, 1886.)]


1886 Aug 16 / Reported by Capt. James Fairweather halfway between island of Jan Mayan and Greenland, a sudden shock, but no upheaval of the water. Foggy and slight rain. 2 hours later another shock. / Fife Herald, Sept. 8 (Cupar). [VI; 602. “Submarine Earthquake in the Arctic Seas.” Fife Herald, September 8, 1886, p. 6 c. 3. “The men on the watch declared that they felt as if they had been struck by electricity.”]


1886 Aug 16 / Hurricane / destructive / St. Vincent, B.W.I. / D. News 19-6-7. [VI; 603. “Hurricane at St. Vincent, W.I.” London Daily News, August 19, 1886, p. 6 c. 7.]


1886 Aug 16 / q and hurricane / St Vincent devastated by hurricane. 500 houses destroyed. / LT, Sept 13-12-d / and Jamaica and earthquake 5 to 11 a.m. [VI; 604. Browne, Mary E. “The Recent Hurricane in St. Vincent, West Indies.” London Times, September 13, 1886, p. 12 c. 4. (No reference is given to 500 houses destroyed in this article.)]


1886 Aug 17 / 9 p.m. / 300 miles east of Malta. Tremendous upheaval in ocean—ab 100 feet high and 30 in diameter. / D. News. 19-5-3 / This was flaming—News of 20th. [VI; 605. (London Daily News, August 19, 1886, p. 5 c. 3.) “Fresh Earthquake Shock at Malta.” London Daily News, August 20, 1886, p. 6 c. 2. “The captain of the steamer Transition, which arrived here [Malta] last night, officially reports that at about nine o'clock on the evening of the 17th he observed something like a blaze of fire coming out of the water. It was about thirty feet wide, and rose to 100 feet above the water, and disappeared at once.”]


1886 Aug 17 / 9 p.m. / Malta Standard 9-3-1 / by Capt of the steamship Transition—200 miles east of Malta a blaze of fire ab 100 feet above surface of the sea. Thought from a submarine volc. Not said sea disturbed. [VI; 606. (Malta Standard, September 9, 1886, p. 3 c. 1.)]


1886 Aug 18 / (Stones) / Phil. Public Ledger of / Stones that had fallen at Greeensborough, Ala. With them "remnants of bricks". [B; 729. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 18, 1886.)]


1886 Aug 18 / May relate to Charleston phe. / Others of stones and water so distinctly related that take them up with Charleston q. [VI; 607. (Refs.???)]


1886 Aug 19 / Cyclone / Jamaica / World, Sept 4-3-5 / Aug 19 right. [VI; 608. (New York World, September 4, 1886, p. 3 c. 5.)]


1886 Aug 18 / Levant Herald, 20th / Violent shock, but little damage. Tcheshiné, Turkey. [VI; 609. (Levant Herald, August 20, 1886.)]


1886 Aug 19 / Toronto Globe of / Waterspout “recently” at Port Philip, [Nova Scotia]. [VI; 610. “Dominion Notes.” Toronto Globe, August 19, 1886, p. 6 c. 2-3. ]


1886 Aug 20 / Sun, 2-7 / Meteor seen a few nights before, Eastport, Me. Visible 30 seconds and left a red train. [VI; 611. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, August 20, 1886, p. 2 c. 7.]


1886 Aug 20 / blazing star / Ac. to Prof. Colbert, in Chicago Tribune. See Sidereal Messenger 5-268. / An astronomer of Chicago noticed, with naked eye, a blazing up of the star Zeta in Cassiopeia. It continued for ½ hour. At the time of greatest brilliance a ray like the tail of a comet seemed to shoot out from it. It was nearly as bright as the most prominent stars in Cass. [VI; 612.1, 612.2. “A Blazing Star.” Sidereal Messenger, 5 (November 1886): 269-270. A Blazing Star.” Chicago Tribune, August 22, 1886, p. 2 c. 4.]


1886 Aug 20 / Date of dispatch from N.Y.—town of Haric, Sonora, Mexico, destroyed by floods / D. News 21-6-4. [VI; 613. “A Town Destroyed by Floods.” London Daily News, August 21, 1886, p. 6 c. 4.]


1886 Aug 20 / ab 9 p.m. / At Kilsyth, 13 miles from Glascow—Sharp rumbling sound and shock. / LT 23-6-e. [VI; 614. “Earthquake in Scotland.” London Times, August 23, 1886, p. 6 c. 5.]


1886 Aug 21 / S S / Phil Public Ledger of a week or so before. Unknown monster reported by G.B. Putnam, a Boston Grammar School Principal. // On Aug 22 was reported from Gloucester—like a large spar, 100 feet long—raised its head 6 feet from water. / Ledger 24-2-last // On 23rd reported 4 times Gloucester. / 26-3-last. [B; 727.1, 727.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 23, 1886, p. 2 c. last.) (Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 26, 1886, p. 2 c. last.) “It Was the Sea Serpent Sure Enough.” New York Tribune, August 14, 1886, p. 2 c. 2. See: 1886 Aug 12, (B; 714).]


1886 Aug 24 / Floods at Mandalay / India / N.Y. D. Graphic 24-430-2. [VI; 615. (New York Daily Graphic, August 24, 1886, p. 430 c. 2; not found in Third Edition.) “Flooding a Big City.” New York Sun, August 25, 1886, p. 1 c. 1.]


1886 Aug 24 / 5 p.m. / Germany / Cloudburst between Gröbers and Schkeuditz transformed the country into a vast lake. Terrible ravages by storm in Saxony. / Jour de St. Petersburg, Aug. 29. [VI; 616. (Journal de St. Petersburg, August 29, 1886.)]


1886 Aug 24 / Chatham small balloon with a camera attached broke away, travelling toward Hampshire. / LT 26-4-c. [VI; 617. Elsdale, Henry. “Lost Balloon.” London Times, August 26, 1886, p. 4 c. 3.]


1886 Aug 25-26 / D News 27-3-6 / q at Srinagar, Cashmere / See Oct 20. [VI; 618. “Earthquake in Cashmere.” London Daily News, August 27, 1886, p. 3 c. 6. See: 1886 Oct 20 (VI: 880, 882, 884, & 885).


1886 Aug. 27 / 10:30 p.m. / 4 distinct shocks at Botzen / [LT] 8-13-c / Pat / what list? / W. Sept 22, 1886 / E Mec 79/383. [VI; 619. “The Earthquakes.” London Times, September 8, 1886, p. 13 c. 3. (W.???. September 22, 1886.) (English Mechanic, 79-383.)]


1886 Aug 27 / Said that at Kyparissia in Messenie (French spelling?), a volcanic light was seen on the coast of Strophades. / C.R. 103-565. [VI; 620. Vidal, Léon. “Sur le tremblement de terre du 27 août 1886 (nouveau style) en Grèce.” Comptes Rendus, 103 (1886): 563-565, at 565. No volcano was known to be in eruption in Greece, Malta, nor Italy, at this time.]


1886 Aug 27 / 11:30 p.m. / Steamship La Valette / 36-18 N; 21-32 E / Ac to Capt. Aquilana, in Malta Standard, Sept 2—felt severe shock at midnight. / Lat 30-17; Long 21-27, he says he saw. “I observed on our right something like a mass of thick black smoke which, like a cone, was rising perpendicularly from the horizon and at intervals changing into a reddish color.” Seems nothing submarine. He says there was “a perfect calm”. / See (smoke ab Sept 7). [VI; 621.1, 621.2. (Malta Standard, September 2, 1886.)]


1886 Aug 27 / Q in Greece / night / believed that 200 perished / LT, Sept. 1-10-c. [VI; 622. “The Earthquake in Greece.” London Times, September 1, 1886, p. 10 c. 3.]


1886 Aug 27 / Increased activity of Vesuvius / D News 30-5-6. [VI; 623. “Terrible Earthquake in Greece.” London Daily News, August 30, 1886, p. 5 c. 6.]


1886 Aug 27 / Shore of Lough Neagh—calm, warm day—sound like a distant peal of thunder—quantity of loose hay whirled up ab 100 feet. / Nature 53/296. [VI; 624. “Barisal Guns and Similar Sounds.” Nature, 53 (January 30, 1896): 295-296, at 296.]


1886 Aug 27 / Day of the q in Greece / At Monastir, a tremendous storm—torrents sweeping down valleys; rivers overflowing, carrying away people, houses, cattle, bridges./ Levant Herald (weekly), Sept 8, p. 358. [VI; 625. (Levant Herald, September 8, 1886, p. 358.)]


1886 Aug 27 / The Excelsior Geyser, in Yellowstone Park, which had been quiet for 4 years, suddenly spouted and continued 24 hours. / N.Y. Trib, Sept 1-1-6. [VI; 626. “Excelsior Geyser Plays for a Time.” New York Tribune, September 1, 1886, p. 1 c. 6.]


1886 Aug 27 / [Cut out] Oakland / same as Ohio story / same name. [VI; 627. (Refs.???)]


1886 Aug 27 / 11:33 p.m. / at Athens / Corfu, 11:18 / C.R. 103-563. [VI; 628. Vidal, Léon. “Sur le tremblement de terre du 27 août 1886 (nouveau style) en Grèce.” Comptes Rendus, 103 (1886): 563-565, at 563.]


1886 Aug 27-28 / night / Naples / quakes / Jour de St Petersbourg, Sept. 3. [VI; 629. (Journal de St. Petersbourg, September 3, 1886.)]


1886 Aug 27 / Shock and an “incessant rumbling” all morning at Charleston. / Ac to McKinley. See green note, Aug 31. [VI; 630. McKinley, Carlyle. A Descriptive Narrative of the Earthquake of August 31, 1886. Charleston: Walker, Evans & Cogswell, 1887, 60. See: (Aug 31).]


1886 Aug 27 / night / Very severe shock / Malta / D. News 28-5-6. [VI; 631. “Severe Earthquake Shock at Malta.” London Daily News, August 28, 1886, p. 5 c. 6.]


1886 Aug 27 / N.Y. D Graphic, 454-1 / Drought and starvation, Stevens Co., Texas. Seven other counties but little better off. [VI; 632. “Starvation in Stevens County, Texas.” New York Daily Graphic, August 27, 1886, p. 454 c. 1.]


1886 Aug 27 / ab 8 a.m. / A sound like distant thunder and a decided shock at Stateburg, S.C. / N-Cour, Sept 13-3-1 / Slight on 28th bet. 4 and 5 a.m. [VI; 633. (Charleston News and Courier, September 13, 1886, p. 3 c. 1.)]


1886 Aug 27 / 10:53 p.m. / Shock, violent, Naples. Simultaneously Vesuvius active. / Jour de St Pitersbourg, (Sept 3). [VI; 634. (Journal de St. Petersbourg, September 3, 1886.)]


1886 Aug 27 / BO / (+) / Torrents fell and  a flood swept through town of Ichtibi, Turkey. Carried away a bridge. / Levant Herald, Sept. 8. [VI; 635. (Levant Herald, September 8, 1886.)]


1886 Aug 27 / q—Greece. 60,000 houses destroyed. 500 killed. / LT, Sept 10-6-e / Coast of Morea. /// Tory P[note cut off]. [VI; 636. Staples, John. “The Earthquakes.” London Times, September 10, 1886, p. 6 c. 5.]


1886 Aug 27 / 11:36 p.m. / Shocks in Turkey / C.R. 103-492. [VI; 637. “M. Flachat adresse une Note sur des secousses de tremblement de terre....” Comptes Rendus, 103 (1886): 492.]


1886 Aug 27 / q severe at Malta / 11 p.m. / D News 28-5-6. [VI; 638. “Severe Earthquake Shock at Malta.” London Daily News, August 28, 1886, p. 5 c. 6.]


1886 Aug 27 /—1 slight / 28—1 slight / 31—5 destructive Sept 1—3 severe / 2—3 severe / 3—2 severe / 4—2 slight / 5—1 moderate / 7—2 slight / 8—1 slight / 10—1 slight / 12—1 slight / 15—2 moderate / 21—1 severe / 22—1 mod. / 27—1 severe / 28—1 mod / 30—1 slight // qs / N.-C., Oct 2-1-1. [VI; 639.1, 639.2. (Charleston News and Courier, October 2, 1886, p. 1 c. 1.)]


1886 Aug 28 and 29 / Sun / Mexborough / G W. Middleton / That on 28th at one p.m. saw many objects called meteors, passing sun's limb, some slower than others—some as large as planet Venus appears. / On 29th were observed again. / E Mec 44/10. [VI; 640. Middleton, G.W. “Meteor.” English Mechanic, 44 (no. 1119; September 3, 1886): 10-11.]


1886 Aug 28 / Vesuvius / Active. [VI; 641. (Ref.???)]


1886 Aug 28-29 / night / Violent th. storm and floods / Constantinople and other parts of Turkey / Levant Herald—Sept 1. [VI; 642.1. (Levant Herald, September 1, 1886.)]


1886 Aug 28 / Eclipse of sun. [VI; 642.2.]


1886 Aug 28 / Ec. Sun / Month. 58-457 / Nature 34-272 / 34-497. [VI; 643. (Month, 58-457.) “The Total Solar Eclipse, 1886 August 28-29.” Nature, 34 (July 22, 1886): 272-274. “The Total Solar Eclipse of 1886.” Nature, 34 (September 23, 1886): 497-499.]


1886 Aug 28 / Violent shocks in Egypt / Toronto Globe 30-1-5. [VI; 644. “A Wave of Earthquakes.” Toronto Globe, August 30, 1886, p. 1 c. 5.]


1886 Aug 28, etc. / Geysers Yellowstone Park unusually active / Amer Met Jour 3/221. [VI; 645. Owen, Richard. “The Recent Earthquake in Greece and Other Places on August 28, 1886.” American Meteorological Journal, 3 (September 1886): 220-222.]


1886 Aug 28 / 2:30 a.m. / Slight shock / Lahore / Times of India 31-1-3. [VI; 646. (Times of India, August 31, 1886, p. 1 c. 3.)]


1886 Aug 28 / q's / Italy and Greece/ World 31-8-4. [VI; 647. (New York World, August 31, 1886, p. 8 c. 4.)]


1886 Aug 28 / q's in Greece preceded by extreme heat and high tides. / Toronto Globe 30-1-5. [VI; 648. “A Wave of Earthquakes.” Toronto Globe, August 30, 1886, p. 1 c. 5. “Advices from Zante say excessive heat, dead calms, and unusually high tides forewarned the inhabitants.”]


1886 Aug 29 / S.S. / In Science 8-258 (Sept 17) is published an account by B.A. Colonna of the U.S. Coast Survey, of a sea monster that he had seen, 29th, off Cape Cod—first appearance like a large spar standing 12 to 15 feet from the water—saw it ½ hour later—this time a dorsal fin behind the "spar". [B; 716.1, 716.2. Colonna, Benjamin Allison. “The Sea-Serpent.” Science, s. 1 v. 8 (September 17,1886): 258, (illustration). The observation was made by Captain Robert Platt, of the U.S. Coast Survey schooner Drift, (not by Colonna).]


1886 Aug 29 / S S off Race Point, Cape Cod / See Science, in September—or NY Sun, Sept 24-2-6. / Story by B A Colonna, of the U.S. Coast Survey. Obj like a periscope or like a very large round spar standing upright in the sea, 12 or 15 feet high. Disappeared and then this and something like a huge dorsal fin was seen. [B; 717.1, 717.2. Colonna, Benjamin Allison. "The Sea Serpent." New York Sun, September 24, 1886, p. 2 c. 6, (illustration.)]


1886 Aug 29 / Severe shocks / island of Crete / Levant Herald, Sept. 1. [VI; 649. (Levant Herald, September 1, 1886.)]


1886 Aug 29 / Trib, 1-2 / q. / Egypt. [VI; 650. “Destroyed by an Earthquake.” New York Tribune, August 29, 1886, p. 1 c. 2.]


1886 Aug 29 / See Aug 26, 1881. [VI; 651. See: 1881 Aug 26, (V; 613).]


1886 Aug 29 / night / as reported by officers of the Canadian Govt Arctic steamer Alert, exploring in Hudson Bay (N.Y. D. Graphic Oct 20-890-4). / Air filled with dense smoke. Thought must been great fires in Labrador. [VI; 652. “Dense Smoke at Sea.” New York Daily Graphic, October 20, 1886, p. 890 c. 4.]


