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Last updated: January 24, 2017.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1800 to 1810


1800:


1800 Feb 4 / Colombia / Ecuador / Venezuela / great q / [BA] '11. [I; 9. Milne, 698.]


1800 Feb. 26 / Lisbon / q and heavy rain / BA 54 / 9 p.m. [I; 10. Mallet, 44.]


1800 Feb 27 / Etna began recurring at intervals until middle of 1802. / BA '54. [I; 11. Mallet, 44.]


1800 Mar 8 / Mexico / great q. / [BA] '11. [I; 12. Milne, 698.]


1800 Mar 20 / Vulcan / Fritsch of Magdeburg / Obs 3/136. [I; 13. Ledger, Edmund. "Observations or supposed observations of the Transits of Intra-Mercurial planets or other Bodies across the Sun's Disk." Observatory, 3 (1879-80): 135-8, at 136.]


1800 Mar 20-21 / China / I / [Small earthquake / BA ' 11.] [I; 14. Milne, 698.]


1800 Apr 1 / Essex / Steeple-Bumstead / det met. BA '60. [I; 15. Greg, 62.]


[1800 Apr 5 /] 1800 Aug. 5 / N. American fireball. BA '60. [I; 17. Greg, 61-63. Greg adds: "great meteor and detonation; stones said to have fallen," and questions the date, "April 5, 1800?. N. America. Evidently confounded with that of Baton Rouge, 5th April, 1799. This meteor is said to have appeared as large as a house 70 feet square, at an apparent height of 200 feet; to have felt warm, and scorched vegetation near where it was supposed to have fallen."  The Baton Rouge and North America meteors are the same, reportedly seen on April 5, 1800. "Intelligence and Miscellaneous Articles. November 1801." Philosophical Magazine, 11 (1801-1802): 189-192, at 191, cv. "Meteorology."]


[1800 Aug. 5. Wrong date. See: 1800 Aug. 8, and, 1800 Apr. 5, (I; 17).]


[1800 Aug. 8 /] N. American fireball. BA '60.  [I; 17. Greg, 62. Both Thayer and Pabst give the date for this meteor as August 5. Greg has two "North America" meteors  in 1800, on April 5 and August 8, (the latter of which was correctly noted by Kiesewetter).]


1800 Aug / Perseids / A. J. Sci 37-335. [I; 16. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Report on the Shooting Stars of August 9th and 10th, 1839, with other facts relating to the frequent occurrence of a meteoric display in August." American Journal of Science, 37 (1839): 325-338, at 335-6, (for August 8, 1800).]


1800 Oct 17 / Small earthquake, Valley of Ossau in the Pyrenees, France. BA 1911. [I; 18. Milne, 698.]


1800 Nov 8 / Op. Mars (Al). [I; 19. Opposition of Mars. 00:55 UT, November 9.]


[1800 December 25 /] 1801 March 10 / [London Times], 3-b / q's / New England. [I; 23. "A severe shock..." London Times, March 10, 1801, p. 3 c. 2. "A severe shock of an Earthquake was felt at Newport, Hanover, Boston, Concord, and other parts of America, on Christmas Day last." Mallet, 45.]


1800 Dec. 29 / Valletri (Latium) Italy—small earthquake, BA 1911. [I; 20. Milne, 698.]


1801:


1801 Jan 1 / Chile / great q / [BA] '11. [I; 22. Milne, 698.]


[1801 March 10. Wrong date. See: 1800 December 25, (I; 23).]


1801 [May 24] / At Rastadt, sulphur rain / rain so charged with sulphur that people made matches of the material / Phil Mag 44-254. [I; 21. Serres, Marcel de. "Observations on the fall of stones from the clouds, or aerolites." Philosophical Magazine, 44 (1814): 217-24, 253-60, at 254. "Pluie Sulphureuse." L'Esprit des Journaux, François et Étrangers, 30 no. 7 (July 1801): 229. Hail, the size of eggs, fell with the sulphurous rain, on "le 4 Prairial," (May 24).]


1801 May 26 / Inferior conjunction Venus-Sun. [I; 24. Inferior conjunction of Venus. 15:39 UT, May 26.]


1801 / June and before / Youghall Mirages / Thomson, Intro to Meteorology, p. 258 / Thomson (D.P.), Intro To Meteorology, 8755. g. 23. [A; 9. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 258. "8755. g. 23." is the British Library shelfmark for this book.]


1801 June 19 / Halle fireball / BA 60. [I; 25. Greg, 62.]


1801 June 19 / Eskilstuna / Sweden / violent q. / a mountain  / the sea covered  / dead fish / BA Rept '54-44. [I; 26. Mallet, 45.]


1801 July 14 / Montgaillard / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 27. Greg, 62.]


1801 Aug 25 / [London Times], 3-c / Planets //  7-2-c / disc of Ceres. [I; 28. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, August 25, 1801 p. 3 c. 3-4. "7-2-c " is an erroneous location from Palmer's Index. "From the Paris Papers." London Times, February 1, 1802, p. 3 c. 1. "The planet discovered by M. Piazzi, at Palermo, on the 1st of January, 1801, was re-discovered at Bremen by M. Olbers, on the 2d ult. in the wing of the Virgin...." "With a telescope, which magnifies 106 times, it cannot be distinguished from a small star."]


1801 Aug 26 / France (Ain) / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 29. Greg, 62.]


1801 Sept 12 / [London Times], 2-c / 16-3-d / q's / Scotland. [I; 30. "Monday morning...." London Times, September 12, 1801, p. 2 c. 3. "Edinburgh, Sept. 12."  London Times, September 16, 1801, p. 3 c. 4.]


1801 Sept 14 / [London Times], 3-c / Sunspots. [I; 31. "Capel Lofft...." London Times, September 14, 1801, p. 3 c. 3.]


1801 Oct 5 / Great q / Mexico /  Look up, see if right—B.A., 1911. [I; 32. Milne, 698.]


1801 Oct 8 / Bologna, Italy / I / [Small earthquake / BA 1911]. [I; 33. Milne, 698.]


1801 Oct 8 / [London Times], 3-d / Nov. 2-3-b / Meteor. [I; 34. "On Wednesday...." London Times, October 8, 1801, p. 3 c.4. "On Wednesday the 30th ult. between five and six in the morning, a very bright meteor was seen in the East, shaped something like a cross; this was accompanied by two smaller ones like stars, one towards the left, which was also bright; and one just perceptible a little below it, the whole moving fast towards the South." "On Saturday...." London Times, November 2, 1801, p. 3 c. 2. "On Saturday morning, [October 31,] about one o'clock, a Luminous Meteor was observed at Chelsea, which rose in the West, and emitted so splendid an azure light for about a minute, that the smallest print could be read by it; it then took a South-East direction, when it divided into small balls or globes, and instantly disappeared without any explosion. It was extremely dark both before and after its appearance."]


1801 Oct 15 / [London Times], 3-d / 14-3-c, d / Ext storms. [A; 10. "Phenomena truly wonderful...." London Times, October 15, 1801, p. 3 c. 4. "Between ten and eleven o'clock on Saturday...," and, "The lightning, and torrents of rain, were tremendous...." London Times, October 14, 1801, p. 3 c. 3-4.]


1801 Oct 23 / Colchester and Bury St. Edwards, stones fell? BA '60. [I; 35. Greg, 62.]


1801 Nov 3 / (+) / [London Times], 3-d / House on fire by a meteor. [I; 36. "A few days ago...." London Times, November 3, 1801, p. 3 c. 4. "A few days ago, about eight o'clock in the evening, the dwelling-house of Mr. Woodroffe, miller, near Horringer-mill, Suffolk, was set on fire by a meteor, and entirely consumed, together with a stable adjoining."]


1801 Nov 12-13 / Night / Philadelphia / shock / BA ' 54. [I; 37. Mallet, 46.]


1801 Early in Dec / Austria / I / [Small earthquake / BA 1911.] [I; 38. Milne, 698.]


1801 Dec 12 / [London Times], 2-d / Ext storm / Plymouth. [I; 39. "Plymouth, Dec. 9." London Times, December 12, 1801, p. 2 c. 4.]


1802:


1802 / Ulm / Thick viscuous liquid / Phil Mag 44-254 /  in abundance covering everything exposed to it. [I; 40. Serres, Marcel de. "Observations on the fall of stones from the clouds, or aerolites." Philosophical Magazine, 44 (1814): 217-24, 253-60, at 254.]


1802 Jan 4 / bet 7 and 8 a.m. / Carinthia and Turkey / great q preceded at Trieste, by a "terrible" thunderstorm and "tidal wave" / BA 54. [I; 41. Mallet, 47.]


1802 Jan 17 / Spain / I [Light quake / BA 1911]. [I; 42. Milne, 698.]


1802 Feb 7 / Vulc / Fritsch of Magdeburg / Obs 3/136. [I; 43. Ledger, Edmund. "Observations or supposed observations of the Transits of Intra-Mercurial planets or other Bodies across the Sun's Disk." Observatory, 3 (1879-80): 135-8, at 136.]


1802 May 12 / (It) / Brescia / great q / [BA] '11. [I; 44. Milne, 698.]


1802 May 28 / Near Puztemischel, Hungary—block of ice, 1200 pounds / Science (Michels) 2-276. [I; 45. Rachel, George W. "Fossil Organisms in Meteorites." Science, o.s., 2 (June 11, 1881): 275-277. at 276; "On May 28th, 1802, there fell near Puztemischel, Hungary, a block of ice weighing 1200 lbs." "Ein ungeheurer Hagelklumpen." Annalen der Physik, 16 (1804): 75. The ice mass contained eighteen cubic feet, (measuring three feet long and wide, and two feet thick), weighed about eleven hundredweight, (too heavy for eight men to move), and took three days to melt. It fell during a violent thunderstorm with hail, as well as another large piece of ice the size of a suitcase, ("reisekoffers").]


1802 Aug 7 / Concussion in dept. Lot and great met seen at Cahors / C.R., 17-621 / det met at Cahors. [Reverse] Concussion at Ceylis (Lot) / BA '54. [I; 46. Perrey, Alexis. "Nouvelles recherches sur les tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, de 1801 à juin 1843." Comptes Rendus, 17 (September 25, 1843): 608-625, at 621. Mallet, 48.]


1802 Aug 10 / Quedlinburg / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 47. Greg, 62.]


1802 Aug 15 / Venezuela / II / [Medium quake / BA 1911]. [I; 48. Milne, 698.]


1802 Aug 23 / "Terrible shock," Richmond, Va., and rumbling sound / BA 54. [I; 49. Mallet, 48.]


1802 Sept 1 / Drought / q. / Naples and Capua / been no rain since March / BA 54. [I; 50. Mallet, 49.]


1802 Sept 15 / Loch Tay, Scotland / stonefall / questioned in BA '60. Refers to Monthly Magazine, Oct, 1802, p. 290. [I; 51. "Scotland." Monthly Magazine, or, British Register, 14 (October 1, 1802): 290-291. "The mountain where this phenomenon took place lies not more than twenty miles distant in a straight line from the village of Comrie, where so many convulsions of the earth have been felt. An uncommonly violent shock took place at Comrie soon after the appearance of the above phenomenon; from which we may conclude that they must have had some connection together." Greg, 62.]


1802 Oct 1 / Beauvais (Oise) / bet 9 and 10 p.m. / det met / q and left a sulphurous odor of long duration / listed as a q / Bull Soc. Sismol. Ital. 14/326 / (BA '54). / C.R. 17-621 / bet 10 and 11 p.m. / meteor / E to W. [I; 52. Perrey, Alexis. "Nouvelles recherches sur les tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, de 1801 à juin 1843." Comptes Rendus, 17 (September 25, 1843):  608-625, at 621; "...entre 10 et 11 heures du soir...." (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 326.) Mallet, 49.]


1802 Oct 10 / Vulcan by Fritsch of Magdeburg / C.R. 83/587 / rapidly crossing the sun. [I; 53. LeVerrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. "Examen des observations qu'on a présentées, à diverses époques, comme pouvant appartenir aux passages d'une planète intra-mercurielle devant le disque du Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 83 (September 18, 1876): 583-589, 621-624, 647-650, 719-723, at 587.]


