Last updated: April 8, 2021. - Fortean Notes

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Last updated: April 8, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1816 to 1820


1816:


1816 / Italian series / Sounds / regular / See March 16, 1888. / 3's. [I; 547. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 36-47.]


1816 / Boll / Reference / See "1888-89" note. [I; 548. See: 1888 Jan 20, (VI; 1241); 1888 March 11, (VI; 1282); 1888 March 16, (VI; 1288); 1888 Ap 7, (VI; 1304); 1888 August 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, (VI; 1433); 1888 Sept 10, (VI; 1449); 1888 Oct 31, (VI; 1470); and, 1889 Jan 15, (VI; 1527).]


1816 [Sept 24] / Auroras / Gt Brit / A. J. Sci 14/96. [I; 549. Silliman, Benjamin D. "Notice of the late Aurora Borealis." American Journal of Science, 14 (1828): 91-111, at 96.]


1816 Jan / The Tower ghost / N and Q 2/10/192. [A; 33. "Ghost in the Tower." Notes and Queries, s. 2 v. 10 (September 8, 1860): 192-193.]


1816 / Look for Tower ghost. / Polt and a cylindrical glass obj., Dec, 25, 1880. [A; 34.]


1816 / Tower ghost / obj like football, July 15, 1882. [A; 35.]


1816 / Tower ghost / a black object, March 13, 1920. [A; 36. See: 1920 March 13, (D: 1013 & 1014).]


1816 Jan 8 / Pesth, Hungary / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 550. Greg, 65.]


1816 Feb 2 / early morning / All Saints Day / (+) / Lisbon q. / A thick fog covered the city. Ab 1 a.m., a qa little later, a meteor. 7 a.m., another but lighter shock. / An Reg 1816. [I; 551. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 58 (1816): pt. 2, 1-227, at 22-23.]


1816 Feb 2 / Shock at Lisbon / followed by heavy rain / BA 54. [I; 552. Mallet, 106.]


1816 Feb. 2 / Lisbon / Quake lasted one minothers 6 hours latera meteor appeared. Things in the air that were uttering criessaid been "flocks of birds". / Rept 54/106 / What species? pigeons? [I; 553. Mallet, 106. Mallet summarizes the letter in the Annual Register, which says "the swarms of birds" were "of all descriptions."]


1816 Feb 16 / Highest recorded tide on Tyne / L.T., 1868, Feb. 11-4-4. [I; 554. "An Extraordinary Tide." London Times, February 11, 1868, p. 4 c. 4. "The morning's tide flowed 30 feet 3 inches on the sill of the Humber Dock lockpit, and highest previously recorded tide was only 30 feet 1 inch (on the 16th of February, 1816)."]


1816 March / Annals of Philosophy / That recently 9 miles from Lausanne, singular snow covered with larvae "different from any which are usually observed in that country. They seemed to be dead but revived when placed near a fire. [I; 555. "Caterpillars in Switzerland."Annals of Philosophy, 7 (March 1816): 243. "A very singular phenomenon has lately taken place in Switzerland, at the distance of about nine miles from Lauzanne. The whole surface of the snow is covered with a species of caterpillar, different from any which are usually observed in that country. These animals appear dead; but when brought near a fire they soon recover animation."]


1816 March 17 / q / Manchester / M Post, Oct 9, '63 / See 1843. [I; 556. "Earthquakes in Manchester." London Morning Post, October 9, 1863, p. 8 c. 3. See: 1843 Mar, 17, (II; 599).]


1816 March 17 / 1 p.m. / Mansfield / Woodhouse / Nottingham / Chester / (q) / (LT 23-3-e / 25-3-e / 26) / rumbling sound and sound as of of fall of hail / this of fall of pieces of stone and mortar from a church steeple / Lincoln / Leicester / Loughborough / Sheffield / 12:37 p.m. at Derby. [I; 557.1, 557.2. "An Earthquake." London Times, March 23, 1816, p. 3 c. 5. "The following accounts of an earthquake...." London Times, March 25, 1816, p. 3 c. 5. "Of the earthquake mentioned in our paper...." London Times, March 26, 1816, p. 3 c. 5. "Country News." Gentleman's Magazine, 86 pt. 2 (April 1816): 366-367, at 366.]


1816 March 23 / Oxford and Surrey / det. met. / BA '60. [I; 558. Greg, 65.]


1816 March 23 / Berkshire and Oxford / bet 10 and 11 p.m. / detonating meteor louder than thunder / Gent's Mag 1816-1-367. [I; 559. "Country News." Gentleman's Magazine, 86 pt. 1 (April 1816): 366-367, at 367, c.v. "March 23." Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 302.]


1816 Ap. 13 / [London Times], 3-d / Great earthfall in Sweden. [I; 560. "The following particulars of a great earth-fall...." London Times, April 13, 1816, p. 3 c. 4. "No sufficient reason is assigned respecting the cause and occasion of this phenomenon, except that such falls of earth, but in a slight degree only, have long since taken place in the neighbourhood of Tiller, and that a sulphurous smell has spread itself." A large landslide, ("erdfall"), extending almost a kilometer inland on the southern bank, fell across the Nidelva river, in Norway, on March 7th, about 6 P.M., according to a letter from Sweden. (Edinburgh Advertiser, April 19, 1816.)]


1816 Ap. 15 / Red dust, different places in Italy / An de Chimie 2/31/268 / See March 14, 1813. [I; 561. Chladni, Ernst Florens Friedrich. "Nouveau Catalogue des chutes de pierres ou de fer; de poussières ou de substances molles, sèches ou humides, suivant l'ordre chronologique."  Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 31 (1826): 253-269, at 267-268. "Delle Nevi e Piogge colorite cadute negli ultimi scorsi anni in diverse parti d'Italia." Giornale di Fisica, Chimica, Storia Naturale, Medicina ed Arti, s. 2 v. 1 (1818): 469-480, at 473.]


1816 Ap. 29-30 / Sunspots / Niles Register 10/167, 168. [I; 562. "Spots on the Sun's Disk," and, "Solar Spot." Niles' Weekly Register, 10 (May 4, 1816): 167-168.]


1816 May 26 / India / Upper Ganges / q / I. [I; 563. A class I earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1816 June 10 / 5 sunspots / June 126 / France / L.T., June 26. [I; 564. "Spots in the Sun." London Times, June 26, 1816, p. 3 c. 3. And, on June 16, eight spots were observed. This article is copied in the Annual Register. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 58 (1816): pt. 2, 1-227, at 80, cv. "Spots in the Sun".]


1816 summer / A n. eye sunspot for 8 or 10 days in succession / Niles' Weekly Register, Oct 1, 1831. [I; 565. Hallowell, Benjamin. "The Solar Phenomena." Niles' Weekly Register, 41 (October 1, 1831): 96. "A n. eye sunspot" is a naked-eye sunspot.]


1816 summer / B. Eagle / 1901 / June 24-10-2. [I; 566. "Was No Summer in 1816." Brooklyn Eagle, June 24, 1901, p. 10 c. 2.]


1816 summer / N.Y. Ev. Post of [June 21, 1927]. [I; 567. Newspaper clipping. (New York Evening Post, June 21, 1927).]


1816 July 19 / Stones"during the storms, inundations, and hurricanes of that month. / Mag Nat Hist 7-303. [I; 568. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 303. The location of "Sternenberg, near Bonn" and the date of the fall as "July 19, 1816," (which isn't noted by Greg), offer few clues about these "aerolites, one of which weighed 100 lbs., others from 20 to 40 lbs."]


1816 Aug 7 / Vesuvius / Gent's Mag 1816/2/267. [I; 569. "Abstract of Foreign Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 86 pt. 2 (September 1816): 262-269, at 266-267. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1816 Aug 7 / Hungary / Det. met. / BA 60. [I; 570. Greg, 65.]


1816 Aug or July / Glastonbury / Metite / BA '60 / See May 17, '16. [I; 571. Greg, 65. See: 1806 May 17, (I; 181).]


1816 Aug 13 / Comrie / said that at Dunkeld a small meteor seen at time of shock / L.T., Aug. 21, 1816 / 10:45 p.m. [I; 572. "Earthquake in Scotland." London Times, August 21, 1816, p. 3 c. 2-3. "About this time, a small meteor was seen to pass from east to west, though the shock seemed to come from the west." Greg, 66. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 117. "At Montrose, a vivid flash of lightning was observed to follow after the shock. At Dunkeld, a small meteor was seen to pass from E. to W. just about the time of the earthquake."]


1816 Aug 13 / q / I / Inverness, Scotland / BA '11. [I; 573. A class I earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1816 Sept 21 / Volc / Goentoer / Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [I; 574. Backer, 880. The Guntur volcano.]


1816 Sept 24 / Comrie / Milne's list / Edin New 31/110 / gives at least back to 1788 / 17 instances in 1795 / Quotes a resident of Comriethat in sky had been "a large luminous body, bent like a crescent, which stretched itself over the heavens". This first assoc. with aerial [end of sentence]. [I; 575.1, 575.2. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122. Milne's list of earthquake-shocks dates from November 8, 1608, to September 1, 1839, (on pages 95 to 122). Under 1816, "Sept. 24," (page 117): "Mr. Gilfillan of Comrie states that there was an uncommon phenomenon in the air,a large luminous body, bent like a crescent, which stretched itself over the heavens." The Rev. Mr. Gilfillan was a clergyman in Comrie for about thirty years.]


1816 Sept 24 / Belfast / 8:20 / Auroral arch, east end as if origin in Pleiades, passing through Cassiopia. Before 10, the top of the arch had regularly declined from the zenith about 20 degrees toward south. / L.T., Oct 3. [I; 576.1, 576.2. "Beautiful Phenomenon." London Times, October 3, 1816, p. 4 c. 1.]


1816 Oct 11 - 14 / qs / Banda, Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [I; 577. Backer, 880. The Banda Api volcano.]


1816 Oct 19 / Dusseldorf / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 578. Greg, 66.]


1816 (Oct. 19?) / At Dusseldorf fell a large mass of friable substance of sulphurous odor. / Niles Weekly Register (Baltimore), Jan 4, 1817, p. 307. [I; 579. "Remarkable meteor." Niles' Weekly Register, 41 (January 4, 1817): 307. "The Gazette of Dusseldorf speaks of a very remarkable meteor. 'On the 19th ult. at nine in the evening, a large mass or iron fell in one of the streets of our city: this mass, when cool, was hard, but it was easily broken, and emitted a sulpherous smell. Meteors of this kind are very rare here.'"]


1816 Nov 15 / Severe shocks in Canada / Niles Weekly Register, Nov. 30 / N.M. [I; 580. "Foreign Articles." Niles' Weekly Register, 11 (November 30, 1816): 220-223, at 222, cv. Canada. "Several severe shocks of an earthquake were felt at Montreal on the 15th of Nov."]


[1816 Dec 18. See: 1806 May 19, (I; 182).]


1816 Dec 16-25 / Italy / Rumblings like cannon fire / Boll. Sis. Ital. 7/37 / Ref. [I; 581. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 37.]


1816 Dec 20 / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 582. Greg, 66. Hungary.]


1817:


1817 Jan 17 / It. Sound / Rumblings / Sciacca / See '16. [I; 583.  Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 37. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1817 Jan 19-24 / (It) / Sciacca / sulphurous odor / column of fire and smoke, or a luminous whirlwind / See 1805. [I; 584. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 339-341. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1817 Jan 23rd and to March / Great eruptions in Java / L.T., Sept. 20-3-a. [I; 585. "Account of a Volcano." London Times, September 20, 1817, p. 3 c. 1. The Ijen volcano.]


1817 Jan 24 / Feb 18 / Volc / Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [I; 586. Backer, 880. The Ijen volcano.]


1817 Jan 27 / 11 p.m. / ShockMansfield, England / Gent's Mag. 1817/1/268. [I; 587. "Country News." Gentleman's Magazine, 87 pt. 1 (March 1816): 268-270, at 268.]


1817 Feb 8 / Aurora at Sunderland / Annals of Phil 9/250. [I; 588. Pensey, Robert. "Aurora Borealis at Sunderland." Annals of Philosophy, 9 (March 1817): 250-251.]


1817 Feb. 13 / [London Times], 3-e / Aurora / Derby. [I; 589. "On Saturday night last...." London Times, February 13, 1817, p. 3 c. 5.]


1817 March 2 / Gothenburg / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 590. Greg, 66.]


1817 March 11 / potential trying to find its pole / Q in Switzerland and lightning in a clear sky over Mt. Blanc / BA '54 / or a met. "a loud detonation. [I; 591. Mallet, 109.]


1817 March / fish / Appin, Scotland / J. F. Inst 4/48. * [I; 592. "Notices of some Showers of Fishes, in various places in Scotland; and of Shells in Ireland." Journal of the Franklin Institute, 4 (1827): 47-48.]


1817 March 18 / Spain / Intense darkness, rain and q / C.R. 17-619. / 10:45 a.m. / BA 54. [I; 593. Mallet, 110. Perrey, Alexis. "Nouvelles recherches sur les tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, de 1801 à juin 1843." Comptes Rendus, 17 (September 25, 1843): 608-625, at 619. "En Espagne, le 18 mars 1817, il y eut fortes secousses au moment ou le soleil venait de se couvrir par un vent impétueux: l'obscurité fut presque complète pendant 15 minutes." Mallet, 110. "The sky had been clear and serene until 10h 30m, but then became overcast; the sun disappeared, and a terrible obscurity began, with a cold and impetuous wind from the N.W., lasting until the shock took place." "Espagne." Journal des Debats, April 6, 1817, p. 1 c. 1. "Le tremblement de terre...." Journal des Debats, April 11, 1817, p. 2 c. 1-2. "Espagne." Journal des Debats, April 13, 1817, p. 1 c. 1.]