1886 Aug. 29 / N.Y. Trib, Sept 1-5-2 / That in Lawrence Co., Ohio, explosive sound been heard—then a great explosion on 29th and excavation found in ground and in it fragments of ore that were almost solid iron. [VI; 653. “Strange Eruptions in Ohio.” New York Tribune, September 1, 1886, p. 5 c. 2.]


1886 Aug 29 / The Chicago explosion / Pop Sci Mo 30/811. [VI; 654. Griffin, La Roy Freese. “A Remarkable Explosion.” Popular Science Monthly, 30 (April 1887): 810-814.]


1886 Aug 29 / N.Y.T., 1-6 / q / Carolinas and Georgia. [VI; 655. “They Come Every Day.” New York Times, August 29, 1886, p. 1 c. 6.]


1886 Aug 29 / That on a farm near Mooney, Ind., with explosive sound earth torn up and a great hole. / World 2-2-2 / “Among the debris were fragments of ore which are almost solid iron. Writer thought volcano active from below but looks as if meteor fell. [VI; 656. (New York World, September 2, 1886, p. 2 c. 2.) “An Indiana Volcano.” Indianapolis News, September 1, 1886, p. 1 c. 6. “On the farm of Mr. Christian Linderback Sunday morning about 7:30 o'clock, one of the most severe of these explosions occurred. The family were in the house at the time, and the immediate scene of the eruption was not more than 150 yards from the house. The noise was like the explosion of gunpowder or of a steam boiler, and the earth was completely torn up for yards around. Those who happened to be looking in that direction saw a cloud of dust and smoke go up some sixty feet high, and in it were pieces of minerals, stumps of trees, roots and rocks. A visit to the spot showed the earth well torn up and covered with the fragments which had been sent up in the explosion. Among these were fragments of ore, which seem to be almost solid iron. The country is very rough and broken abd well filled with minerals, which have never been disturbed.”]


1886 Aug 29 / Total eclipse solar / Grenada / Clerke. [VI; 657. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 4th ed., 1902, 453.]


1886 Aug 29 / Great explosion / Chicago / powder / Sun 31-1-1 // also mine explosion, Scranton, Pa, 30th / 31-1-2. [VI; 658. “Chicago's Big Explosion.” New York Sun, August 31, 1886, p. 1 c. 1. “Explosion of Fire Damp.” New York Sun, August 31, 1886, p. 1 c. 2.]


1886 Aug 29 / Dynamite works in Chicago blown up by lightning in a storm. / World 30-1-1 / 31-8-1. [VI; 659. (New York World, August 30, 1886, p. 1 c. 1.) (New York World, August 31, 1886, p. 8 c. 1.)]


1886 Aug 30 / Sea serp in Hudson River / Sun 31-2-5. [B; 718. "Seen by Sober Men." New York Sun, August 31, 1886, p. 2 c. 5.]


1886 Aug 30 / Standard, Sept 10-2-6 / Cor writes that he had read of a meteor at the time of the Charleston q—writes of a meteor he had seen, 30th, 9:45 p.m. Brilliant meteor at Lynmouth, N. Devon. It seemed to start from the second star in the tail of the Great Bear. [VI; 660.1, 660.2. “A Brilliant Meteor.” London Standard, September 10, 1886, p. 2 c. 6.]


1886 Aug 30 / 10 p.m. / Llanrwst [Wales] / great meteor from near zenith / D. News, Sept. 2. [VI; 661. “Extraordinary Meteor.” London Daily News, September 2, 1886, p. 6 c. 3.]


1886 Aug 30 / 1 p.m. / White smoke from the crater on Galita Island, Mediterranean / [LT] 9-13-d. [VI; 662. “Volcanic Disturbances in Galita Island.” London Times, September 9, 1886, p. 13 c. 4. “New Volcano in the Mediterranean.” Illustrated London News, 89 (September 18, 1886): 308-309, (illustration). The Galite Islands, (off the northern coast of Tunisia), are the remnants of an extinct volcano, but the main island does not possess a volcanic crater. Only smoke was seen coming from the main island, (at a distance of fourteen miles), by the captain of a British steamship.]


1886 Aug 30-31 / night / Heavy frost, Decatur, Indiana. Much damage to crops. / N.Y. D. Graphic, Sept 1-494-2. [VI; 663. “Heavy Frost in Indiana.” New York Daily Graphic, September 1, 1886, p. 494 c. 2.]


1886 Aug 30 / L'Astro, 1886-391 / [note cut off] bodies walked [note cut off] not at [note cut off] ing of Havre. [VI; 664. Jacquot, Maurice. "Autre passage de corpuscles devant le Soleil le 30 août 1886." Astronomie, 5 (1886): 390-391. Over a period of forty minutes, a total of “corpuscles,” (travelling in the same direction, about three or four times per minute), were observed by telescope, and by direct observation, to rapidly cross the disc of the sun, (disappearing soon as as they departed the disc). Jacquot speculated upon a belt of meteors between the Earth and the Sun, (akin to that between Mars and Jupiter); but, others suggested such objects were due to birds seen from a distance flying across the Sun's disc. Léotard, Jacques. "Meme sujet." Astronomie, 5 (1886): 391-392.]


1886 Aug 31 / World, 2-2 / Ghost /Elizabethport, N.J. [B; 730. (New York World, August 31, 1886, p. 2 c. 2.)]


1886 Aug 31 / Heat and q. / See Dec. 3, 1831. / Number of cases in 20's—around 1824. [VI; 665. See: 1823 Oct 23, (I; 1084); 1823 Nov 30, (I; 1091); 1824 Nov 30, (I: 1152 & 1156); 1825 Jan 13, (I; 1174); 1826 Feb 1, (I: 1235 & 1236); and, 1831 Dec 3, (I; 1663).]


1886 Aug 31 / q and heat / Oct 31, 1837. [VI; 666. See: 1837 Oct 31, (I; 2245).]


1886 Aug 31 / Similar clouds at Chios, Ap. 3, 1881. [VI; 667. See: 1881 Ap. 3, (V: 471 & 473).]


1886 Aug 31 / Previous to the q., Honey Creek, eastern end of Bartholomew Co, suddenly filled with water. / NY Trib, 1895, Nov 2-4-3. [VI; 668. “Curious Result of the Earthquake.” New York Tribune, November 2, 1895, p. 4 c. 3. See: 1895 Oct 31, (VII; 1394).]


1886 Aug 31 / BO / Ab. 20 minutes after the first shock—a large meteor from n.e. to s.w. / N Courier, Sept3-2-4-x // around Mt. Pleasant, S.C. / Cavities in earth and geysers. From depths of earth came “organic matter. / N-Courier, Sept 3-2-4-x / other places fountains of boiling water. / On the seabeach, were large mounds of sand, containing basins filled with fresh water—had been no rain—unaccountable. / N.C. 3-2-5—other small bodies of clear, “limpid” water. / col. 6x—wells that been low filled with “pure” water at Somerville. [VI; 669.1, 669.2. (Charleston News and Courier, September 3, 1886, p. 3 c. 4-6+.)]


1886 Aug 31 / Extreme drought, Missouri, whole month of August / N.Y. Graphic, Sept 6-534-1. [VI; 670. “Damaging Drought in Missouri.” New York Daily Graphic, September 6, 1886, p. 534 c. 1.]


1886 Aug 31 / Cuba slightly shaken / N.Y. Trib, Sept. 11-1-1. [VI; 671. “Cuba Was Slightly Shaken.” New York Tribune, September 11, 1886, p. 1 c. 1.]


1886 Aug 31 / First shock, Charleston, ab. 9:50 p.m. [VI; 672. (Refs.???)]


1886 Aug 31 / For Andromeda and Charleston, see Aug (25), 1885. [VI; 673. See: (1885 Andromeda), and, 1885 Aug 25, (VI; 114, 115, & 118).]


1886 Aug 31 / The zone / last Aug., 1833. [VI; 674. See: 1833 Aug [Last of], (A; 105).]


1886 Aug 31 / Sound / Sun, 2-6 / That for several days residents of Mystic, Conn, had heard the faint tinkling of a bell in the sky. That the mystery had been solved. Someone had seen a big white or gray eagle with a bell tied to its neck. / Is there a white eagle? [VI; 675. “A Bell Tinkling in the Sky.” New York Sun, August 31, 1886, p. 2. c. 6.]


1886 Aug 31 / stones and series / July 4-5, 1841 / See notes for others. / Oct., 1844. [VI; 676. See: 1841 July 4-5, (II: 325 & 327); 1844 Oct 14, (II; 774); 1844 Oct 20, (II: 781); and, 1844 Oct 22, (A; 183).]


1886 Aug 31 / See Sun, Dec. 28, 1887-4-7. / Left deep pits between Charleston and Summerville—on their margins white sand like seashore sand—on this sand a dense growth of seaweed. Like May q., Australia, before big one in India. [VI; 677. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, December 28, 1887, p. 4 c. 7. See: (May q., Australia), and, (q. India).]


1886 Aug 31 / BO / In Cosmos, Oct 4, said that captains of ships in the Mediterranean last of August were reporting having seen volumes of smoke and glares. [VI; 678. (Cosmos, s. 4 probably. v. 5 (October 4, 1886).]


1886 Aug 31 / Have Bermuda and Bahamas papers. [VI; 679.]


1886 Aug 31 / BO / In “A Study of Recent Earthquakes”, by Dr. Davison / 36 pages to the Charleston q. No ap. in sky mentioned. Great deal upon “epicentral isoseismal lines”. [VI; 680. Davison, Charles. A Study of Recent Earthquakes. London: Walter Scott, 1905, 102-137.]


1886 Aug 31 / time of q / Flash of light in eastern sky, followed by a cloud of fire and smoke, reported at St. Stephen's, S.C. In his pamphlet, (see green note), McKinley says he was unable to verify this report. [VI; 681. McKinley, Carlyle. A Descriptive Narrative of the Earthquake of August 31, 1886. Charleston: Walker, Evans & Cogswell, 1887, 38. “St. Stephen's.—Three severe shocks and four lighter ones. Then a dark blue light flashed in the eastern sky. It vanished and revealed a cloud of fire and smoke, which swiftly sped to the west and out of sight, leaving upon its beholders the sensation as if a hot wave swept through the atmosphere. The air was perceptibly charged with electricity.” “(The writer has been unable, after repeated inquiries, to obtain any verification of the peculiar phenomena here described.)”]


1886 Aug 31 / Earthquake of Aug 31, 1886 / PTS, p v. 2 / At Charleston, killed 20. Died of wounds and exposure—83. [VI; 682. (PTS??? p. v. 2.)]


1886 Aug 31 / BO / In “A Descriptive Narrative of the Earthquake of August 31, 1886, Mr Carl McKinley, editor or writer of editorials, of the News and Courier, tells of two showers of pebbles, which according to him “undoubtedly fell”. McKinley records reports from Cape Romain Light Station. “There was an unusual fall of meteors during the night.” [VI; 683.1, 683.2. McKinley, Carlyle. A Descriptive Narrative of the Earthquake of August 31, 1886. Charleston: Walker, Evans & Cogswell, 1887, 16. “Two slight 'showers' of pebbles, to the amount of perhaps a quart or more, undoubtedly fell in the rear of The News and Courier building. The phenomenon was confined, so far as known, to a space of fifty square yards, and its source must be inferred from these facts.”]


[The following twenty-two notes were clipped together by Fort. VI: 684-705.]


1886 Aug 31 / Charleston and Baluchistan / Feb 13, 1893. [VI; 684. See: 1893 Feb 12, (VII; 844).]


1886 Aug 31 / Charleston and Baluchistan / Dec 22, 1892. [VI; 685. See: 1892 Dec 20, (VII: 806 & 807).]


1886 Aug 31 / See Jan 27 with Spanish q's in this zone. / Feb 5. [VI; 686. See: (Feb 5).]


1886 Aug 31 / Last of Charleston, Jan 2-4, 1887. Here phe, but most in Maryland. [VI; 687. See: 1887 Jan 2, (VI; 963, 964, 965, 966, & 967).]


1886 Aug / q. / Cashmere / See July 10, 1885. [VI; 688. See: (1885 July 10; not here; wrong date???).]


1886 Aug 31 and Oct / Nothing in North China Herald (Shanghai). [VI; 689.]


1886 Aug 31 / See Oct 18-19, 1860 / like Cashmir / but q, Peru, 13th. [VI; 690. See: (1860 Oct 18-19???).]


1886 Aug / Srinagar / q / Jan. 15, 1885. [VI; 691. See: 1885 Jan 15, (V; 2108.1).]


1886 Aug 31 / Cashmir / See Rels. / qs amd distant metites. [VI; 692. See: (quakes and distant mets.).]


1886 Aug 31 / Cashmir / qs and distant mets / France and Eng. / March 17, 1871. [VI; 693. See: 1871 March 17, (IV: 335 to 347, & 349), and 1871 March 17-18, (IV; 348).]


1886 // Va and India / Aug 28, etc., 1833 / Kandhur, near Cashmir. [VI; 694. See: 1833 Aug, (I; 1786); 1833 Aug 26, (I; 1787); 1833 Aug 29, (I: 1788, 1850, & 1870).]


1886 // Virginia and Cashmir / June 4 and 6, 1828. [VI; 695. See: 1828 June 4, (I; 1394), and, 1828 June 6, I; 1395).]


1886 Aug 31 / Charleston / q  and stones / See Aug 29, 1833. [VI; 696. See: 1833 Aug 29, (I: 1850, 1870, & 1871).]


[1886 Aug 31] / Charleston / Aug 31, 1886 / See Feb 13, 1893. / q at C / metite—Ohio. [VI; 697. See: (1893 Feb 13, (VII; 848), and, 1893 Feb 13, 14 / March 2, 3, 7 / June 20-29 / July-Dec, (VII; 847).]


1886 [Aug.] / Charleston phe / Aug., 1886 / dust from Hecla? / stat. over Paris / Dec 16-25, 1874. [VI; 698. See: 1874 Dec 16-25, (IV; 1571).]


1886 Aug 31 / q and geolog and meteors / March 8, 1832. [VI; 699. See: 1832 March 8, (I: 1681 to 1685).]


1886 Aug 31 / Charleston and Cashmere / See 1889, July 11-12. [VI; 700. See: 1889 July 11-12, (VI; 1838).]


1886 Aug 31 / Charleston / Hurricane and phe / Aug 28, 1911. [VI; 701. See: (1911 Aug 28).]


1886 Aug 31 / Meteoric explosion with phe of a q. at Charleston, Nov, 1766 / Am J. Sci 39-336. [VI; 702. "Earthquake in Connecticut, &c." American Journal of Science, 39 (1840): 335-342, at 336.]


1886 Aug 31 / See storm, Aug 26, 1881. [VI; 703. See: 1881 Aug 26, (V; 614).]


1886 Aug 31 / Cashmir and S. Car / See Dec 20, 22, 1892. [VI; 704. See: 1892 Dec 20, (VII: 806 & 807), and 1892 Dec. 22, (VII; 808).]


1886 Aug 31 / Srinagar / Zones with Spain, etc. / See Jan 15, 1885. [VI; 705. See: 1885 Jan 15, (V; 2108.1).]


1886 Aug 31 / Fiji Times, Oct. 2 / Eruption at Niua Foou. Thunder and lightning. Earthquakes and eruption—at night the flames visible 100 miles away—6 villages buried in dust. Cocoanut trees broken by volc bombs like round shot. / N.F. is one of the Tongas. [VI; 706. (Fiji Times, October 2, 1885.) The Niuafo'ou volcano.]


1886 Aug 31 / Big meteor and smash / See Calabria, Sept 7 (?), 1905. [VI; 707. See: (1905 Sept 7).]


1886 Aug 31 / New star in Androm / maximum, Aug 31, 1885 / Charleston zone, Aug 25, 26. [VI; 708. See: (1885 Aug 31).]


1886 Aug 31 / Severe shock, S. Car and Georgia, Jan 23, 1903. / Nature 67-303 / Servest since 1886. [VI; 709. “Notes.” Nature, 67 (January 29, 1903): 302-306, at 303. See: (1903 Jan 23).]