1802 Oct 21 / Carmarthen / See Oct 30, 1868. [I; 54. Spurrell, William. Carmarthen and Its Neighbourhood: Notes Topographical and Historical. 2nd edition. Carmarthen: William Spurrell, 1879, 134. "Oct. 21. Shock of an earthquake felt at Carmarthen between 7 and 8 p.m." "Country News." Gentleman's Magazine, 72 pt. 2 (December 1802): 1153-1157, at 1154. See: 1868 Oct 30, (III; 1603).]


1802 Oct 26 / Russia / Austria-Hungary / great q, / II or III / [BA 1911] / Turkey. [I; 55. Milne, 698.]


1802 Nov / Etna / "Etna" / Rodwell. [I; 56. Rodwell, George Farrer. Etna: A History of the Mountain and of its Eruptions. London: C. Kegan Paul, 1878, 102.]


1802 Nov 6 / Suffolk / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 57. Greg, 62.]


1802 Nov 7 / Algiers / q. / II [medium] / BA '11. [I; 58. Milne, 698.]


1802 Nov 8 / Tran Merc / Sc Op. 1. [I; 59. (Scientific Opinion, 1). 06:14 to 11:43 UT, November 9.]


1802 Nov 9 / Vulcan by Kayser at Amsterdam / C.R. 83-719. [I; 60. LeVerrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. "Examen des observations qu'on a présentées, à diverses époques, comme pouvant appartenir aux passages d'une planète intra-mercurielle devant le disque du Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 83 (September 18, 1876): 583-589, 621-624, 647-650, 719-723, at 719-20. Le Verrier and Fort recognized that Kayser's unknown object was Mercury, (and not Vulcan).]


1802 Nov 9 / Transit Mercury / Obs. 29/416. [I; 61. Denning, William Frederick. "The Planets and Planetary Observation." Observatory, 29 (1906): 280-283, 308-314, 355-359, 375-380, 414-418, 458-462; 30 (1907): 92-96, 128-134, 205-208; at v. 29, 416. Transit of Mercury. 06:14 to 11:43 UT, November 9.]


1802 Nov 26 / Turkey / I / [Light quake / BA 1911]. [I; 62. Milne, 698.]


1802 Dec 24 / op. Mars / (Al). [I; 63. (Al). Opposition of Mars. 01:03 UT, December 25.]


1802 (ab) Dec 26 / Conj Venus. [I; 64. Sun conjunct Venus. 15:12 UT, December 31.]


1802 Dec 28 / Japan / q and sea waves / III / [Heavy / BA 1911]. [I; 65. Milne, 699.]


1802 Dec 31 / Sisteron (Basses-Alpes) / Sun rose a glowing red color. / q. at 11 a.m. and at 2 p.m. / BA '54. / Nov 31? [I; 66. Mallet, 51. Mallet indicates December 31 as the date.]


1803:


1803 / Volc fish / Volc of Cotopaxi / witnessed by Humboldt / His story see Sci. Gos. 1870-25 / That this time and other times of eruptions in the northern Andes fishes have been cast by the volcanoes —always of the same species, Arges Cyclopum. / Millions of them sometimes in such numbers that their decomposing remains have bred disease. But though it is said that some have fallen in a "half-boiled" condition, most of them were untouched by fire and some were alive. [I; 68.1, 68.2. Spicer, William Webb. "The Volcano-Fish." Science Gossip, 6 (no. 62; February 1, 1870): 25. Humboldt, Alexander von. "Memoir on a new Species of Pimelodus thrown out of the Volcanoes in the Kingdom of Quito...." Philosophical Magazine, 24 (1806): 333-339. "The mountains of the kingdom of Quito occasionally offer another spectacle, less alarming, but not less curious to the naturalist. The great explosions are periodical, and somewhat rare. Cotopaxi, Tungurahua, and Sangay, sometime do not present one in twenty or thirty years. But during such intervals even these volcanoes will discharge enormous quantities of argillaceous mud; and, what is more extraordinary, an innumerable quantity of fish. By accident, none of these volcanic inundations took place the year that I passed the Andes of Quito; but the fish vomited from the volcanoes is a phænomenon so common, and so generally known by all the inhabitants of that country, that there cannot remain the least doubt of its authenticity." Humboldt, Alexander von, and, Aimé Bonpland. Recueil d'observations de zoologie et d'anatomie comparée : faites dans l'océan atlantique, dans l'intérieur du nouveau continent et dans la mer du sud pendant les années 1799, 1800, 1801, 1802 et 1803. Paris: F. Schoell & G. Dufour, 1811, v. 1, 24-25, "Pimelodus Cyclopum."]


[1803. Wrong date. See: 1803 April 20, (I; 69).]


1803 Jan 8 / Poland / I / [Light quake / BA 1911]. [I; 67. Milne, 699.]


1803 Jan 21 / Silesia / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 70. Greg, 62-63. Greg notes: "Seemed to pass close to the ground; a whizzing noise heard, then it seemed to lie burning on the ground; next day a jelly-like mass found on the snow. Curious, if true."]


1803 Feb 2 / Marseilles, France / I / [Light quake / BA 1911]. [I; 71. Milne, 699.]


1803 Feb 4, 5, 6 / Red rain / R—May 16, '46. [I; 72. Fournet, Joseph Jean Baptiste Xavier. "Sur les Pluies de Terre Observées Depuis Quel-ques Années dans le Bassin du Rhone." Mémoires de l'Académie des sciences, belles-lettres et arts de Lyon. Classe des Sciences, s. 2 v. 13 (1863): 185-245, at 214. Refer to: 1846 May 16, (II; 962).]


1803 March 8 / Italy / red dust / An de Chimie 2/31/267. [I; 73. Chladni, Ernst Florens Friedrich. "Nouveau Catalogue des chutes de pierres ou de fer; de poussières ou de substances molles, sèches ou humides, suivant l'ordre chronologique."Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 31 (1826): 253-269, at 267. Chladni gives the dates as March 5 and 6. (Opuscoli scelti sulle scienze e sulle arti, vol. 22, not online).]


1803 Ap. 3-15 / Volc / Goentoer, Java / C.R. 70-878 / N.M. [I; 74. Backer, 879. The Guntur volcano.]


1803 April 20 / Described in Richmond Gazette of 23rd / tremendous fall of meteors at R. / A.J. Sci 26-135 / from 1 till 3 a.m. / also in Mass. [I; 75. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 26 (1834): 132-174, at 135-136. The Lyrid meteor shower.]


1803 Ap. 20 / Mets / A. J. Sci. 26-135 /  [36-]358 / 40-363. [I; 76. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 26 (1834): 132-174, at 135-6. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "On the Meteoric Shower of April 20, 1803, with an account of Observations made on and about the 20th April, 1839." American Journal of Science, 36 (1839): 358-362, at 359-360.  Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Contribution towards a History of the Star-Showers of Former Times." American Journal of Science, 40 (1841): 349-365, at 363.]


[1803 April 20 /] 1803 / Meteors / Am. J. Sci 40-349. [I; 69. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Contributions towards a History of the Star-Showers of Former Times." American Journal of Science, 40 (1841): 349-365, at 363.]


1803 Ap. 20 / Meteors / newspapers in Nor. Car., Va., and N.H. quoted / A. J. Sci. 36-359 / Heavens seemed to be on fire from 1 to 3 a.m. Alarming and astonishing in Richmond. / Also N.Y.—Mass. [I; 77. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "On the Meteoric Shower of April 20, 1803, with an account of Observations made on and about the 20th April, 1839." American Journal of Science, 36 (1839): 358-362, at 358-361.]


1803 Ap. 25 / Japan / q / BA '11 / I [Light]. [I; 78. Milne, 699.]


1803 Ap. 26 / Ac to Fletcher / L'Aigle. [I; 79. Fletcher, 98. This is the L'Aigle meteorite, named after the commune in France where it fell).]


1803 May 2 / L'Aigle (Orne) / Bib Brit 37/283. [I; 80. "An Account of a Phenomenon." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts, 37 (1808): 258-291, at 283-284.]


1803 May 9 / * Cambridge / detonation and shock / meteor / BA '60. [I; 81. Greg, 63.]


1803 June 4 / Metite struck a house at East Norton. / European Magazine 44-72. / 1/2 of siliceous clay / rest oxidated iron, magnesia, nickel and sulphur / BA-60; Phil Mag, July, 1803. [I; 82. "Domestic Intelligence." European Magazine, and London Review, 44 (July 1803): 72-8 , at 72-3. "On the 4th ult. a ball of fire struck the White Bull public-house, kept by John Hubbard, at East Norton... Some fragments of this ball were found near the spot, and have been subjected to a chemical analysis by a gentleman in the neighbourhood, who has found them to consist of nearly one half siliceous clay, thirty-five parts of oxidated iron, twelve of magnesia, and a small portion of nickel, with some sulphur." Greg, 62-3; Greg states that it was a "vitrified stone containing nickeliferous iron." Vauquelin, Louis Nicolas. "Memoir on the Stones said to have fallen from the Heavens." Philosophical Magazine, 15 (1803): 346-354, at 349; Vauquelin provides his chemical analyses of the Benares (a) meteorite and two fragments of the Barbotan meteorites, (one said to have fallen a year earlier, in 1789), which had similar results with each other, (and, which are similar to the analysis of the East Norton stone). The East Norton fall continues to be considered "doubtful" as a meteorite.]


[1803 June 9 /] 1809 June 9 / 5 p.m. / Cascade of water and hail poured in a torrent upon London upon a space not more than 200 acres. / Symons Met 47-140. [I; 268. "Historic Rains." Symons' Meteorological Magazine, 47 (August 1912): 140. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 73 pt. 1 (June, 1809): 586-588, at 587. "On Thursday evening, at five o'clock...." Bell's Weekly Messenger, June 12, 1803, p. 191 c. 3.]


1803 July 4 / East Norton / Leicester / Metite? / BA '60 / Phil Mag. July, 1803. [I; 83. Greg, 62-3. Vauquelin, Louis Nicolas. "Memoir on the Stones said to have fallen from the Heavens." Philosophical Magazine, 15 (1803): 346-354, at 349.]


1803 July 24 / 11 p.m. / Christiana / q preceded by sound like thunder / At Laurwig, q followed by aerial sound and disturbance. / BA 54. [I; 84. Mallet, 53.]


1803 Sept 1 / III [Heavy] / q / Calcutta / BA '11. [I; 85. Milne, 699.]


1803 Sept 22 / Geneva / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 86, Greg, 62.]


1803 Oct 8 / Stones near Avignon / Bib Brit 24-295. [I; 87. "Lettre du Prof. P. Prevost aux Réd. de la Bibl. Brit. sur quelques Bolides et Pierres Tombées dont il est question dans deux lettres du Prof. Biot." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts. 24 (1803): 295-6. The date has been corrected from "Oct 5" to "Oct 8," as the date provided by the "Rédacteur" of the Bibliothèque Britannique is incorrect.]


1803 Oct 8 / Apt / (Fletcher). [I; 88. Fletcher, 98. This is the Apt meteorite.]


1803 Oct 8 / Gordes (Vaucluse) / France / bet 6 and 7 p.m. / "Some persons believed they felt an earth-quake." At. Apt, an aerolite had fallen bet. 10 and 11 a.m. / Rept. B Assoc 54/53/ Same as 5th? [I; 89.1, 89.2. Mallet, 53. Fort copied the wrong date, "5 octobre 1803" provided by the Bibliothèque Britannique in a footnote. The date in the article, "le 15 vendémiaire an 12" from the French Republican Calendar, should have been converted to "8 octobre 1803"; so, Fort's suspicion about the date was correct, as the fall of the Apt meteorite, (the meteorite reported by Biot), occurred in the morning, and was followed eight hours later by this "believed" earthquake.]


1803 Oct 15 / Great floods / Madeira / Symons 3-4. [I; 90. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "To the Editor of the Meteorological Magazine." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 3 (February 1868): 3-5, at 4.]


[1803 Oct 28. Wrong date. See: 1803 Dec 28, (I; 91).]