1817 March 18 / N Spain / q / II. [I; 594. A class II earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1817 March 18 / Lot-et-Garrone / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 595. Greg, 66.]


1817 March 18 / the unipumic[?] volcano / Q [in] Spain and a volcano reported to be in the Sierra de Cameros. / Jour des Deb, Ap 6-1-1. [I; 596. "Espagne." Journal des Debats, April 6, 1817, p. 1 c. 1. "On dit qu'un volcan s'est ouvert une issue dans la montagne dite Sierra de Cameros." “Remarkable News.” Literary Gazette, 1817 (April 12, 1817): 187. “It is said that there was an eruption of a volcano in the mountain called Sierra de Cameros.” There has not been a volcanic eruption recorded on the mainland of Spain in historical times.]


1817 March 18 / 10:45 a.m. / "The sun disappeared, and a terrible obscurity began." / qMadrid / BA 54. [I; 597. Mallet, 110.]


1817 Ap / Caraboo. [A; 36.1.]


1817 Ap / Caraboo / For an astonishing versionof a fake princess who arrived gorgeously, see Shepard, Fads, Fakes etc., p. 98 /( N B Y). [A; 37. Shepard, William Edward. Fads, Fakes, Freaks, Frauds, And Fools. Anderson, Indiana: Pub. for the author by the Commercial Service Company, 1923, 97-100.]


(1817) / Caraboo / For an instance of way stories get twisted see W.E. Shepard "Fads, Fakes", etc. Here is is that Caraboo, arrived at Bristol, posed as a foreign princess. took most expensive suite in best hotel, and two of 3 coaches loaded with bagges and servantsgiven a reception at the Town Hallran up bills and victimized tradesmen and disappeared. [A: 38.1, 38.2.]


1817 / Caraboo / [Letter to Fort, from George F. Stone, editor of the Western Daily Press, in Bristol, June 3, 1925]:

Dear Sir,


I asked one of our reporters to look up the story of "Princess Caraboo" about which you wrote to me some little time ago, and I also made an inquiry from a very well-informed Bristol man who pays considerable attention to local history. In neither case was it possible to trace the burial place of this lady.


You are I take it familiar with the statement made in "Notes and Queries" for May 20, 1865, to the effect that in 1849 she was living in Bristol and that she died in December 1864. The statement was she was known at the time of her death as Mary Baker.


The principal cemetery in Bristol in use at that time was Arno's Vale, and a representative of the Company has kindly searched his books for the end of '64 and the beginning of '65. He report that the only person bearing a name something like the one in question is that of "Mary Ann Baker of 7, Rosemary Street" who was bured on the 31st January 1865. Whether that has anything to do with the case I cannot tell. Rosemary Street is in another part of the town to that in which "Mary Baker" is alleged to have been living years before. If she died in December the burial would certainly have occurred before Jan. 31, 1865. I have not the time to investigate the problem and you had better not quote me in any statement you may publish.


Yours sincerely,

s/ George F. Stone

Editor


[A; 39. Letter; Stone, George F., to Fort; June 3, 1925. "Caraboo." Notes and Queries, s. 3 v. 7 (May 20, 1865): 408-409.]


[1817] / Caraboo / But here part of her confession explains, or would, if she had spoken Javanese. That she had picked up with a traveller who had taught her Malay. [A; 40.]


[1817] / Carab. / Eze, Duce, Trua, Tan, Zennee, Sendee, Tam, Nunta, Berteen, Tashman / FireApa / Water / Ana / RainSavee / "Caraboo" printed by J.M. Gutch, Bristol, 1817 / Carried a gong on her back an struck it occasionally. [A; 41. Gutch, John Mathew. Caraboo. London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1817, "A vocabulary of words, with their meanings, made use of by Caraboo," 57-59.]


[1817] / BO / Astonishing thing is that in the accounts (Chambers Jour., 66-753) for instance, it is told that her story was according to the interpreter, who spoke Malay / Then later it is said that she spoke in a language she had invented, some of which were gypsy words. / In this pamphlet said that Eynesso invented the story. [A; 42.1, 42.2. "The Princess Caraboo." Chambers's Journal, s. 5, 6 (November 30, 1889): 753-756. Gutch, John Mathew. Caraboo. London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1817, 6-7.]


[1817] / Carab. / Not confronted with Mrs. Neale. Mrs W's story is that she told Carab that Mrs. N. was in the house and had communicated her suspicion: and threatened to confront, whereupon Carab confessed. / Metteryes / Beekgood / Dosidinner / Pakeychild / Neeegg / Archeepotato / Savooknife. [A; 43.1, 43.2. Gutch, John Mathew. Caraboo. London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1817; 27, 57-9.]


[1817] / Carab / The two storiesone, said that Carab told it to Eynessoother said that Carab told it to Mrs. Worrall. Each plentifully circumstantial. If she did not tell one of these stories to E, may not have told the other to W. [A; 44.]


[1817] / Carab / Conventional story in Strand 9/451. If 1st half cannot be believed because it is all the story told by Eynesso, the second half, or the confession, may be doubtful. In this account are reproduced characters and numerals written by Caraboo, but not a word as to her story in Javanese and her words in no known language. [A; 45.1, 45.2. "A Singular Imposture." Strand Magazine, 9 (April 1895): 451-456. Gutch, John Mathew. Caraboo. London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1817, 6-12.]


[1817] / BO / Carb / Samuel Worrall was the magistrate. / Manuel Eynesso. [A; 46. Gutch, John Mathew. Caraboo. London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1817; 1, 6-7.]


[1817] / Carab / Not said she spoke pure Javanese / Then someone else who had been to the East Indies added the details; not said he translated from Malay but believing that her signs meant what he told, "in the warmth of his anxiety to discover her history". [A; 47. Gutch, John Mathew. Caraboo. London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1817, 7.]


1817 (Apr 1) / Notes and Queries, 3-7-196 / That in Times of Jan 13, 1865, announced the death of the impostor Caraboo at Bristol. / p. 269, someone asks for exact date of death. / p. 310, George Pryce, of City Library, Bristol, writes that she had returned from America and exhibited in London about 7 years later (1824) and had made her way to Bristol. He believed she had died about 3 months before his date of writing but believed the exact date to be unknown. / p. 409someone else writes from Bristol that he had known Carab in Bristol since 1849 where "after much reluctance she gave him her signature as Mary Baker." He too had been unable to find out the exact date of her death. / p. 418a cor asks, for the sake of completing the history of this char, the date of the death and entries in the parish register. / I don't know what demonstrates that she [was] persuaded to write a name. [A; 48.1 to 48.4. Bates, William. "Caraboo." Notes and Queries, s. 3 v. 7 (March 11, 1865): 196-197. "Caraboo." Notes and Queries, s. 3 v. 7 (April 1, 1865): 269. Pryce, George. "Caraboo." Notes and Queries, s. 3 v. 7 (April 15, 1865): 310. "Caraboo." Notes and Queries, s. 3 v. 7 (May 20, 1865): 408-9. "Caraboo." Notes and Queries, s. 3 v. 7 (May 27, 1865): 418. "Death of the Princess 'Caraboo.'" London Times, January 13, 1865, p. 5 c. 6.]


[1817 April] / BO / Carab / In Bristol Daily Post, no mention of Caraboo. Under "Deaths" no record of her under any of her names. Post for Dec, 1864. [A; 49.]


[1817 April] / BO / Carab / Not in B. Daily Post, Jan., 1865, nor Dec., 1864. [A; 50.]


1817 April / Caraboo's Confession / Fox sisters confession / Some psychic researchers refuse to accept that, pointing out that it was made worth their while to confess. / Lecture tour. [A; 51.]


[1817 April] / Carab / Specimens of writing examied by Oriental scholars without identifying it, and sent to Oxford, where said no known language. / Said that everyone who examined it "very properly, and without a moment's hesitation" pronounced it humbug. As to stories about her she was taken in by a "Mrs. W." of Bristol. Ran away from Mrs. W. and people of Bath took her in. Mrs. W. followed her and took the girl back to Bristol. Here said that a Mrs Neale recognized her as having been an English girl who had lodged in Bristol: and Mrs Neale and Mrs W confronted the girl and girl confessed to Mrs. W, begging her not to tell. / Not say Mrs. W. but Mrs Samuel Worrall, of Knole Park near Bristol. That she born at Witheridge, Devonshire, in 1791, and left home at age of 16 to work in a farm house and then in various services in London. / Mrs W. sent her to America. [A; 52.1 to 52.4. Gutch, John Mathew. Caraboo. London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1817; 21, 24-54. "Every gentleman who perused it very properly, and without a moment's hesitation, pronounced it a Humbug."]


[1817 April] / In this pamphlet said not true she was smuggled aboard but was shipped openly as Mary Burgess; one of the names of Mary Wilcocks who had married Burgess. [A; 53. Gutch, John Mathew. Caraboo. London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1817, 46, footnote 25.]


[1817 April] / The story is that she was taken into the home of Mrs. Worral, and because of circumstances unstated ran away from Mrs. W., and found hospitality in Bath; was followed to Bath by Mrs. W., who took her back to Knowles, where almost immediately a Mrs Neale came and identified her as an English girl; whereupon she broke down and confessed that she was Mary Wilcocks; that Mrs W went to Devonshire and from her story of Mary the Wilcocks recognized their daughter Mary but that neither of the parents was taken to Noles to make sure of the identification and that almost immediately after returning from Devonshire, Mrs W. shipped the girl away to America, not smuggling her away as she was accused of doing and under a name unrecognized by C's friends in Bath. [A; 54.1 to 54.4.]


[1817 April] / Carab / Gloucester Journal, June 9, 1817 / Letter from Dr. C.H. Wilkinson describes her hands as unaccustomed to labor. "Very cautious in respect to gentlemen, never allowing them to take a hold of  her hand." Went to house top to adore the sun. Fencing with great dexterity, sword in one hand and dagger in other. On back of head a scar of an operation, extremely regular incisions he thought was Oriental cutting, but unlike any operation by an European surgeon. / Gl. Jour. / Dr. Wilkinson of Bath / Sailed June 28 / told in Journal, July 4. [A; 55.1, 55.2. 55.3. Gutch, John Mathew. Caraboo. London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1817, 14-15. (Gloucester Journal, June 9, and July 4, 1817.)]


[1817 April] / BO /Caraboo / In the pamphlet "Caraboo" it is said the interpreter was an impostor. (So cut out picked up Malay.) This pamphlet in which said she an impostor said she was particularly expert in fencing. "Complexion very trifling sallow", p. 20 / Carried with her a cord of knots like the Chinese abacus (Italics), p. 20. / That one or 2 chars of her writing resembled Chinese. [A; 56.1, 56.2. Gutch, John Mathew. Caraboo. London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1817, 20-21.]


[1817 April ] / Carab / In Niles Weekly Register, Aug 30, arrival of the impostor "Poll" Baker is recorded in Phil. / Sept 20, under the title "Shameful" said that a concert had been arranged in Philadelphia for the benefot of Mary Baker, or Miss Carraboo, the infamous impostor. / Oct 18Editor writes that he is sincerely mortified to learn that at the concert this questionable character appeared and wrote in an unknown language upon sheet of paper and spoke in the unknown language. [A; 57.1, 57.2. "John Bull is a wonder-loving fellow...." Niles' Weekly Register, 13 (August 30, 1817): 10. "Shameful." Niles' Weekly Register, 13 (September 20, 1817): 64. "Carraboo Concert." Niles' Weekly Register, 13 (October 18, 1817): 128.]


[1817 April ] / BO / Caraboo in Bath recognized by someone, who notified a believer in her. Whereupon enthusiastic reception in Bath. [A; 58.]


[1817 April] / BO / Caraboo ran away from Mrs W on June 6. [A; 59.]


[1817 April] / Car / Said sent to America in charge of some Moravian Missionaries. [A; 60. Gutch, John Mathew. Caraboo. London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1817, 46.]


1817 Ap / Caraboo / [The World of Letters.] / The Observer]. June [10, 1923.] [A; 61. Newspaper clipping. (London Observer, June 10, 1923; not at BNA).]