1886 Aug 31 / See a more southerly zone, Ap 4, etc., 1868. [VI; 710. See: 1868 Ap 4, (III; 1328), and, (1868 Ap. 4, etc.).]


1886 Aug 31 / night / Smyrna / bet. 10 and 12 p.m. / Naturalist's World 3-188. [VI; 711. (Naturalists' World and Scientific Record, 3-188; possibly @ McGill.)]


1886 Aug 31 / See Aug 27, 31, 1887. [VI; 712. See: (1887 Aug 27, 31).]


1886 Aug 31 / Relations / Aug 26, 1881 / Hurricane, Charleston / q., Chios. [VI; 713. See: (1881 Aug 26).]


1886 Aug 31 / People flying from houses, entangled in the wires of overthrown telegraph poles in the streets. [VI; 714. (Refs.???)]


1886 Aug 31 / Phil Public Ledger, Sept 4 / Just before—lurid glare in the sky. “It became terribly hot 20 minutes before the shock—a peculiar, scorching heat.” Like q in Greece. [VI; 715. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, September 4, 1886.) See: (1881 Aug 26).]


1886 Aug 31 / “It became terribly hot about twenty minutes before the shock.” / NY Trib, Sept 4-5-2-x. [VI; 716. “In Charleston During the Shock.” New York Tribune, September 4, 1886, p. 5 c. 2-3.]


1886 Aug 31 / In Sci Amer 75/219, Dr. T.N. Roberts, of Summerville, the center of phe, writes that for many days before the great q., detonations that he supposed were subterranean had been heard. [VI; 717. Roberts, T.N. “Barisal Guns—Remininscences of the Charleston Earthquake of August 31, 1886.” Scientific American, n.s., 75 (September 12, 1896): 219.]


1886 Aug 31 / Great dark, heavy clouds preceding the rumbling by a few seconds. / Trib 4-5-3-x. [VI; 718. “In Charleston During the Shock.” New York Tribune, September 4, 1886, p. 5 c. 2-3.]


1886 Aug 31 / BO / q at 9:51 p.m. [VI; 719. (Refs.???)]


1886 Aug 31 / Again relation Charleston and Greece / Aug 26, 1881. [VI; 720. See: (1881 Aug 26).]


1886 Aug 31 / between 10 and 12 p.m. / Smyrna / Several sharp shocks / Standard, Sept 2. [VI; 721. “Earthquake at Smyrna.” London Standard, September 2, 1886, p. 5 c. 7.]


1886 Aug 31 / Charleston / 1st = 1811. [VI; 722. See: 1811 Sept 10 and Dec 16, (I; 350).]


1886 Aug 31 / A luminous cloud moving rapidly in the sky and another later. / (World, 5-1-7) // Said appearance in the sky first q. / World 4-2-4. [VI; 723. (New York World, September 4, 1886, p. 2 c. 4.)  

(New York World, September 5, 1886, p. 1 c. 7.)]


1886 Aug 31 / “Just before the sun dipped below the horizon, it was totally eclipsed by a mass of very black clouds. That suddenly sun shone again. / N.C. 3/3-4-x / 6-2-4 / That later another meteor “of extraordinary size and brilliancy” was seen. [VI; 724. (Charleston News and Courier. September 3, 1886, p. 3 c. 4+.) (Charleston News and Courier, September 6, 1886, p. 2 c. 4.)]


1886 Aug 31 / NY Herald, Sept. 3 / “A curious story”—that by many persons in Waynesboro, Georgia, had seen an unusually large meteor before the first great shock. [VI; 725. “A Ball of Fire.” New York Herald, September 3, 1886, p. 3 c. 4.]


1886 Aug 31 / “A scarlet tinge to the sky and a distant smell of sulphur in the air” reported from Raleigh, N.C. / NY Times 2-1-5-x. [VI; 726. (New York Times, September 2, 1886, p. 1 c. 5+.)]


1886 Aug 31 / Magnetic storm—or, at any rate, magnetic needles, in Rochester, N.Y., were greatly affected. / Toronto Globe, Sept 6-6-1. [VI; 727. “Round the Globe.” Toronto Globe, September 6, 1886, p. 6 c. 1.]


1886 Aug 31 / See Jan 2, 3, 4, 1887, and Jan 11. [VI; 728. See: (1887 Jan 2, 3, 4, 11).]


1886 Aug 31 / For Charleston q's, 1888, see Amer. Geologist 2/135. [VI; 729. Bryson, John. “Charleston and its vicinity....” American Geologist, 2 (August 1888): 135-137.]


1886 Aug 31 / q / Charleston / Loud detonations seemingly nearby. / Bull Seis. Soc A 4-147. [VI; 730. Taber, Stephen. "Seismic Activity in the Atlantic Coastal Plain near Charleston, South Carolina." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 4 (1914): 108-160, at 147.]


1886 Aug 31 / See Jan 3-4, '87. [VI; 731. See: (1887 Jan 3-4).]


1886 Aug 31 / q. N.Y. City / Sc Am 73-187. [VI; 732. “An Earthquake on the Atlantic Coast.” Scientific American, n.s., 73 (September 21, 1895): 187.]


1886 Aug 31 / Terrific eruption volcano on Tonga Islands reported. / Sc Am 56/133. [VI; 733. Foshay, P. Max. “Coincidence of Charleston Earthquake with a Reported Eruption in the Tonga Group.” Scientific American, n.s., 56 (February 26, 1887): 133. The Niuafo'ou volcano.]


1886 Aug 31 / BO / Such heat felt from volc Sakurashima, Japan, Jan 1914, in places far miles away. / Nature, 92-561. [VI; 734. “Notes.” Nature, 92 (January 15, 1914): 561-566, at 561. The Aira volcano.]


1886 Aug 31-Sept 10 / Volc., Friendly Islands / began June 8, and on 11th of June at ab. same time as volc in N. Zealand. / A.J. Sci 3/33/311 / 2 preceding eruptions 19 and 40 years before. [VI; 735. “Volcanic Eruption in Niua-fu, Friendly Islands.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 33 (1887): 311. The Niuafo'ou volcano.]


 

1886 Aug 31 / q and met / (+) / Charleston / Was said that 2 or three showers of hot stones had [fallen] upon or near the office of the Charleston News and Courier. “An examination of some of these shortly after they had fallen forced the conviction that the public was being made the victim of a practical joke. MWR, Aug, 1886. [VI; 736.1, 736.2. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 8; August 1886): 232-237, at 234.]


1886 Aug 31 / “Mobile, Alabama: about 9:45 p.m. of the 31st, a very brilliant meteoric display was observed in the western horizon; it passed across the sky from east to west appearing at intervals in the form of  a ball of fire. The display continued about 45 seconds.” / M.W.R., Aug. [VI; 737. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 8; August 1886): 232-237, at 236.]


1886 Aug 31 / Met and q-effects / Charleston / Dec 9, 1865. [VI; 738. See: 1865 Dec 9, (III: 788 & 789).]


1886 Aug 31 / “On Tuesday night a large meteor was seen to fall; its course was from northeast to southwest, and it left a shiny wake. Many persons thought that it had some connection with the earthquake, as it was seen about 20 minutes after the first shock. / News and Courier 3/2/4-x / See Aug 25, 1885. [VI; 739.1, 739.2. Charleston News and Courier, September 3, 1886, p. 2 c. 4+.)]


1886 Aug 31 / P.T.S. / p. v. 2 / No. 10. [VI; 740. Refs.???)]


1886 Aug 31 / Friendly Islands / small q / [BA] '11. [VI; 741. Milne, 733.]


1886 Aug. 31 / Similar to June 12, etc., 1897. [VI; 742. See: (1897 June 12, etc, (VII: 1807, 1808, 1810, 1812, 1813, 1820, 1822, and 1823).]


1886 Aug 31 / Sea Sand thrown out of fissures. / See May 10, etc., 1897. [VI; 743. See: 1897 May 10, (VII: 1770 & 1771), and, 1897 June 12, (VII; 1815).]


1886 Aug 31 / At Chesterfield, S.C. 1st shock at 9:30 p.m. Air charged with electricity. / N. Courier, Sept 19-8-1. [VI; 744. (Charleston News and Courier, September 19, 1886, p. 8 c. 1.)]


1886 Aug 31 / Geysers in streets of Charleston / mostly muddy / N.C. 5-3-6. [VI; 745. (Charleston News and Courier, September 5, 1886, p. 3 c. 6.)]


1886 Aug 31 / In the Friend of India, June 22, 1897, Prof Oswald quoted that he saw at the time of the q at Charleston meteor after meteor shoot from an apparent radiant near Leo. It continued magnificently for six minutes. [VI; 746. (Friend of India, June 22, 1897.)]


1886 Aug 31 / q. at 10:10 p.m. / News and Courier, Sept. 1 / few minutes later, another though less violent / 2 minutes later, another. [VI; 747. (Charleston News and Courier, September 1, 1886.)]


1886 Aug 31 / The sunset cloud is 3-3-4, N Courier. [VI; 748. (Charleston News and Courier, September 3, 1886, p. 3 c. 4.)]


1886 Aug 31 / No disturbance of the sea / N-C, Sept 4-3-3. [VI; 749. (Charleston News and Courier, September 4, 1886, p. 3 c. 3.)]


1886 Aug 31 / Time of q.—as reported by Capt of a steamship on Lake Superior. A gale and high waves. Suddenly the gale stopped and the waves quieted. / Charleston N and Courier, Sept 12-1-2. [VI; 750. (Charleston News and Courier, September 12, 1886, p. 1 c. 2.)]


1886 Aug 31 / For 3 months had been a drought around Tolono, Ill. / N-Courier, Sept 12-4-1. [VI; 751. (Charleston News and Courier, September 12, 1886, p. 4 c. 1.)]


1886 Aug 31 / Not said what date, in N. Courier 11-3-2, but a well, hot almost boiling, at Macon. [VI; 752. (Charleston News and Courier, September 11, 1886, p. 3 c. 2.)]


1886 Aug 31 / News and Courier / ITH / ++. [VI; 753.1. (Shelfmark for Charleston News and Courier???)]


1886 Aug 31 / N.Y. Herald, Oct 12-4-5 / Account of mysterious explosive sounds been heard at Ninety Six, S.C., since Jan., 1885. [VI; 753.2. “Trembling Earth.” New York Herald, October 12, 1886, p. 4 c. 5. ]


1886 Aug / Shocks in Cashmere / reported in Nature, Aug 20, 1885. [VI; 754. “Notes.” Nature, 32 (August 20, 1885): 374-376, at 375. See: 1885 Aug 14, (VI; 98).]


1886 Aug / Cashmere / See Nov 15, 1885. [VI; 755. See: 1885 Nov. 15, (VI: 207 & 208).]


1886 Sept / Stone-throwing in a village near Gloucester / Med and Dayb., Oct. 1 / N.M. [B; 731. (Medium and Daybreak, October 1, 1886.)]


1886 Sept. / Wld man / Maine / See Oct 27, 1891. [B; 732. See: 1891 Oct 27, (B; 1171).]


1886 Sept / q and stones later / Aug 29, 1833. [VI; 756. See: 1833 Aug 29, (I: 1788 & 1850).]


[1886] Sept / q's / Cashmere / See Oct. 20. [VI; 757. See: (Oct 20).]


[1886 Sept 1. Wrong date. See: 1886 Aug 2, (B; 733).]


1886 Sept 1 / Frost and damage to crops, Wisconsin / N.Y. D. Graphic 3-510-2. [VI; 758. “The Frost in Wisconsin.” New York Daily Graphic, September 3, 1886, p. 510 c. 2.]


1886 Sept, ab. / Series of heavy rains and cloudbursts began, in Rio Grande Valley, New Mexico. / N.Y. D. Graphic 16-614-2 / Ab 25 houses destroyed in Socorro. [VI; 759. “Disastrous Rains in the Rio Grande Valley.” New York Daily Graphic, September 16, 1886, p. 614 c. 2.]


1886 Sept. 1 / In Nassau Times, Sept 29—that Capt Paul Boynton, the professional swimmer, had found a mass of porous friable substance floating on Lake Michigan—he thought been shaken up from bottom of the lake.. It had a sulphurous odor. Tons of it. [Vi; 760. (Nassau Times, September 29, 1886.)]


1886 Sept 1 / q in Spain / Malaga and Antequara / considerable damage / Malta Standard, Sept 9. [VI; 761. (Malta Standard, September 9, 1886.)]


1886 Sept 1 and morning of 2nd / Malaga, Spain / severe shocks / Naturalists' World 3-188. [VI; 762. Naturalists' World and Scientific Record, 3-188; possibly at McGill.)]


1886 Sept 1 / Bowdrie Township, Ill / On a farm explosive sound, cloud smoke, and debris 60 feet in the air and a deep hole in ground. / World 4-1-4. [VI; 763. (New York World, September 4, 1886, p. 1 c. 4.)]


1886 (Sept 1, ab.) / Frgs / London (Ont) Advertiser of Sept 6 / “Hundreds of acres of ground at Bog Flat, Cal., were covered with very small frogs after a hard shower the other day. The little fellows were not larger than crickets, and were just as lively.” [VI; 764. (London Advertiser, (Ontario), September 6, 1886.) Big Flat, California, (not Bog Flat). “Breakfast Budget.” Wheeling Daily Intelligencer, September 1, 1886, p. 2 c. 2; check quotes.) (“Nuggets of News.” Wessington Springs Herald, (South Dakota), August 13, 1886, p. 3 c. 6. & others, before August 7.)]


1886 Sept 1 / BO / night / A number of bright meteors / N.C. 3-3-6-x. [VI; 765. (Charleston News and Courier, September 3, 1886, p. 3 c. 6+.)]


1886 Sept 1 / Shocks / Malaga / Standard, 3rd. [VI; 766. “Earthquake at Malaga.” London Standard, September 3, 1886, p. 5 c. 7.]


1886 Sept 1 / Capt H.J. Olsen, of brig Wilhelmine, 50.10 N, 1.40 W., 3:30 and 4 p.m., 3 rumbling sounds and shocks. / Nature 34-496. [VI; 767. Mohn, H. “Earthquake at Sea.” Nature, 34 (September 23, 1886): 496.]


1886 Sept 1 and 2 / Severe at Charleston / N-Courier, Oct. 2. [VI; 768. (Charleston News and Courier, October 2, 1886.)]


1886 Sept 1 / Shocks / Malaga, Spain / Lloyds Newspaper, Sept 5. [VI; 769. “Earthquake Shocks at Malaga.” Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, September 5, 1886, p. 2 c. 2.]


1886 Sept 2 / S S reported from Charlotte, Mich, in Narrow Lake / World 3-1-2. [B; 719. (New York World, September 3, 1886, p. 1 c. 2.)]


1886 Sept 2 / Oakland, Ind. / Sound like explosion of a steam boiler. On a farm, cloud of dust and smoke there and deep hole in earth. / Trib 4-5-3 / See 5th. [VI; 770. “An Eruption in Illinois.” New York Tribune, September 4, 1886, p. 5 c. 3. The dispatch was from Oakland, Illinois, (not Indiana).]


1886 Sept 2 / Phe on farm of Christian Lukenbach, Bowdrie Township, was near Oakland, California. / (Toronto Globe, 4-1-5) / Deep hole—smoke and dust in air 60 feet. [VI; 771. (Toronto Globe, September 4, 1886, p. 1 c. 5.) Bowdre Township, (not Bowdrie), is about 7 miles, (11 km.), from Oakland, Illinois, (not California, nor Indiana).]


1886 Sept 3 / Strange Language / 212 Centre St, St. Louis / (Religio-Phil Jour., Oct 3-6-2) / Colored woman suddenly starts speaking German, French, Spanish. Doubtful what language. /// 44 / 56. [B; 734. "Strange Manifestations." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 41 (no. 6; October 2, 1886): 6, (c. 2). Miss Frankie Washburn claimed that she did not know the languages that she spoke when possessed by different spirits; and, "...their language was Greek to her, though conveyed through her." Opinions were given that her xenoglossia had involved speaking in the German, French, Spanish, and "Indian" languages.]