1803 Oct 29 / Caucasia / I / [Light quake / BA 1911]. [I; 92. Milne, 699.]


1803 Nov 13 / Met size moon / Edinburgh and London / BA 60 / L.T., Nov 15-3-a / 16-3-d / 30-4-a. [I; 93. Greg, 62-3, with illustration. "An uncommon luminous meteor...." London Times, November 15, 1803, p. 3 c. 1. "An uncommon luminous meteor was seen on Sunday night, about forty minutes past eight o'clock,which attracted the notice of all those who happened to be out at the time, for a considerable distance round the metropolis. A Gentleman, coming up from Lee bridge, towards Clapton turnpike, saw it very distinctly; it had an oval form, and was followed   by sparks, which gave it somewhat the appearance of having a tail. It emitted a very vivid white light. The effect of the light was indeed so strong, that any small object on the road could be readily perceived. It moved with great velocity  in a north-west direction, and disappeared by entering a thick black cloud; a few seconds after which  a most awful rumbling noise, like distant thunder, or a heavy discharge of artillery, was heard, and continued a considerable time. It was also seen in Whitechapel, Knightsbridge, Hammersmith, and many miles round the metropolis, the whole of which was illuminated by it. At the time of its appearance, the congregation were coming out of the Broadway Chapel, Westminster, and many of them, struck with fear, ran in again. The passengers in Leicester-Fields were particularly affected by it, and several females were so much alarmed that they screamed out. The meteor descended to the earth, at the west end of Great Queen-street, next Drury-Lane, when a blue flame, accompanied by a strong sulphurrous smell, immediately darted upwards to a considerable height. The superstitious, as usual, entertained a thousand conjectures as to the cause of this phenomenon, which, no doubt, was one of those fire-balls so often mentioned by philosophers, and of which several accounts may be found in the Philosophical Magazine, and particularly in vol. iv p. 230; vol. xi, p. 191; vol. xvi, p. 191, 217, 224, 289, 294, 295." The Times' almost illegible citation for "vol. iv" in the Philosophical Magazine is wrong; and, while given here as "230," the "fire-ball" at Kent, in 1798, is reported in this volume, at page 434. "Intelligence and Miscellaneous Articles. Philosophical Magazine, 4 (June-September, 1799): 431-434, at 434. "On Sunday night, the meteor...." London Times, November 16, 1803, p. 3 c. 4. "On Sunday night, the meteor, seen in London, was observed at Chelmsford and Brighton. At the former place, it appeared at no great distance from the earth. It resembled a small ball of fire, of a pale colour, but seemed to increase in magnitude during its progress. When it burst, it divided into several vivid streams, which were precipitated downward with great velocity; a rumbling noise succeeded, resemblin distant thunder." "On Friday, the 18th inst...." London Times, November 30, 1803, p. 4 c. 1. "On Friday, the 18th inst. about two o'clock in the afternoon, Mr. Quaife, of Netherfield, near Buttle, observed, passing in a direction from the Zenith towards the North-west quarter, or something near the North point, a fiery Meteor of such brilliancy , that it appeared beautifully conspicuous, though the sun shone exceedingly bright at the time. It exhibited its greatest lustre, at about 45 or 50 deg, above the horizon, whence it descended, seemingly, in a perpendicular direction, and after a few seconds silently vanished. This phænomenon happening in the day-time, was probably witnessed but by few persons."]


1803 Nov 13 / 8:30 p.m. / "very remarkable" fireball — England. / Mag. Pop Sci 3-61. [I; 94. "The November-Asteroids." Magazine of Popular Science, 3 (1837): 56-62, at 61.]


1803 Nov 15 / Geneva / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 95. Greg, 62.]


1803 Dec 12 / Mt. Blanc / 4:30 p.m. / Violently shaken and ice fell from it / BA 54. [I; 96. Mallet, 54.]


1803 Dec 13 / 11:30 a.m. / Massing, Bavaria / stonefall/ BA '60 / (F). [I; 97. Greg, 62. Fletcher, 98. This is the Mässing meteorite.]  


1803 Dec 16 / Schwartzenburg / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 98. Greg, 62.]


[1803 Dec 28 /] 1803 Oct 28 / (Fr) / Nantes and Antwerp—q / Storm at Paris and Rouen and met seen. / BA '54. [I; 91. Mallet, 54.]


1803 Dec 28 / Q believed by some persons at Nantes and Antwerp. Great storm and meteor. / BA '54. [I; 99. Mallet, 54.]


1804:


1804 / Wheat fell in Spain—said been carried over Straits of Gibraltor from a threshing floor at Tetuan. / M.W.R., May, 1917. [I; 100. McAtee, Waldo L. "Showers of Organic Matter." Monthly Weather Review, 45 (May 1917): 217-224, at 220. Hartwig, Georg. The Aerial World. New ed. London : Longmans, Green, and Co., 1881, 194.]


1804 Jan 6 / [LT], 3-a / 10-2-d / 12-2-d / 13-2-d / 16-3-a / 17-3-c / 18-2-c / 19-3-b / 24-2-d / Ghst / St James Park. [A; 11. "Hammersmith Ghost." London Times, January 6, 1804, p. 3 c. 1. "The real Hammersmith Ghost...." London Times, January 10, 1804, p. 2 c. 4. "The ghostly Cobler of Hammersmith...." London Times, January 12, 1804, p. 2 c. 4. "Another Ghost." London Times, January 13, 1804, p. 2 c. 4. "The St. James's Park Ghost." London Times, January 16, 1804, p. 3 c. 1. "Park Ghost." London Times, January 17, 1804, p. 3 c. 3. "Notwithstanding our repeated publications...." London Times, January 18, 1804, p. 2 c. 3. "Another Ghost!" London Times, January 19, 1804, p. 3 c. 2. "The Ghost in St. James's Park...." London Times, January 24, 1804, p. 2 c. 4.]


1804 Feb / Austria, Styria / I / [Light quake / BA 1911]. [I; 101. Milne, 699.]


1804 Feb 24 / Great th. storm. Holland to Moscow. / BA 54. [I; 102. Mallet, 55.]


1804 Mar 17 / Berlin / Det met / BA 60. [I; 103. Greg, 62.]


1804 Ap. 5 / Metite / Glascow / (F) / Possil, near Glascow / 3 miles from / Bib. Univ 26/203. [I; 104. "Notice sur la Chute d'un Nouveau Bolide, ou Aérolithe." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts. 26 (1804): 203-204. Fletcher, 98. This is the High Possil meteorite.]   


1804 Ap 15 / 9:45 p.m. / Det met / Geneva / Bib. Brit. 25/364. [I; 105. "Notice sur un Bolide Fulminant, observé à Genève." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts. 25 (1804): 364-5. Greg, 62.]  


1804 May 9 / [LT], 3-b / Planet Hercules by Olbers. [I; 106. "New Planet." London Times, May 9, 1804, p. 3 c. 2. Copied in: "New Planet." Literary Journal, 3 (1804): 572. "New Planet.—A letter from Germany states, that Dr. Olbers has discovered a planet, which, from its immense size, he has called Hercules. It is three times the size o( Jupiter, and goes round the Sun in the space of 211 years, because it is supposed to be 3,047,000,000 of miles from the Sun; it looks to the naked eye like a star of the first magnitude, and is now in the sign Gemini, Dr. Olbers observed, on the 8th of December last, that it moved, and, on the 6th of February, that it was a planet, attended by seven satellites, one of which is twice the size of the earth. It is inclined to the plane of the ecliptic, in an angle of 30 degrees. It is in 13 degrees North amplitude; its eccentricity is 1100, and the Sun to an inhabitant of the Earth placed in it, with our powers of vision, would appear no larger than the smallest of the fixed stars." This newspaper hoax by the Times is dismissed with an editorial criticism. "German news...." London Times, May 12, 1804, p. 2 c. 2. "German news state the discovery of another, and an immensely large Planet. One would imagine that when Europe is so troubled with "malignant stars," men would have quite employment enough in discovering the modes of relieving themselves from earthly distress." Cunningham, Clifford. "The Planet Hercules." Mercury, 33 no. 5 (September/October, 2004): 10.]


1804 June 4 / Dessau / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 107. Greg, 62.]


1804 June 7 - 8 / about midnight / q. / Greece / preceded by "terrible heat" / BA '54. [I; 108. Mallet, 56. "Preceded, on the present occasion, by a perfect calm, great heat, and a terrible noise lasting two seconds."]


1804 spring and summer / Ext rains / Med. Repos. 8-374 / 9 - 7, 165 / Rec. Bull Soc. Sci, Montpellier 2-166. [I; 109. Duvall, Grafton. "A History of the extraordinary Season of 1804." Medical Repository, Hexade 2 v. 2 (1805): 374-383; Hexade 2 v. 3 (1806): 7-24, 165-177. Poitevin. "Sur les pluies extraordinaires...." Recueil des bulletins, publiés par la Société des sciences, lettres et arts de Montpellier, 2 (1805): 166-168.]


1804 July 4 / Eruption / Sea of Azov / First a little island rose. / BA 54. [I; 110. Mallet, 57.]


1804 July 7 / Japan / III / [Heavy quake / BA 1911]. [I; 111. Milne, 699.]


1804 July 28 / During q at Spoleto (see if so spelled) blood red moon—dry fog—then entirely obscured by vapors. / C.R. 17-621. [I; 112. Perrey, Alexis. "Nouvelles recherches sur les tremblements de terre...." Comptes Rendus, 17 (1843): 608-625, at 621. Spoleto, Italy, was spelled as "Spolleto" in this note and as "Spollete" in Perrey's article, which does not mention a dry fog, (only thick vapors).]


1804 July 28 / Spoleto, Italy / q—Vesuvius sent forth smoke. / fog—moon blood-red / BA '54. [I; 113. Mallet, 57.]


1804 August / Frgs / D-79 / 3 leagues from Toulouse at La Conseilliere / ac to Prof. Pontus of Cahors. / sky cloudless / Suddenly a thick cloud and thunder and lightning and very large drops of water—rain of toads—fell on garments of travellers on the road between Albi and Toulouse. / ab volume of a cubic inch / one or 2 months old / fields filled with them / For a quarter of an hour his coach travelled on a "living pavement" of them. / See Aug 15, 1836. / C.R. 3/54. [I; 114.1, 114.2, 114.3. The note copies information from page 79 of The Book of the Damned. Pontus. "Pluie de crapauds." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 54-55.]


1804 Aug / Fremard, near Amiens / frgs. / Rec Sci 3/333. [I; 115. Martin, William Charles Linnaeus. "On the Fall of Frogs, Toads, and Fishes from the Sky." Recreative Science, 3 (1862): 328-334, at 333.]


1804 Aug. 3 / Inferior conjunction Venus-Sun / (Al). [I; 116.]


[1804 Aug 7. Wrong date. See: 1804 Aug 25, (I; 117).]


1804 Aug-Oct / Tiflis, Georgia / and Italy / alternating q's / BA '54. [I; 118. Mallet, 57-60.]


1804 Aug 19 /Eckwarden / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 119. Greg, 62. Eckwarden, Lower Saxony, Germany.]


[1804 Aug 25 /] 1804 Aug 7 / (fog and q) / Grenada / Dark mist and q / D-228. [I; 117. The note copies information from page 228 of The Book of the Damned. See: "BD. Grenada q & met. Aug 25 not 7, 1804," (SF-V; 324). Mallet, 57.]


1804 Aug 25-26 / Spain / q's / Grenada / "At Albugnol, the heavens were obscured by a dark mist, which resolved itself into a cloud, whence in ten minutes five terrible flashes of fire (lightning?) issued, and after each flash a shock took place." / BA '54. [I; 120.1, 120.2. Mallet, 57.]


1804 Aug 25 / q—fog / Almeira, in Grenada, Spain / qs—heavens obscured by a dark mist which condensed into a cloud, from which came "five terrible flashes of fire". A mountain was cleft and sent out a stream. / BA 54. [I; 121. Mallet, 57.]


1804 Aug 12 and Nov. 22 / Vesuvius. [I; 122.]


1804 Sept / near Senlis, France / Frgs / Rec. Sci 3/332 / Aug., 1804. [I; 123. Martin, William Charles Linnaeus. "On the Fall of Frogs, Toads, and Fishes from the Sky." Recreative Science, 3 (1862): 328-334, at 332. "Même sujet." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 2 (no. 76; October 25, 1833): 347. "M. Duméril à qui avait été renvoyée la lettre de M. Marnier, communique une lettre qu'il a reçue d'une dame qui désire garder l'anonyme, et dans laquelle se. trouvent confirmés les faits avancés par M. Peltier. Au mois de septembre 1804, cette dame habitait un château des environs de Senlis, un jour qu'elle chassait avec son mari dans le parc, le temps fut obscurci par un nuage noir et épais. Bientôt un violent coup de tonnerre s'étant fait en tendre, le nuage creva et il en tomba un torrent de crapauds, avec quelques gouttes de pluies. Je crus d'abord, dit-elle, que c'était de la grêle, mais quand je vis la terre jonchée de ces vilains animaux, je vous laisse à penser ce que j'éprouvai. Cette pluie dura environ un quart d'heure."]