1817 / Caraboo / [Local Notes] / 'Western Daily Press,' Bristol., 27th August 1926. [A; 63. Newspaper clipping. "Local News & Notes." Western Daily Press, (Bristol), August 27, 1926., p. 7 c. 6. "'Princess' Caraboo." "Some interesting sidelights on the romantic history of 'Princess' Caraboo, referred to in Wednesday's issue, are provided by Mr Charles Eyles, managing clerk to Messrs James Sinnott and Son, solicitors to the 'Princess's' daughter. Miss Mary Ann Baker, who died in February, 1900, at the age of 71 years. Miss Baker is described lady-like woman although eccentric in her dress. She clothed herself almost in rags and appeared rarely to wash her face. She lived at 2, Queen Street, Bedminster, and at the time of her death as the neighbours had not seen her for some time the police broke into the house and found her lying dead. An inquest was held at the Bedminster Police Station, and it was revealed at this inquiry that she was the daughter of Mrs Mary Baker, who had been known as Princess Caraboo." "A Seller of Leeches." "Miss Baker was buried at Arno's Vale and as she was apparently without friends or relatives Mr Eyles was the only person who attended the funeral. She died intestate and a communication was received from the Treasury by a Bristol solicitor to sell her property. In the meantime Mr Eyles had discovered, however, that a relative was in existence at Ilfracombe. With a doctor he visited the house and found that some of the bedrooms had not been used for 20 or years, and there was a thick coating of dust over everything. Documents and money were scattered about the house and it was found that Miss Baker had died worth about £600 or £800. She had made a living selling leeches as her father and mother had done before her." "Place of Burial." "Miss Baker's father and the 'Princess's husband, appears have been a doctor, and amongst papers found in the house were letters signed 'R. Baker,' and dated 1840 and 1841, relating to the purchase of large number of leeches. There was also the scrap of paper (reproduced in another column) possibly in the mother's handwriting, and memorial card stating that Mrs Baker (the 'Princess') died on December 25, and was buried at Hebron Chapel on January 3, 1865. It was in looking through the papers in the house that Mr Eyles was able to trace the relative at Ilfracombe to whom the proceeds of the estate passed. At the sale Eyles purchased, as souvenirs, a bead bracelet which had probably belonged to the mother, a small ivory salt spoon and a glass cup in the base of which is inserted a George III sixpence. The romantic story of the 'Princess's' hoax aroused more than local interest and her career was the subject of an illustrated article in the Strand Magazine in April, 1895. An examination of the burial registers at Hebron Chapel, Bedminster, shows that a Mary Baker, of Princes Street, Bedminster, aged 74 years, was interred there on January 3, 1865." "The Princess Caraboo." Western Daily Press, (Bristol), August 27, 1926, p. 8 c. 6-7. The photographed "scrap of paper" states: "Mary Baker [/] Daughter of [/] Richard and Mary Baker [/] born 7th February 1829 [/] Priscilla Baker born 16th Nov [/] 1830 4 o clock in the morning. [/] Died 26th October 1831[.]" "An Almondsbury Hoax." Western Daily Press, (Bristol), August 25, 1926., p. 9 c. 3.]


1817 April / BO / Caraboo's daughter / Western Daily Press, Feb 13, 1900 / That on Feb. 7, John Smith, neighbor of Mary Jane Baker, aged about 55, smelled burning, and in B's yard saw old rags and a chair burning but was assured by Baker that it was all right. She not seen again. On Feb. 11th, police informed she not see, sent P. C. Drake and another constable who broke in and found her on top landing, dead. There were extensive burns on left side of body. Ac to post mortem, death due to internal diseases, possibly accelerated by burns. / John Smith, Queen Street, Coronation Road / next door to Baker's, which was no. 2, Queen Street. [A: 64.1, 64.2, 64.3. "Burning Fatality." Western Daily Press, (Bristol), February 13, 1900, p. 7 c. 7.]


1817 Ap. 3 / Caraboo / 613.k.20 (5). [A; 65. "613.k.20.(5.)" is the British Library's shelfmark for Gutch's book Caraboo.]


1817 Ap. 3 / Evening, at Almondsbury, near BristolCaraboo / Biographical Tracts 613.K.20 / Young woman walked into a cottage making signs that she wished to sleep theredeclined animal food, showing much disgust. Examined by a magistrate who said that her language and manners were such as never in his experience. Imposturea Portuguese named Manuel Eynesso pretended he could speak her language and told a story purporting to be an interpretation of her own that she had been stolen from an East Indian Islandand someone else acquainted with the East Indies "in the warmth of his anxiety to discover her history" told that her name was Caraboo of Chinese-Malay origin and kidnapped by pirates from her home in Java on a ship, from which she escaped to the coast of England, having exchanged her clothes, worked in gold, for common clothes, and had wandered 6 weeks. The story is that she was identified as Mary Baker and that she confessedand told some incidents in her life. Her parents were visited and corroborated the stories of incidentsno record they ever went to Bristol to identify her. She wished to go to America and her passage was paidextraordinarilyto Philadelphia. / George Psalmanazar / See R.J. [A: 66.1 to 66.6. "Biographical Tracts" has not been traced; however, there are some other accounts of her imposture. Baring-Gould, Sabine. Devonshire Characters and Strange Events. London: John Lane, 1908, 35-46. Ashton, John. Varia. London: Ward & Downey, 1894, 111-142. Stevens, C.L. McCluer. Famous Crimes and Criminals. New York: Duffield, 1924, 82-88. ("See R.J.")]


[1817 April] / The Princess Caraboo. / 'Western Daily Press,' Bristol, 27th August 1926. [A; 67. Pabst: "original note missing / copied from The Fortean, no. 9, p. 9." Newspaper clipping. "The Princess Caraboo." Western Daily Press, (Bristol), August 27, 1926, p. 8 c. 6-7. "These illustrations supplement  the story told...." Fortean Society Magazine, no. 9 (Spring 1944): 9.]


1817 Ap / [illustration] / [Fort's free-hand copy of the "letters" made by "Princess Caraboo"]. [A; 68. Pabst: "original note missing / copied from The Fortean, no. 9, p. 9." "These illustrations supplement the story told...." Fortean Society Magazine, no. 9 (Spring 1944): 9.]


1817 Ap 4 / Mexico / q / I. [I; 598. A class I earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1817 Ap. 10 / Bohemia / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 599. Greg, 66.]


1817 April 16 / (It) / (Volc) / 2 a.m. (?) / Palermo / sounds, objs cross sun, and Etna eruption / BA 54 / D-228. [I; 600. The note copies information from page 228 of The Book of the Damned. Mallet, 111. "At Palermo, strange howling noises were heard in the air, and large spots were obseved on the sun. A very great eruption of Etna was the cause of the shocks at both places." Mallet records "2h 30 m A.M." as the time for a severe shock on the same date at Appenzell, Switzerland, (not for the several shocks at Naples and Palermo).]


1817 Ap 17 / Rhine / BA '60 / Fireball. [I; 601. Greg, 66.]


1817 [Ap. 26] / Phe by igneous meteor / [London Times]. Ap. 26/3/c. [I; 602. "Spain.Alcour, Feb, 28." London Times, April 3, 1817, p. 2 c. 3. "On the 20th ult. the weather was rainy, and extremely warm. At three o'clock in the afternoon, there was some lightning, followed with thunder; about half-past six there arose all of a sudden a most tempestuous wind; rain and hailstones fell; the whole heavens became illuminated with lightning, with the exception of a black cloud which increased by little and little to a great hulk; at seven a detonation was heard of such appaling loudness, that the people in the streets fell in terror on the ground, and a suffocating smell of sulphur ensued, and spread into the interior of their houses; a second detonation, not so loud, followed, and the black cloud then bursting open, an immense globe of fire issued from it, and descending rapidly on a Convent of Franciscans, destroyed the iron-cross which surmounted it, set fire to the timber work, and dividing itself into two volumes of flame, enveloped the whole of one side of the church, and making an opening of more than six feet in the walls burst into the interior." "Corsica." London Times, April 26, 1817, p. 3 c. 3. "You will have read in the newspapers the phenomenon produced in Spain by an igneous meteor. There was something similar in Corsica."]


1817 Ap. 26 / [London Times]. 3-c / Meteor of Corsica / Aud phe. [I; 603. "Corsica." London Times, April 26, 1817, p. 3 c. 3. "For three months we have had no rain, and the most incessant and terrible winds have prevailed: in the middle of March a dreadful conflagration appeared in the canton of Venaco; in less than three hours the flames had destroyed a surface of more than two leagues of this fine country. Fifteen houses were burnt in the village of Poggio. It is believed that the cause of this fire was electrical, and that fires of a similar kind that have happened in other cantons have had the same origin."]


1817 Ap. 27 / Hesse / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 604. Greg, 66.]


1817 Ap. 30 / Q's at Naples, and Vesuvius greater activity / J. des Deb., May 16, 1817. [I; 605. "Italie." Journal des Debats, May 16, 1817, p. 1 c. 1.]


1817 May 2 / Fireball / Gottingen / BA 60. [I; 606. Greg, 66; "or 3rd May."]


1817 May 21 / 12 h / Venus / Inf conjunction / (Al). [I; 607. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1817, 52.]


1817 June 10 / June 30hot rain / at Inverness, Aug. 7, 31, Sept 2, and several times in 1818 / Roper / List of Earthquakes. [I; 608. Roper, 29-30. Roper cites Mallet's catalog for these earthquakes, which include: February 20, September 1, and November 11, 1818. Roper gives the last date as November 10, 1818. Mallet, 112-113, 119-120. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 118. Milne does not mention the "hot rain," (only three shocks on June 10 and 16). "Earthquakes." Philosophical Magazine, 51 (1818): 193-194. "June 30th. After a storm accompanied with a hot rain two shocks very violent were felt at Inverness and in the environs of Loch Ness in Scotland." "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 88 pt. 2 (December 1818): 557-558, at 557. Earthquakes on November 9, 1817, at Yorkshire, and November 10, 1818, at Inverness, are noted. "Earthquakes." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 6 (1820): 370-371.]


1817 June 30 / Inverness and neighborhood / a quake and hot water fell from the sky / preceded / Rept B Assoc 54/112 / not preceded. [I; 609. Mallet, 112; "Preceded by a storm and hot rain."]


1817 July 24 / Loud detonations / and the Lake of Canterno, Italy, ran dry / Nat. Reg. (Wash.), Oct 25. [I; 610. "Italy." National Register, 4 (Oct 25. 1817): 268. "Leghorn, Aug. 9Natural Phenomena.—On the 24th of last month, about mid-day, after a very loud detonation, the Lake of Canterno, also called Porciano totally disappeared. A large opening was discovered in the bottom through which the waters have probably escaped into the sinuosities of the neighbouring mountains." "Leghorn, August 9." London Morning Post, August 30, 1817, p. 2 c. 5.]


1817 Aug 7 / Augsburg / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 611. Greg, 66.]


1817 Aug 21 / [London Times]. 2-e / St. Stevens / q. [I; 612. "The New York Advertiser of the 17th June...." London Times, August 21, 1817, p. 2 c. 5.  A severe shock is reported at "St. Stevens," New Brunswick, (which probably was "St. Stephen"), on June 4th.]


1817 Aug 29 / [London Times]. 2-e / Inverness / q. [I; 613. "Another slight shock...." London Times, August 29, 1817, p. 2 c. 5.  The shock was felt on August 17th.]


1817 Sept. 8 / Richmond / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 614. Greg, 66.]


1817 Sep 12 / Dark / Scotland / (123). [I; 615.]


1817 Sept 25 / Great meteor visible at noon in Venezuela / National Intelligencer (Wash.), Nov. 11, 1817. [I; 616. (National Intelligencer, November 11, 1817).]


1817 Oct 5 / Woburn, Mass / q / BA '11. [I; 617. A class I earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1817 Oct 6 / Tunbridge Wells / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 618. Greg, 66.]


1817 Oct 13 / 11 p.m. / Detonating meteor at Genesee, N.Y. / National Intelligencer (Wash.), Nov. 4. [I; 619. (National Intelligencer, November 4. 1817).]


1817 Oct 17 / Aix / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 620. Greg, 66.]


1817 Oct 21 / Day of the W. Indian hurricane8 inches of rain fell on Island of Grenadaheavy rains continued. / Q J. Roy Inst. 5-136. [I; 621. "Extraordinary Fall of Rain." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 5 (1818): 136.]


1817 Nov. 22 / Severe quake in Greenland / BA 54 / Hecla quiet at the time. [I; 622. Mallet, 114. "Earthquake in Greenland." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 5 (1818): 135.]


1817 Dec. 8 / Op. Mars / (Al). [I; 623. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1817, 136.]


1817 Dec 8 / 12:57 a.m. / Ipswich / Detonating meteor from Tauruslike discharge of a distant cannon / Gent's Mag., 1818/1/159. [I; 624. "Arts and Sciences." Gentleman's Magazine, 88 pt.1 (February 1818): 159-160, at 159. Greg, 66.]


1817 Dec 10 / 11 p.m. / Smart shock / S. Car and Georgia / Niles' Weekly Register, Jan 17, 1818. [I; 625. "Chronicle." Niles' Weekly Register, 13 (January 17, 1818): 343-344, at 343. cv. Earthquake. "About eleven o'clock on the night of the 10th of last month (December) a smart shock of an earthquake was felt at the same instant in nearly all the towns and settlements in the upper part of South Carolina and Georgia.".]


1817 Dec 22 to 26 / Vesuvius. [I; 626. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1818:


1818 / Hail in the Orkneys preceded by sounds like cannonading (Schwedoff) / Symons 17/149 / Schwedoff explained that detonated like meteorites. [I; 627. Schwedoff, Theodore. "On the Origin of Hail." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 17 (November 1882): 146-152, at 149. "The hail at the Orkneys in 1818 was preceded by a noise like the cannonade of several pieces or artillery."]


1818 Jan 6 / Loft's Vulcan / supposed by him to be a comet in transit over sunobserved at least 3 1/2 hours / Ipswich / Quar Jour Roy Inst 5/117 / No comet known. [I; 628. "Supposed Transit of a Comet." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 5 (1818): 117. Lofft, Capel. "On the appearance of an opaque body traversing the sun's disc." Monthly Magazine, or, British Register, 45 (March 1, 1818): 102-103.]