1886 Sept 3 / See under Lum. Objects. / Switchback Mts, near Mauch Chunk, Pa. [B; 735. See: (Lum. Objects).]


1886 Sept 3 / Toronto Globe of / H. House in village of Chesley, Canada / N.M. [B; 736. “The Dominion.” Toronto Globe, September 3, 1886, p. 6 c. 3. “Chesley village claims to have a haunted house.”]


1886 Sept 3 / World, 1-2 / Hudson / S.S. / 4-5-4 / 11-1-2 / (strange there that logs Mich., Conn., etc.) ]B; 720. (New York World, September 3, 1886, p. 1 c. 2.) (New York World, September 4, 1886, p. 5 c. 4.) (New York World, September 11, 1886, p. 1 c. 2.)]


1886 Sept 3 / World of 3-1-2 / Sea Serp in Hudson / 4-5-4 // Sea Serp reported from Michigan / 6-8-5 / 9-1-2 / 11-1-2. [B; 721. (New York World, September 3, 1886, p. 1 c. 2.) (New York World, September 4, 1886, p. 5 c. 4.) (New York World, September 9, 1886, p. 9 c. 2.) (New York World, September 11, 1886, p. 1 c. 2.)]


1886 Sept 3 / Herald 3-5-5 / Sea serp. / Lake Michigan. [B; 726. “Another Sea Monster Sighted.” New York Herald, September 3, 1886, p. 5 c. 5. The Michigan monster was reported in Narrow Lake, about 10 miles south of Charlotte, (not in Lake Michigan).]


1886 Sept 3-5 / Heavy th. storms / Symons Met Mag 1886-133. [VI; 772. "Thunderstorms and Heavy Rains of September 3rd to 5th." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 21 (October 1886): 133-137.]


1886 Sept 3 / World—Sept 4-2-5 / “Volcanic dust” falling at Wilmington, N.C.—light and soft and looked like ashes. [VI; 773. (New York World, September 4, 1886, p. 2 c. 5.)]


1883 Sept 3 / noon / Sharp shock / New Zealand / N.Z. Times, Sept 4. [VI; 774. “Sharp Earthquake.” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), September 4, 1886, p. 2 c. 8.]


1886 Sept 3 / 11:28 p.m. / q / Zante / “For some time past there had been extraordinary atmospheric disturbances, excessive heat, dead calms, and unusually high tides.” / Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, Sept. 5. [VI; 775. (Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, September 5, 1886, p. 2 c. 2; not found in this issue.) “Terrible Earthquake in Europe.” Cardiff Times, September 4, 1886, p. 6 c. 3. “For some time past extraordinary atmospherical disturbances, excessive heat, dead calms, and unusually high tides had warned people here to prepare for something serious.”]


1886 Sept. 3 / Tequisixtlan, Mexico / slight shock / D. News, 14th. [VI; 776. (London Daily News, September 14, 1886; not found here.)]


1886 Sept 4 / Stones later / See Aug 29, 1833. [VI; 777. See: 1833 Aug 29, (I: 1788 & 1850).]


1886 Sept 4 / 2:30 a.m. / 7:30 a.m. / 1:30 p.m. / Showers of stones—Charleston / N and C. 6-5-2 / good details / a thunder axe or part of one // It was one person's idea that the largest looked like part of a stone axe. Fell near the N and C buildings—said that some of the second fall bounded into press rooms—thought be by mischevious boys. “On a close examination, however, no one was found in the neighborhood, and the pebbles themselves were found to be warm. Said that several persons saw the third fall, the pebbles falling almost perpendicularly. Pebbles from size of a grape to of egg. Flinty. Looked water-worn. // Editorial / “Stars be dimmed by a nebulous haze.” / 7-4-2 // Clouds later. / 9-8-1-x // All fell in one small space. About a quart collected. [Vi; 778.1 to 778.4. (Charleston News and Courier, September 6, 1886, p. 5 c. 2.) (Charleston News and Courier, September 7, 1886, p. 4 c. 2.) (Charleston News and Courier, September 9, 1886, p. 8 c. 1+.)]


1886 Sept 4 / 4 p.m. / Waterspout that was seen burst over Swansea, carrying out contents of houses. / Symons 21-120 / page 137 / Cor. denies that waterspout was seen coming from the bay, as stated. [VI; 779. "Whirlwind and Waterspout in South Wales." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 21 (September 1886): 118-121. "Whirlwind and Waterspout in South Wales." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 21 (October 1886): 137-138.]


1886 Sept 4 / The largest stone so shaped that it was someone's idea that it was part of an Indian axe. / N.C. 6-5-2. [VI; 780. (Charleston News and Courier, September 6, 1886, p. 5 c. 2.)]


1886 Sept 4 / Other newspapers record of fall of small blue and gray stones at 10:30 a.m. / See B Eagle, Sept 6? [VI; 781. “More Shocks.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 4, 1886, p. 4 c. 1. “At 10:30 o'clock this morning while the sun was shining brightly and the sky was overcast with flying light blue and white clouds, a terrific spout of small blue and gray water-hardened stones fell. These crashed through the skylights of the News and Courier job printing rooms, frighteneing the compisitors and sending them scampering out into the streets. A crowd collected and the stones which average from half an inch in thickness were mostly burst in falling.”]


1886 Sept. 4 / Alatyr, Nijni / Norgorod, Russia / (F) / See Sept 22. [VI; 782. Fletcher, 105. See: 1886 Sept 22, (VI; 835). This is the Alatyr meteorite.]


1886 Sept 5 / A few minutes after the shock a brilliant meteor shot across the southeastern sky, splitting into many colored lights as it went, and leaving a long trail of fire behind it like a sky rocket. / N. Courier, Sept 6. [VI; 783. (Charleston News and Courier, September 6, 1886.)]


1886 Sept 5 / The meteor / 11:10 p.m. / From E to W. [VI; 784. (Refs.???)]


1886 Sept 5 / Remarkably brilliant meteor recorded at Charleston at the U.S. Signal Service Station. / Ac to McKinley. / See green note, Aug 31. [VI; 785. McKinley, Carlyle. A Descriptive Narrative of the Earthquake of August 31, 1886. Charleston: Walker, Evans & Cogswell, 1887, 87. “A remarkably brilliant meteor was observed on September 5. It was about the size of a cocoanut, and was first seen in the southeast, at an altitude of about twenty-five degrees, moving toward the northwest. It disappeared from sight within about five degrees of the horizon. In passing, it left a train of light, of a white and greenish tint, and small fragments fell, which gave it the appearance of a 'sky-rocket,' after bursting.”  See: (Aug 31).]


1886 Sept 5 / N-C-6-2-5 / ab 11:10 p.m. / Charleston / from s. east / Meteor of “extraordinary size and brilliancy”. [VI; 786. (Charleston News and Courier, September 6, 1886, p. 2 c. 5.)]


1886 Sept 5 / 11 p.m. / Columbia, S.C. / q—roaring sounds at intervals—5 minutes after the shock two “remarkably large and brilliant meteors” shot across the sky from N. to S. / L.T. 7-5-c. [VI; 787. “The Earthquakes.” London Times, September 7, 1886, p. 5 c. 3.]


1886 Sept 5 / q. / Piedmont and Lombardy, Italy / B.A. '11. [VI; 788. Milne, 733.]


1886 Sept 5 / (It) / q / Piedmont / BA '11. [VI; 789. Milne, 733.]


1886 Sept 5 / B Eagle, 6th / Shock reported from Columbia, S.C., at 11:07 p.m., and two “remarkably brilliant and unusually large meteors”. [VI; 790. “In Great Peril.” Brooklyn Eagle, September 6, 1886, p. 4 c. 1.]


1886 Sept 6 / 8:15 p.m. / Meteor—at Contoocook and Wolfborough, the roaring sound and vibrations thought a q. / M.W.R., Sept, p. 266. [VI; 791. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 9; September 1886): 265-267, at 266.]


1886 Sept 6 / NY / Mass / Conn / N.H. // Det Met / MWR 86/266. [VI; 792. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 9; September 1886): 265-267, at 266.]


1886 Sept 6 / Sun, Sept 8—dispatch from Contoocook, New Hampshire /  q. felt and that just before it a brilliant meteor had been seen. / N and C / from Oct 1 to 8 and from 24 to Nov 1, have. [VI; 793. “New Hampshire Gets a Shock.” New York Sun, September 8, 1886, p. 1 c. 6. (Charleston News and Courier, ca. 1886.)]


1886 Sept 6 / M.W.R. 1886-266 / That met was seen in NH, Mass and Conn. That the explosion was “accompanied by trembling [that was] thought by some to be an earthquake.” [VI; 794. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 9; September 1886): 265-267, at 266.]


1886 Sept 6 / moon / M. Valderrama, of Madrid, observing the moon. Plato was on the border of terminator. / Interior of the crater dark when suddenly over the dark ellipse shot something like a search-light. / L'Astro 5-448. [VI; 795. Flammarion, Camille. “Curieuse Observation à Faire sur la Lune.” Astronomie, 5 (1886): 447-454, at 447-449, (illustration).]


1886 Sept 6 / For Contoocook phe, see Am J. Sci 3/29/426 and after. [VI; 796. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 14.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 29 (1885): 425-437, at 427. Rockwood, Charles Greene, Jr. “Notes on American Earthquakes: No. 15.” American Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 32 (1886): 7-19, at 10. See: 1884 Nov 12, (V; 2045); 1884 Nov. 23, (V; 2054); and, 1886 Sept 6, (VI: 791 & 793).]


1886 Sept 7 / dispatch dated // Springs appeared near Havana, Cuba, “recently”. Plantations submerged. / N.C. 8-3-2. [VI; 797. (Charleston News and Courier, September 8, 1886, p. 3 c. 2.)]


1886 Sept 7 / 1:44 a.m. / severe shock, Evansville, Ind, and explosive sound. / N.Y. D. Graphic 7-542-2. [VI; 798. “Earthquake in Evansville, Ind.” New York Daily Graphic, September 7, 1886, p. 542 c. 2.]


1886 Sept. 7 / Date of dispatch from Havana—that near the village of Ceibadelagna, Cuba, springs had appeared and the water had formed a large lake. / N.Y. Trib. 8-5-3. [VI; 799. “A New Lake in Cuba.” New York Tribune, September 8, 1886, p. 5 c. 3-4.]


1886 Sept 7 / Rumbling sound followed by shock, ab 7 p.m. N. Zealand. / N.Z. Times, 8th. [VI; 800. “Earthquake Shocks.” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), September 8, 1886, p. 2 c. 9.]


1886 Sept 7 / 1:45 a.m. / Evansville, Ind / Sound like explosion of dynamite followed by shock / World 8-5-2. [VI; 801. (New York World, September 8, 1886, p. 5 c. 2.)]


1886 Sept 8 / morning / S S seen by 2 men in the Connecticut Rover near Cromwell, ab 100 feet long and head 10 feet above water. / Sun 9-1-6. [B; 722. "The Sea Serpent in the Connecticut River." New York Sun, September 9, 1886, p. 1 c. 6.]


1886 Sept 8 / 16 miles n.w. of Point Reyes, Pacific Coast, U.S.A. / 9 distinct shocks ac to Capt of the steamship. / Standard 11-5-7. [VI; 802. “More Earthquake Shocks.” London Standard, September 11, 1886, p. 5 c. 7.]


1886 Sept. 8 / Clouds in Charleston described (9-8-1) as very remarkable. “The whole of the northern part of the heavens was covered with a pitch black cloud which cast a fearful gloom over that section of the city.” [VI; 803. (Newspaper??? probably Charleston News and Courier. September 9, 1886, p. 8 c. 1.)]


1886 Sept 8 / Strange cloud off Carolina Coast / N and C 10-5-2 / At first thought waterspout but stationary several hours. Seen through glasses from Savannah, georgia, looked like smoke from a burning vessel. / Thought might been from grass on fire on one of the islands off coast but no fire seen. [VI; 804.1, 804.2. (Charleston News and Courier, September 10, 1886, p. 5 c. 2.)]


1886 Sept 9 / L.T., 3-b / Volc. dust / New Zealand. [VI; 805. “New Zealand Volcanic Dust.” London Times, September 9, 1886, p. 3 c. 2.]


1886 Sept 9 / N.Y. D. Graphic, 554-4 / The drought in Illinois serious. Wells and streams dried up. [VI; 806. (New York Daily Graphic, September 9, 1886, p. 554 c. 4; not found here.)]


1886 Sept 9 / L.T., 13-d / Volc / Galita Island. [VI; 807. “Volcanic Disturbances in Galita Island.” London Times, September 9, 1886, p. 13 c. 4. See: 1886 Aug 30, (VI; 662).]


1886 Sept 10 / Shocks in Greece continuing / Standard, 11th. [VI; 808. “More Earthquake Shocks.” London Standard, September 11, 1886, p. 5 c. 7.]


1886 Sept 10 / Wilmington, Del / 4:50 p.m. / Two powder mills explode. / Sun 11-2-5-x. [VI; 809. “Two Powder Mills Explode.” New York Sun, September 11, 1886, p. 2 c. 5.]


1886 Sept 10 / Volcanic mt or hill rose out of a lake in island in the Tonga group. / Sun, Nov 2-1-3. [VI; 810. “Earthquake on Ninafou Island.” New York Sun, November 2, 1886, p. 1 c. 3. The Niuafo'ou volcano.]


1886 Sept 10 / Volc, Tonga Islands, and from a lake a mountain rose. / N.Y. Herald, Nov. 2-4-4. [VI; 811. “A Mountain Born of a Lake.” New York Herald, November 2, 1886, p. 4 c. 4. The Niuafo'ou volcano.]


1886 / ab. Sep 11 // At Hope Valley, R.I., objects in sky said been mirage of ships and of Block Island. Block Island 28 miles away. / Sun, Sept 6-2-6. [VI; 812. “Block Island in the Clouds.” New York Sun, September 6, 1886, p. 2 c. 6. “A remarkable mirage was witnessed at Hope Valley in this State a few
days ago in which Block Island Sound, with ships sailing across it, was plainly seen in the clouds, and there was so clear a view of the Island that the hotels were visible, and some persons fancied they saw people about them. Hope Valley is thirteen miles inland, and Block Island fifteen miles from the mainland.”]


1886 Sept 11 / q—met—geolog. / Four towns near Akron, Ohio—shock and a great meteor. / Oct 12, morning, shock. “Several years ago the earth settled several feet without apparent cause in this region.” / Warsaw (Ill) Bulletin, Sept 17-1-5. [VI; 813. (Warsaw Bulletin, (Illinois), September 17, 1886, p. 1 c. 5.)]


1886 Sept 12 / night / N.Y. City / from s. west / remarkable small cyclone / World 13-1-1. [VI; 814. (New York World, September 13, 1886, p. 1 c. 1.)]


1886 Sept 12 / (See Sept 11.) / 4 a.m. / Low rumbling sounds, accompanied by shocks of earthquake and a large meteor traveling close to the earth south of Akron, Ohio. / Trib 13-5-2 / 14-5-1—that this q felt in many towns in Ohio, without the met been seen. [VI; 815. “Distinct Shocks in Central Ohio.” New York Tribune, September 13, 1886, p. 5 c. 2. “A large meteor passed over the shaken up region, travelling close to the earth and throwing off heated parts every few feet. The meteor illuminated the country for a great distance and is supposed to have struck the earth close to this city [Akron] as a shock was distinctly felt immediately after the great fire-ball passed.” “The Earthquake in Ohio.” New York Tribune, September 14, 1886, p. 5 c. 1. “Accompanying the shocks came a great meteor, which shot from west to east.”]


1886 Sept 12 / 8 p.m. / At Onancock, Va, a shaking of houses and falling of trees thought be a q, which had strong upward suction. / Richmond Whig 15-3-2. [VI; 816. (Richmond Whig, September 15, 1886, p. 3 c. 2.)]


1886 Sept 13 / Dispatch Hartford, Conn. / Narrow cyclone / NY Times 14-1-4. [VI; 817. “Connecticut's Cyclone.” New York Times, September 14, 1886, p. 1 c. 4.]