1804 Sept / Bromo / volc / Java / [C.R.] 70-878 / N.M. [I; 124. Backer, 879. The Bromo cone of the Tengger Caldera.]


[1804 Sept 1. Wrong date. See: 1804 Sept 16, (I; 125).]


1804 Sept 7 / Fireball / Tunbridge Wells / size moon / s.e. to n.w. / BA 60. [I; 126. Greg, 62.]


1804 Sept 10 / Weimar / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 127. Greg, 62.]


[1804 Sept 16 /] 1804 Sept 1 / Grenada, Spain / I / [light quake / BA 1911] / See Aug 25. [I; 125. Milne, 699.]


1804 Sept 25 / Vesuvius / BA 54 / See date July 28. [I; 128. Mallet, 57.]


1804 Oct 11 / Caucasia / I / [Light quake / BA 1911]. [I; 129. Milne, 699.]


1804 Oct. 18 / Tuscany / severe q of a series and "dull aërial noises" / BA 54. [I; 130. Mallet, 60.]


1804 Nov. 24 / Metite (stone) / Hacienda de Bocas, San Luis Potosi, Mexico / (F). [I; 131. Fletcher, 98. This is the Hacienda de Bocas meteorite.]


1805:


1805 Jan. 28 / Op. Mars / (Al). [I; 132.]


1805 Feb. 1 / Fireball / Saxony / BA 60. [I; 133. Greg, 62.]


1805 Feb 17 / Det met / Sigmaringen, Germany / BA 67-415. [I; 134. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 415.]


1805 March 21 / Innsbruck, Austria / I / [light quake / BA 1911]. [I; 135. Milne, 699.]


1805 March 25 / (old time) / Two stones fell at Irkutsk. / B Assoc 1860/62 / C.R. 125-896. [I; 136. Greg, 62. Meunier, Stanislas. "Sur quelques circonstances particulières qui paraissent avoir avoir accompagné la chute d'une météorite le 9 avril 1891 à Indarck, en Transcaucasie." Comptes Rendus, 125 (1897): 894-897, at 896.]


1805 first of April / Volc / Tjermai, Java / C.R. 70-878. [I; 137. Backer, 879. The Cereme volcano.]


1805 Ap. 6 / Irkutsk, Siberia / Stone fell. / Fletcher's Intro to Study of Meteorites, p. 98. [I; 138. Fletcher, 98. This is the Doroninsk meteorite.]


1805 April 27 / [LT], 3-a / q. / Birmingham / Wolverhampton / Newcastle. [I; 139. "The Birmingham Chronicle of yesterday...." London Times, April 27, 1805, p. 3 c. 1. "The Birmingham Chronicle of yesterday contains the following article:—'On Sunday morning last, about one o'clock, two smart shocks of an earthquake were distinctly felt in this town, at Handsworth, West Bromwich, and other places lying in that direction. A letter upon the circumstance, from Wolverhampton, observes, 'I, and many hundreds more here, and at Stone, Stafford, Newcastle, &c. were much alarmed by an earthquake, which was felt here some little time before one o'clock on Sunday morning.'"]


1805 June / daytime / Stonefall / Constantinople / BA 60. [I; 140. Greg, 63.]


1805 July / Vesuvius. [I; 141.]


1805 July 3 / Candia, Greece / II / [medium quake / BA 1911]. [I; 142. Milne, 699.]


1805 July 16 / U.S. Columbia / III / [Heavy quake / BA 1911]. [I; 143. Milne, 699.]


1805 July 21 / Fireball / London / BA 60. [I; 144. Greg, 63.]


1805 July 26 / Italy / III / [Heavy quake / BA 1911]. [I; 145. Milne, 699.]


1805 July 26 / Ref. for all vol. 14 / phe / Bull Soc Sismol Ital 14/326. [I; 146. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 326.)]


1805 July 26 / BA '11—III [Heavy] / q / Naples / Scots Magazine 1805-717. [I; 147. "Earthquake at Naples." Scots Magazine and Edinburgh Literary Miscellany, 67 (1805): 717-8. "Naples, July 3d." London Times, September 3, 1805, p. 2 c. 2-3. See: 1805 Aug 12-Sept. 18, (I; 153). Milne, 699.]


1805 July 27 / [LT], 3-b / Th. storm / violent / Birmingham. [I; 148. "On Tuesday morning...." London Times, July 27, 1805, p. 3 c. 2.]


1805 Aug 6 / Berlin / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 149. Greg, 63.]


1805 Aug. 11 / Moodus explosion / 7 occurrences recorded from 1791 to Aug. 11, 1805, but had been heard for a century. / in the Am. J. Sci 39/339 / Writer tries to show they are earthquake phe, but says that there is no good explanation. [I; 150.1, 150.2. "Earthquake in Connecticut." American Journal of Science, 39 (1840: 335-342, at 338-9. There were seven occurrences, (not six).]


1805 Aug 11 / E. Haddam, Conn. / 4 p.m., th. storm / 7 p.m., q. / BA 54. [I; 151. Mallet, 63.]


1805 Aug. 11 / 2 explosions / "moodus" sounds / E. Haddam, Conn / (M) - Am. J. Sci 39/339. [I; 152. Mallet, 63. "Earthquake in Connecticut." American Journal of Science, 39 (1840): 335-342, at 339.]


1805 Aug 12-Sept. 18 / Vesuvius / violent eruption / 9:30 p.m. / Scots Magazine 1805-946 / Good see 1806-329. / L.T. 27-2-b / 28-2-d / Sept 3-2-b. [I; 153. "Eruption of Mount Vesuvius." Scots Magazine and Edinburgh Literary Miscellany, 67 (1805): 946-947. "Journal of the Eruption of Mount Vesuvius...." Scots Magazine and Edinburgh Literary Miscellany, (1806): 329-332, 413-416.  On the reverse side of this note are a list of articles concerning the earthquake of July 26, 1805, at Naples and its surrounding area. "Naples. August 3." London Times, August 27, 1805, p. 2 c. 2. "The situation of the Neapolitans...." London Times, August 28, 1805, p. 2 c. 4. "Naples, July 3d." London Times, September 3, 1805, p. 2 c. 2-3. At 9:45 AM, twelve minutes before the main shock, "Several persons who were bathing felt the earth fail them under their feet, and the fish mounted to the surface of the water, and appeared agitated in an extraordinary manner." "The sky was perfectly serene, but on the surface of the earth there was a sort of fog, from which emanated a strong smell of sulphur."]


1805 Aug. 27 / [LT], 2-b / 28-2-d / Sept. 3-2-b / 6-3-a / 12-3-a / q. violent—Naples. [I; 154. "Naples. August 3." London Times, August 27, 1805, p. 2 c. 2. "The situation of the Neapolitans...." London Times, August 28, 1805, p. 2 c. 4. "Naples, July 3d." London Times, September 3, 1805, p. 2 c. 2-3. "In the late earthquake in Naples...." London Times, September 6, 1805, p. 3 c. 1. "A letter from Rome states...." London Times, September 12, 1805, p. 3 c. 1.]


1805 Oct 13 / Italy / I / [Light quake / BA 1911]. [I; 155. Milne, 699.]


1805 Oct 14 / Fireball / Shrewsbury / BA 60. [I; 156. Greg, 63. Greg asks: "1806?"]


1805 Oct 15 / Vesuvius / BA '54. [I; 157. Mallet, 63.]


1805 Oct. 21 / Fireball / Sweden / BA '60. [I; 158. Greg, 63.]


1805 Oct 22, 23 / Meteor / York / Symons Met. 3-4. [I; 159. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "To the Editor of the Meteorological Magazine." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 3 (February 1868): 3-5, at 4.]


1805 Oct 23 / Germany / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 160. Greg, 63.]


1805 Nov / (F) / near Calvi, Corsica. [I; 161. Fletcher, 98. This is the Asco meteorite.]


1805 Dec. 12 / [LT], 3-d / q (?). [I; 162. "A New Comet." London Times, December 12, 1805, p. 3 c. 4. "On Sunday night, the 8th inst. a Comet, equal in light to a star of the fourth magnitude, with a large coma, but no nucleus, or tail, was observed, at the Royal Observatory, at Greenwich, pass the Meridian at 60 deg. 24 min. 7 sec. mean time, with right ascension 353 deg. 6 min. 54 sec. and declination 23 deg. 41 min. 14 sec. South; discovered by Mr. Finnagen, the Assistant. The same was discovered by Dr. Herschel, at Slough, near Windsor, about the same time. It could not be seen the following evening though clear." An unpublished paper by William Herschel, sent to the Royal Society, announced his discovery of this comet. Dreyer, John Louis Emil, ed. The Scientific Papers of Sir William Herschel, Volume 1. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013, cxi. "At 5h 25' While I was examining the Constellation of Aquarius I perceived a Comet. It is of considerable brightness and easily to be seen by the naked eye. The extent of its coma is about 20 minutes, and its present situation nearly 4 degrees south following Flamsteed's 100dth Aquarii, making almost an equilateral triangle with the 100dth and 107th of this Constellation." Comet 3D/Biela had been observed, (its second discovery), on November 10, 1805. by Jean Louis Pons, in Marseilles, and had its closest pass to Earth on December 9, 1805.]


1805 Dec 30 / "Moodus" sound / one explosion / Am J. Sci 39/339. [I; 163. "Earthquake in Connecticut." American Journal of Science, 39 (1840): 335-342, at 339.]


1806:


1806 winter / Larvae / Silesia / (D-93). ** [I; 164. The note copies information from page 93 of The Book of the Damned. Müller, Albert. "On the dispersal of non-migrating insects by atmospheric agencies." Transactions of the Entomological Society of London, 1871, 175-186, at 183. Waga, Antoni Stanisław Florian. "Sur la prétendue pluie d'Insectes." Revue et Magasin de Zoologie Pure et Appliquée, s. 2 v. 10 (1858): 261-269, at 263. Waga lists a fall of insects, at Anspach, on January 14, 1806. "On so-called Showers of Insects." Naturalist, 8 (1858): 235-236. "Verhandlungen der Gesellschaft zur Beförderung der Naturkunde und Industrie Schlesiens...." Jenaische Allgemeine Literatur-Zeitung, 1807 v. 2 (no. 141; June 17): 513-518, at 513, (cv. "Nachricht von einem Raupenschnee"). Scramm stated that the caterpillars ("raupen") fell over an area a German "meile" in length and half a meile wide, with the stiff snow, between Leobschütz, (now, Głubczyce, Poland), and Troppau, (now, Opava, Czech Republic). It was suggested that, after emerging in mild weather, the caterpillars fell from trees, weakened by a cold wind, and were blown aloft.]


1806 Jan 2-3 / China / II / [Medium quake . BA 1911]. [I; 165. Milne, 699.]


1806 Jan 20 / 12:15 a.m. / (19th) / (Fr) / Orgon (Bouches-du-Rhône) / q's and sound like of cannon / BA '54. [I; 166. Mallet, 64.]


1806 Jan 19-20 / 12:15 a.m. Orgon (Bouches-du-Rhone) France, earthquakes and sounds like of cannon. BA 1854. [Not in series I of Notes, in Pursuit. Mallet, 64.]


1806 Jan 23 - 24 / Fr / Poitiers / 2 qs and sounds / BA '54/ [I; 167. Mallet, 64.]


1806 Feb 11 / Fireball / Stockholm / BA '60. [I; 168. Greg, 63.]


1806 Feb. 12 / Small q. / Emilia, Italy / BA '11. [I; 169. Milne, 699.]


1806 Feb. 12 / Emilia, Italy / I / [Small earthquake / BA 1911]. [I; 170. Milne, 699.]


1806 Feb 12 / (It) / Milan / Flashes / sulphurous odor / q / See for ref. 1805. [I; 171. (Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 335.) See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


[1806 Feb. 24-25. Wrong date. See: 1806 Mar 24, (I; 175).]