1818 Jan 17 / Vermont / det met / BA 67. [I; 629. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 415.]


1818 Jan 18 / Siberia / BA 60 / Fireball. [I; 630. Greg, 66.]


1818 Jan 28 / Campbelltown, Scotland / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 631. Greg, 66.]


1818 Feb. 6 / Daylight met / Blackwoods 2/516. [I; 632. "Meteor Observed by Dr. Clarke, Cambridge." Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, 2 (February, 1818): 516.]


1818 Feb. 6 / 2 p.m. / Brilliant daylight meteor from zenith toward north / Cambridge and Norfolk / Gent's Mag 1818/1/268, 461 / sun brilliant in a cloudless sky. [I; 633. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 88 pt.1 (March 1818): 268-269, at 268. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 88 pt.1 (May 1818): 461-463, at 461.]


1818 Feb 6 / Lincolnshire / det. met. / B.A., '60 / '54-115. [I; 634. Greg, 66. Mallet, 114. Thomson, David Purdie. Introduction to Meteorology. Edinburgh and London: W. Blackwood and Sons, 1849, 302. "...its light was so intense, that it shone with an effulgence equal to the sun which was then shining in a cloudless sky. Dr. Clarke supposes that a meteoric body fell from this meteor, and accounts from Lincolnshire state, that upon the appearance of the fireball a hissing sound was heard, and a trembling of the earth took place like the shock of an earthquake."  Clarke, Edward Daniel. "Account of a Meteor, apparently accompanied by Matter falling from the Atmosphere, as seen at Cambridge." Annals of Philosophy, 11 (1818): 273-274. "Friday, the 6th inst. about two o'clock...." Norfolk Chronicle, February 14, 1818, p. 2 c. 5.]


[1818 Feb 6 /] 1818 Feb 16 / At Coningsby, Lincolnshiresounds like gun shots / ground shaking slightly / on 20th, noises like firing of cannon and a "meteor" seen at Kirkton-in-Lindsey / Repeat, Ap. 30 / B Assoc 54/115. [I; 636. Mallet, 114-115, and 118. "A subterranean noise like the firing of cannon was heard at this time." Again, on February 20, 1818, Mallet records another shock, ("Accompanied, as the former shock, by noises like the firing of cannon"); and, again, on April 30, 1818, Mallet records a "smart shock" across Lincolnshire. "Luminous Meteor." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 5 (1818): 132. "The same meteor was seen at the same time, at Swaffham in Norfolk; and it is remarkable, that a slight shock of an earthquake, accompanied with noises, was heard and felt at Coningby, Holderness, and other places, on the same day." "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 88 pt.1 (February 1818): 171, cv. "Feb. 6." "Tremblemens de terre en 1818."Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 9 (1818): 433-435. Only the "secousse légère" at Coningby, on February 6th, is recorded, without any mention of a meteor.]


1818 Feb. 15 / Limoges, France / met reported / unknown whether iron or stone / Phil Mag 4/8/459.  BA / 1860. [I; 635. Greg, Robert Philips. "Observations on Meteorolites...." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 8 (1854): 329-342, 449-463, at 459. Greg, 66.]


[1818 Feb 16. Wrong date; see: 1818 Feb 6, (I; 636.).]


1818 Feb. 20 / 3 p.m. / Another shock at Coningsby, and a meteor seen in Lindsey. First shock at C. was Feb 6. / In Lincolnshire. / Gents Mag., 1818/1/171, 364. [I; 637. Mallet, 115. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 88 pt.1 (February 1818): 171, cv. "Feb. 6." "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 88 pt.1 (April 1818): 364. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 118. "Felt also at Kirton in Lindsey, where meteor apparently about size of cannon ball with a streamer behind it; seen at same time moving in air with great velocity."]


1818 Feb 20 / Great quake / Italy / 23 / IIIqFrance / BA '11. [I; 638. A class III earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1818 Feb. 20 / (It) / phe / Catania / See 1805. / See Ann de Chimie 33/405. [I; 639. "Tremblement de terre de Catane." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 9 (1818): 435-437. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 341-342. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1818 Feb 20 / III / 23I / q's / Italy. [I; 640. A class III earthquake, and a class I earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1818 Feb 23 / France / II / q. [I; 641. A class II earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1818 Feb 24-25 / towns in Bouches-du-Rhone / (q's) / B As. '54/115. [I; 642. Mallet, 116.]


1818 Feb 28 / q / Italy / I. [I; 643. A class I earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1818 March 1 / One of the most terrible hurricanes in history of Mauritius / Gent's Mag. 1818/2/76. [I; 644. "Abstract of Foreign Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 88 pt. 2 (July 1818): 73-77, at 76.]


1818 March 7 / afternoon / Isle of Wright (near Whitwell) / For half an hour a roaring sound and violent atmospheric disturbance. The clbrst. called a waterspout. Nothing said [was] seen. / Gent's Mag., 1818/1/364. [I; 645. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 88 pt.1 (April 1818): 364.]


[1818 March 14. Wrong date. See: 1813 March 13, (I: 646, 647, 648, 649).]


1818 Ap. 10 / Zaborzika, Volhynis / Stone fell. / BA, 60. [I; 650. Greg, 66. This is the Zaborzika meteorite.]


1818 Ap. 11 / Zaborzika, Volhynia, Russia / Metite / (F). [I; 651. Fletcher, 99. This is the Zaborzika meteorite. Fletcher gives April 11 as the correct date, ("not 10").]


1818 Ap. 30 / Again / See Feb 6, 1818. [I; 652. Another shock felt across Lincolnshire and to Holderness in Yorkshire. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 118. See: "1818 Feb 6," (I; 636).]


1818 May 17 / Motz, Savoy / Q preceded by loud detonations. / BA 54. [I; 653. Mallet, 118.]


1818 May 31 / q / Mexico / II. [I; 654. A class II earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1818 June / Seres, Macedonia, Turkey / Metite / F. [I; 655. Fletcher, 99. This is the Seres meteorite.]


1818 June / Seres, Macedonia / stone / 15 lbs / BA 60. [I; 656. Greg, 66. This is the Seres meteorite.]


1818 July / Isle of Elyafter a th storm, several "creeping creatures" ab six inches in length were picked upwere locusts. / Gentleman's Mag. 88/366 / They were locusts. [I; 657. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 88 pt. 2 (October 1818): 366, c.v. "Immediately after a thunder-storm...."]


1818 July 17 / bet 9 and 10 p.m. / Met size of full moon / Montpelier, Vt. / A.J. Sci 2/32/441. [I; 658. Haidinger, William. "Notices of Meteoric Masses." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 32 (1861): 440-443, at 441. "Meteor in America." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 6 (1819): 160-161.]


1818 July 19 / South of France / shocks and heavy rains and followed by great electrical explosions / BA 54. [I; 659. Mallet, 118.]


1818 July 19 / Pau, etc. / q and great th. storm / BA 54. [I; 660. Mallet, 118.]


1818 Aug 3 / Worthing / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 661. Greg, 66.]


1818 Aug 5 / Chelenfort / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 662. Greg, 66.]


1818 Aug 10 / Slobodka, Smolensk, Russia / Metite / (F). [I; 663. Fletcher, 99. This is the Slobodka meteorite. Greg, 66.]


1818 Sept 2 / [London Times], 3-c / Bencoolen / q. [I; 664. "According to letters from Bencoolen...." London Times, September 2, 1818, p. 3 c. 3. The quake at Bencoolen, (now, Bengkulu City, Sumatra, Indonesia), was felt on March 18th.]


1818 Sept 8 / q / Italy / II. [I; 665. A class II earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1818 Sept 14 / England / Fireball / [BA 60]. [I; 666. Greg, 66.]


1818 Oct 21-24 / Volc / Goentoer, Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-880. [I; 667. Backer, 880. The Guntur volcano.]


1818 Oct 21, etc. / Violent eruption, volc Goenoing, in Preang. / Gents Mag. 1919/1/557. [I; 668. "Antiquarian and Philosophical Researches." Gentleman's Magazine, 89 pt. 1 (June 1819): 557. The Guntur volcano.]


1818 Oct. 31 / Hecla / BA 54. [I; 669. Mallet, 120. The Hekla volcano.]


1818 Oct 31 / (Metite) / Between Becharest in Wallachia, and Mehadia. Great met. / (BA 1849) / Ac to Boguslawski's Catalog it was aerolithic. / BA '60. [I; 670. Greg, 66. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 18. "Near Mehadia, a meteor by which the whole neighbourhood was illuminated for 5 minutes."]


1818 Nov 8 / and great q / Volc. / Lemongang / Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-878 / also another volcSmeroe. [I; 671. Backer, 880. The Lamongan and Semeru volcanoes.]


1818 Nov. 13 / Meteor / Gosport / BA 60. [I; 672. Greg, 66.]


1818 Nov. 17 / Fireball / Gosport / BA 60. [I; 673. Greg, 66.]


1818 Nov 20 / q / St. Domingo, West Indies / II. [I; 674. A class II earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1818 Nov. 28 / Comet in Pegasus. [I; 675. Comet C/1818 W2.]


1818 Dec 9 / q'sI / Italy and Philippines. [I; 676. Two class I earthquakes. Milne, 701.]


1818 Dec 18 / Halle / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 677. Greg, 66.]


1818 Dec 20 to May 21, 1819 / Eight q's in the West Indies, of which seven were between 9 and 11 p.m. / BA 54. [I; 678. Mallet, 121.]


1818 Dec 26 / 3 h / Venus / Inf Conjunction / (Al). [I; 679. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1818, 136.]


1819:


1819 / Auroras / Gt Brit / Am. J. Sci 14/95. [I; 680. "Notice of the late Aurora Borealis." American Journal of Science, 14 (1828): 91-111, at 95.]


1819 Jan 4 / [London Times], 2-d / Vesuvius. [I; 681. "Extract of a letter from Naples...." London Times, January 4, 1819 p. 2 c. 4.]


1819 Jan 29 / q / Caucasia / I. [I; 682. A class I earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1819 Feb. 2 / Canterbury / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 683. Greg, 66.]


1819 March 12 / Vera Cruz, Mexico / q / I. [I; 684. A class I earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1819 March 18 / q / Oran and Mascara, in Morocco / "A great number of the inhabitants disappeared beneath the ruins." / B Assoc 1854/122 / Whole district of Cutch was ravaged. / "Many meteors or falling stars were observed on the night after." / B Assoc 1854/122. [I; 685.1, 685.2. Mallet, 122-123. Milne, 701.]


1819 March 26 / Berne / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 686. Greg, 66.]


1819 April / Metite / Salerno, Italy / at Massa-Lubrense / Stonefall / BA '60. [I; 687. Greg, 66.]


1819 Ap 3, 4, 11 /Copiapo, Chile / qs / III. [I; 688. A class III earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1819 Ap. 3, 4, 11 / Great q. / Chile / [BA] '11. [I; 689. A class III earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1819 Ap. 17 / Vesuvius. [I; 690. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1819 May 3 / Oaxaca, Mexico / q / II. [I; 691. A class II earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1819 May 5 / 12:30 p.m. / Great met, Aberdeen and other places, exploded with a sound that terrified cattle. / Q.J. Roy Inst 7-395 / See BA 67. [I; 692. "Meteors." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 7 (1819): 395. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 415.]


1819 May 26 / Italy (Latium) / q / I. [I; 693. A class I earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1819 May 26 / Etna / BA 54. [I; 694. Mallet, 122. The Etna volcano.]


1819 May 27-29 / Eruption of Etna / Q. Jour Roy Inst 19-227. [I; 695. "An Account of the Eruption of Mount Etna, of the 27th May, 1819." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 19 (1825): 227-234. The note gives "Vesuvius" as the volcano, but this has been corrected as "Etna."]


1819 May 27-28 / ab. midnight / Etna begins. / Bib. Univ. 11/191. [I; 696. Moricand, Stephano. "Notice sur une éruption récente de l'Etna." Bibliothèque Universelle des Sciences, Belles-Lettres, et Arts, Sciences et Arts, 11 (1819): 191-199. The Etna volcano.]


1819 June 9, 10, 11, 18, 24 / Detonations like cannon fire from Etna / Q J. Roy Inst 19-229. [I; 697. "An Account of the Eruption of Mount Etna, of the 27th May, 1819." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 19 (1825): 227-234, at 229-230. The note gives "Vesuvius" as the volcano, but this has been corrected as "Etna."]


1819 June 11 / A few days beforecoast Masswave 10 feet highseveral persons drowned. / Niles Weekly Register, June 19. [I; 698. "Boston, June 11." Niles' Weekly Register, 16 (June 19, 1819): 288. At Sandy Bay, Cape Ann.]


1819 June 13 / 6 a.m. / Jonsac / "contains no iron / BA 60. [I; 699. Greg, 67. This is the Jonzac meteorite.]


1819 June 13 / 6:15 a.m. / Jonzac / Stones fell like hail after 3 detonations. / Bib. Univ. 15/311 / Charente-Infériure / (F). [I; 700. Fletcher, 99. "Notices des Séances...." Bibliothèque Universelle des Sciences, Belles-Lettres, et Arts, Sciences et Arts, 15 (1820): 307-311, at 311. This is the Jonzac meteorite.]


