Last updated: April 8, 2021. - Fortean Notes

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Last updated: April 8, 2021.

Charles Hoy Fort's Notes


1831 to 1833


1831:


1831 Jan-Feb / Messina / I. [I; 1582. A class I earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1831 Jan 2 / q / Italy (Basilicata) / BA '11. [I; 1583. A class II earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1831 Jan 2 / 3 a.m. / Aerolite in village of Mangapatnam, Cadapah, India / Trans Bombay Geo Soc 9/199. [I; 1584. Malcolmson, J.G. "Notice of the Fall of an Aërolite." Gleanings in Science, 3 (1831): 389. Buist, George. "Notices of the most remarkable Meteors in India of the fall of which accounts have been published." Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 9 (1849-1850): 197-230, at 199.]


1831 Jan 7 / A / France / A.J.S. 20/396. [I; 1585. "Aurora Borealis at Paris." American Journal of Science, 20 (1831): 396.]


1831 Jan. 7 / Auroral phe? / Germany / Nature 27-297. [I; 1586. Groneman, H.J.H. "Remarks On and Observations of the Meteoric Auroral Phenomenon of November 17, 1882." Nature, 27 (January 25, 1883): 296-298. This is the same date that Herapath discovered the Great Comet of 1831 (C/1831 A1). "A Letter from Mr. Herapath to the President, announcing the discovery of a comet." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 2 (1831): 6-7.]


1831 Jan 12 / Berlin / F. ball / BA '60. [I; 1587. Greg, 72.]


[1831 Jan 13] / Disap / Extraord / LT, 1831, Jan 13-2-f. [A; 93. "Extraordinary and Mysterious Disappearance of an Orphan Boy." London Times, January 13, 1831, p. 2 c. 6. A destitute orphan, John Hopkins, was found wandering near Westminster Abbey, on December 28th, told police of being dismissed from a farm, near Liverpool, robbed, and his search for an uncle in London. He was found a place to stay, but, disappeared, while on an errand to buy some eggs, on January 4th. On that same evening, another older lad showed up at the house, said that a man sent him for a servant's job, but was sent away. The orphan's story of his dismissal was found to be true, and his few belongings were left behind. Police thought that he had again fallen prey to thieves and villains, (in a brief tale that predates Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist).]


1831 Jan 28 / Gotha / F. ball / BA 60. [I; 1588. Greg, 72.]


1831 Feb. 12 / Solar eclipse / A. J. Sci. 22-189. [I; 1589. "A report of observations on the Solar Eclipses of Feb. 12, 1831." American Journal of Science, 22 (1832): 189-190.]


1831 Feb 19 to 25 / Etna / BA '54/224. [I; 1590. Mallet, 224.The Etna volcano.]


1831 Ap 12 / See May 19, 1806. / Reported by a sea captain at 0° 22' S and 23° 27 W. / rumbling sound and sharp shock to vessel. [I; 1591. See: 1806 May 19, (I; 182). Daussy, Pierre. "Note sur l'existence probable d'un volcan sous-marin situé par environ 0°20' de latitude sud, et 22° de longitude ouest." Comptes Rendus, 6 (April 16, 1838): 512-516, at 515. The ship was the Eagle. Mallet, Robert. "Fourth Report upon the Facts and Theory of Earthquake Phenomena." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1858, 1-136, at 20.]


[1831 Ap. 13. Wrong date. See: 1851 Ap. 13, (I; 1592).]


1831 May / 2nd attack on K Hauser. [A; 94.]


1831 May 7 / Hail / 3 inches circumference / Ohio, Ky. / Niles' Register, 21st. [I; 1593. "Hail storm." Niles' Weekly Register, 40 (May 21, 1831): 195.]


1831 May 7 / Tornado / S. Car. / Niles Register, 21st. [I; 1594. "Dreadful tornado." Niles' Weekly Register, 40 (May 21, 1831): 195-196.]