1886 Sept 14, ab / Standard of / Shower flies / Cupar. [VI; 819. (London Standard, September 14, 1886; not found here.) See: 1886 Aug. 7, (VI: 587 & 588).]


1886 Sept 14 / Trombe / Marseilles / C.R. 103-530. [VI; 818. Barthelet. “Trombe du 14 septembre à Marseille.” Comptes Rendus, 103 (1886): 530-531.]


1886 Sept. 14 / ab 1 p.m. / Trombe / Marseilles / C.R. 103-531. [VI; 820. Barthelet. “Trombe du 14 septembre à Marseille.” Comptes Rendus, 103 (1886): 530-531.]


1886 Sept. 14 / q / Paris / (N.M.) / C.R. 108-1188. [VI; 821. Flammarion, Camille. “Sur le tremblement de terre du 30 mai.” Comptes Rendus, 108 (1889): 1188.]


1886 Sept 15 / News and Courier, 6-1 / At Abbeville, “mysterious sounds had been heard for 5 months. [VI; 822. (Charleston News and Courier, September 15, 1886, p. 6 c. 1.) McKinley, Carlyle. A Descriptive Narrative of the Earthquake of August 31, 1886. Charleston: Walker, Evans & Cogswell, 1887, 32. “In the upper part of the State, notably in Abbeville County, mysterious subterranean sounds, most resembling the detonations of distant artillery were heard by many people during the eighteen months preceding the shock at Charleston. In the neighborhood of Ninety-Six they were generally heard over an area of eight or ten square miles. The fact of the occurrence of these noises was published by Mr. Henry J. Kinard some time in May, 1886, when it was suggested that they were caused by blasting rock somewhere in the county. This explanation was proved to be insufficient, however, and it should be added that the sounds continued with more force and frequency after the shocks in August, though they ceased to be heard during August and September.” “Trembling Earth.” New York Herald, October 12, 1886, p. 4 c. 5. J. McD. Kinard stated: “I first heard the underground noise in January, 1885. The sound was dead—that is, brief and without reverberation. Could I illustrate its volume? Well, it was as loud as the report of a cannon fired three or four miles away. I noticed it pretty frequently the first day. Then for two or three weeks I didn't hear it at all. For a long time before the Charleston earthquake there was no report that I heard.” “Charleston Shaken Again.” New York Times, September 16, 1886, p. 1 c. 3. “Volcanic Noises.” Indianapolis News, October 12, 1886, p. 1 c. 1. “A party of railroad graders camped near Mr. Kinard several months ago were badly frightened by the noise. For tbe two weeks before last week tbe noises were heard night and day and few persons had a single night of sound rest. Then reports were heard Suuday night of last week, two of them so heavy that Dr. T.S. Blake, whose scientific attainments make him a credible witness, says he twice arose, thinking a thunder storm was passing, but the sky was clear. The reports have been heard at intervals ever since. John Williamson says one shock on that Sunday night made his house, a new one, tremble for half a minute.” “News From the Old Star.|” Abbeville Press and Banner, December 8, 1886, p. 1 c. 3. The sounds continued, as reported in a dispatch from Ninety Six, South Carolina, (dated December 7): “The earthquake sounds in the neighborhood of our town continue to be heard almost daily, and some of the more timid are inclined to think that something fearful will be the result. Some times we hear loud reports similar to the report of a cannon, and no one can tell front what direction the sound comes. We hear it and that is all there is of it. The sound seems to come from the bowels of the earth. We can't explain—no one can explain. It is an undeniable fact and comes at such regular intervals that we are inclined to think that there is something wrong somewhere. This is all we know about it.”]


1886 Sept 16 / Tornado wheel-cloud reported from Victor Township, Michigan. “The cloud resembled a huge wheel in the western sky and moved with wonderful rapidity.” From Howell, Mich: “The cloud appeared like a great wheel revolving in the western sky.” / M.W.R. 1886-259. [VI; 823. “Tornado Studies for September, 1886.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 9; September 1886): 257-259, at 259.]


1886 Sept 16 / Cyclone / Indiana // Storm / Ill and Michigan / N Courier 17-2-1. [VI; 824. (Charleston News and Courier, September 17, 1886, p. 2 c. 1.)]


1886 Sept 17 / Phil Ledger of / Livestock killed at Clinton, Mass. Reports of a reptile 20 to 45 feet in length. [B; 723. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, September 17, 1886.)]


1886 Sept 17 / Trib, 1-1 / Metite / Nova Scotia. [VI; 825. (New York Tribune, September 17, 1886, p. 1 c. 1; not found here nor in Index.)]


1886 Sept 19 / Sun protub. / R—Sept 26, '79. [VI; 826. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 257.]


1886 Sept 19 / N.Y.T.., 5-4 / NY? / q. [VI; 827. “Village Seismology.” New York Times, September 19, 1886, p. 5 c. 4. A satirical fiction.]


1886 Sept 20 / St John. / N B? / or Newfoundland? / human flesh and bones found in a thicket / Halifax Citizen, Sept 21, p. 2. [B; 737. (Halifax Citizen, September 21, 1886, p. 2.)]


1886 Sept 20 / “Sheet lightning in the east” and later rumbling sounds and shocks at Columbia, S.C. / Halifax Citizen 22-3-3. [VI; 828. (Halifax Citizen, September 22, 1886, p. 3 c. 3.)]


1886 Sept 21 / 9:30 p.m. / Very brilliant meteor, Savannah, Georgia. / MWR '86-266 / Several smaller ones in following hour. [VI; 829. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 9; September 1886): 265-267, at 266.]


1886 Sept 21 / Severe at Charleston / N-Courier, Oct 2. [VI; 830. (Charleston News and Courier, October 2, 1886.)]


1886 Sept 1-22 / Have Standard. [VI; 831.]


[1886 Sept 22. Wrong date. See: 1889 Sept 22, (B; 738).]


1886 Sept 22 / 8:53 p.m. / Large met / Chattanooga, Tenn / MWR '86-266. [VI; 832. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 9; September 1886): 265-267, at 266.]


1886 Sept 22 / q. / Java / B.A. 11 / See Dec 12, 13, 1875. [VI; 833. Milne, 733. See: (1875 Dec 12, 13).]


1886 Sept 22 / Halifax Citizen of / A peculiar worm in Nova Scotia. Ab ½ inch long. In great numbers. Bored into potatoes, eating inside and leaving a shell. / See Oct. 28. [VI; 834. (Halifax Citizen, September 22, 1886.) See: 1886 Oct 28, (VI; 915).]


1886 Sept 22 / See Sept. 4. / Metite fell at Nowo-Urei (Penza), Russia. Southeasterm Russia. Said small diamonds in it. Of 3 stones, one removed for Museum of Nat Hist, Paris. [VI; 835. (Refs.???) See: 1886 Sept. 4, (VI; 782). This is the Nowo-Urei meteorite.]


1886 Sept 23 / London (Ont) Advertiser / “A big bird with a head like an ape's, with bulging eyes, surrounded by a fringe of gray hair, and with ears like a man's, save that they are covered with fine gray hair, was captured at Fort Wayne, the other day, and crowds visit it daily.” / Horned owl? / Tufts of h. o. not like a man's ears. [VI; 836.1, 836.2. (London Advertiser, Ontario, September 23, 1886.)]


1886 Sept 23 / 7:30 p.m. to midnight / Poughkeepsie / Auroral waves in eastern and western horizons. / Sun 25-1-6. [VI; 837. “A Strange Light in the Heavens.” New York Sun, September 25, 1886, p. 1 c. 6.]


1886 Sept 23 / 11 p.m. / 5 shocks, Winfield, Iowa. / Richmond Wing 25-1-4. [VI; 838. Richmond Whig, September 25, 1886, p. 1 c. 4.)]


1886 Sept 23 / N.Y.T. = Times, 8-2 / q. / N.Y. City. [VI; 839. “Thinks He Felt an Earthquake.” New York Times, September 23, 1886, p. 8 c. 2. Only two households in New York City reported shaking floors, (on Monday at midnight, September 20-21), were an earthquake; however, being on 125th and 127th streets, both households are in the vicinity of the Manhattenville Fault, (or 125th Street Fault), where minor earthquakes occurred in 1981 and 2001.]


1886 Sept 23 / bet 7 and 8 p.m. / Inhabitants of Kingston, Jamaica, alarmed by streaks and flashes of light in sky. In the Colonial Standard of 25th, said that was nothing but electric lights of a ship, but seems not known what ship. Said it was either a war ship or the Cable Co's ship. [Vi; 840.1, 840.2. (Colonial Standard, Jamaica, September 25, 1886.)]


1886 Sept 25 / Religio-Phil Jour, 6-4, copied from N.Y. Herald / Phe at Elizabethport, N.J. [B; 739. "A Genuine Ghost Scare." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 41 (no. 5; September 25, 1886): 6, (c. 4).]


1886 Sept. 25 / London (Ont.) Advertiser / On Brigantine Beach, N.J., a battered old piece of wreckage washed ashore, and ab 400 "altogether new and strange fish". Ab one lb. each, black, large eyes, queer-shaped heads. [B; 740. (London Advertiser, (Ontario), September 25, 1886.).]


1886 Sept 26 / At sea between Southampton Island and Diggs, clouds of dense smoke thought to have come from fires in labrador. / Phil Public Ledger, Oct 26-4-1 / Hudson Bay/ (See L.T., Oct 4-6-b—volc, Alaska.) [VI; 841. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 26, 1886, p. 4 c. 1.) “Volcanic Eruption in Alaska.” London Times, October 4, 1886, p. 6 c. 2. The Pavlof volcano.]


1886 Sept 26-Oct 2 / Nucleus of neb in Andromeda more intense than usually—and another point of light near it. / Observatory 9-402 / This new spot of light became more starlike up to Oct 2, ac to one astronomer. In opinion of another, no change had taken place. / See Oct 19. [VI; 842.1, 842.2. “The Great Nebula in Andromeda.” Observatory, 9 (1886): 402-403. See: (Oct 19).]


1886 Sept 27 / Boy with convulsions and furniture affected / World, 1886, Sept 27-3-1. [B; 741. (New York World, September 27, 1886, p. 3 c. 1.)]


1886 Sept 27 / severe at Charleston / N-Courier, Oct. 2. [VI; 843. (Charleston News and Courier, October 2, 1886.)]


1886 Sept 27 / [LT], 6-c / Volc / New Zealand. [VI; 844. “Volcanic Eruption off New Zealand.” London Times, September 27,1886, p. 6 c. 3. The White Island volcano.]


1886 Sept 27-28 / night / Series of shocks / Thuringia, Central Germany / Nature 34-553. [VI; 845. “Notes.” Nature, 34 (October 7, 1886): 553-555, at 553.]


1886 Sept 28 / Small q / NC 29-1-1 / News Courier. [VI; 846. (Charleston News and Courier, September 29, 1886, p. 1 c. 1.)]


1886 Sept 28 / aphides / 11 a.m. / Myriads of “strange greenish insects with whitish wings” at Meriden, Conn. / Phil Public Ledger 30-3-[column not given]. [VI; 847. (Philadelpha Public Ledger, September 30, 1886, p. 3.)]


1886 (Sept 30) / Baychester, on Pelham Bay / 9:56 a.m. / Powder explosion, felt in New Haven, Conn. / Sun, Oct 1-2-5. [VI; 848. “Giant Powder Let Loose.” New York Sun, October 1, 1886, p. 2 c. 5. The explosion was thought to be an earthquake in Bridgeport, forty miles away, as well as many other locations.]


1886 Sept 30 / 10 a.m. / Powder explosion, New Rochelle, N.Y. Taken in Conn. for a q. / N.Y. Herald, Oct 1-9-2. [VI; 849. “Not Wiggins But Dynamite.” New York Herald, October 1, 1886, p. 9 c. 2.]


1886 Sept 30 / Colima, (Mexico) in eruption for 3rd time in a year. / [LT], Oct 1-3-f / Aug 30. [VI; 850. “Mexico.” London Times, October 1, 1886, p. 3 c. 6. See: 1886 Aug 30, (VI; 662). The Colima volcano was in eruption from December, 1885.]


1886 Sept 30 / Yloilo / Lights / D-282. [VI; 851. The note copies information from page 282 of The Book of the Damned. Higgin, Thomas. "Electrical Phenomenon." Nature, 35 (December 23, 1886): 173.]


1886 Sept-Oct / Japan Mail / nothing. [VI; 852.]


1886 // autumn /// Almost entire absence of wasps in the Midland Counties / Midland Naturalist 9-308. [VI; 853. “Wasps.” Midland Naturalist, 9 (1886): 308.]


1886 Oct / (+) / Srinagar, Cashmere / See Nov 15, 1885. / Point is, this was meteors on a q. region, / See Aug 20, 1885. [VI; 854. See: (1885 Aug 20), and, 1885 Nov. 15, (VI; 207).]


1886 Oct. / Pabloff / See Aug 12. [VI; 855. See: 1886 Aug 12, (VI; 593). The Pavlof volcano.]


1886 Oct / Darkness / Durhamshire / E Mec 46/75/col 1. [VI; 856. “Unusual Darkness.” English Mechanic, 46 (no. 1173; September 16, 1887): 75.]


1886 Oct / Sci Gos, Nov., 1886—over city if Salzburg, from 2 to 4 p.m., millions of butterflies. [VI; 857. “Science Gossip.” Science Gossip, 22 (no. 263; November 1886): 257.]


1886 / ab Oct 1 // Yarn of a 40-feet snake in W Va. / Sun 4-1-2. [B; 724. "A Monster Snake in West Virginia." New York Sun, October 4, 1886, p. 1 c. 2.]


1886 Oct 1 / Fires in town in Maine / Sun, 1886, Oct 1-2-7. [B; 742. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, October 1, 1886, p. 2 c. 7.]


1886 Oct 2 / Disap. / Halifax Citizen of / A boatman, George Liston, of Halifax, reported to police that he had seen a man cross a wharl and suddenly disappear. Investigation but nothing was learned. [B; 743. (Halifax Citizen, October 2, 1886.)]


1886 Oct 2 / dated from N.Y. / Mt. Pabloff, Alaska, in eruption / L.T. 4-6-b. [VI; 858. “Volcanic Eruption in Alaska.” London Times, October 4, 1886, p. 6 c. 2. The Pavlof volcano.]


1886 Oct. 3 / Andromeda / Herr N. von Konkoly, hearing of reported change in Andromeda nebula, saw new star of about 10th mag. / (Astro Reg., 1886-269) / —On 3rd, it was photographed by von Gothard. others saw it, About 9th mag. [VI; 859. “Reported Continuance of Change in the Great Nebula in Andromeda.” Astronomical Register, 24 (November 1886): 269-272. The magnitudes were given as: “from the 10th to the 10.5th,” on October 3; “9,” on October 6; and,  “about the 8th,” on October 8, 1886. “Beobachtungen des Andromeda-Nebels.” Astronomisch Nachrichten, 115 (1886): 251- 254. Miklós Konkoly-Thege, and Jenő Gothard.]


1886 Oct 3 / Trib, 3-1 / Charleston / q. [VI; 860. “How Charleston Was Shaken.” New York Tribune, October 3, 1886, p. 3 c. 1.]


1886 Oct 4 / Myst disap / Englishman named Boyd, at Basle, Switzerland / See summer, 1897. [B; 744. See: (1897 Summer).]


1886 Oct. 4 / Fires / London (Ont) Advertiser of / At Harmony, Me. Fires supposed to be incendiary. A barn burning and others blazing up. People in a panic, and furniture and clothing packed up on piazzas. Said that business had been suspended. [B; 745. (London Advertiser, (Ontario), October 4, 1886.)]


1886 Oct 4 / 11 p.m. and 2 hours later / Shock / Shetlands / [LT] 6-9-f. [VI; 861. “Earthquake in the Shetlands.” London Times, October 6, 1886, p. 9 c. 6.]


1886 Oct 6 / wld man / Phil Public Ledger of, quoting the Waterville (Me) Sentinel—3 men camping 100 miles north of Moosehead Lake. 2 of them away from camp for a week. Returned and found the dead body of their companion. They hunted for themurderer and came upon a monstrous wild man—10 feet high, "with arms covered with hair, and seven feet long". They shot him. [B; 746.1, 746.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 6, 1886.) (Waterville Sentinel, Maine, ca. October, 1886.)]