1806 March 14 / Inferior conjunction Venus-Sun / (Al). [I; 172.]


1806 March 15 / (Fr) / Alais / (D-74) / (metite) / Clay / (See Sept., 1814.) / and Valence (Drome) / Bib. Univ 18/82 / Bib Brit 37/284. [I; 173. The note copies information from page 74 of The Book of the Damned. Fletcher, 98. This is the Alais meteorite. Flight, Walter. "Meteorites and the Origin of Life," Eclectic Magazine, 89, (n.s., v. 26; December 1877): 711-718, at 715. Hombres-Firmas, Louis Augustin d'. "Notice sur les Aerolithes du Départmt. de l'Ardêche." Bibliothèque Universelle des Sciences, Belles-Lettres, et Arts, Sciences et Arts, 18 (1821): 80-83, at 82. "An Account of a Phenomenon." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts, 37 (1808): 258-291, at 283-4.]


1806 Mar 15 / 5:30 p.m. / Metite / Alais / The substance dissolved in water. / Retrospect of Discoveries 1806/357. [I; 174. Pages, & Hombres-Firmas, Louis Augustin d'. "On the fall of two meteoric Stones." Retrospect of philosophical, mechanical, chemical, and agricultural discoveries, 2 (July, August, September, 1806; no. 6): 357-8. Pages, & Hombres-Firmas, Louis Augustin d'. "Relation de la Chute de Deux Aérolithes." Journal de Physique, de Chimie, d'Histoire Naturelle et des Arts, 62 (June 1806): 440-2, at 442.]


[1806 Mar 24 /] 1806 Feb. 24-25 midnight, Santa Barbara, Calif. Small earthquake. BA 1911. [I; 175. Milne, 699.]


1806 Mar 25 - Ap. 3 / Mexico / great q / [BA] '11. [I; 176. Milne, 699.]


[1806 March 30. Wrong date. See: 1813 March 30, (I; 177).]


1806 Ap. 9 - 10 / Calabria, Italy / I / [Small quake / BA 1911]. [I; 178. Milne, 699.]


1806 May / Volca / Lemongang / Java / C.R. 70-878 /N.M. [I; 179. Backer, 879. The Lamongan

volcano.]


1806 May 17 / Metite? / Basingstoke, Hants / BA '60. [I; 180. Greg, 63.]


1806 May 17 / See Aug., 1806. / Glastonbury, Somerset. / stone fell weighing 2½ lbs. / Phil. Mag. 4/8/458. [I; 181. Greg, Robert Philips. "Observations on Meteorolites...." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 8 (1854): 329-342, 449-463, at 458.]


1806 May 19 / At meeting ["seance" crossed out] of French Acad, Ap. 16, 1838 (C.R. 6-514), M. Daussy gave data for thinking that there was a submarine volcano off Cape Verde about 0° 20' S., and 22 W. (west of Paris?). If so ab. 20 west of Greenwich. Reported by a sea captain, a column of smoke, 12 or 15 miles in N.W., he at 2º 43' S. and 22° 55' W. / Next—see Ap 12, 1831. ["Dec. 18, 1816" crossed out]. [I; 182.1, 182.2. See: 1831 Ap 12, (I; 1591). Daussy, Pierre. "Note sur l'existence probable d'un volcan sous-marin situé par environ 0° 20' de latitude sud, et 22° de longitude ouest." Comptes Rendus, 6 (April 16, 1838): 512-516, at 514. Crossed out date for "Dec. 18, 1816" was the next observation. Mallet, Robert. "Fourth Report upon the Facts and Theory of Earthquake Phenomena." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1858, 1-136, at 20.]


1806 May or Ap 19 / Ship shocks / See Nov 8 - 9, 1868. / Feb. 5, 1842 / April 12, 1831 / Feb. 20, 1861 / Sept. 10, 1868 / Oct. 13, 1878. [I; 183. See: 1806 May 19, (I; 182); 1831 Ap 12, (I; 1591); 1842  Feb 5, (II; 428); 1861 Feb 20, (III; 68); 1868 Sept 10, (III; 1550); 1868 Nov 8-9, (III; 1616); and, 1878 Oct. 13, (IV; 2466).]


1806 May 29 ab. / Vesuvius / BA 54. [I; 184. Mallet, 64. Mallet gives the date as "31?"]


1806 June 19, 21 / Italy / I / [Small earthquake / BA 1911]. [I; 185. Milne, 699.]


1806 July 17 / 8 p.m. / broad daylight / Great met / ¼ diameter of moon, over London / European Magazine 50-74 / BA '60. [I; 186. "Domestic Intelligence." European Magazine, and London Review, 50 (July 1806): 70-77, at 74. Greg, 63. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 48 (1806): 353-464, at 427.]


1806 July 26 / Ball lightning down chimney and out by door / An Reg 1806/43. [I; 187. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 48 (1806): 353-464, at 430.]


1806 Aug 8 / Krasnoyarsk, Siberia / Tremendous shock. Violent storm. A mountain replaced by a lake. "The country was covered with volcanic ashes." / BA 1854 / BA '11 = III [Violent earthquake]. [I; 188. Mallet, 64. Milne, 699.]


1806 Aug 26-30 / Severest q in Rome since 1703 / BA '54. [I; 189. Mallet, 64.]


1806 Sept. 23 / Stonefall at Weimar, according to Baumhauer's Catalog but questioned in BA '60. [I; 190. Greg, 63. Kämtz, Ludwig Friedrich. Lehrbuch der Meteorologie. Halle: In der Gebauerschen Buchhandlung, 1831-1836, v. 3, 281. Kämtz only records this as an exploding fireball, or detonating meteor.]


1806 Oct. 6 / (q) / Gerace, Calabria / BA '54-64. [I; 191. Mallet, 65.]


1806 Oct 14 / Swansea, etc. / Met, great light / BA '60. [I: 192. Greg, 63. Greg asks: "1805?"]


1806 Nov 1 / Spain and San Salvador / great q / [BA] '11. [I; 193. Milne, 699.]


1806 Nov-Dec / China / I / [Small quakes / BA 1911]. [I; 195. Milne, 699.]


1806 Dec 1 / Lima, Peru / I / [Small quake / BA 1911]. [I; 196. Milne, 699.]


1806 Dec 17 / Ulm / Q / BA '54/65. [I; 194. Mallet, 65.]


1806 Dec 22 / Fireball / England / BA 60. [I; 197. Greg, 63.]


1807:


1807 / Silesia / Polt / Jour Soc 9/26. [A; 12. “Correspondence.” Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 9 (February 1899): 22-32, at 26-27. Kerner, Justinus Andreas Christian. Translated by Catherine Crowe. The Seeress of Prevorst. London: J.C. Moore, 1845, 274-289. Owen, Robert Dale. Footfalls on the Boundary of Another World. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1860, 242-250.]


1807 Jan 14 - 15 / Pau / (q) / BA '54/65. [I; 198. Mallet, 65.]


1807 Jan 22 / China / I / [Small quake / BA 1911]. [I; 199. Milne, 699.]


1807 March 4 / Op. Mars / (Al). [I; 200.]


1807 March 6 / 9:45 p.m. / Meteor / "immense ball of fire" / Glascow / Scots' Magazine 1807-235.

[I; 201. "Scottish Chronicle." Scots Magazine and Edinburgh Literary Miscellany, 69 pt. 1 (1807) 235-240, at 235.]


1807 March 6 / Geneva / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 202. Greg, 63.]


1807 March 13 / Ichnow (Smolensko)  / Metite / A.U.S. 3/26. [I; 203. (Archives of Universal Science, 3-26) @ Toronto Public Library).]


1807 March 25 / [Meteor]ite / Timochin, Smolensk, Russia / F / See Bib. Brit. 35/362. [I; 204. Thayer writes: "Fletcher?" Fletcher, 98. This is the Timochin meteorite. "Chute d'un Aérolithe." Bibliothèque Brittannique, Science et Arts, 35 (1807): 362-363. Greg, 63. Chladni, Ernst Florens Friedrich. "Nouveau Catalogue des chutes de pierres ou de fer; de poussières ou de substances molles, sèches ou humides, suivant l'ordre chronologique."Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 31 (1826): 253-269, at 259. Chladni gives the date as March 13, citing Gilbert's Annalen der Physik. "Zeitungsnachricht von einem Meteorsteine, der in Rusland herab gefallen ist." Annalen der Physik, 26 (1807): 238-239. The Timochin meteorite was seen to fall by peasants during the height of a thunderstorm, according to a letter from Minister of Internal Affairs Count Kochubey to N.N. Fuchs, Permanent Secretary of the Academy of Sciences, June 1, 1807. http://www.meteorites.ru/menu/description-e/timochin-e.html ]


1807 March 30 / France / I / [Small quake / BA 1911]. [I; 205. Milne, 699.]


1807 Aug 9 / Nurenberg / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 206. Greg, 63.]


1807 Aug ? / Shore at Brighton and all watering places on the s. coast of England covered with ladybirds. / Sci Gos. 2/169. [I; 207. "Ladybirds." Science Gossip, 2 (no. 20; August 1, 1866): 169-170, at 169. Kirby, William, & Spence, William. An Introduction to Entomology. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 3rd ed., 1818, v. 1, 266. No month is given by these references, only 1807.]


1807 Sept 6 / Volca / Goentoer / Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [I; 208. Backer, 879. The Guntur volcano.]


1807 Sept 30 / Comet appeared 1st near sun / London / comet like star 1st mag / set nearly due west about 8 p.m. / European Mag., 52-319 / In France seen first, on 26th (p. 437.) / See Venus, Oct. 15. [I; 209. "Domestic Intelligence." European Magazine, and London Review, 52 (1807): 318-322, at 319. "Reflections on the Appearance of the late Comet." European Magazine, and London Review, 52 (July 1806): 437-438. The Great Comet of 1807, (C/1807 R1), would have been visible to the naked eye during twilight for the whole of August in the southern hemisphere, but it wasn't noticed until September 9th, by an Augustinian monk, Parisi, in Sicily, even though it was as bright as Spica, (the 15th brightest star).]


1807 Oct. 15 / Inferior conjunction Venus-Sun  (Al). [I; 211.]


1807 Oct 23 / [London Times], 3-c / Met / Manchester. [I; 212. "On Monday morning, in Manchester...." London Times, October 23, 1807, p. 3 c. 3.]


1807 Oct 27 / [London Times]. 3-d / Obj near sun /29-2-d / [Nov.] 2-3-c / 7-2-d / 14-3-d / 31-2-b / Dec. 28-2-d / at Orkney / Comet. [I; 210. "The Comet." London Times, October 27, 1807, p. 3 c. 4. "The Comet." London Times, October 29, 1807, p. 2 c. 4. "Comet." London Times, October 2, 1807, p. 3 c. 3. "On Wednesday evening, a Comet made its appearance, visible to the naked eye, in the neighbourhood of London." "The Comet...." London Times, October 7, 1807, p. 2 c. 4. "The Comet has advanced...." London Times, October 14, 1807, p. 3 c. 4. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, October 31, p. 2 c. 2. "Another Comet." London Times, December 28, 1807, p. 2 c. 4. A second comet, in addition to the first, was observed at Orkney, on the night of October 29-30, 1807.]


1807 Nov. 10 / Italy / I / [Small quake / BA 1911]. [I; 213. Milne, 699.]


1807 Nov 18 / Algiers / II / [Medium quake / BA 1911]. [I; 214. Milne, 699.]


1807 Dec. 14 / Sound / over Weston, Conn / 3 distinct, violent explosions and stones fell. / Am. J. Sci., 2/28/303 / See full details 2/47/1-8. / or Dec 22? [I; 215. Greg, 63. Greg and others give the correct 1807date of the Weston meteorite's fall as "Dec. 14." "Meteor of August 11, 1859." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 28 (October 1859): 300-303, at 303. Silliman, Benjamin, and, James Kingsley. "An account of the Meteor which burst over Weston in Connecticut, in December, 1807...." Memoirs of the Connecticut Academy of Arts & Sciences, 1 pt.1 (1810): 141-161. Silliman, Benjamin, and, James Kingsley. "An account of the Meteor which burst over Weston in Connecticut, in December, 1807...." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 47 (1869): 1-8.]


1807 Dec. 22 / (F) = this date? / Weston, Conn. / Listed in BA 54 as a q. accompanied by a meteor. [I; 216. Fletcher, 98. This is the Weston meteorite. Fletcher also gives the date of its fall, (the first meteorite to fall and be collected in the United States), as "Dec. 14." Mallet, 67. Mallet gives the date as "Dec. 22."]


1807 Dec. 22 / 3a.m. / Dusseldorf / q. preceded by a rumbling sound / BA 54. [I; 217. Mallet, 67.]


1808:


1808 and 1802 / See Feb. 27, 1828. [I; 218. See: 1827 Feb 16, (I; 1376).]