1819 June 14 / Larvae / At Riga, Russia, during a strong n.w. wind, fell caterpillars. People swept [them] into heaps and dug ditches to bury them. Destroyed in every way think of without seeming to diminish the numbers. / Niles Weekly Register, Sept 4, 1819. [I; 701. "Foreign Articles." Niles' Weekly Register, 17 (September 4, 1819): 11-16. at 15, cv. Russia.]


1819 ab. middle of June / Berwick-upon-Tweed / about noon / met or met train / first like a ball of fire and then like a flaming sword / visible 5 minutes / LT, June 18-3-a. [I; 702. "A remarkable meteor...." London Times, June 18, 1819, p. 3 c. 1. "A remarkable meteor was observed at Berwick-upon-Tweed last week about noon, the sun at the time being very bright, and the sky cloudless. It had the appearance at first of a ball of fire, and afterwards of a flaming sword pointing to the earth, in a direction over the town. It continued in sight above five minutes, and took a northerly course at a great distance from the earth."]


1819 June 16 / (q) / Cutch, India / preceded by a violent wind and "noise like that of a large flight of birds" / B Assoc 1854/122. [I; 703. Mallet, 123. Milne, 701.]


1819 June 16 / Time of the great q. / At Masulipatam, India, a tremendous th. storm. And a fireball burst, doing damage. / BA 55-98. [I; 704. Powell, Baden. "Report on observations of luminous meteors, 1854-55." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1855, Notices and Abstracts, 79-100, at 98. "On the 16th of June 1819, at the time of the great earthquake, a tremendous thunder-storm occurred at Maulipatam, during which a fire-ball was seen to descend on the roof of a bungalow, when it burst with an explosion like a 40-inch shell, and immediately set the thatch in a blaze." Masulipatam is, now, Machilipatnam, India.]


1819 June 16 / q of Cutch / 1150 persons buried in the ruins of Bhooj. Said that from the hill was thrown a ball of fire that then fell to the ground, scorching vegetation. Rain fell in torrents. / Trans. Lit Soc Bombay, 3/90. [I; 705. "Papers relating to the Earthquake which occurred in India in 1819." Transactions of the Literary Society of Bombay, v. 3, 90-116, at 102. The ball of fire and scorched vegetation were observed at Roha, (Kotda), with a similar observation at Poorbunder, (Porbandar).   "1140" bodies were recovered at Bhooj with about 300 missing and presumed buried in the ruins, (page 101).]


1819 June 16 / 1st shock at Kutch / Am J. Sci, 4-316 / also at Ahmedabad / another, 23rd, midnight. / Volcano opened 30 miles from Bhooj. [I; 706. "Account of the Earthquake at Kutch, on the 16th of June, 1819. Drawn up from published and unpublished letters from India." American Journal of Science, 4 (1822): 315-319. "Account of the Earthquake at Kutch, on the 16th of June, 1819." Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, 3 (June, 1820): 120-124.]


1819 June 18 / Auxerre, France / "Water spout" and large hail fell. Destroyed the harvest in 19 communes. / Q J Roy Inst 6-162. [I; 707. "Water Spout." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 6 (1819): 162.]


1819 June 26 / "Passage of [the] earth through [the] tail of [a] comet" / Clerke, Hist Astro, appendix. [I; 708. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 4th ed., 1902; 103, 446.]


1819 June 26 / See July 26. / 3 solar spots by Gruithuisen cited with "Vulcans" / An. Sci Disc, 1860/411. [I; 709. "New Planets." Annual of Scientific Discovery, 1860, 409-411, at 411. See: (July 26).]


1819 June 26 / Time of a comet, Pastorff saw dark spot with a luminous center cross the sun. Astronomers, among them Olbers, said could not have been the comet. / Webb, Celestial Objects, p. 40.

[I; 710. Webb, William Thomas. Celestial objects for common telescopes. 3d ed. London: Longmans, Green, 1873, 38. 4th ed. London: Longmans, Green, 1881, 39-40. Comet C/1819 N1. Olbers, Heinrich Wilhelm Matthias. "On the Passage of the Comet of 1819 across the Disc of the Sun." Philosophical Magazine, 57 (1821): 444-446, at 445. Pastoroff states: "...the small black spot in the middle of the disc on the 26th of June was a new spot, or the nucleus of the comet." Olbers states: "I will not decide whether what MM. Gruithuisen and Wildt saw upon the sun (at the period of the passage) was really the comet, or an ordinary spot. However, none of the spots seen before the 26th of June could be on that day in the middle of the disc; and M. Brandes could not perceive at twelve o'clock the spot observed at eight by M. Gruithuisen: these two facts appear very remarkable." Pastorff, Johann Wilhelm. "Schreiben des Herrn Geheimenrathes Pastorff an den Herausgeber." Astronomische Nachrichten, 4 (1825): 273-278. See: 1828 May 26, (I; 1391).]


1819 summer / Large numbers of butterfliesthe Camberwell Beautyseen floating off the coast of Durham. This butterfly so rare in Gt. Britain that from 1911 to 1921, only about 20 recorded captures in Eng and Scotland. / The Field, Nov. 5, 1921. [I; 711. (The Field, November 5, 1921; not at BNA.)]


1819 July 1 / See July 3. [I; 712. See: 1819 July 3, (I; 715).]


1819 July 2 / [London Times], 2-b / Etna. [I; 713. "Extract of a letter from Messina...." London Times, July 2, 1819, p. 2 c. 2. The Etna volcano.]


1819 July 3 / Ab 2 hours after sunset in England, new comet, not far from Beta Auriga, nearly in a line with Beta Capella. To north and not far from horizon when first seen. / [London Times] 5-3-bc / 6-3-c / Had been seen at Leeds, at 10 and 11 p.m., July 1. Declination ab 40° N. Supposed longitude 10 or 15° of Cancer. / [London Times, July] 7-3-dAberdeen on the 1st. / This comet had a tail. [I; 714.1, 714.2. "New Comet." London Times, July 5, 1819, p. 3 c. 2. "Between 10 and 11 o'clock...." London Times, July 6, 1819, p. 3 c. 3. "The Comet." London Times, July 7, 1819, p. 3 c. 4. Comet C/1819 N1.]


1819 July 3 / Sudden appearance of a comet / Paris / Clerke, Hist Astro/103. [I; 715. Clerke, Agnes Mary. A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1st ed., (1885), 134; 4th ed., (1902), 103. "Indications of the same kind had been afforded by the comet which suddenly appeared above the north-western horizon of Paris, July 3, 1819, after having enveloped (as already stated) our terrestrial abode in its filmy appendages...."  The Tralles comet, (C/1819 N1), was discovered on July 1st, with its head being about zero magnitude, (as bright as the star Vega). Hind, John Russell. The Comets. London, J.N. Parker and Son, 1852, 112. Hind states that Cacciatore claimed that the comet "exhibited phases similar to a crescent moon, during part of its visibility, and that the crescent was not always on the same side of the nucleus." From July 3 to 23, Cacciatore observed the crescent shape of its nucleus, which reversed its position on July 15. Cacciatore, Niccolò. Della cometa apparsa in Luglio del 1819. [Palermo]: Dalla Reale Stamperia, 1819, 46, with observations at 16, 20, 27, 29, and 34. Comet C/1819 N1.]


1819 July 14 / Terrific detonations from Vesuvius / Q. J. Roy Inst 19-232. [I; 716. "An Account of the Eruption of Mount Etna, of the 27th May, 1819." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 19 (1825): 227-234, at 232. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1819 July 24 / Detonating meteor / Youngstown, Ohio / A. J. Sci 6/316. [I; 717. "Meteors." American Journal of Science, 6 (1823): 315-325, at 315-316. Greg, 67.]


1819 July 26 / Remarkable storm / Catskill / A. J. Sci 4-124. [I; 718. "An account of a remarkable storm which occurred at Catskill, July 26, 1819." American Journal of Science, 4 (1822): 124-142.]


[1819 July 26 /] 1819 Oct. 2 / BO / Larvae / Niles Register of / During a thunderstorm in Bristol, England, a mass of larvae fell from the sky and carried away in bushels. [I; 733. "Foreign Articles." Niles' Weekly Register, 17 (October 2, 1819): 76-80, at 79. "A severe Storm of thunder and lightning...." Bristol Mirror, July 31, 1819, p. 3 c. 4. "During the storm, a flight of caterpillars fell, apparently from a cloud, in a garden, and were shovelled away by bushels."]


1819 Aug 1 / London / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 719. Greg, 67.]


1819 Aug 2 / Kioto, Japan / q / III. [I; 720. A class III earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1819 Aug 6 / Moravia / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 721. Greg, 67.]


1819 Aug / Perseids / A. J. Sci 37-355. [I; 722. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Report on the Shooting Stars of August 9th and 10th, 1839, with other facts relating to the frequent occurrence of a meteoric display in August." American Journal of Science, 37 (1839): 325-338, at 336.]


1819 Aug 13 / Amherst / D-42. [I; 723. The note copies information from page 42 of The Book of the Damned." "Chronicle." Annual Register, 63 (1821): pt. 2, 687, cv. "Gelatinous meteor at Amherst in Massachusetts." "Gelatinous Meteor at Amherst in Massachusetts." Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, 5 (1821): 395-396. "Sur une Matière gélatineuse tombée de l'atmosphère."Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 19 (1821): 67-69. Graves, Rufus. "Account of a gelatinous Meteor." American Journal of Science, 2 (1820): 335-337. Greg, 67.]


1819 Aug 15 / Q and sound like cannon fire, St Andrews, Lower Canada. [I; 724. Mallet, 124. "Earthquakes." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 9 (1820): 355-356.]


1819 Aug 18 / Shocks / Voss, Sweden / BA 54. [I; 725. Mallet, 124.]


1819 Aug 20 / Rotweil / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 726. Greg, 67.]


[1819 Aug 23. Wrong date. See: 1879 Aug 23, (A; 69).]


1819 Aug 31 / Norway / Lunroe series begins. / BA 54. [I; 727. Mallet, 124. Milne, 701.]


1819 Sept 2 / bet 2 and 3 a.m. / and 16th, bet 10 and 11 p.m. / Shocks / New Madrid region / Columbian Sentinel, Oct 30. [I; 728. (Columbian Sentinel, Oct 30, 1819).]


1819 Sept 5 / Red rain / Studein, in Moravia / RMay 16, '46. [I; 729. Refer to: 1846 May 16, (II; 962).]


1819 Sept 5 / Small pieces of earth from a cloud / Annals of Phil, N.S., 12/95. [I; 730. Chladni, Ernst Florens Friedrich. "A new catalogue of the fall of stones, iron, dust, and soft substances, dry or moist, in chronological order." Annals of Philosophy, n.s., 12 (1826): 83-96, at 95. "At Studein, in Moravia, in the jurisdiction of Teltsch, between eleven and twelve o'clock at noon, the sky being serene and tranquil, a shower of small pieces of earth, proceeding from a small insulated transparent cloud." Chladni, Ernst Florens Friedrich. "Neue Beiträge sur Kenntniss der Feuermeteore und der herabgefallenen Massen." Annalen der Physik, 68 (1821): 329-370, at 353-354. Hontschick, Wenzel Kajetán. "Steinregen in Mähren...." Hesperus: encyclopädische Zeitschrift für gebildete Leser, 1819, no. 42 (November 1819): 289-290. Sand, dry clay, and small pebbles fell from a cloud, in an otherwise clear sky, onto the roof of a house for a period of eight to ten seconds, without any rain nor wind, and rolled off, in the presence of two witnesses standing outside, (one of whom was the local burgrave), while the local inhabitants were indoors, attending church, on Sunday. Chaldni and the editor of the Hesperus dismiss this event as being terrestrial in origin, since the earthy matter, (which contained particles of quartz and flecks of mica), was apparently not consistent with other extraterrestrial aerolites. Studein and Teltsch are the German names for Studená and Telč, in the Czech Republic.  Reference to May 16, 1846. Fournet, Joseph Jean Baptiste Xavier. "Sur les Pluies de Terre Observées Depuis Quel-ques Années dans le Bassin du Rhone." Mémoires de l'Académie des sciences, belles-lettres et arts de Lyon. Classe des Sciences, s. 2 v. 13 (1863): 185-245, at 214.]


1819 Oct 1 / England / Fireball / [BA 60]. [I; 731. Greg, 67.]


1819 Oct 2 or before / Worms / Bristol / Nothing in Bristol Observer. [I; 732. See: 1819 July 26, (I; 733).]


[1819 Oct. 2. Wrong date. See: 1819 July 26, (I; 733).]


1819 Oct 13 / (F) / Politz, S. Prussia / 3 stones fell. / Ph. Mag 4/8/459. 8 a.m. / BA '60. [I; 734. Fletcher, 99. This is the Pohlitz meteorite. Greg, Robert Philips. "Observations on Meteorolites...." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 4 v. 8 (1854): 329-342, 449-463, at 459. Greg, 67.]