1886 Oct 6 / Eruption / White Island, N.Z. / N.Z. Herald, Oct 11, p. 11 / N.Y. Times, June 17, 1883. [VI; 862. “Eruption at White Island.” New Zealand Herald, October 11, 1886, p. 11 c. 7. (New York Times, June 17, 1883.)]


1886 Oct 7 / N.Y. Times, 1-5 / Nov 29-2-4 // Comet in Leo. [VI; 863. “A New Comet in Leo.” New York Times, October 7, 1886, p. 1 c. 5. “Barnard's Comet.| New York Times, November 29, 1886, p. 2 c. 4. Comet C/1886 T1.]


1886 Oct. 7 / White points crossing sun / See Ap. 4, 1882. / Second time goes with protuberance on sun. [VI; 864. Cornillon, Hippolyte. “Corpuscles devant le Soleil.” Astronomie, 5 (1886): 429-430. See: 1882 April 4, (V; 821).]


1886 Oct 7 / Oct 19 // Sun protub. / R—Sept 26 '79. [VI; 865. Refer to: 1879 Sept 26, (IV; 2786). Riccò, Annibale. "Grand Protubérances Solaires Observées à Palermo de 1881 à 1887." Astronomie, 7 (1888): 254-258, at 257.]


1886 Oct 7 and Nov. 2 / Aurora at Lyons, N.Y. In Nature 35-54, Dr Veeder notes that there was seismic activity in South Carolina and other places. [VI; 866. Veeder, Major Albert. “Aurora.” Nature, 35 (November 18, 1886): 54.]


1886 Oct 8 / Sun, 2-7 / Says that ac to a Maine newspaper of repute a wild man 10 feet high had recently been killed 100 miles N of Moosehead Lake. He was covered with long brown hair. [B; 747. “Sunbeams.” New York Sun, October 8, 1886, p. 2 c. 7. (The original story was reported by the Waterville Sentinel, then reprinted in the Wilton Record, (October 6, 1886), the Industrial Journal of Bangor, (“A New Kind of Game,” October 8, 1886), and St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger, (“Odd Gleanings,” October 12, 1886). The Maine newspapers may only be originals or microfilm, (at Maine Historical Society, Portland), and St. Albans Daily Messenger may only be found on microfilm.)]


1886 Oct 9 / Child fall / Religio-Phil Jour, 6-5 / Rosa Eckert, 4 years old, fell out a 3rd story window at Logansport—unconscious a few minutes and then resumed interrupted play, unharmed. [B; 748. "Notes and Extracts on Miscellaneous Subjects." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 41 (no. 7; October 9, 1886): 6, (c. 5).]


1886 Oct 9 / 12:35, 1:50, 3:40 a.m. / severe / Charleston / Richmond Whig 10-1-7. [VI; 867. (Richmond Whig, October 10, 1886, p. 1 c. 7.)]


1886 Oct 10 / S S reported off Southport, Conn. / Phil Pub Ledger 13-4-1. [B; 725. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 13, 1886, p. 4 c. 1.)]


1886 Oct 10 / Gale / Cuba / 16—England. [VI; 868. (Refs.???)]


1886 Oct 14 / Flames / Telegram dated from Stockport, to San Francisco Bulletin (I get from the New Zealand Times, Dec 9-2-5)—That Willie Brough, 12 years old, who had created excitement in Turlock, Madison Co., by setting objects afire "by his glance", had been expelled from the Turlock school because of his freaks. It is said that his parents had cast him off, believing him to be possessed by a devil; but that a farmer had taken him in and had sent him to school. "On the first day, there were five fires in the school: one in the center of the ceiling, one in the teacher's desk, one in the teacher's wardrobe, and two on the wall. The boy discovered all and cried from fright. The trustees met and expelled him that night." [B; 749.1 to 749.4. "The following astounding story...." New Zealand Times, December 9, 1886, p. 2 c. 5. “The following astounding story was published in the San Francisco Bulletin as a telegram from the town of Stockport, dated October 14th last, We should think the circumstanoe did create intense excitement; and although it reads 'yarnily,' there may be more truth in it than the 'quid nuncs' are prepared to admit. We live in an age of queer eventualities. The telegram said:—Willie Brough, twelve years old, who created excitement among superstitious people near Turlock by apparantly [sic] setting fire to all objects by his glance on Sunday last, and who is held responsible for the destruction of 9,000 dol. worth of farm property, has been expelled from the Madison country school, near Turlock, on account of his wonderful freaks. After Sunday’s fire Brough’s family refused to have anything to do with him, believing him possessed of a devil. The boy was taken in by a farmer and sent to school. On the first day there were five fires in the school—one in the centre of the ceiling, one in the teacher’s desk, one ia the teacher’s wardrobe, and two on the wall. The boy discovered all, and cried from fright. The trustees met and expelled him that night. One Turlock insurance agent has given notice that he will cancel all policies on property occupied by the boy. The neighborhood of Turlock is. in a furore of excitement about the mystery.” (San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, ca. Oct, 1886; could not find here.) “Flames Flashed From His Eyes.” New York Herald, October 18, 1886, p. 10 c. 3. “Investigation of the story about Willie Brough, the boy living at Turlock, in the San Joaquin valley, who was supposed by superstitious people to set fire to objects by merely fixing his eyes upon them, exploded that part of it, of course. He is evidently overcharged with electricity to a remarkable extent. The snapping of his fingers causes sparks to fly. The Postmaster at Turlock has him relate gleefully how he set fire to wall paper by this means. An insurance agent, it is alleged, had refused to take more risks on property in the neighborhood so long as the boy remained there. The man, however, denies this statement. but confirms the story of the peculiar electric phenomena, and declares himself deeply interested from a scientific point of view." "Popular excitement has been so great since the story of the sinister powerof Master Brough was circulated that the father has felt impelled to move away, and has gone to reside on the other side of the San Joaquin River, taking refuge with his family in a cottage in the cotton wood timber, a long way from village or railroad. The correspondent of the Herald found him there. He denied that his son had caused fires, but admitted he had told him that when lying in bed at night he saw sparks flying about him. Willie is an extremely nervous boy, eleven years old,with a largely developed head. In a melancholy way he told your correspondent that he did not know how the mysterious fires occurred, but said he saw sparks about his own body at night." "M.A. Kuhlman, who keeps a school in Mercer county, in which the alarm first began, describes how five fires broke out in one afternoon in different parts of the schoolhouse, being caused by no visible agency. Other scholars were hastily dismissed, but Willie Brough was detained. A few minutes later he fixed his eyes on a hay shed a few yards distant and called the teacher's attention to the fact that smoke issued from the same. Very soon it was in a blaze. The teacher forbade him to come to school any more. He does not believe him guilty of arson, but is inclined to think he is the victim of supernatural agencies. On the previous Sunday eleven mysterious blazes occurred in the house of William's father. One broke out at a corner of the roof, another in some bedding on the middle of the floor and the third charred some grain sacks in the barn. Willie looked at a straw stack near by, and flames issued out of the top. The mother of the boy is prostrated with excitement and anxiety. Many of the inhabitants of the country around Turlock are spiritualists, and implicitly believe that no natural explanation can account for these occurrences." "The Turlock Boy." Daily Alta California. October 17, 1886, p. 5 c. 4. "Stockton, October 16th.—There are a thousand wild tales floating around Turlock about the fire boy. Rigorous investigation, made necessary by these circumstances, shows abont a dozen well-authenticated blazes at the farmhouse, including several on the walls. A number of alleged fire smirches on the walls are not included in the estimate, being more like dirt smears. The haystack was probably set fire from the ground on the further side of the house and barn and granary. The five fires at the school may have been set by children in the opportunity afforded by the excitement. Young Brough says that previous to Sunday's fires he saw a shower of sparks in the room, which burnt him. It will probably be discovered that the fires were the work of an incendiary, who was aided by accidents and a vivid imagination and belief in spirits on the part of the townspeople."]


1886 Oct. 14 / Gales / U.S. and Gulf Mexico / Lake Erie. [VI; 869. (Refs.???)]


1886 Oct 14 / telegram of, from Halifax // Shock / Cape Breton Island, Canada / Nature 34-602. [VI; 870. “Notes.” Nature, 34 (October 21, 1886): 601-603, at 602.]


1886 Oct. 15 / (It) / Parma / q. / flashes and shock of wind / See 1805. [VI; 871. Refer to: 1805 July 26, (I; 146). (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 387.)]


1886 Oct 16 / Ship disap / Religio-Phil Jour, Nov 13-4-5 / Reported at Baltimore, by Capt Powell, of the brig Mississippi, from Rio de Janeiro—early morning, Oct 16, lat 20° N, long about 48° W, saw a bark moving erratically. Disappeared. Could not be seen again with glasses. [B; 750.1, 750.2. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 41 (no. 12; November 13, 1886): 4, (c. 4-5).]


1886 Oct 16 / Polt / Religio-Phil Jour, 2-4, copying from Philadelphia Item—2 cols on a haunted house, home of Francis D. Worley, 143 N. Broad St, Gwynedd, Montgomery Co., Pa. Crockery falling from shelves—pots, bottles flung about the house. Every lamp in house broken. Debris was a wagon-load. Glassware, etc., rose before their eyes. [B; 751.1, 751.2. "Haunted House." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 41 (no. 8; October 16, 1886): 2, (c. 4). "Bewitched." Richmond Daily Dispatch, (Virginia), October 10, 1886, p. 6 c. 3. The phenomenon was apparently first noticed when glass jars from the cellar flew out of a cellar window. Hundreds of jars of fruits in the cellar were bursting by Worley and his son, Matthew, (at first thought to be caused by warmth or fermentation); but, crockery, cups, dishes, lamps, and glassware would rattle, move, and fly off shelves, sideboards, and tables. "The windows were left open, and a glass cup and two glass chimneys placed on a table in the centre of the room gave a warning shake and suddenly disappeared as though shot from a cannon, passing through the windows and striking the ground fully thrty feet away." "Thursday started in fair and proved to be the most eventful day of the week. At about 10 o'clock in the morning, as the little adopted daughter of Mr. Worley was carrying a glass dish from the dining room into the kitchen, it broke with a crash and cut her hands severely in several places. Experiments were then tried. Dishes were placed on tables and people watched them for a few moments, when the dishes would either slide to the floor or dart out of the windows." "About noon, as Matthew Worley was standing with a small china platter in his hand, he says that it began to move in a circle. He became frightened and let it go, thinking it would fall to the door, but instead of doing as he expected it went through a window as though thrown by some invisible hand and struck the road about thrity feet from where he stood." "Among those who have the least tendency to believe in spooks the general opinion is that the house is bewitched by magnetic influence. This influence, they say, comes from the little girl who was adopted by Mr. and Mrs. Worley. She is twelve years of age, of a very nervous nature, and has been living with the family for about six weeks. She was taken from a home in this city, and these people think that her every look seems to indicate that there is something exceedingly strange and weird about her."]


1886 Oct 16 / NY Times, 5-3 / S.S. / Norwalk. [B; 728. “That Sea Serpent Again.” New York Times, October 16, 1886, p. 5 c. 3.]


1886 Oct. 16 / Cor saw light on moon and investigated whether he could see Nov. 14 / L'Astro 1887-69. [VI; 872. Lihou, Benjamin. “La cirque lunaire de Platon.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 69, (illustration). See: 1886 Nov. 14, (VI; 939).]


1886 Oct. 16 / q. / Alsace / Nature 34-618. [VI; 873. O'Reilly, Joseph Patrick. “The Earthquake of October 16 in the Vosges, &c.” Nature, 34 (October 28, 1886): 618.]


1886 Oct. 17 / 7:40 p.m. / Det met / Mobile, Ala / MWR 1886-296. [VI; 874. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 10; October 1886): 295-297, at 296.]


1886 / '85? / Oct 18 / N.Y. Times, 1-2 / 28-2-7 // Balloon / France / Gower's death denied and sustained. / See Aug. [VI; 875. “Very Strange If True.” New York Times, October 18, 1886, p. 1 c. 2. “Aeronaut Gower Not Alive.” New York Times, October 28, 1886, p. 2 c. 7. “Mr. F. A. Gower.” Electrical Review, 7 (October 31, 1885): 3. Frederick A. Gower made an ascension on July 18, 1885, at Cherbourg, with the intention to cross the English Channel. The balloon was seen in the water by a sailing ship, after it had passed close enough for Gower, (in a small wicker basket), to shout a few words to the ship's pilot. The ship could not sail to the balloon; and, Gower's balloon, (without Gower nor its basket), was recovered soon afterwards by a fishing boat. See: 1885 Aug 27 / or 25, (VI; 121).]


1886 Oct 18 / News and C, 3-1 / Burning earth near Camden, S. Car. [VI; 876. (Charleston News and Courier, October 18, 1886, p. 3 c. 1.)]


1886 Oct 19 / Cor noted brightening of Andromeda nebula. Quotes Mr Ward so noting on Nov. 1. / See Sept. 26. / Observatory 9-398 / See Sept 26. [VI; 877. Tarrant, Kenneth J. “31 Messier Andromedæ.” Observatory, 9 (1886): 397-398. Ward, Isaac W. "The Red Variable Star V Cygni—31 Messier Andromedae." English Mechanic, 44 (no. 1128; November 5, 1886): 217. See: (Sept 26).]


1886 Oct 19 / dated, from N.Y. // Volcs in Ecuador and S. Peru in eruption / L.T. 20-5-e. [VI; 878. “South American Volcanoes.” London Times, October 20, 1886, p. 5 c. 5. The Tungurahua and Ubinas volcanoes, but Ulbinas was not in eruption.]


1886 Oct. 20 / 4:55 a.m. / Rather severe shock at Murree / also Simla / Pioneer Mail, 27th. [VI; 879. (Pioneer Mail, October 27, 1886.)]


1886 Oct 20 / at Srinagar, Cashmere / See Aug 25-26. [VI; 880. See: 1886 Aug 25-26, (V; 618).]


1886 Oct 20 / Sea quake / 4:30 p.m. / 64 W / 19. N. / BA '11. [VI; 881. Milne, 733.]


1886 Oct 20 / Srinagar / Had been a q here May 30, 1885. / BA '11 / And in Cashemere, May 30. [VI; 882. Milne, 733. See: (1885 May 30).]


1886 Oct 20 / Zone or Antipodes / Charleston – ab 33 N, 80 W / Srynagar = 34 N, 75 E. The exact corresponding point in Tibet ab 300 miles E of Syr., where reports not likely to come from. / (Maps may be wrong.) [VI; 883. The antipode for Charleston, South Carolina, would be in the Indian Ocean, about 1500 kilometres west of Perth, Australia, (not in Tibet).]


1886 Oct 20 / (+) / Dispatch from Bombay—severe and prolonged q in Cashmere, early morning. “A number of brilliant meteors were observed at the time and continued until sunrise. [VI; 884. (Refs.???)]


1886 Oct 20 / (+) / Correspondent to Times of India, Nov 5, writes that the q. at Srinagar was at one minute to five a.m. “At first the upper timbers of the houses creaked and cracked, without any trembling of the earth.” Many persons ran to the streets, “and some say that meteors and falling stars were seen at the time.” / Says been other shocks, Sept and Oct. [VI; 885.1, 885.2. (Time of India, November 5, 1886.)]


1886 Oct 20 / ab. 5 a.m. / Rather severe shock at Murree district at Simla. / Seemed from N. to S. / Pioneer Mail (Allahabad, 27th / N.M. [VI; 886. (Pioneer Mail, October 27, 1886.)]


1886 Oct 20 / ab. 6 a.m. / Shock short but rather sharp at Darjeeling / Pioneer Mail (Allahabad), Nov. 3 / N.M. / no damage. [VI; 887. (Pioneer Mail, November 3, 1886.)]


1886 Oct 20 / 4:45 a.m. / Rather severe shock at Peshawur and Murree. / Times of India 29-2-1. / (N.M.) [VI; 888. (Times of India, October 29, 1886, p. 2 c. 1.)]