1808 / all year // Pignerol, etc. [I; 219.]


1808 / At Carniola, Germany, red snow fell to a depth of over 5 feet. / B Eagle, 1891,  Oct. 25-14-6. [I; 220. "To the Editor of the Brooklyn Eagle." Brooklyn Eagle, October 25, 1891, p. 14 c. 6. Carniola, Germany, is now known as Slovenia; however, the depth of the layer of red snow that fell one night, in March of 1808, was only "20 Centimeter" between Cadore, Belluno and Feltre, (in northern Italy), according to an earlier version of this article. Agardh, Carl Adolph. "Über den in der Polar-Zone Gefundeden Rothen Schnee." Nova acta physico-medica Academiae Caesareae Leopoldino-Carolinae Naturae Curiosorum, 12 pt. 2 (1825): 735-750. See: 1808 March 5 - 6, (I; 223).]


1808 Feb / Mexico / II / [Medium earthquake / BA 1911]. [I; 221. Milne, 699.]


1808 Feb 8 / (Cut) / Brioude (Haute-Loire) several shocks / "The first shock was accompanied by a disturbance in the air—like that caused by a cannon shot." / Rept B.A. 54/66. [I; 222. Mallet, 67.]


1808 March 5 - 6 / night / Red snow / Switzerland and Italy (vast) / Q. Jour Roy Inst 7/189. [I; 223. "On Coloured Snow and Rain." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 7 (1819): 189-190. "Delle Nevi e Piogge colorite cadute negli ultimi scorsi anni in diverse parti d'Italia." Giornale di Fisica, Chimica, Storia Naturale, Medicina ed Arti, s. 2 v. 1 (1818): 469-480.]


1808 April 2 / Turin, Italy / III / [Violent quake / BA 1911]. [I; 224. Milne, 699.]


1808 April 2 / Quakes in many places in France, centering around Pignerol—but it was preceded by a loud sound in the air. / Ciel et Terre 16/463 / BA '11. [I; 225. Van Den Broeck, Ernest. "Un phénomène mystérieux de la physique du globe." Ciel et Terre, 16 (1895-1896): 447-474, 479-501, 516-530, 535-546, 601-616; 17 (1896-1897): 4-15, 37-43, 99-109, 148-157, 183-191, 208-219, 348-353, 399-407; at v. 16, 463. "1808, du 2 avril au 18 mai, secousses sur une aire très étendue, avec foyer principal à Pignerol. A Corps et dans plusiers autres communes, la secoussesfut précédée, d'un bruit de collision dans l'air, semblable au choc d'une quantité innombrable de pierres." Milne, 699.]


1808 Ap 8 / 40 shocks had been counted by the 8th at Pignerol. / Sounds like explosions of cannon at Barga but no shocks felt. / Rept 54/70. [I; 226. Mallet, 70-71.]


1808 April 12 / In Piedmont, centering around Pignerol. In Rept B.A. 54/6 said that though at 5:30 p.m. luminous meteors were seen. That in several of the communes of the Alps, shocks preceded by aerial sounds as of innumerable stones colliding. [I; 227. Mallet, 68-69. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 37. Cancani states that these sounds were heard from April 2 to May 18, 1808.]


1808 Ap. 13 / q / Calcutta / I [Small] / BA '11. [I; 228. Milne, 699.]


1808 Ap 14 and 16 / France and Switzerland / qs. / B.A. ' 11. [I; 229. Milne, 699.]


1808 April 16 / Quake / Again at Barga and at La Tour, two detonations heard and a luminous meteor observed. [I; 230. Mallet, 74. No reference for detonations and meteor in Mallet.]


1808 Ap. 19 / one p.m. / Great number of metites fell in the commune of Pievdei Casignano, in the Dept. of Taro (formerly the duchies of Parma and Placentia). / Archives of Universal Science 3-26. [I; 231. (Archives of Universal Science, 3-26. @ Toronto Public Library.]


1808 Ap. 19 /Borgo San Donino, Parma, Italy / Metite / (F) / and Ph. M. 4/8/459. 40 miles east of Piedmont / Rept BA 1860. [I; 232. Fletcher, 99. This is the Borgo San Donino meteorite. Greg, Robert Philips. "Observations on Meteorolites...." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 8 (1854): 329-342, 449-463, at 458. Greg, 63.]


1808 Ap. 20 / qs in the affected area / 22nd, 3 p.m., a waterspout passed over Marennas. / at Barga, called a th. storm / BA 54.[I; 233. Mallet, 77.]


[1809?] 1808 April 20 / Etna / Scots' Magazine 1809-789 says that the day before people in Messina were much surprised to see the streets covered with ashes. Says the ashes had been driven by a strong south wind from the top of the mountain 60 miles away. [I; 234.1, 234.2. "Historical Affairs." Scots Magazine and Edinburgh Literary Miscellany, 71 (October 1809): 769-793, at 789.]


1808 May / Footprints and devour / An Reg, 1808-37 / That, in May, 1808, upon the estate of John Gurney, of Eastham, the steward had found a dead lamb—in the neck a perforation, size of a goosequill. He found two living lambs similarly injured—one died later. A neighbor sent him a large male cat as the criminal. Some kittens had been killed by similar perforations, also were partly devoured. The steward remembered that in snow by the lambs he had seen footprints of a cat. / Own—something killed all—and tom cat may have devoured dead kittens. [A; 13.1, 13.2, 13.3. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 50 (1808): 1-178, at 37-38, "Feline Ferocity."]


1808 May 1 - June 5 / Volc / Azores / BA 54. [I; 235. Mallet, 79. Mitchill, Samuel Latham. "History of the Earthquakes and Volcanoes in the Azores...." Transactions of the Literary And Philosophical Society of New-York, 1 (1815): 324-331, at 324-327.]


1808 May 13 / Shocks, rumbling sounds reported almost every day before 13th / A red cloud was seen over the country lying along the river Pelice, / other occasional shocks rest of year. [I; 236. Mallet, 82.]


1808 May 16 / Skenige / Sweden / bodies in sky / D-270. [I; 239. The note copies information from page 270 of The Book of the Damned. Acharius, Erik. J.C. Hauff, trans. "Account of an extraordinary meteoric phenomenon." North American Review, 3 (1816): 320-322. Acharius, Erik. "Besynnerligt Meteor-Phenomén." Kungl. Svenska vetenskapsakademien. Handlingar. 29 (1808): 215-218.]


1808 May 17 / Italy / I / [Small quake / BA 1911]. [I; 237. Milne, 699.]


1808 May 18 / See April 2. [I; 238. See: 1808 April 2, (I; 162).]  


1808 May 21 / Ferentino / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 240. Greg, 63.]


1808 May 22 / See June 8, 1901. [I; 241. See: (1901 June 8.)]


1808 May 22 / (F) / The Stanway stones—a gluey substance abundant upon them / Phil Mag 44-222 / Sept 19, 1831. / See Nov 25, 1833. [I; 242. Fletcher, 99. These are the Stannern meteorites. Serres, Marcel de. "Observations on the fall of stones from the clouds, or aerolites." Philosophical Magazine, 44 (1814): 217-24, 253-60, at 222. "This gluey substance was also abundant on the stones of Stannern: according to a description given of it, it seems to have been similar to cart-wheel grease."]


1808 May 29 / Cape Spartel / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 243. Greg, 63.]


1808 July 29 / Troston (England?) / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 244. Greg, 63.]


1808 Aug 1 / San Francisco / great q / [BA] '11. [I; 245. Milne, 699.]


[1808 Aug. 1. Wrong date. See: 1808 Oct 26, (I; 246).]


1808 Aug 15 / Vienna, etc. / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 247. Greg, 63.]


1808 Sept 3 / (F) / 3:30 p.m.—Bib. Brit 39/369 / Lissa, Bohemia / Metite / BA, '60 / near Prague. [I; 248. Fletcher, 99. This is the Lissa meteorite."Chute d'Aérolithes en Bohème." Bibliothèque Britannique, 39 (1808): 369-371. Greg, 63. ]


1808 Sept 29 / [London Times], 3-c / Met / London. [I; 249. "Tuesday night, about ten o'clock, a meteor...." London Times, September 29, 1808, p. 3 c. 3.]


1808 Oct 5 / [London Times]. 3-a / 17-3-c / 20-3-c / 25-2-d / Comet. [I; 250. "Another Comet has been seen at Edinburgh...." London Times, October 5, 1808, p. 3 c. 1. "The Comet...." London Times, October 17, 1808, p. 3 c. 3. "The situation of the Comet...." London Times, October 20, 1808, p. 3 c. 3. "By a correspondent." London Times, October 25, 1808,  p. 2 c. 4.]


1808 Oct 24 / q /Iceland / west of Hecla / Smithsonian Inst. Report 1885-509. [I; 251. "Volcanic Eruptions and Earthquakes in Iceland within Historic Times." Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian, 1885, 495-541, at 509.]


[1808 Oct 26 /] 1808 Aug. 1 / Small quake at Leghorn, Italy. BA 1911. [I; 246. Milne, 699.]  


1808 Nov 11 / Fireball / England / BA '60. [I; 252. Greg, 63.]


1808 Dec 29 / Berne / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 253. Greg, 64.]


1808 Dec 11 to Jan 31, 1809 / D-fog / At New Granada, sun, at rising, was pale as moon. / often bluish or greenish / Unusual coldness, frequent frost near Bogota. A dry haze nights, too. From 1st to 12th parallel of S. Lat. / An Reg, 1808-445. [I; 254. (Annual Register, 50 (1808): 445. Not found in 1808 nor 1809). "Atmospheric Phenomena in New Granada." New Monthly Magazine and Literary Journal, 1832 pt. 3, 170-171. Guevara-Muria, A., and Williams, C.A., Hendy, E.J., Rust, A.C., Cashman, K.V. "Observations of a stratospheric aerosol veil from a tropical volcanic eruption in December 1808: is this the Unknown ∼ 1809 eruption?" Climate of the Past, 10 (2014): 1707-1722. The volcano responsible for this dry fog and cooling of the world's climate remains a mystery; and, two contemporary Spanish accounts are reprinted, (in Spanish and with English translations), in this recent article. “Noticias Meteorológicas,” (originally published in Semanario del Nuevo Reyno de Granada). Posada, Eduardo, (ed.). Obras de Caldas. Bogotá: Imprenta Nacional, 1912, 347–50. Unanue, José Hipólito. Observaciones sobre el clima de Lima: y sus influencias en los seres organizados, en especial el hombre. Madrid: Imprenta de Sancha, 1815, 13-14.]


1809:


1809 / Kikino, Smolensk, Russia / Metite / (F) /// 135 / 172 / 289 / 33 / 34. [I; 255. Fletcher, 99. This is the Kikino meteorite.]


1809 / Permj, Russia / stones with hail / See 1844. [I; 256. Schwedoff, Theodore. "On the Origin of Hail." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 17 (November 1882): 146-152, at 151. See: 1844, (II; 705).]


1809 Jan 18 / 2 a.m. / Dunning, Perthshire / Sound and shock. / Bell's Weekly Messenger, Jan. 29—p. 35. [I; 257. "Earthquake." Bell's Weekly Messenger, January 29, 1809, p. 35 c. 2. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 114-115. Mallet, 83.]


[1809 Feb 3. Wrong date. See: 1810 Feb 3, (I; 258).]


1809 March 10 / Russia / I / [Small quake / BA 1911]. [I; 259. Milne, 699.]


1809 March 27 / Etna / BA 54. [I; 260. Mallet, 84.]


1809 Ap. 5 / Japan / II / [Medium quake / BA 1911]. [I; 261. Milne, 699.]


1809 April 8 / Op. Mars / (Al). [I; 263. Thayer and Pabst give the date as "April 18"; but, I read the note as "April 8."]


1809 Ap. 9 / Tours, France / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 262. Greg, 64.]


1809 May 3 / Island of Corfu, Greece / I / [Small quake / BA 1911]. [I; 264. Milne, 699.]


1809 May 3 / (Reference.) / Barnstaple, Devonshire / q and rumbling sound / Trans Devonshire Assoc 16-651 / (CO). [I; 265. Parfitt, Edward. "On Earthquakes in Devonshire." Report and Transactions of the Devonshire Association, 16 (1884): 641-661, at 651.]