1819 Oct 24 / Antwerp / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 735. Greg, 67.]


1819 Oct 28 / morning / Earthquake in Montreal / 29th"a storm of thunder and lightning" for hour and a half of unusual violence / Quebec Mercury, Nov. 16 / Violent shocks, 7:25 a.m., on 28thMercury, Nov. 2. [I; 736. "Late Earthquake." Quebec Mercury, November 16, 1819, p. 366. "Many inhabitants...." Quebec Mercury, November 2, 1819, p. 350. "Many inhabitants of this city assert that, on Thursday last about 25 minutes past 7 o'clock, A.M., they perceived in their houses a tremendous motion, similar to that caused by an earthquake; the duration of which was 5 or 6 seconds." The date of the earthquake was October 28th, (not the 29th).]


1819 Nov 2 / In the afternoon at Blankenburg and Dixmunde, Flanders / at night in Scheveningen / Edin Phil Jour 2/381. [I; 737. "Red Rain." Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, 2, no. 4 (April 1820): 381. De Meyer, Isaac-Joseph, and, Philippe De Stoop. "Pluie Rouge, tombée à Blankenberge; Analyse de cette eau." Annales Generales des Sciences Physiques, 2 (1819): 269-271.]


1819 Nov 2-3 / night / D-40 / red rain Scheveningen, Holland / Quar Jour Roy Inst 9-202. [I; 738. The note copies information from page 40 of The Book of the Damned. "On the night of the 2d and 3d of November...." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 9 (1820): 202. "On the night of the 2d and 3d of November, coloured rain also fell at Schweningen, of a red colour. It is described as having the taste of filings of iron, mixed with sulphur." "Singular rain." Annals of Philosophy, 16 (1820): 226. "Pluie rouge tombée à Blankenberge, le 2 novembre 1819."Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 12 (1819): 431-433. De Meyer, Isaac-Joseph, and, Philippe De Stoop. "Unterfuchung des zu Blankenberge in Flandern am 2, November 1819 herabgefallenen rothen Regens." Annalen der Physik und der Physikalischen Chemie, 64 (1820): 335-337.]


1819 Nov 2 / In the Quebec Mercury, Nov. 23, taken from a Salem newspaper, dated Nov 9, which takes from a Newburyport paper of Nov 5. That on the Tuesday before [the] 5th, or the 2nd. Thatintense darkness and thunder and rain that was colored "with some dingy substance". [I; 739. "Dark Days." Quebec Mercury, November 23, 1819, pp. 374-375. "The weather was extremely thick with dense clouds, and so dark in the middle of the day, that lighted candles were necessary in many rooms. A torrent of rain, attended with thunder and lightning, ensued, as severe as we have witnessed this season. And what is singular the rain which fell was noticed by several persons to be coloured as with some dingy substance."]


1819 Nov 2 / Boston / Intense darknesslittle or no rain / Columbian Centinel, Nov 6 / Here, too, the account of rain, Nov. 2, at Newburyport, Mass. [I; 740. (Columbian Centinel, Boston, November 6, 1819; @ Newsbank.)]


1819 Nov 6 to 10 / N. Eng and Canada / Dark Day / Sc Am 112-229. [I; 741. Talman, Charles Fitzhugh. "Dark Days and Forest Fires." Scientific American, n.s., 112 (March 6, 1915): 229. Plummer, Fred Gordon. Forest Fires: Their Causes, Extent, and Effects, With a Summary of Recorded Destruction and Loss. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1912, 18.]


1819 Nov 7 / See Nov. 9. [I: 742. See: (Nov 9).]]


1819 Nov 7 and 9 / See Oct. 28, 29. / Quebec Mercury of Nov. 16Same account as Burlington paper.  "...the blackened colour of the air viewed through a luminous substratum presented a spectacle awful and grand in the extreme." Said that after thunder and lightning had subsided, the darkness continued and seemed to increase until ab. 4 p.m. [I; 743.1, 743.2. "Meteorological Phenomena." Quebec Mercury, November 16, 1819, pp. 366-367. This phenomenon at Montreal was followed, on November 7th, by the earthquake. "A little before 3 o'clock there was a slight shock of an Earthquake, distinctly felt in different parts of the City, accompanied with a noise resembling the discharge of a distant piece of Artillery. As the attention of all classes was closely rivetted on the more impressive aspect of the sky, but little notice was paid to the shock. The encreasing gloom engrossed the attention of all, and every thing else gave way to the awful expectation of what might be the conclusion. About 20 minutes past 3 o'clock, after the darkness had gradually encreased and seemed at that moment to have attained its greatest depth, the whole City was instantaneously illuminated by one of the most vivid flashes of lightning ever witnessed in Montreal; this was suddenly followed by an awful peal of Thunder, so loud and near as to shake the strongest buildings to their foundation."]


1819 Nov 7 / Described in N.Y. Times, 1881, Ap. 23-2-7. [I; 744. "The Dark Day in Canada." New York Times, April 23, 1881, p. 2  c. 7. Dorwin identifies "the morning of Sunday" as November 8, 1819, whereas the correct date was November 7. See: 1819 Nov 8, etc., (I; 755).]


1819 Nov 7 / b. rain / Montreal / Oct 17, 1834. [I; 745. See: 1834 Oct 17, (I; 1930).]


1819 Nov. 7 / See Montreal, May 21-22, 1871. [I; 746. See: 1871 May 21, (IV: 410, 411, 412), and, 1871 May 22, (IV; 419).]


1819 Nov. 7 / Montreal series / See May 20, 24, 1848. [I; 747. See: 1848 May 20, (II; 1219), and, 1848 May 23, (II; 1221).]


1819 Nov. 7 / Dark day and meteor / May 21, 1877. [I; 748. See: 1877 May 21, (IV; 2118).]


1819 Nov. 7 / See Fires like Sept., 1881, and Siberia, 1896? [I; 749. See: (1881 Sept); 1896 July, (VIII: 1541 & 1542); and, 1896 July 19-30, (VII: 1539 & 1544).]


1819 Nov 7 / In Col. Cent., Nov. 24, said that at Louisville the smoke had been attrib to forest fires in Ky. In Nor. Car., to forest fires in that state. [I; 750. (Columbian Centinel, Boston, November 24, 1819; @ Newsbank.) See: 1819 Nov, (I; 773).]


1819 Nov 7 / Columbia Centinel, Nov 24 / That the smoke and darkness had appeared about the same time, attended by colored rain at sea, Canada, Eastern, Western and Southern states. [I; 751. (Columbian Centinel, Boston, November 24, 1819; @ Newsbank.) See: 1819 Nov, (I; 773).]


1819 Nov 7 / See Dark day and met, Madagascar, May 21, 1877. [I; 752. See: 1877 May 21, (IV; 2118).]


1819 Nov 8 before / Norfolk, Va., in the Quebec Mercury, Nov. 23 (dated Norfolk, Nov. 8) / "In consequence of the fire some where (it is said in the Dismal Swamp) our atmosphere is so beclouded and has been so for several days, that no object at any considerable distance can be discerned. The James River Steam Boats have neither of them arrived yet, (9 o'clock), and no doubt the delay proceeds from a difficulty in finding the way along." [I; 753. "Norfolk, Nov. 8." Quebec Mercury, November 23, 1819, p. 375.]


1819 Nov 8 / Niles Weekly Register, Nov. 27 / Said that in West Indies, difficult for navigators to make their observations on account of the smoke. / No special date mentioned. [I; 754. "Chronicle." Niles' Weekly Register, 17 (November 27, 1819): 208, cv. Smoky Atmosphere.]


1819 Nov 8, etc. / Account by Mr J. H. Dorwin to the Montreal Star, in Sci Amer 44/329 / Sun (8th) rose upon a cloudy sky, greenish in places, inky in places. Soon intense darkness and heavy shower of rain like soap suds, which after settling, deposited a substance like soot. Late in afternoon, sky cleared. The next day fine. Morning of the 10th, again the clouds and intense darkness. Then a great body of clouds that seemed to rush upon the city and darknessflash and detonation and shaking city. Then rain with soapy, sooty substance. / Should be 7th and 9th. [I; 755.1, 755.2, 755.3. (Jedediah Hubbell Dorwin was the author of “Montreal in 1816: reminiscences of Mr. J.H. Dorwin.” Montreal Daily Star, February 1, 7, & 26, 1881; not found in February 5, 1881.) "The Dark Day in Canada." New York Times, April 23, 1881, p. 2  c. 7. Dorwin identifies "the morning of Sunday" as November 8, 1819, whereas the correct date was November 7. "The Dark Day in Canada." Scientific American, n.s., 44 (May 21, 1881): 329.]


1819 Nov 9 / In the Northern Whig (Hudson, N.Y.), Nov. 23that ac to a Buffalo paper, rain had fallen "lately", "deeply tinged with some sooty substance". [I; 756. (Northern Whig, November 23, 1819. No copy @ http://nyshistoricnewspapers.org/lccn/sn83021032/ ).]


1819 Nov 9 / (Plan) / Tell that volc or etc., but admit of forest fires. See Sci Amer, that was forest firesstill the phebut can't clear this up till Sept, 1881. [I; 757. "The Dark Day in Canada." Scientific American, n.s., 44 (May 21, 1881): 329. Talman, Charles Fitzhugh. "Dark Days and Forest Fires." Scientific American, n.s., 112 (March 6, 1915): 229.]


1819 Nov 9 / At Albany, N.Y.8 a.m. / darkness and fall of hailwind was from the south. Candles lighted at 3 p.m.atmosphere thick, hazy, yellowish / Quebec Mercury, Nov. 23. [I; 758. "Dark day." Quebec Mercury, November 23, 1819, p. 375.]


1819 Nov 9 / That in several showers in N.Y. State recently ashes had fallen in rain. / Niles Weekly Register, Dec. 4. [I; 759. "Chronicle." Niles' Weekly Register, 17 (December 4, 1819): 223-224, at 223, cv. Singular rain. "Several showers have recently fallen in the state of New Yorkmixed with the rain was a considerable quantity of ashes, and it had a blackish color and sooty smell."]


1819 Nov. 9 / Similar darkness at Quebec / Oct 17, 1834Oct 14, 1835Oct. 18, 1839 / Niles National Register, Nov 16, 1839, p. 192. [I; 760. "Chronicle." Niles' Weekly Register, 57 (November 16, 1839): 192, cv. Darkness at Quebecsingular phenomenon. "The Quebec Canadian states that on the forenoon of the 18th October, a darkness settled upon that city, which rendered the use of candles necessary for several hours in the forenoon. The wind blew from the east, but the darkened clouds came from the west. The atmosphere was moist. The same phenomenon occurred on the 17th of October, 1823; and on the 14th of October, 1835."]


1819 Nov 9 / See Feb. 24/1868. [I; 761. See: 1868 March 2, (III: 1292 & 1293).]


1819 Nov 9 / In Columbian Centinal (Nov 17), said that the smoke at sea had delayed navigation since the first of the monththat smoke had been attributed to forest fires in New Jersey but that his smoke had appeared well to the windward of New Jersey. [I; 762. (Columbian Centinal, November 17, 1819).]


1819 Nov 9 / d fog and q. / See Sept 1, 1841. [I; 763. See: 1841 Sept 1, (II; 366).]


1819 Nov 9 / See Nov 8, 1842. [I; 764. See: 1842 Nov 8, (II; 508).]


1819 Nov 9 / right date / In the Northern Sentinel (Burlington, Vt) / Astonishing appearances in the heavens at Montreala series of awful events, equally impressive to the minds of the illiterate and the learned. Said that the first unusual appearance to attract attention was upon the 7th. A remarkably dark morningabout 8 a.m., appeared a thick cloud or haze of a dingy orange color. About three quarters of an hour later, rain like ink fell, impregnated with a fine substance like ink or ashes. "It was conjectured that a volcano had broken out in some distant quarter and the ashes of the eruption floating in the cloud giving it its unusual color." The weather then cleared and the afternoon was pleasant. Nothing noted the next day. Upon the 9th, darkened in the morning. By noon, candles lighted in all the public offices "and even in the butchers' stalls". The darkness increased and so did a general dread. About 3 o'clock in afternoon, a slight shock of an earthquake and sound like distant gunfire. 20 minutes later, when darkness at its greatest intensity, the whole city suddenly illuminated by "one of the most vivid flashes of lightning ever witnessed in Montreal and an awful peal of thunder so loud and near as to shake the strongest buildings to their foundations". Said that the concussion was so violent that it was supposed by many persons to be a second earthquake. There were other such detonations and then fell rain darker than that of the 7th"apparently more charged with sooty matter". [I; 765.1 to 765.8. (1819 Nov 9 / right date / In the Northern Sentinel, (Burlington, Vt).]


1819 Nov. 10 / Montreal, Canada / slight shock followed by great stormblack rain / B Assoc 1854-125 / D-33. [I; 766. The note copies information from page 33 of The Book of the Damned, (which refers to November 9, not as Maller states, November 10). Mallet, 125. Zurcher, Frédéric, & Margollé, Elie. Meteors, Aërolites, Storms, and Atmospheric Phenomena. New York: C. Scribner, 1876, 238. "Black Rain." Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, 2, no. 4 (April 1820): 381-382. "Tremblemens de terre." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 15 (1820): 421-424, at 422.]


1819 Nov. 10 / Montreal / Listed as a q in Mallets Catalog. [I; 767. Mallet, 125.]


1819 Nov. 13 / Fireball / St. Domingo / BA 60. [I; 769. Greg, 67.]


1819 Nov 19 / Shock / Lunroe, Norway / BA 54 / where had been phe. qs and sounds since Aug 31 / qs in Sweden back to Aug 18. [I; 768. Mallet, 124-125.]