1886 Oct / Tree hoppers that eject liquid and account for “weeping trees. / Insect Life 3/415 / BO / Cut the white insects and wings off. They were so-called white ants, but no have white ants. / Insect Life 4/146. [VI; 889.1, 889.2. McGuire, R.J. “The Weeping Tree Phenomenon.” Insect Life, 3 (June 1891): 415. “A Flight of White Ants.” Insect Life, 4 (November 1891): 146. These “so-called white ants” are identified as termites, (Reticulitermes flavipes). The “tree hopper” insect, (Proconia undata) identified as ejecting droplets of “dew” to produce the “weeping tree” is now identified as the Broad-headed Sharpshooter, (Oncometopia orbona).]


1886 Oct 21 / D. News, 6-5 / Unknown bird at Kirton-in-Lindsey, Lincolnshire. Naturalists unable to identify it. Size of a turkey—web feet, bill 7 or 8 inches long, dark grey speckled, wings 6 feet tip to tip. [VI; 890. “Rara Avis in Terris.” London Daily News, October 21, 1886, p. 6 c. 5. Some of the naturalists thought that it was a “Northern diver” (Gavia immer, or the “common loon” in North America), though these birds seldom have a wingspan exceeding 147 cm. (58 inches), or a weight above 4 kilograms (9 pounds).]


[The following eleven notes were clipped together by Fort. VI: 891-901.]


1886 Oct 21, etc. / Rainfall / See 3 cases, Oct., 1892. [VI; 891. See: 1892 / End of Sept, (C; 61); 1892 Oct. 19, (C; 66); 1892 Oct 22, (C; 67); 1892 Oct, (VII; 722); and, 1892 / late in the fall, (C; 71, 72, & 73).]


1886 Oct / Give up the rains as q. phe—too many of these in diff. Octobers. [VI; 892.]


1886 / first 3 weeks in Oct // Localized rain every afternoon / Charlotte, N.C. / D-182. ** [VI; 893. The note copies information from page 182 of The Book of the Damned. ("Rain from cloudless sky." Monthly Weather Review, 14 (October 1886): 287. The original newspaper article in the Charlotte Chronicle is no longer extant. (“The Prevailing Drought.” Washington Evening Star, October 25, 1886, p. 1 c. 5. Sergeant Barry of Signal Office had, himself, witnessed the rain from a cloudless sky, at Charlotte, on October 21, 1886, reporting it to the Weather Bureau.)]


1886 Oct 15 / That rain fell or several minutes from a clear sky at Rondout,  N.Y. Afternoon / Phil Public Ledger, Oct 20-4-1. [VI; 894. (Philadelphia Public Ledger,October 20, 1886, p. 4 c. 1.)]


1886 Oct 27 / Charlotte / Halifax Citizen of / As to rain of Charlotte, tells of 2 trees. Say that persons had climbed the trees and had seen the water coming down from above them. “It could be seen coming down from a point above the trees. [VI; 895. Halifax Citizen, October 27, 1886.)]


1886 Oct / In Nature 36-564, an account of a rain tree in India. Here it was sap falling from a broken branch. [VI; 896. “Notes.” Nature, 36 (October 13, 1887): 562-564, at 564. “A Real Weeping Tree.” Indian Forester, 13 (no. 4; April 1887): 179.]


1886 / dispatch dated Oct 5 // to NYT / Charleston N and C of 8th / “Constant fall of rain from cloudless sky” at Dawson, Georgia, beginning about middle of Sept. Was space 25 feet sq. Said ac to many observers a genuine and ceaseless fall of rain. [VI; 897. (Charleston News and Courier, October 8, 1886.) “A Very Strange Phenomenon.” New York Times, October 6, 1886, p. 1 c. 6. “A Constant Rain.” Atlanta Constitution, October 5, 1886, p. 2 c. 2. “Rain From a Cloudless Sky.” Atlanta Constitution, October 17, 1886, p. 4 c. 4. “A strange phenomenon has occurred about five miles northeast of Cassville, the old county site of this country. It has been raining there for about three week[s]; every evening about five o'clock, apparently from a cloudless sky. The rainfall covers an area of about twenty square feet. Rev. James England, well known all over the state, witnessed this and will vouch for its truth. The first known of it was Mr. Geo. Gibbons and his daughter were walking out and walked into it before they knew it.” Cassville is about 250 kilometres north of Dawson, Georgia.]


1886 Nov 5 / That water falling in Charleston, but the convention having arisen that it was in all cases from trees, so the description is worded. “Standing on the sidewalk to the east of the tree and looking to the west one could see the drops of water falling to the earth. The drops were very fine but they could be distinctly seen. The reporter abandons the dew-explanation and says that the fall was from insects “which, according to entomologists, exude the water which so much resembles a rainfall. [VI; 898.1, 898.2, 898.3. (Refs.???)]


1886 Oct 24 / News and Courier of / The rain at Charlotte, N.C. / 25-8-1-x.  [VI; 899.1. (Charleston News and Courier, October 25, 1886, p. 8 c. 1+.)]


1886 / Oct 23 / Water falling from the sky, every afternoon at Aiken, S.C., upon a space 10 feet square. Letter dated, N and C, Oct 26. / Fell day after day, since late in Sept. / 28th—said that water falling from cloudless sky at Summerville. Said been reported from Cheraw, and in both cases only dew falling from trees. [VI; 899.2, 899.3, 899.4. (Charleston News and Courier, October 26, 1886.) (Charleston News and Courier, October 28, 1886.)]


1886 Oct 21 / News and Courier of / Had been rumored that every day between 9 and one o'clock rain fell between two stores in Cheraw, S.C. “For the past few days a number of our citizens have watched the spot where the rain was said to fall, and they were much surprised to find that every day, between 9 and one o'clock, drops of rain can plainly be seen to fall in this particular locality. [VI; 900.1, 900.2. (Charleston News and Courier, October 21, 1886.)]


[1886 Oct] / Charleston / NY Sun, Oct 24—“It is reported that in Chesterfield County, in the northeastern part of the State, it has been raining for ten or twelve days out of a cloudless sky. Something of this character has been observed here (Charleston). This morning at 5 o'clock the sidewalks were wet, and the gutter pipes attached to the roofs were running water just as though a heavy rain was falling. Not a single cloud was to be seen in the skies at any time during the night.” Comments upon the dry season. [VI; 901.1, 901.2. “Earthquake Phenomena.” New York Sun, October 24, 1886, p. 1 c. 5. (“Current Events.” Brooklyn Daily Eagle, October 22, 1886, p. 4 c. 8. At Cheraw, Chesterfield County, South Carolina.) See: 1886 Oct 21, (VI; 900).]


1886 Oct 22 / Sun, Oct 23—Charleston—severe q at 5:26 a.m. “At the same time there was an extraordinary meteoric shower, which was witnessed by dozens of persons.” [VI; 902. “Shaken by Earthquakes.” New York Sun, October 23, 1886, p. 3 c. 1.]


1886 Oct 22 / 5:20 a.m. / q. / Charleston / and 2:20 p.m. [VI; 903. (Refs.???)]


1886 Oct 22 / N and Courier, 23[rd] / “A number of persons who had risen and were in the streets sta[te] that they observed a brilliant meteoric display about that hour. / Trib index / Trib., 1886 / Times, Aug 29-1-6. [VI; 904. (Charleston News and Courier, October 23, 1886.) “Want in Charleston.” New York Tribune, September 6, 1886, p. 1 c. 4. “Five minutes after the shock an extraordinary celestial phenomenon occurred. It was a meteor of unusual size and brilliancy which shot athwart the heavens from the southeast and appeared to reach the earth in the direction of Savannah.” “They Come Every Day.” New York Times, August 29, 1886, p. 1 c. 6.]


[1886] Oct 22 / Charleston / Sun, Nov 1-3-2 / “A meteoric shower occurred just at the moment of the shake, fifty or more meteors being in motion at the time in the heavens, a little south and east of the zenith.” [VI; 905. “The Earthquake Record.” New York Sun, November 1, 1886, p. 3 c. 2.]


1886 Oct 22 / cloud-form / Phil. Public Ledger, 26th, from NY Times—a cloud like a gigantic horse and rider at Rhineback, N.Y. “It was visible only a few minutes and then 'galloped' out of sight. There are people who are greatly exercised over the strange event.” [VI; 906. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, October 26, 1886.) “A Strange Phenomenon.” New York Times, October 23, 1886, p. 1 c. 6.]


1886 Oct 22 / Q / Charleston / 23—Greece / Sun 24-1-3-x. [VI; 907. “Earthquakes in Greece.” New York Sun, October 24, 1886, p. 1 c. 3. “Earthquake Phenomena.” New York Sun, October 24, 1886, p. 1 c. 5.]


1886 Oct 22 / q and rumblings at Malaga. / Malta Standard of 28th / On 23rd in Greece—Standard of Nov. 4. [VI; 908. (Malta Standard, October 28, 1886.) (Malta Standard, November 4, 1886.)]


1886 Oct 23 / Whirl / Ireland / Symons Met Mag 21/149. [VI; 909. Kempster, W.H. "Extraordinary Whirlwind." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 21 (November 1886): 149-150. “Destructive Tornado in County Roscommon.” Irish Times, (Dublin), October 25, 1886, p. 5 c. 3.]


[1886] [Oct 24] / Charleston / Oct 24—“A detonation, no appreciable shake.” / Sun, Nov. 1. [VI; 910. “The Earthquake Record.” New York Sun, November 1, 1886, p. 3 c. 2.]


1886 Oct 23-24, about midnight./ BO / A meteor detonated over Atlanta, Georgia. / N.Y. Herald 25-5-4 / Moved eastward. Light so intense small objects on ground visible. [VI; 911. “Celestial Fireworks.” New York Herald, October 25, 1886, p. 5 c. 4.]


1886 Oct 24 / 9:30 p.m. / A large meteor at Charleston / M.W.R. 1886-296. [VI; 912. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 10; October 1886): 295-297, at 296.]


1886 Oct 26 / Nothing in Auckland Weekly News for Nov-Dec. [B; 752.]


1886 Oct 26 / Try an Auckland paper for continuation, Jan., 1887. / Have N.Z. Times. [B; 753.]


1886 Oct 26 / Animal stories begin June 10. [B; 754.]


1886 Oct 26 / Auckland, dispatch from / N Z Times of 27th / "It is reported from the Waikato that undoubted traces of a saurian monster have been found at the slaughter yards near Frankton Junction. Yesterday morning the carcass of a sheep was found to have been taken from a hook and devoured, the bones which were clean-picked, being found near the place, with tracks of feet unlike those of any known animal. Men are on the watch [with guns and revolvers.].” / N Z Times, 28th—said that cor. been told Maoris had brought alligator eggs from Australia some years before and put them near the Waikato River, and supposed one had hatched out and survived. [B; 755.1, 755.2, 755.3. “The Reported Alligator.” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), October 27, 1886, p. 3 c. 1. “The Supposed Alligator.” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), October 28, 1886, p. 2 c. 7.]


1886 Oct 26 / (Nov.) // The next in the N.Z. Times is Nov. 12—dated Auckland, Nov. 11—"The saurian monster in the Waikato district has developed into a tiger, the footprints of which, it is alleged, have been seen on Castleton's farm, and large numbers of people on horseback and foot have been out hunting it." [B; 756.1, 756.2. “The Waikato Alligator.” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), November 12, 1886, p. 2 c. 8.]


1886 Oct 26 / Auckland, Nov 27 / New Zealand Times 27-2-8 / “There was some excitement at Paeroa River this week on account of the reported 'saurian monster' being seen in the river. The animal has been captured, and proves to be an enormous gray seal, 7 ft 6 in long and weighing 3 cwt. Another is believed to be still at large.” [B; 757.1, 757.2. “The Crocodile.” New Zealand Times, (Wellington), November 27, 1886, p. 2 c. 8.]


1886 Oct. 26 / (A) / We turn to Auckland papers. Of the New Zealand Herald, only a monthly edition findable: find preceding accounts. Oct 11-11-6—that correspondent from Hamilton, Sept 28, had written that there had been an extraordinary occurrence on the farm of Mr. Castleton, at Frankton, near slaughter yards on Sept. 27th—one of Mr. C's sons, aged 14, had seen in a creek, a tributary to the Waikato, a commotion—then he saw a long-headed animal, brownish and covered with scales, body as thick as a calf. It saw him and dashed toward him open-mouthed. Said that another boy was chased. / There follows a letter from Mr. Arthur Inkersley, one of the masters of the Auckland Grammar School. That on the morning of Sept 12 he was rowing down the Waikato River from Hamilton to Mercer and he saw the head of some swimming creature travelling fast, with great commotion. / A cor. from Huntley writes that two weeks before 2 tourists had reported "a monster with a head like an alligator" in the river. / This cor. says that the year before—just a year before—a little Maori girl had been found dead in one of the creeks. She had been absent from her parents only 20 minutes. "The flesh of the right arm was completely strip[p]ed from the bone. / Next issue Nov. 8—nothing findable. [B; 758.1 to 758.7. “Two Children Chased by a Saurian Monster.” New Zealand Herald, October 11, 1886, p. 11 c. 6. “Saurian Monster Captured.” New Zealand Herald, November 26, 1886, p. 5 c. 5. “The Ohinemuri edition of the 'saurian' has been captured, and proves to be an enormous grey seal, measuring 7 feet 6 inches, and weighing some 3cwt. Messrs. Gibbons and Brady, of the Junction Mill, effected its capture. The animal is alive, and fairly well. There is, it is stated, still another at large.”]


1886 Oct 26 / In the Fiji Times, Dec 15, quoting a N.Z. newspaper of Nov. 8—Said that in the swampy land in which, some time before, the Castleton boys had seen a monster, on the 6th of Nov. again they saw a strange animal—one of them ran to call his father; the other climbed into trees. Mr. Castleton and another man arrived. They came upon tracks, which they followed a quarter of a mile until in a dense gorge jungle they could no longer be followed. The footprints were like those at the slaughter house. These prints indicated a distance between front and hind feet, of four feet, 6 inches. In Mr. Castleton's opinion the beast was feline, and was not the one the boys had seen previosly. Ac to boys it was very different. "They described it as having a large flat head like that of a tom cat; with rough brown hair and grayish stripes on the body, standing as high as a yearling beast, and with a tail like that of a cow. [B; 759.1 to 759.5. (Fiji Times, December 15, 1886.)]


1886 Oct 26 / Animal / Seal? / N. Zealand. [B; 760. “Saurian Monster Captured.” New Zealand Herald, November 26, 1886, p. 5 c. 5. See: 1886 Oct. 26, (B; 760).]]


1886 Oct. 26 / Animal in Victoria / Feb. 28, 1890. [B; 761. See: 1890 Feb 28 and March 1, (B; 1085).]


1886 Oct 26 / Japan / This is the Charleston-Greece-Cashmir-Japan zone. / See Dec. 10. [VI; 913. See: 1886 Dec. 10, (VI; 952).]


1886 Oct. 26 / Oshima, Kiusiu, Japan / (F) / See Nov. 10. [VI; 914. Fletcher, 105. See:  1886 Nov. 10, (VI; 934). This is the Oshima meteorite.]


[1886 Oct 27] / Tracks in snow? / Sun, Oct. 27, 1886, 3-2. [B; 762. “The Extraordinary Fun Unknown Parties had with Farmer Carter's Property.” New York Sun, October 27, 1886, p. 3 c. 2.]


1886 Oct 27 / Sun, 3-2 / Tricks on a farmer, Potter Co, Penn., near N.Y. border—no tracks to indicate persons. [B; 763. “The Extraordinary Fun Unknown Parties had with Farmer Carter's Property.” New York Sun, October 27, 1886, p. 3 c. 2.]


1886 Oct 28 / N.Y. Herald, 9-5 / Halo appears over a bishop's grave in 1886, Burlington, N.J., nightly. [B; 764. “Halo Over a Bishop's Grave.” New York Herald, October 28, 1886, p. 9 c. 5. “over the spot where the bishop's head rests is where the apparition appears. The light can be seen from a distance, but on a near approach it disappears.”]


1886 Oct 28 / Malta Standard of / That “an extraordinary worm or caterpillar had appeared in Malta—very destructive—not described. / See Sept. 22. [VI; 915. (Malta Standard, October 28, 1886.) See: 1886 Sept 22, (VI; 834).]