1831 May 13 / Vouillé (Vienne) / stonefall / C.R. 58/226 / (F) / Poitiers, ac to F. [I; 1595. Fletcher, 100. This is the Vouillé meteorite. Vouillé is about 60 kilometers east of Poitiers, midway between Poitiers and La Rochelle. Daubrée, Gabriel-Auguste. "Note sur deux aérolithes, l'un tombé à Vouillé (Vienne), le 13 mai 1831, et  offert au Muséum d'Histoire naturelle par la ville de Poitiers; l'autre tombé à Mascombes, départment de la Correze, le 31 Janvier 1836, et dont la chute était restée sans publicité." Comptes Rendus, 58 (1864): 226-230, at 227-229.]


1831 May 13 [July 28] / (Fr) / Vouillé / Metite and 3 dets. / BA 67/416. [I; 1619. Glaisher, James, and, Robert Philips Greg, Edward William Brayley, Alexander Stewart Herschel, Charles Brooke. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1866-67." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1867, 288-430, at 416. The Vouillé meteorite fell during the night of May 13 to 14 and was found the next day.]


1831 May 13 [July 18] / Poitiers, France / stone weighing 40 lbs / Greg asks whether May 13. / (See.) / BA 60. [I; 1613. Greg, 73.]


1831 May 13 / Particulars / Metite / (Vienne) / particulars. / La S. P. Tous 9-93. [I; 1596. Daubrée, Gabriel-Auguste. "Note sur deux aérolithes." La Science Pour Tous, 9 (no. 12; February 18, 1864): 93. See: 1831 May 13, (I; 1595).]


1831 May 26 / 11:18 a.m. / Shocks, Genoese Coast (Italy) / 11:15 a.m. / Marseilles / BA 54. [I; 1597. Mallet, 225. Milne, 704.]


1831 May 26 / It Sounds / Sound phe / See 1816. [I; 1598. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 38. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1831 May 13 / B.M. / Fletcher / Metite / Ap. 13, 1831 / Vouille, France / May 13, 1831 / F. [I; 1599. Fletcher, 100. This is the Vouillé meteorite.]

1831 June 11 / Clinton Co., N.Y. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [I; 1600. Clinton Co., New York, (not "Tenn."). Finley, 3.]


1831 June 28 / 5 p.m. / shocks / Sicily / BA 54. [I; 1601. Mallet, 225-226.]


1831 June 28 to July 2 / (to Oct the effects) / Submarine volc before ap. of island of Ferdinandea. Then increased activity. Said that the volcanic materials formed the island. / At Palermo, the haze noticed July 23, 24, 25 and again Aug 4, 5, 6. Upon Aug 8, the sun was whitish blue and there were afterglows. The, 5 dates in Aug. and 3 in Sept and 2 in Oct, afterglows noted at Palermo. / C.R. 102-1061. [I; 1602.1, 1602.2. Riccò, Annibale. "L'île Ferdinandea, le soleil bleu et les crépuscules de 1831." Comptes Rendus, 102 (1886): 1060-1063, at 1061. The red afterglows were observed of August 19, 25, 26, 26 and 29, on September 10, 17, and 18, and, on October 4 and 5, of 1831. The Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia volcano.]


1831 July 2 /Sicily / 13Parma / 14Parma / shocks / BA 54. [I; 1603. Mallet, 226.]


1831 July 5 / Cannonading heard at Schmaleninken. Attributed to a battle between General Gielgud against Tolstoy and Rennenkampt. / Jour des Deb., 20-2-1 / Not heard on the 6th. / War between Poland and Russiain Deb. 17-1-3, said that Gielgud was on 5th "Au dela de Memel. [I; 1604.1, 1604.2. "On lit dans la Gazette officielle de Berlin du 13 juillet...." Journal des Debats, July 20, 1831, p. 2 c. 1. "Frontières de Lithuanie, 8 Juillet," and, "Prusse." Journal des Debats, July 17, 1831, p. 1 c. 3. During the Polish-Russian War of 1830-1831, the sounds heard at Smalininkai, (now, in Lithuania), were believed to be due the cannon from a battle between the forces of Polish general Antoni Gielgud against the Russians, somewhere nearby; but, after a failed assault at Vilnius, Gielgud's forces were, at that time, en route to Memel, (Klaipėda), far from Smalininkai, and not in any battle.]