1809 May 9 / Volc / Goentoer / Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-898. [I; 266. Backer, 880. The Guntur volcano.]


1809 May 23 / 19h / Venus Inf Conj. (Al). [I; 267.]


[1809 June 9. Wrong date. See: 1803 June 9, (I; 268).]


1809 June 17 / St. Bart / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 269. Greg, 64.]


1809 June 20 / Stone weighing 6 ounces fell on shipboard. / Lat 30°, 58' N / Long., 70°, 25' W / Phil Mag 4/8/458 / Sc Am, NS, 1-383 / Bib Brit 48/162. [I; 270. Greg, 64. Greg, Robert Philips. "Observations on Meteorolites...." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 8 (1854): 329-342, 449-463, at 458. "A Column of Facts in Relation to Meteors." Scientific American, n.s., 1 (December 10, 1859) 383. Scientific American gives the date as June 17, 1809, and Greg writes: "(June 17?)"; however, that was the date of the ship's departure from Block Island, (Rhode Island), and the event occurred three days later. "Melanges."  Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts, 48 (1811):162-168, at 164-166. This stone was subsequently lost, so its meteoric composition remains unknown.]


1809 June 23 / Poitiers (?) / rain of frgs / L'Institut 2/409. [I; 271. "Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 2 (no. 84; December 17, 1833): 409-410. "M. Mauduy, conservateur du cabinet d’Histoire naturelle de Poitiers, écrit pour témoigner de deux faits qui sont deux nouvelles preuves en faveur de la réalité de ce phénomene." "Le 23 juin 1809, écrit-il, par un temps fort chaud, je fus assailli par une pluie d'orage dont les gouttes fort grosses étaient mêlées de petits corps de la grosseur d'une noisette sauvage qui couvrirent la terre en un instant, et que je reconnus pour être de petits crapauds. Tous avaient subi leur métamorphose; et je n'en vis pas un seul à l'état de tétard." "... La deuxième fois, c'était au mois d'août 1822, par un temps orageux et extraordinairement chaud, je fus encore surpris par une pluie à grosses gouttes fort abondante, et mêlée comme la première de petits crapauds; j'en reçus plusieurs sur mon chapeau. Cette fois ces animaux avaient la grosseur d'une noix ordinaire. Je me trouvais alors éloigné de plus d'une lieue de tous ruisseaux, rivières ou marais."]


1809 summer / Toads / France / L'Institut 2/409 / Rec. Sci 3/333. [I; 272. "Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 2 (no. 84; December 17, 1833): 409-410. See: 1809 June 23, (I; 271). Martin, William Charles Linnaeus. "On the Fall of Frogs, Toads, and Fishes from the Sky." Recreative Science, 3 (1862): 328-334, at 333.]


1809 July 29 / Neumark / Fireball / Ba '60. [I; 273. Greg, 64.]


1809 Aug 7, 8 / China / III / [Violent earthquake / BA 1911]. [I; 274. Milne, 699.]


1809 Aug 14 / Italy / I / [Small earthquake / BA 1911]. [I; 275. Milne, 699.]


1809 Aug 25 / Italy / II / [Greater quake / BA 1911]. [I; 276. Milne, 699.]


1809 Aug 28 / Parma / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 277. Greg, 64.]


1809 Sept 3 / Bell's Weekly Messenger—Ann Moore, faster of Tutbury / p. 283. [A; 14. No extant copy of the article in Bell's Weekly Messenger has been found; however, details regarding Ann Moore's alleged fast are detailed in Dr. Henderson's book. Henderson, Alexander. An Examination of the Imposture of Ann Moore Called the Fasting Woman of Tutbury. London: Underwood and Blacks, 1813.]


1809 Sept 4 / New crater of Vesuvius opened, great flow of lava. Night of 5th, great eruption of ashes. / Bell's Weekly Messenger 1809-321. [I; 278. (Bell's Weekly Messenger, October 8, 1809, p. 321. No extant copy found.)]


1809-(?) / Bathurst / Disap and clothes with bullet holes. / See Stuber case, Aug. 16, 1892. [A; 15. See: 1892 Aug. 16).]


1809 Nov 25 /Bathurst / See S. Baring-Gould's Historic Oddities. / 9009.d.3. [A; 16. Baring-Gould, Sabine. Historic Oddities and Strange Events. 1st series. London: Metheun, 1889, 1-25.]


1809 Nov / Bathurst. [A; 17.]


1809 Nov. 25 / Bathurst / [typescript]:


Cornhill Magazine, 55-279:


That, upon November 25, 1809, Benjamin Bathurst, who had been to Vienna, upon a secret embassy from the English Government to the Court of the Emperor Francis, arrived in the small town of Perleberg, Germany. With a valet and a secretary, he took lodgings at an inn. Considerable stress is placed upon his fears that emissaries of Napoleon Boneparte might harm him, and it is said that he asked for protection from the local military authorities.


He was standing outside the inn—"and was never seen again."


But his trousers were found.


Several weeks later, at a considerable distance from the inn, Bathurst's trousers were found, in the woods. They were perforated, as if with bullets, but were not blood-stained. In a pocket was an unfinished letter from Bathurst to his wife, expressing fear of French influences, and fear that the writer would disappear, or that he would not be permitted to reach England. There was no evidence of "French influences", and it was in territory not occupied by the French, but the supposition was that Bathurst had been abducted by order of Napoleon Boneparte, even though, in the spring of 1811, Napoleon assured Mrs. Bathurst that he knew nothing of the matter. The English Government offered 1,000 pounds reward, and Bathurst's family offered 1,000 pounds reward, and Prince Frederick offered a reward; but nothing further came out, except that Bathurst's fur overcoat was found in a peasant's cottage. The peasant's wife said that she had found it at the inn, and had taken it.


(79)


The circumstances of the vanishing are that, at seven o'clock in the evening—darkness having set in several hours before—Bathurst's carriage drew up at the inn. Bathurst went to the carriage, at the door of which stood the valet. An ostler's lantern was upon him. The landlord stood ready to bid him farewell. Bathurst stepped round the heads of the horses—"and suddenly, inexplicably, without a word, a cry, an alarm of any kind, he was gone."

Bloodhounds were brought to the place. From the vanishing point, they could find no scent to take up.


[A; 18. A typescript note. Thayer writes: "The above 'note' is typewritten. It seems to be two fragments of pages from a manuscript, as if Fort had deleted the incident from a book about to be published. It seems to me that I remember the story from one of his books, however. It would be interesting to find the printed version, if it was printed, and to compare it with this fragment to see how it differs." Baring-Gould, Sabine. "The disappearance of Bathurst." Cornhill Magazine, n.s., 8 (March 1887): 278-291, with the quotes "and was never seen again," and, "Suddenly, inexplicably, without a word, a cry, an alarm of any sort, he was gone," at 282. In Lo!, (part 1, chapter 16), Fort wrote "a shorter story," thus: "Upon November 25th, 1809, Benjamin Bathurst, returning from Vienna, where, at the Court of the Emperor Francis, he had been representing the British Government, was in the small town of Perleberg, Germany. In the presence of his valet and his secretary, he was examining horses, which were to carry his coach over more of his journey back to England. Under observation, he walked around to the other side of the horses. He vanished. For details, see the Cornhill Magazine, 55-279."]


1809 Nov. 25 / BO / Ac to Sabine Baring-Gould, "Historic Oddities," p. 12—On Jan 23, 1810, in a Hamburg newspaper appeared a paragraph telling / that Bathurst was well in mind and body, his friends having received a letter from him, dated Dec. 13. This is a secondary mystery. As Baring-Gould asked—Who? Why? Was it imperative to make the authorities abandon the mystery? [A; 19.1, 19.2. Baring-Gould, Sabine. Historic Oddities and Strange Events. 1st series. London: Metheun, 1889, 12.]


1809 /Disaps. Bathurst / 1910, Dec 18—Lloyds W. News / Skeleton found buried near Perleberg. [A; 21. (Lloyds Weekly News, December 18, 1910.)]


1809 Nov. 29 Munich fireball. BA 1860. [I; 279. Greg, 64. Fort's original note mistakenly gives the location as "Parma."]


1809 Nov. 29 / 1810—Nov. 28 / 1820—Nov. 29 / 1821—Nov. 30 / 1822—28th / 1823—27th / 1824—27th / 1831—26th / 1839—29th / Athenauem 1840-1013 / List of aerolites fallen last of Nov. by M. Capocci, director of Observatory of Naples / (noted). [I; 311. "Falling Stars." Athenæum, 1840 (no. 686; December 19): 1013. The dates given in the Athenaeum do not match those given in the original Comptes Rendus article, (nor is the series of aerolites in Lombardy and Piedmont around July 17th for a different series of years). Ernesto Capocci included "aérolithes, globes de feu, bolides, et averses d'étoiles filantes" in the list from which he found his November "aérolithes," (or "apparitions d'aérolithes").  In November of 1809, Greg notes a fireball at Munich on the 29th; on November 28, 1810, Greg notes an "aërolitic meteor" at Cerigo, (Kythira.); on November 29, 1820, Greg notes a meteor train, at Cosenza and the Ionian Isles, but only Arago mentions a  "shower of stones," or, "Chute abondante de pierres aux environs de Cosensa, en Calabre," (citing the Comptes Rendu article, which does not identify any fallen stone in 1820); on November 28, 1821, Greg notes a fireball at Naples, and nothing for November 30th; on November 30, 1822, Greg notes the Futtehpur meteorite, in India, but nothing on the 28th;  on November 27, 1823, Greg notes a fireball at Naples; on November 27, 1824, Greg notes a fireball at Erlangen and Prague; on November 26, 1831, Greg notes a fireball at Sögel; on November 29, 1831, Greg notes a large fireball at Hildburghausen; on November 30, 1834, Greg notes a fireball at Naples; and, on November 29, 1839, Greg notes a large fireball which went west to east, then "turned back" over the Adriatic Sea, to then pass over Naples from the northeast to southwest. See: 1839 Nov. 29, (II; 135). "Sur la périodicité des aérolithes." Comptes Rendus, 11 (1840): 357-360. Arago, François. Astronomie Populaire. Paris: Gide, 1857, v. 4, 208. Greg, 64, 68-70, 73-74, 77.]


1809 Dec 4 / Cape Town / 3 shocks—10 minutes later another accompanied by noises like the firing of several pieces of heavy artillery in quick succession—or that not a quake, though so listed—"The sky became clear, and numerous meteors were observed." / Rept. 54/85 / It is said that many persons said felt the shock upon the bursting of the meteors. [I; 280.1, 280.2. Mallet, 85. "Earthquakes at the Cape of Good Hope in 1809." Philosophical Magazine, n.s, 9 (1831): 71-75. The note takes its quote from Mallet; but, the original quote was: "The sky was very clear, the stars shone with great brilliancy, and numerous meteors were observed."]


1809 Dec 5 / Another shock and sound like thunder at Cape Town / BA 54 / 7 a.m.—also 12:30 p.m. / ab. 5 p.m. / Many very brilliant meteors burst at times of shocks. [I; 281. Mallet, 85-6.]


1810:


[1811 /] 1810 Dec. 25 / Formosa / I / 1811 / Greece / I / [small quake[s] / BA 1911]. [I; 319. Two different earthquakes were noted upon a single note with "Dec. 25" mistakenly copied as their date. Milne gives "1810" as the only date for an earthquake in Formosa. Milne, 700.]


1810 Jan 2 or 3 / Geneva / Fireball / Ba '60. [I; 282. Greg, 64.]


1810 Jan. 14 / Hungary / II / [Medium earrthquake / BA 1911]. [I; 283. Milne, 699.]


1810 Jan 17 / Phil Mag 44-255 / Red rain in the mountains of Placentia / a liquid "almost as thick and heavy as snow. [I; 284. Serres, Marcel de. "Observations on the fall of stones from the clouds, or aerolites." Philosophical Magazine, 44 (1814): 217-224, 253-260; at 255.]


1810 Jan. 17 / Dept of Plaisance / Thunder heard and red snow fell. / Bell's Weekly Messenger, May 6, p. 142 / In the mountains here. [I; 285. "A remarkable phenomenon is mentioned in the French Papers...." Bell's Weekly Messenger, May 6, 1810, p. 142 c. 2.]


1810 Jan 22 / Pignerol / Shock and explosion (p 86) and here and elsewhere noted that M. Perrey had remarked that there was a periodicity upon the 22nd of the month. [I; 286. Mallet, 86.]