1886 Oct 28 / Insects / Malta / See July 29, 1886. [VI; 916. See: 1886 July 29, (VI; 574).]


1886 Oct 28 / News and Courier 29, 8-3—“A strange celestial visitor.” “A strange sight was seen in the heavens yesterday. “Shortly after 5 o'clock, a large meteor which burned with a blue light was seen to shoot across the sky.” [VI; 917. (Charleston News and Courier, October 29, 1886, p. 8 c. 3.)]


1886 Oct 29 / In the Sanikili district, Turkey, q—six villages destroyed. / Levant Herald, Dec. 8. [VI; 918. (Levant Herald, December 8, 1886.)]


1886 Oct 30 / News Courier, 3-2 / Rain insects of Africa. [VI; 919. (Charleston News and Courier, October 30, 1886, p. 3 c. 2.)]


1886 Oct. 30 / Det met / Faloterbe, s.w. coast of Sweden, evening. It was seen to explode and then sounds like gunfire were heard. / Nature 35-112. [VI; 920. “Notes.” Nature, 35 (December 2, 1886): 111-113, at 112.]


1886 Oct 30 to Nov. 16 / Sun more free from spots for a longer continuous period than since 1879. / Sid Mess 6-88. [VI; 921. “Sun Spots.” Sidereal Messenger, 6 (February 1887): 88.]


1886 Oct 31 / 8:25 p.m. / Magnificent meteor at Belfast falling a little to the left of the Pleiades. / Nature 35/8 / 35-29—Cor writes that at Llanberis, N. Wales, at 8:25 p.m., he saw an immense meteor come from the same part of the sky. There was a rushing sound. [VI; 922.1, 922.2. Murphy, Joseph Murray. “Meteor.” Nature, 35 (November 4, 1886): 8. “Meteors.” Nature, 35 (November 11, 1886): 29.]


1886 November / Maggie Beadling, Banksville, Pa. / girl still in trance / See Aug 5, 1884. [B; 765.  ("She Predicts Her Own Cure." Indiana State Sentinel, February 23, 1887 p. 2 c. 6.) ("A Marvelous Instance of Faith Cure." Columbian, (Bloomsburg, PA), February 25, 1887, p. 4 c. 2.) See:  

1884 Aug 5, (B; 610).]


1886 Nov / Bullets / See Sept 24, 1870. [B; 766. See: 1870 Sept 24, (A; 624).]


1886 Nov / Bullets / See 1867 summer. [B; 767. See: 1867 summer, (A; 507).]


1886 Nov. 1 / night / 12:15 p.m. / Nordheinsund, w. coast of Norway. Heavy rumbling sounds n.w. to s.e. and vibrations. / Nature 35-158. [VI; 923. “Notes.” Nature, 35 (December 16, 1886): 157-159, at 158.]


1886 Nov. 1 / night / Yarn of the Black Barge on a Va. River / Sun, 1887, Jan 16-3-5. [B; 768. “A Ghostly Barge.” New York Sun, January 16, 1887, p. 3 c. 5.]


1886 Nov. 2 / Sun, 1-3+ / Charleston / A spring reported before in Custom House yard—“proves to have been caused by a break in a water pipe.” [VI; 924. “Another Shock at Summerville.” New York Sun, November 2, 1886, p. 1 c. 3.]


1886 Nov 2 / early morning / Great boiler explosion in Charleston / N and Courier 3-8-1 /// 425. [VI; 925. (Charleston News and Courier, November 3, 1886, p. 8 c. 1.)]


1886 Nov. 2 / Auroras and mets / Lyons, N.Y. / See Ap. 14. / See Oct. 7. [VI; 926. See: 1886 Ap. 14, May 8, July 27, Nov. 2, (VI; 419), and, 1886 Oct 7 and Nov. 2, (VI; 866).]


1886 Nov. 3 / 10:50 p.m. / Shock at Simila / 3rd in 3 weeks / Pioneer Mail, Nov. 10 [VI; 927. (Pioneer Mail, November 10, 1886.)]


1886 Nov. 3 / At Hamar, Norway, bet 8 and 9 p.m.—darkness—suddenly a bright white cloud appeared. It drifted in a n.e. direction, from time to time emitting rays. “The cloud retained throughout its original form, and disappeared at last in the darkness.” / Nature 35-159 / (D-275). [VI; 928.1, 928.2. The note copies information from page 275 of The Book of the Damned. "Notes." Nature, 35 (December 16, 1886): 157-159, at 159.]


1886 Nov. 5 / 12:25 p.m. / q. / Charleston, etc. / N.Y. Herald 6-2-5. [VI; 929. “Again the Lively Quake.” New York Herald, November 6, 1886, p. 2 c. 5-6.]


1886 Nov. 5 / See Nov 3. / 2 a.m. / Hamar, Norway. / Splendid meteor. / Nature 35-112. [VI; 930. “Notes.” Nature, 35 (December 2, 1886): 111-113, at 112. See: 1886 Nov. 3, (VI; 928).]


1886 Nov 7 / Charleston News Courier, 4-1-+ / Lightning photographed during storm, at Wellsville, Mo, on ceiling of a church, picture of an old man with long hair and beard. / See N.Y. papers. [B; 769. (Charleston News Courier, November 7, 1886, p. 1 c. 1+.)  "A Weird Picture." Butler Weekly Times, (Missouri), November 10, 1886, Supplement, (p. 9), c. 4). "Mr. M.L. Williams of Ridge Prairie, showed us a remarkable photograph recently. It was a picture of a man's face and head, with long flowing beard. It was taken from the ceiling ot the Methodist church at Wellsville, Montgomery county. It seems that some time in last August the church, during a heavy thunder storm, was visited by lightning, and that picture was flashed upon the smooth surface of the ceiling by the electiic fluid, and thence photographed. It is a weird and shadowy picture, of the Storm King, apparently, and has a strange mystery about it.—Marshall Progress." (NY newspapers, ca. November 7, 1886.) (Warrenton Banner (Warrenton, Missouri), October 22, 1959, Page 7. ... the second time that the Wellsville Methodist Church was struck bv lightning. ... to records and photographs the same edifice was struck on August 18, 1886; at Newspaper.com.)]


1886 / about Nov. 10 // “It had been discovered. If any forest fire great enough to cast ashes, not have to wait to be discovered. The ashes fell on q center. No report from anywhere else. [VI; 931. (Refs.???)]


1886 (Nov 10) / Sept, Oct. and Nov. // In M.W.R., under “Forest and Prairie Fires”, nothing in N or S Carolina mentioned. Peculiar circumstance is that in December, besides one in Florida, on 27, only forest fires reported were in N and S Carolina. In S Car—between Charleston and Sumter, on 1st. / [Note cut off] [On 2nd and 3rd at] Wilmington, N.C. [VI; 932.1, 932.2. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 9; September 1886): 265-267, at 265-266. “Miscellaneous Phenomena.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 10; October 1886): 295-297, at 295-296. “Miscellaneous Phenomena,.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 11; November 1886): 325-328, at 326-327. “Miscellaneous Phenomena,.” Monthly Weather Review, 14 (no. 12; December 1886): 356-357.]


1886 / about Nov 10 // N and C., Nov 20 / That about ten days before, ashes had fallen from the sky at Summerville. It is said that the material was undoubtedly ashes. Said that it had been discovered that upon the day of the occurence an extensive forest fire near Summerville. [VI; 933.1., 933.2. (Charleston News and Courier, November 20, 1886.)]


1886 Nov. 10 / See Oct. 26. / Metite / Maemé, Satsua, Japan / metite / R—Ap 18, 1838 / See Dec. 10. [VI; 934. Refer to: (1838 Ap. 18). See: 1886 Oct. 26, (VI; 914).]


1886 Nov. 12 / Trib, 2-5 / Wind as seed-carrier. [VI; 935. “Wind As a Seed Carrier.” New York Tribune, November 12, 1886, p. 2 c. 5.]


1886 Nov. 12 / N and Courier, 3-1 / Bullets falling from sky. [VI; 936. (Charleston News and Courier, November 12, 1886, p. 3 c. 1.)]


1886 Nov 12 / Bullets / Charleston News and Courier, 3-1, copying from Colleton Press, that near Walterboro, Colleton Co., S.C., two men, W.F. Wasdin and S. Pinkussohn, saw small shot falling around them. Thought a spent charge from some sportsman's gun, but the rain of lead continued. They showed specimens to the Editor fo the Press, who said were like shot findable in the stores. [B; 770.1, 770.2. (Charleston News and Courier, November 12, 1886, p. 3 c. 1.) (Colleton Press, ca. November, 1886.)]


1886 Nov 13 / (+) / q and polt / News and Courier, 2-3 / Small qs localized in one house like polt phe. [VI; 937. Charleston News and Courier, November 13, 1886, p. 2 c. 3.)]


1886 Nov. 13th / 6:30 a.m. / At Ujiji, Central Africa—violent shock and rumblings and explosion for ab. a year. / L.T., Jan. 27, 1888. [VI; 938. “Earthquakes in Central Africa.” London Times, January 27, 1888, p. 13 c. 3. Ujiji, Tanzania.]


1886 Nov. 14 . Cor writes that had seen in Plato two brilliant points united by a luminous band. / See Oct 16. [VI; 939. Lihou, Benjamin. “La cirque lunaire de Platon.” Astronomie, 6 (1887): 69, (illustration). See: 1886 Oct. 16, (VI; 872).]


1886 Nov 15 / Remarkable display of Leonids at Shanghai like most brilliant fireworks. Written by a cor to Nature in Leonid period 1896-99. / (Look this up.) [VI; 940. Kingsmill, Thomas William. “Leonid Meteor Showers.” Nature, 61 (March 22, 1900): 491.]


1886 Nov 15 / 33 year period / be that active in 1853 and 1919. [VI; 941. (Refs.???)]


1886 Nov. 16 / [LT], 9-e / Lunar phe. [VI; 942. “Lunar Phenomenon.” London Times, November 16, 1886, p. 9 c. 5.]


1886 Nov 17 / Reading / met seen at // Times, Nov. 18 / Also other places—see Nature. [VI; 943. Sclater, Philip Lutley. “Meteor.” Nature, 35 (November 25, 1886): 76. “Meteor.” London Times, November 18, 1886, p. 7 c. 3.]


1886 Nov 17 / 7:15 p.m. / Birmingham, etc. / Fireball / E Mec 44/283. [VI; 944. “Meteor.” English Mechanic, 44 (no. 1131; November 26, 1886): 283.]


[1887 Nov 19. "Smoky Day." Talman, Charles Fitzhugh. "Dark Days and Forest Fires." Scientific American, n.s., 112 (March 6, 1915): 229.]


1886 Nov 20 / Religio-Phil Jour., 4-5 / Negro named Charles Douglas, of Pittsburgh, Pa., charges another Henry Thornton, with practicing witchcraft. [B; 771. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 41 (no. 13; November 20, 1886): 4, (c. 5).]


1886 Nov. 23 / Disap / Charleston News and Courier, 25th, Edina, Mo., man and 3 sons pulling corn on a farm and struck by lightning. Man slightly injured, one son killed, other seriously injured, the third had disappeared. "What has become of him is not known, but it is supposed that he was blinded or crazed by the shock and wandered away." [B; 772.1, 772.2. (Charleston News and Courier, November 25, 1886.)]


1886 Nov. 27 / ab. 7 p.m. / Great meteor / Germany / Met Zeit 3/177. [VI; 945. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 3 (1886): 173-180, at 177. The meteor was observed in Austria, (not in Germany).]


1887 Nov. 27 / 7:15 p.m. / also on 28th // Violent and destructive shocks—Scio. / Levant Herald, Dec. 1. [VI; 946. (Levant Herald, December 1, 1886.)]


1886 Nov. 28 / St. Louis Globe-Democrat of, and Religio-Phil. Jour., Feb 12, 1887 / Polt that answered with raps in Perry, Missouri. [B; 773. "The Ralls County Ghost." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 41 (no. 25; February 12, 1887): 6, (c. 3). (St. Louis Globe-Democrat, November 28, 1886.)]


1886 Nov. 29 / 4 p.m. / 50 miles north of Bismarck, Dak—Det. meteor / Phil Pub Ledger, Dec 3. [VI; 947. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, December 3, 1886.)]


1886 Dec / Met ship. * [VI; 948. (Refs.???)]


1886 Dec. 4 / 9:16 p.m. / Stonyhurst College, Blackburn / Meteor that left a trail between 27 Lyncis and Theta Gemini. / Nature 35-133 / See p. 151. [VI; 949. “Notes.” Nature, 35 (December 9, 1886): 132-134, at 133. Denning, William Frederick. “Fireball of December 4, 1886.” Nature, 35 (December 16, 1886): 151.]


1886 Dec 5 / Trib, 1-3 / Volcanoes / Guatemala. [VI; 950. “Volcanoes in Guatemala.” New York Tribune, December 5, 1885, p. 1 c. 3. A search for a new volcano in Totonicapan, to account for smoke, volcanic dust and ashes, failed to discover any new volcano. In Guatemala, only the Pacaya volcano was in active eruption, since December, 1885; and, in Central America, about 500 kilometres away, the Momotombo volcano in Nicaragua, was in eruption since May.]


1886 Dec 9 / N.Y.T., 1-5 / q / S. Car. and Missouri. [VI; 951. “Earthquakes Going West.” New York Times, December 9, 1886, p. 1 c. 5.]


1886 Dec. 10 / Volc—the Tarumae, in Japan, to 16th / Phil P.L., 1887, Feb 16 / See Nov 10. / See Oct 26. [VI; 952. (Philadelphia Public Ledger, February 16, 1887.) See: (Oct 26), and, (Nov 10).]


1886 Dec 10 / Afterglow at Amiens, France / C.R. 102-67 / See Dec 10, 1882. [VI; 953. “M. C. Decharme signale l'apparition de lueurs crépuscurlaires....” Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 67. See: 1882 Dec 10-11, (V: 1047 & 1048).]


1886 Dec 11 / Meteor / Löwenberg / Met Zeit 4/71. [VI; 954. "Kleinere Mittheilungen." Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 4 (1887): 69-72, at 71.]


1886 Dec 13 / Eruption, Mt Tarumai, Yezo, Japan / Nature 35-472. [VI; 955. "Notes." Nature, 35 (March 17, 1887): 471-474, at 472. The Shikotsu volcano.]


1886 Dec 18 / Sun Pillar / Hertford. [VI; 956. (Refs.??? Probably, LT or Met. Mag.)]


1886 / ab Dec 25 // Mirage in Italy / Pop Sci News 21-67. [VI; 957. “A Remarkable Mirage.” Popular Science News, 21 (May 1887): 67.]


1886 Dec 26 / Sounds / morning / At Farmington upon a windless day a roaring, booming sound like surf. Nearest coast at Boothbay and Harpswell—70 to 80 miles away. But next day's papers told of a great storm along the coast. So it was supposed to have been that. / Pub Ledger, 1887, May 11-1-9. [VI; 958.1, 958.2. (Philadelphia Public Ledger. May 11, 1887, p. 1 c. 9.)]


1886 Dec 28 / (Trance) / Village of Red Lion, York Co., Pa. / Religio-Phil jour, Jan 8, 1887—p. 4, col. 5 / A farmer, Henry Welchman, supposed dead, but before burial exhumed and found to be in a trance. [B; 774. "General Items." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 41 (no. 20; January 8, 1887): 4, (c. 4-5). "Escaped From the Grave." Washington Evening Star, (D.C.), January 1, 1887, p. 8 c. 4.]


1886 Dec 30 / (S S) / Near Tivoli, N.Y., man named Brown had seen sea serp thrust head up in crack of ice. Animal with eyes the size of saucers. First time been reported since Dec. 1. / NY Times, Jan 1-4-7. [B; 775. “The Sea Serpent on Ice.” New York Times, January 1, 1887, p. 4 c. 7.]


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

1886 Dec 30-31 / night / Shocks in Spain / LT, Jan 1-10-d. [VI; 959. “Shock of Earthquake in Spain.” London Times, January 1, 1887, p. 10 c. 4.]









 
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