1831 July 9 / G's island/ See Jan 3, 1832. [I; 1605. See: 1832 Jan 3, (I; 1667). The Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia volcano.]


1831 July 9 / The new island/ Niles' Register (* DA), vol 41, p. 71, 77, 327, 438. [I; 1606. "Submarine Explosion." Niles' Weekly Register, 40 (September 24, 1831): 71. "Appearance of a New Island in the Mediterranean." Niles' Weekly Register, 40 (October 1, 1831): 77. "The New Island." Niles' Weekly Register, 40 (December 31, 1831): 327. "Miscellaneous." Niles' Weekly Register, 40 (February 11, 1832): 438. "*DA" is the shelfmark for Niles' Weekly Register at the New York Public Library. The Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia volcano.]


1831 July 9 / Grahams Islandsee Lyell's Principles of Geology. [I; 1607. Lyell, Charles. Principles of Geology. 4th edition. London: John Murray, 1835, v. 2 , 199-205. 11th edition. London: John Murray, 1872, v. 2, 58-63. Lyell gives the date as July 10. The Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia volcano.]


1831 July 9 / Ship Crawford, 16 miles from Sicilysubmarine volc eruption. / Niles Register, Sept 24 / New island seen next day from another vessel (N. Reg, Oct. 1). / See Jan 3, 1832. [I; 1608. "Submarine Explosion." Niles' Weekly Register, 40 (September 24, 1831): 71."Appearance of a New Island in the Mediterranean." Niles' Weekly Register, 40 (October 1, 1831): 77. See: 1832 Jan 3, (I; 1667). The Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia volcano.]


1831 July 13 / The New IslandGraham Islandsouthern shore of Sicily / Phil Trans. 1832-237 / was first seen on 13th / was a volcanic crater. [I; 1609. Davy, John. "Some Account of a New Volcano in the Mediterranean." Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 122 (1832): 237-249. The Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia volcano.]


1831 July 14 / Many shocks, Murray Bay, Gulf of St. Lawrence. Preceded by subterranean noise which seemed to come from N or N.W. / BA 54. [I; 1610. Mallet, 226.]


1831 July 15 / Clermont, etc. / 4 p.m. / tremendous storm / great fall of hail / Sheep swept away by torrents. / Jour des 'Deb, July 19. [I; 1611. "On écrit de Clermont, 16 juilliet." Journal des Debats, July 19, 1831, p. 2 c. 2-3.]


1831 July 18 / q's / June and July / II / BA 11 / Sciacca (Girgenti). [I; 1612. A class II earthquake. Milne, 704.]


[1831 July 18. Wrong date; see: 1831 May 13.]


1831 July 18 / Tuscany / "A meteoric detonation in air?" / BA 60. [I; 1614. The meteoric detonation is listed in Greg's catalog, ("60"), not Mallet's, ("54"). Greg, 73.]


1831 July 18 / (q) / Foligno, Tuscany, Italy / Metite. / BA 60. / See May 16, '34. [I; 1615. Greg, 73. See: 1834 May 16, (I; 1875). Greg lists this as a meteoric detonation; but, a quake is not mentioned here.]


1831 July 20 / Cayuga Co., N.Y. / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [I; 1616. Finley, 3.]


[1831 July 27. Wrong date; see: 1831 August 27, (I; 1617).]


1831 July 27, 28, 29 / Celebration in Paris / Cannon fire, etc. / J. des Deb 26-1-3. [I; 1618. "M. le préfet de la Seine...." Journal des Debats, July 26, 1831, p. 1 c. 3 & p. 2 c. 1.]


[1831 July 28. Wrong date; see: 1831 May 13.]


1831 August / Month of lurid sunsets, Malta and Sicily, attrib to dust from the new volcano of Graham Island. / Phil Trans 1832-252. [I; 1620. Davy, John. "Further Notice of the New Volcano in the Mediterranean." Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 122 (1832): 251-253.]