1819 Nov 16 / B. Rain / Broughton, USA / Oeuvres, Arago, 12/466. [I; 770. Arago, François. Oeuvres Complètes de François Arago. Paris: Gide, 1859, v. 12, 466.]


1819 [November] / (+) / Darkness, etc. / Montreal to Bermuda / M.W.R. 1904/23 / Vividly set forth in N.Y. Times, Ap. 23/2/7, 1881. [I; 771. "Forest Fires in November, 1819." Monthly Weather Review, 32 (January 1904): 23-24. "The Dark Day in Canada." New York Times, April 23, 1881, p. 2  c. 7.]


1819 Nov / Dark day in Canada / described in NY Times, 1881, Ap. 23-2-7. [I; 772. "The Dark Day in Canada." New York Times, April 23, 1881, p. 2  c. 7.]


1819 Nov / C / In M.W.R., 1904/23, from the Columbian Centinel (sic), Nov 24that "The late smoky atmosphere was experienced at nearly the same time far at sea, in the Canadas, and in the Eastern, Western, and Southern States, attended with colored rain." Said that many terrified inhabitants of Montreal had fled from the city. "The Montreal papers contain whole columns of accounts of the 'astonishing appearances', and it was conjectured that they were occasioned by eruptions of some neighboring volcano, and it was assured that during the darkness there were three shocks of [an] earthquake." / Said that there was a great forest fire in Kentucky, in North Carolina, and in Canada. / Issue of Dec 8ththat ac to Bermuda papers, dated Nov 6"They complain much of the smoky appearance and scent of the atmosphere which some conjecture to have been occasioned by a great fire on the American continent or to exhalations of the Gulph Stream. [I; 773.1 to 773.6. "Forest Fires in November, 1819." Monthly Weather Review, 32 (January 1904): 23-24. The full quotes from the Columbian Centinel, (November 24, 1819), are given, here, as: "The late smoky atmosphere was experienced at nearly the same time far at sea, in the Canadas, and in the Eastern, Western, and Southern States, attended with colored rain. At sea the mariners found it difficult to take observations. The appearance was the most murky in Canada, where a general dread appears to have prevailed; and it is reported that many of the inhabitants of Montreal, in expectation that the arkness was a forerunner of an earthquake which would engulph their city, actually left it and fled to the neighbouring towns. The Montreal papers contain whole columns of accounts of the 'astonishing appearances', and it was conjectured that they were occasioned by eruptions of some neighboring volcano, and it was assured that during the darkness there were three shocks of an earthquake." "Smoky atmosphere.Letters from Louisville, Ky., inform us that a great part of the woods between that place and Lexington, a distance of 74 miles, were in a blaze; and at Louisville the inhabitants had been nearly suffocated with smoke. * * * In North Carolina the smoky atmosphere was attributed to woods on fire in that State. The same in Canada." And, from the Columbian Centinel, (December 8, 1819), here, as: "South Carolina, Charleston, November 25." "Smoky atmosphere.—We have Bermuda papers of the 6th instant. They complain much of the smoky appearance and scent of their atmospphere, which some conjectured to have been occasioned by a great fire on the American Continent; and others, to be exhalations of the Gulph Stream."]


1819 Nov. / Montreal / slight q and noise like distant thunder at 3 p.m. / the flash and peal and shake at 3:20. [I; 774.]


1819 Nov / See effects of Vesuvius, Ap. to 27th, 1906. [I; 775. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1819 Nov. 18 / London / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 776. Greg, 67.]


1819 Nov. 19 / Fireball / Rochelle / BA 60. [I; 777. Greg, 67.]


1819 Nov. 21 / Det. met / Baltimore / Direction S. / BA '60. [I; 778. Greg, 67.]


1819 Nov. 21 / Slight q. / Lunroe / BA 54 / Series goes on. [I; 779. Mallet, 125.]


1819 Nov. 21 / MetChester Co., Pa / Am. J. Sci 6/316 / going e.N-e. / Half size of full moon / well defined tail / detonation 3 minutes later. [I; 780. "Meteors." American Journal of Science, 6 (1823): 315-325, at 316-318.]


1819 Nov 21 / evening / Brilliant meteor / Philadelphia / 6 p.m. / streets lighted by itthen detonations / Also Wilmington and Washington / Quebec Mercury, Dec. 28 / Am J. Sci 6/315. [I; 781. "A Brilliant Meteor." Quebec Mercury, December 28, 1819, p. 410. "Meteors." American Journal of Science, 6 (1823): 315-325, at 316-318. "Mr. Bowditch on the Meteor of Nov. 21, 1819." Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, 6 (1821-1822): 380.]


1819 Nov 25 / Vesuvius at time of great rainstorm / Philadelphia Register 3-190. [I; 782. (Philadelphia Register and National Recorder, 3 (1820): 190. American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Historical Periodicals Collection:Series 1 (1684-1820). ) The Vesuvius volcano.]


1819 Nov. 28 / 1:30 a.m. / Severe shock / Comrie / BA 54. [I; 783. Mallet, 126. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 118. "At Comrie a very smart shock between 1 and 2 A.M., and more alarming than any for ten years."]


1819 Nov. 29 to Dec 3 / China / q's / II / BA '11. [I; 784. A class II earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1819 Dec 1 / Vesuvius / one of greatest in 20 years / London Magazine / Feb., 1820. [I; 785. "A private letter from Naples says...." London Magazine, 1 (February 1820): 202. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1820:


1820 / Flammarion, "The Atmosphere," p. 472 / "Xavier de Maistre declares that a young girl was carried off by a whirlwind in 1820, but it is not said to what height." / 6-16-6 / 2-12 6 / 29 / 9 [note cut off]. [A; 87.1, 87.2. Flammarion, Camille. The Atmosphere. London: S. Low, Marston, Low, & Searle, 1873, 472.]


1820 / Nantes / shower of small fish / Magasin Pittoresque 4-371 / Cosmos 3-5-79. [I; 786. "Sur les Pluies de Crapauds." Magasin Pittoresque, 4 (1836): 370-371, at 371. "Dans l'été de 1820, les élèves du seminaire de Nantes, étant à la promenade, virent avec surprise à la suite d'un orage, pendant lequel ils s'etaient mis à l'abri, la surface de la campague couverte, sur une étendue de quatre cents pas, d'une multitude de poissons d'un pouce de longueur environ, qui sautillaient sur l'herbe: il n'y a certes pas à dire, comme pour les crapauds, que ces animaux étainent venus là d'eux-mêmes." "Pluie de poissons." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 5 (July 17, 1869): 79.]


1820 Jan. 5 / Persecuting Flames / See Dec., 1904. / Nov. 14, 1870 / [Typescript]:


(198)

Annual Register, 1820-13:

That Elizabeth Barnes, a girl aged 10, had been brought to court, accused by John Wright, a linen draper, of Foley-place, Mary-le-bon, of having upon divers occasions, and by "some extraordinary means", set fire to the clothing of Wright's mother, by which she had been burned so severely that she was not expected to live. The little girl had been a servant in the Wright household. Upon January 5th, an unexplained fire had broken out. Upon the 7th, Mrs. Wright and the girl were sitting by the hearth, in the kitchen. Mrs. Wright rose and moved toward the door. She found herself in flames. Upon January 12th, 1820, when, with the girl, she was in the kitchen, about eight feet from the hearth, where "a very small fire" was, again she found her clothes burning. On the 13th, Wright heard screams from the kitchen, where his mother was, and where the girl had been. He found his mother in flames. This time "part of her clothes were burned to a cinder, and her flesh was materially injured." Then Wright accused the girl, who had left the kitchen a moment before this occurrence. But it was Mrs. Wright's belief that "something supernatural" had assailed her. On the 14th, her daughter arrived, to keep guard, but, going to the kitchen, where the girl was, "again, by some unknown means, she caught fire." "She was so dreadfully injured by the fire that she was put to bed." When it seemed that she had gone to sleep, she was left thereand her screams brought back her son and daughter, who found her in bed, surrounded by flames. Then the girl was told to leave the house. She did so, and there were no more fires. The magistrate said that he had no doubt that the girl was guilty, but that he could not pronounce sentence, until Mrs. Wright could testify.


[A; 71. Typescript. Thayer writes: "This is a sheet of typed manuscript of Fort's composition, apparently a 'cut' from one of his books. My guess is that it was originally written for The Book of the Damned then held and used later in Wild Talents where the following appears almost verbatim." "Chronicle." Annual Register, 62 (1820): pt. 2, 1-670, at 13-16, cv. "Mysterious Case." See: Fort's Wild Talents, (chapter 13); 1870 Nov. 14, (A; 641); and, 1904 Dec., (C; 599).]


1820 Jan 11 / London Times]. 2-e / 15-3-a / Vesuvius / Table of eruptions of Etna / 15-3-a. [I; 787. "Vesuvius." London Times, January 11, 1820, p. 2 c. 5. "Volcanoes." London Times, January 15, 1820, p. 3 c. 1-2.]


1820 Jan. 16 / Op. Mars / (Al). [I; 788. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1820, 4.]


1820 Jan 16 / Vesuvius / BA '54. [I; 789. Mallet, 126. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1820 Feb. 12 / (B.D. 193) / Stark's Vulcan / about twice the size of Mercury / C.R. 83-314. [I; 790. The note copies information from page 193 of The Book of the Damned. Carrington, Richard Christopher. "On some previous Observations of supposed Planetary Bodies in Transit over the Sun." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 20 (March 1860): 192-194. Carrington, Richard Christopher. "On some previous Observations of supposed Planetary Bodies in Transit over the Sun." Memoirs of the Royal Astronomical Society, 29 (1861): 192-194. "On the 12th, a singular spot of well-defined circular form, with circular atmosphere and orange-gold tint, was seen, the apparent size of which was nearly twice the apparent diameter of Mercury. At noon, 12h, this spot was 11' 20" distant from the east limb, and 14' 17" from the south limb of the sun; and at 4h 23m in the evening it was no longer to be seen. The appearance was rather indicative of the transit of a planetary body heavenly body, having a path included within that of Mercury, than of a solar spot." On February 12, 1820, Steinhübel also reported observing "a dark, round, well-defined spot" transiting the sun's disk over a period of five hours. Fort copies his erroneous reference of  "C.R. 83-314" from The Book of the Damned. LeVerrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. "Examen des observations qu'on a présentées, à diverses époques, comme pouvant appartenir aux passages d'une planète intra-mercurielle devant le disque du Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 83 (September 18, 1876): 583-589, 621-624, 647-650, 719-723, at 621. Wolf, Rudolf. Handbuch der Mathematik, Physik, Geodäsie und Astronomie. Zurich: F. Schulthess, 1872, v. 2, 327. Webb, William Thomas. Celestial objects for common telescopes. 4th ed. London: Longmans, Green, 1881, 43. 3rd ed. London: Longmans, Green, 1873, 41-42.]


1820 Feb 15, 21, etc. / St. Maure (Ionian Islands) / qs and heavy rains / London Mag 2/215. [I; 791. "Ionian Isles." London Magazine, 2 (August 1820): 215.]


1820 Feb. 21 / St. Maura, Greece / q / II. [I; 792. A class II earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1820 Feb. 23 / Vesuvius violent / had been active / BA 54. [I; 793. Mallet, 127. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1820 March 3 / [London Times], 2-d / Ext activities of a wolf. [A; 70. "Death of a Wolf." London Times, March 20, 1820, p. 2 c. 4.]


1820 March 3 / New Aleutian volc / BA 54. [I; 794. Mallet, 127. Garnier, Jean-Guillaume. Traité de Météorologie, ou Physique du Globe. Brussels: Société Belge de Libraire, 1837, 127. "Le 3 mars, dans la nuit, à Unalaska (îles Aleutiennes) grande secousse accompagnée d'un bruit souterrain très intense. Un nouveau volcan se forma à l'île de Turinak, éloignée de 100 werstes de celle d'Unalaska." "Volcans dàns diverses parties du globe." Nouvelles annales des voyages, de la geographie et de l'histoire, 15 (1822): 130-132, at 131. "Éruptions Volcaniques. Nouveau Volcan." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 22 (1822): 396-397. "Tremblements de Terre." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 33 (1826): 402-412, at 404. "3 Mars, dans la nuit; Unalaska; grande secousse accompagné d'un bruit souterrain très-intense. Un nouveau volcan se forme à l'île Turinak, éloignée de 100 werstes de celle d'Unalaska." Perrey, Alexis. "Documents sur les tremblements de terre et les phénoménes volcaniques des iles Aleutiennes...." Mémoires de l'Académie des sciences, arts et belles-lettres de Dijon, s. 2 v. 13 "Partie des Science" (1865): 121-251, at 228-229. This volcanic eruption at the beginning of March, 1820, is currently attributed to the Westdahl volcano, (which was not a newly formed volcano).]


1820 March 21 / Terrific eruption / Aleutian Islands / An Reg 1822-683. [I; 795. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 64 (1822): pt. 2, 683, cv. "Volcano." The Westdahl volcano.]


1820 Ap. 5 / ab 20 N and 51 W. / Aerolite fell with rain on a vessel. / Mag Nat Hist 6-297. [I; 796. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...."  Magazine of Natural History, 6 (July 1833): 289-308, at 297.]


1820? Ap. 5 / In sea near Antigua / Fireball / aerolitic, ac to Baumhauer / BA 60. [I; 797. Greg, 67.]