1810 Jan. 22 /Bathurst Myst / L.T., 1810, Jan. 22/3/a  / Nov. 16/3/b. [A; 20. "Mr. Bathurst...." London Times, January 22, 1810, p .3 c. 1. "Mr. Bathurst, who is supposed to have been murdered near Perleberg, was son to the Bishop of Norwich, and married to a sister of the present Sir William Call." The second article, ("Parliamentary Intelligence." London Times, November 16, 1810, p. 3 c. 2), refers not to Benjamin Bathurst, but, instead to Charles Bathurst. "A Mysterious Crime." Living Age, 75 (s. 3, v. 19, no. 961; November 1862): 231-234. The Living Age reprints another article from the Times. "Mr. Bathurst." London Times, January 20, 1810, p. 3 c. 2. Dash, Mike. "The Disappearance of Benjamin Bathurst." Fortean Times, 54: (Summer 1990): 40-44.]


1810 Jan 30 / Stonefall / Caswell, N.C. / BA 67-415 / Gazeteer for—Caswell. Details / Bib Brit 48/166. [I; 287. Greg, 64. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 415. "Melanges." Bibliothèque Britannique, Sciences et Arts, 48 (1811):162-168, at 166-167. Listed by Greg originally gives its date as April 30, but Glaisher et al gives the correct date of January 30. "Shower of Meteoric Stones in North America." Philosophical Magazine, 36 (October 1810): 316. The Caswell meteorite was a chondrite, but no specimen of it has apparently been preserved. Caswell is the name of the county, in North Carolina. Venable, F.P. "A List and Description of the Meteorites of North Carolina." Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 7 (1890): 33-51, at 41.]


[1810 Feb 3 /] 1810 Feb 3 / q—met—fires / at dawn / town in Hungary / shock / Houses on a mountain were observed to be lighted up by reflection from unknown fires, supposed to be subterranean. / BA '54 / See 1810. [I; 258. Mallet, 86. "Houses situated on a mountain were observed to be lighted up after the shocks; it was supposed by the reflexion of subterranean fire from some opening in the earth caused by the earthquake (!) (?)."]


1810 Feb. 3 / After the shocks, houses on a mountain near Csakwar, Hungary were for considerable time illuminated. / C.R., 17-622 / See 1809. [I; 288. Perrey, Alexis. "Nouvelles recherches sur les tremblements de terre...." Comptes Rendus, 17 (1843): 608-625, at 622.). See "1809 Feb 3" refers to a wrongly dated note, (I; 258), which should be "1810 Feb 3."]


1810 Feb 4 / Japan / II / [Medium earthquake / BA 1911]. [I; 289. Milne, 699.]


1810 Feb 16 / Candia, on island of Candia, ruined by q. / 2000 perished. / BA 54. [I; 290. Mallet, 87. Candia is now known as Heraklion, on the island of Crete.]


1810 March 20 or 25 / Canary Islands / III / [Violent earthquake / BA 1911]. [I; 291. Milne, 699.]


1810 March 25 / Violent q and great loss of life / Teneriffe / BA, 54. [I; 292. Mallet, 87.]


1810 Ap 8 / 7:20 p.m. / 7:25 / Shocks / Calcutta / Gent's Mag 80-373. [I; 293. "Abstract of Foreign Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 80 pt. 2 (October 1810): 373-380, at 378, "Asia." Mallet, 87.]


1810 Ap. 14 / Hungary / III / [Violent quake / BA 1911]. [I; 294. Milne, 699.]


1810 Ap 20-1 / night /Metite / New Grenada (U.S. Columbia?) / wherever Bogota is / L. An. Sci 1860/19. [I; 295. "L'aérolithe de Montrejeau." Année Scientifique et Industrielle, 4 (1860): 16-21, at 19. New Grenada was a republic that mainly consisted of Panama and Colombia. The Santa Rosa,  Tocavita, and Rasgatá meteorites were collected in 1824. The specimen, (which Greg gives as "1600 lbs."), would be the Santa Rosa, which weighed 612.5 kilograms and which was found by Cecilia Corredor buried on a hillside near Santa Rosa de Viterbo, in 1810. "Mémoire sur différentes Masses de fer qui ont été trouvées sur la Cordillière orientale des Andes."Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 25 (1824): 438-443. Fletcher, 91. Fletcher identifies these as the Santa Rosa and Rasgata meteorites. Ward, Henry. "Colombian Meteorite Localities: Santa Rosa, Rasgata, Tocavita."  American Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 23 (January 1907): 1-8. Ramirez, J. Emilio. "The meteorites of Santa Rosa de Viterbo, Boyacá, Colombia." Popular Astronomy, 57 (January 1949): 29-37. Ramirez identifies the large mass, (a brecciated octahedrite), as the Santa Rosa,  the Tocavita as a finer octahedrite, and the Rasgatá, as the ataxite specimen, (since there has been confusion over various specimens and their identities); also, he reports that two other meteorites were found near Santa Rosa, in 1926 and in 1942.]


1810 Ap. 20 / Santa Rosa, New Grenada / Met iron / but doubtful whether fell or found this day / BA '60. [I; 296. Greg, 64.]


1810 May / Wild dog of Ennerdale appeared suddenly and the destruction began. Often killed seven or eight sheep a night, bit into the jugular vein and drank the blood. / Chambers' Journal 81-470 / Hunters organized. If reported in the daytime plowmen unyoked their horses and rode bare-backed. Said that milking, cutting of hay, feeding of horses neglected for these fruitless hunts. In July a fund was raised to buy a good pack of hounds. There were two or three hunts a week, but the animal always eluded. Once when a hunt went past a church, the whole congregation ran out to join. The vicar threw off his surplice and joined. There were long hunts ending 15 or 20 miles away and nothing run down. On 12th of September, it or a dog was seen to enter a cornfield. This animal was shot, wounded, chased by dogs and killed. [A; 22.1, 22.2. 22.3, 22.4. "The Wild-dog of Ennerdale." Chambers's Journal, s. 6 v. 7 (June 25, 1904): 470-472.]


1810 July 3 / [London Times], 3-e / Witchcraft at Burton. [A; 23. "Witchcraft." London Times, July 3, 1810 p. 3 c. 5. A calf was burned alive, near Burton-in-Kendal, England, to break an enchantment.]


1810 ab. July 15 / Futteh-Ghur, Shahabad, India / Stone fell. / BA '60. [I; 297. Greg, 64.]


1810 July 26 / Destructive hurricane at Chatillon, France / Bell's Weekly Messenger, Aug 12, p 250. [I; 298. "On the 26th ult. a most destructive hurricane...." Bell's Weekly Messenger, August 12, 1810, p. 250 c. 2.]


1810 July 30 / Began violent qs at Azores which continued into 1811. / BA 54. [I; 299. Mallet, 88.]


1810 Aug 10 / (F) / Tipperary, Ireland / Stonefall / 7 3/4 lbs / 11:30 a.m. / BA 60 / Moores-Fort, Tipperary. [I; 300. Fletcher, 99. This is the Mooresfort meteorite. Greg, 64.]


1810 Aug., etc. / Polt home of Mr. Chave, of Sampford Peverell, near Taunton / S. Baring-Gould, Devonshire Characters, p. 286. [A; 24. Baring-Gould, Sabine. Devonshire Characters and Strange Events. London: John Lane, 1908; 286-291, "The Sampford Ghost."]


1810 Oct 18 / [London Times], 3-c / 22-3-c / Sampford Ghst / See Aug 27. [A; 25. "Sampford Ghost." London Times, October 18, 1810, p. 3 c. 3; and,  "For the Times." London Times, October 22, 1810, p. 3 c. 3. The first article repeats Mr. Colton's disputations regarding various facts regarding the haunting, and the second article is a churchman's view regarding ghosts.]  


1810 Sept 10 at least to 13th / Began eruption of Vesuvius—unusual, but was not preceded by drying up of wells. / Bell's Weekly Messenger, Oct, p. 330 / (not a mistake in year, see 1809). [I; 301. "Italy. Eruption of Mount Vesuvius." Bell's Weekly Messenger, October 21, 1810, p. 330 c. 3.]


1810 Sept 10 / night / Vesuvius / Gentleman's Mag. 80-374 / night 13th greater / great on 12th—81-75. [I; 302. "Abstract of Foreign Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 80 pt. 2 (October 1810): 373-378, at 374-376, "Naples, Sept. 24." "Abstract of Foreign Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 81 pt. 1 (January 1811): 70-79, at 75, "Italy."]


1810 Sept 22 / A dried pond at Luton, Bedfordshire, suddenly filled. / This phe had recurred before at time of q in Lisbon, in 1755. / Gent's Mag 80-379. [I; 303. "Country News." Gentleman's Magazine, 80 pt. 2 (October 1810): 378-380, at 379.]


1810 Oct 5 / [London Times]. 3-b / 18-3-a / Vesuvius. [I; 304. "A tremendous eruption of Vesuvius...." London Times, October 5, 1810, p. 3 c. 2. "Mount Vesuvius." London Times, October 18, 1810, p. 3 c. 1.]


1810 Oct 24, 25, 26 / Fearful hurricane, Havana, and earthquake / Symons' Met. Mag 3-5. [I; 305. Lowe, Edward Joseph. "To the Editor of the Meteorological Magazine." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 3 (February 1868): 3-5.]


1810 Oct 29 / [London Times], 3-a / Met / Waly. [I; 306. "Waly (On the Meuse)|, Sept. 22." London Times, October 29, 1810, p. 3 c. 1.]


1810 Nov. 9 / New Hampshire / violent shock / Violent wind sprang up suddenly a moment before it. / BA-54. [I; 307. Mallet, 89.]


1810 Nov 9 / (Ref) / 9:15 p.m. / Exeter, New Hampshire / Ac. by Judge Samuel Tenney—sound under his feet and a tremendous report. The atmosphere, dry, however [d]id not shake the house. / Mems. Boston Soc Nat Hist 2-16. [I; 308. Brigham, William T. "Volcanic Manifestations in New England." Memoirs Read Before the Boston Society of Natural History, 2 (1871/1878): 1-28, at 16.]


1810 Nov 10-11 / night / Damaging high tide / Boston, England / Bells Weekly Messenger, Nov 18. [I; 309. (Bells Weekly Messenger, November 18, 1810.)]


1810 Nov. 23 / (Fr) / (F) / Sound near Orleans / ab. 1:30 p.m. / Bib Brit 45/397 // stones at Charsonville (Meung) (Loiret) / 46/94. BA-'60. [I; 310. Fletcher, 99. This is the Charsonville meteorite. "Notice sur une chute de Pierres Atmosphériques." Bibliothèque Britannique. 45 (1810): 397-399. "On trouve dans le Journal de l'Empire, du 15 de ce mois, l'article suivant sur le même Phénomène." Bibliothèque Britannique, 45 (1810): 399-400. Jurine. "Nouveaux Détails sur la Chute de Pierres Atmosphériques près d'Orléans." Bibliothèque Britannique, 46 (1811): 94-96. Greg, 64.]


1810 Nov. 28 /Aerolite? / See Nov 29, '09. [I; 312. Fort refers to Capocci's list of aerolites falling at the end of November. See: 1809 Nov. 29, (I; 311). "Falling Stars." Athenæum, 1840 (no. 686; December 19): 1013.]


1810 Nov. 28 / Fireball "evidently aerolitic fell between Cape Matapan and Island of Cerigo, Greece. / BA 60. [I; 313. Greg, 64; at 9:30 P.M. Cerigo was a British name for the island of Kythira.]


1810 Nov. 29 / Violent shock at sea north of Cape Matapan / 11 a.m. / BA 54. [I; 314. Mallet, 89.]


1810 Dec 3 / [London Times], 3-d / q / Travancore / Eng.? [I; 315. "A letter from Travancore...." London Times, December 3, 1810, p. 3 c. 4. Travancore is in India.]


1810 Dec 10 / Vesuvius. [I; 316.]


1810 Dec 25 / It / 2 a.m. / Parma, etc. / BA 54 / severe shock and probable det. met. [I; 317. Mallet, 90; Mallet writes of  "a sudden light," (no mention of a detonating meteor).]


1810 Dec. 25 / Emilia, Italy / I / [small quake / BA 1911]. [I; 318. Milne, 700.]


[1810 Dec. 25. Wrong date. See: 1810. (I; 319), and, 1811, (I; 319).]

 
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