[1820 Ap. 7. Wrong date. See: 1820 May 7, (I; 798).]


1820 Ap. 11 / 2 - 3 a.m. / Cork, Ireland / q and sounds like cannon / BA '54 / [London] Times, Ap. 14-2-e. [I; 799. Mallet, 127. "Earthquake at Cork." London Times, April 14, 1820, p. 2. c. 5. "Tremblemens de terre." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 15 (1820): 421-424, at 423.]


1820 Ap. 18 / Fireball / Augsburg / BA 60. [I; 800. Greg, 67.]


1820 Ap 27 / Vulcan / Monthly Notices 1862 / (D-193). ** [I; 801. The note copies information from page 193 of The Book of the Damned. Carrington, Richard Christopher. "On some previous observations of supposed planetary bodies in transit over the Sun." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 20 (March 1860): 192-194. Steinhübel's observation was made on February 12, 1820, which is the same date as Stark's observation. No observation for April 27, 1820, is noted herein; thus, the reference for 1862, given by Fort, appears to be erroneous. See: 1820 Feb. 12, (I; 790).]


1820 May 1 and 2 / Immense comet at St Johns, New Brunswick, for several nights, in the N.W. sky. / 60 or 70 degrees between nucleus and end of tail. / Philadelphia Register 3-324. [I; 802. (Philadelphia Register 3-324).]


1820 ab May 1, etc. / Vesuvius / An Reg 1820/129 / Active on 20th. [I; 803. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 62 (1820): pt. 2, 1-670, at 129. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1820 May 2 / Brest / q and "thunder" / A. Reg 1820/129. [I; 804. "Chronicle." Annual Register, 62 (1820): pt. 2, 1-670, at 129-130.]


1820 May 4 / Great q / Mexico / [BA '11. [I; 805. A class III earthquake. Milne, 701.]


[1820 May 7 /] 1820 Ap. 7 / B / Irkutsk / violent shock / B As., 54/128. [I; 798. Mallet, 128.]


1820 May 10 / Great tidal wave / Acapulco / BA 54. [I; 806. Mallet, 128.]


1820 May 10 /Andernach / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 807. Greg, 67.]


1820 May 21 / (Hu) / Oedenburg, Hungary / Metite / BA '60. [I; 808. Greg, 67. "Stone-fall; smelt of sulphur." See: 1841 Aug 10, (II; 356).]


1820 June 11 / Volc / Api / Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [I; 809. Backer, 880. The Banda Api volcano.]


1820 July 12 / (F) / Lixna, Dunaberg, Russia / Metite / BA '60. [I; 810. Fletcher, 99. This is the Lixna meteorite. Greg, 67.]


1820 July 12 / Th stone / Meteoric stone fell at Listen (Witebsk), Russia, in a violent th. storm. / Niles Register, Jan 6, 1821. [I; 811. "Foreign Articles." Niles' Weekly Register, 19 (January 6, 1821): 303-308, at 308, c.v. Russia. "Aérolithes." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 15 (1820): 432-433. "Un aérolithe est tombé à Duna, gouvernement de Witebsk, en Russie, le 12 juillet 1820, à 6 heures du soir. Il pesait 40 livres, et s'est enfoncé d'un pied et demi en terre." Listen is now identified as Līksna, Daugavpils, Latvia. This is the Lixna meteorite.]


1820 July 16 / (F) / 4:30 a.m. / At St. Neots, near the Ouze. Mirage said to be of Great Paxton, / An. Phil. 16/149. [I; 812. "Curious Atmospherical Phenomenon." Annals of Philosophy, 16 (1820): 149. "One of those very singular and curious atmospherical phenomena...." Cambridge Chronicle and Journal, July 21, 1820, p. 3 c. 2.]


1820 July 17 / People at Schwartz, Tyrol, in churches at annual day of thanksgiving gor having been spared qs since July 17, 1670, when a violent q and great damage. / London Mag. 2/329. [I; 813. "On the 17th of July...." London Magazine, 2 (August 1820): 329-330.]


1820 July 20 / Brünn / Fireball / BA '60. [I; 814. Greg, 67.]


1820 July 22 / not looked up / [London Times, 3-c / Atmospheric phe / Huntingdonshire. [I; 815. "One of the very singular...." London Times, July 22, 1820, p. 3 c. 3. "One of those very singular and curious atmospherical phenomena...." Cambridge Chronicle and Journal, July 21, 1820, p. 3 c. 2. "One of those very singular and curious atmospherical phenomena, which is occasionally seen among the Hartz Mountains in Hanover, and has once or twice been observed on Souter Fell, in Cumberland, has been seen in Huntingdonshire.About half-past four o'clock on Sunday morning, July 16th, the sun was shining in a cloudless sky, and the light vapours arising from the River Ouze were hovering over a little hill near St. Neot's, when suddenly the village of Great Paxton, its farm-houses, barns, dispersed cottages, trees, and its different grass-fields, were clearly and distinctly visible in a beautiful aerial picture, which extended from east to west about four hundred yards. Nothing could exceed the astonishment and admiration of the spectator, as he looked at this surprising phenomenon, from a gentle declivity in an opposite direction at the distance of half a mile, or his regret at its disappearance in about ten minutes." If this was a superior mirage of Great Paxton, (about 4 kilometres to the northeast of St. Neots), the morning Sun was only about 2.5° above the horizon. Fort has looked up the "spectral army" observed at Souther Fell, (or, Souter Fell), since 1735, on the Midsummer Eve. "A Journey to Caudebec Fells, with a Map and Description of the Same." Gentleman's Magazine, 17 (November 1747): 523-525. Clarke, James. A Survey of the Lakes of Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire. 2d ed. London: 1789, 55-56. "Leeds.Extraordinary phenomena." Edinburgh Annual Register, 5 pt. 2 (1812): 124-127. Brewster, David. Letters on Natural Magic. New York: Harper, 1836, 125-127. "The Spectre Horsemen of Southerfell." Notes and Queries, s. 1 v. 7 (March 26, 1853): 304. Martineau, Harriet. A Complete Guide to the English Lakes. London: Whittaker, 1855, 96-99.


1820 July 30 / 3 h / Venus / Inf. conjunction / (Al). [I; 816. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1820, 76.]


[1820 July 31 /] 1820 Aug 31 / London / solid ice / 18 inches by 6 / E Mec 84/18. [I; 818. "The Late Storm." London Morning Post, August 4, 1820, p. 3 c. 2. "The hail was larger than was ever known. A friend of mine picked up a solid piece of ice eighteen inches long and six broad, yesterday morning; it had made a deep hole in the ground." This piece of solid ice fell at Sudbury, Suffolk, (not in London). Pratt, F. “Giant HailstonesTemperature Contrasts.” English Mechanic, 84 (no. 2159; August 10, 1906): 18. Webster, William Henry Bayley. Recurring Atmospheric Periods and Periodic System of the Atmospheric Actions. London: Simpkin, Marshall, 1857, 56-67. “Domestic Occurrences.” Gentleman's Magazine, 90 pt. 2 (September 1820): 172-176, at 173.]


1820 Aug 6 / Ovelgönne, Finland / Aerolites, ac to Baumhauer. / Ac to BA 60, substance from hayrick burned by lightning. [I; 817. Greg, 67.]


[1820 Aug 31. Wrong date. See: 1820 July 31, (I; 818).]


1820 Sept 7 / In Oeuvres, XI/576, M. Arago's description suggests military formation but they were separated by equal distances, all in a straight line. / An. de Chemie 30/417. [I; 819. "Etoiles filantes en plein jour." Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 30 (1825): 416-421. Arago, François. Oeuvres Complètes de François Arago. Paris: Gide, 1859, v. 11, 575-578. Meteors, distant birds, or an unknown phenomenon, observed during an eclipse, at Embrun?]


1820 Sept 27 / 9 p.m. / Barmouth, Merionethshire / q and sound like cannon / BA '54. [I; 820. Mallet, 129.]


1820 ab. Oct 1 / Silky substance / Pernambuco / A Reg 1821/681 / (D). [I; 821. The note copies information from page 58 of The Book of the Damned. "Rain of Silk." London Magazine, 4 (July 1821): 93. "Chronicle."  Annual Register, 63 (1821):  pt. 2, 681, cv. "Rain of silk."]


[1820 ab. Oct 1 /] 1821 Oct / [Oct] 15, 1820 / Silk / Pernambuco / (26) / D-58. [I; 898. The note copies information from page 58 of The Book of the Damned. The fall was at the beginning of October in 1820, (not 1821). "Extrait d'une lettre de M. Lainé, consul de France à Fernambouc, datée du 1er novembre 1820." Annales de Chimie, s. 2 v. 15 (1820): 427.]


[1820 Oct 1. Wrong date. See: 1826 Oct 1, (I; 822.1, 822.2).]


1820 Oct 19 / Honduras / q / II. [I; 823. A class II earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1820 Nov 12 / 4 p.m. / det met / globe of fire / Kursk, Russia / Mag Pop Sci 3-62. [I; 824. "The November-Asteroids." Magazine of Popular Science, 3 (1837): 56-62, at 62.]


1820 Nov. 20 / Cholimschk, Russia / Det met / BA '60. [I; 825. Greg, 67.]


1820 Nov 29 / aerolite / Cosenza / great met / Stones fell, ac to Arago. / BA 60. [I; 826. Greg, 67.]


1820 Nov 29 / Cosenza, Italy / met train / An Reg 1821/14. [I; 827. "Chronicle."  Annual Register, 63 (1821):  pt. 2, 14, cv. "Phenomenon."]


1820 Nov 29 / Aerolite / See Nov 29, '09. [I; 828. Fort refers to Capocci's list of aerolites falling at the end of November, in: 1809 Nov. 29, (I; 311). "Falling Stars." Athenæum, 1840 (no. 686; December 19): 1013.]


1820 Dec 5 / Naples / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 829. Greg, 67.]


1820 Dec 9 / Tumea / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 830. Greg, 67.]


1820 Dec 13 / [London Times], 2-c / q / Leadhills and Wanlockhead. [I; 831. "Earthquake." London Times, December 13, 1820, p. 2 c. 3.]


1820 Dec. 29, 30 / q / ice / met / 4:10 a.m. / Zante / "dreadful [subterranean] bellowing noise" said been subterraneanbut lumps of ice, and qor hailstones, some weighing 10 ounces each fellnofirst a luminous meteor visible 5 or 6 minutes / on 30th, another meteor / BA-54 / See An de Chimie 18/413, / Get series rightab. 1820. [I; 832.1. 832.2. Mallet, 130-131. Greg, 67. "Tremblemens de terre."Annales de Chimie et de Physique, s. 2 v. 18 (1821): 413-415.]


1820 Dec 29 / obj and q / (Cut) / Ionian Islands / A luminous obj or meteor "apparently 4 to 6 feet in diameter" was seen over the sea. 3 or 4 minutes later, the quakeon 30th, another met passed over Zante. / B As Rept 1854-131. [I; 833. Mallet, 130-131. Milne, 701. De Férussac, André Étienne d'Audebert. "Note sur le Tremblement de Terre qui a désolé l'île de Zante le 20 décembre 1820." Journal de Physique, de Chimie, d'Histoire Naturelle et des Arts, 92 (1821): 466-470. "Trois ou quatre minutes avant, on a vu à la distance de deux lieues de la pointe ou promontoire de Geraca, qui est au sud-est de l'île, une espèce de météore enflammé et presque nageant sur la mer, lequel resta allumé cinq à six minutes; à la distance où il a été vu, il paroissoit du diamétre de quatre à cinq pieds."]


1820 Dec 29 / Zante / The q was preceded by a single flash of lightning. / Edin N P. J 36/367. [I; 834. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 36 (1843-1844): 72-86, 362-376, at 367.]


1820 Dec 29 / Zante / A meteor / 3 or 4 minutes late, great qtorrents of rain and masses of ice up to weight of 300 grammes. / C.R. 17-618. [I; 835. Perrey, Alexis. "Nouvelles recherches sur les tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, de 1801 à juin 1843." Comptes Rendus, 17 (September 25, 1843): 608-625, at 618-619.]


1820 Dec 29 / Celebes / Great q. and sea rose to "a prodigious height". / Q. J. Roy Inst 12-427. [I; 836. "Earthquake at Celebes." Quarterly Journal of Science and the Arts, Royal Institution of Great Britain, 12 (1822): 427.]


1820 Dec 29 / q and (rain and hail) / Zanteq and "unexampled deluge of rain" and lumps of ice 1/4 pound each. / [London Times], Feb 26-3-d / 27-3-b, 1821 / A deluge from the hills, in which 20 houses were washed away. Shocks several a day in January (at least). [I; 837.1, 837.2. "Earthquakes in Zante." London Times, February 26, 1821, p. 3 c. 4. "Earthquakes in Zante." London Times, February 27, 1821, p. 3 c. 2.]


1820 Dec 29 / q / / Chile / II / BA 11. [I; 838. A class II earthquake. Milne, 701.]


1820 Dec 30 / Zante / Fireball / BA 60 / See Jan 6. [I; 839. Greg, 67.]


1820 Dec 31 / Nellore, India / severe qs / N.Y. Ev Post, Sept 12-2-3, 1821. [I; 840. “The following intelligence from India....” New York Evening Post, July 12, 1821, p. 2 c. 4.]

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