1831 Aug / Blue sun / See Oct. 12. [I; 1621. See: 1831 Oct 12, (I; 1648).]


1831 Aug. 4 / A "waterspout" burst upon the Clidagh Mts (Kerry), Ireland. A flood 15 feet deep and 900 wide poured down. Not said any waterspout seen. / Gents Mag 101/2/168. [I; 1622. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 101 pt. 2 (August 1831): 168-170, at 168, c.v. "Ireland." "The flood at its height appeared like an arm of the sea; its depth in the valley from 15 to 16 feet, and its breadth upwards of 300 yards."]


1831 Aug 14 / Shock near Naples while Vesuvius in eruption / BA 54. [I; 1623. Mallet, 226.]


1831 Aug 17 / Sat., Sun and Monday before / At Mobile / Bluish or greenish sun. Mornings and bet 5 and 6 p.m. / Am J. Sci 21/198. [I; 1624. "Singular Phenomenon." American Journal of Science, 21 (1832): 198. Quoting the Mobile Register of August 17: "On Saturday last, between five and six o'clock P.M., the attention of our citizens was attracted by the extraordinary appearance of the sun. The predominating color of the rays of light which it transmitted, was a pale blue or violet, varying occasionally from that to a sea green. A large spot, apparently of the size of a dollar, was also visible to the naked eye on its lower limb. On Sunday morning it exhibited the same unusual appearance, casting a bluish shade over the objects on which it shone; and at 6 o'clock on Monday evening its whole face was of a pale green color. It was not seen yesterday."]


1831 Aug 3 / Africa / 9Russia and France / 10Paris / 15New York / 31China / fog like the Siberian / La Sci Pour Tous 19/58 / See May, 1822. [I; 1625. Bresson, Gédéon. "Les Offuscations du Soleil." La Science Pour Tous, 14 (no. 8; January 23, 1869): 57-58. See: 1822 May 21, (I; 948).]


1831 Aug 12 / At Philadelphia, for a long time after sunset, "the Western heavens seemed like one vast sea of crimson flame, lit up by some invisible agent". Then not a star to be seen but the moon was visible, "green and ghastly". The same phenomenon at New York and "by many attributed to burning meadows in the direction of Newark. / N. Y. American, Aug 16, '31. [I; 1626.1, 1626.2. (New York American, August 16, 1931.) “Phenomenon.” Charleston Mercury, August 25, 1831, p. 2 c. 1. “Half our population were, on Saturday, after sunset, admiring and wondering at the strange and beautiful appearance of the western horizon. For a long time after the sun had disappeared the western heavens seemed as one vast sea of crimson flame. Thousands of our citizens gazed at the spectacle—some with wonder, others with admiration, and others fearful that it was a sad augery of coming evil. Superstition is never idle on such an occasion. Many conceited that the moon was 'green and ghastly,' and others marvelled that not a solitary star should glisten in the heavens. The most probable solution of this phenomenon may be found in the rarity and warmth of the atmosphere.Philad. Enquirer.”]


1831 Aug 3 / Blue sun / Bermuda ' YB '41/267 / Upon th 11th, great q and hurricane throughout West Indiesnot Bermuda. / BA '11. / At BarbadoesHurricane, q and volcanic eruption. 3000 persons perished. / BA 54. [I; 1627. "Blue Sun." Timbs' Year-book of Facts in Science and Art, 1841, 262-263. Mallet, 226. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1831 Aug 3 / La Sci Pour Tous 14-58a dry fog was first observed upon coast of Africa. / 9Odessa and central France / 10Paris / 15New York / end monthCanton, China / Said that the most extraordinary thing was that this smoke or dry fog seemed to disappear in part with the setting of the sun and to return at sunrisenights very clear and stars very visiblethat some fog remained and was phosphorescent and appeared to occupy the higher regions of the atmosphere. [I; 1628.1, 1628.2, 1628.3. Bresson, Gédéon. "Les Offuscations du Soleil." La Science Pour Tous, 14 (no. 8; January 23, 1869): 57-58. Roche, Édouard Albert. Recherches sur les Offuscations du Soleil et les Meteores Cosmiques. Paris: Leiber, 1868, 55.]


1831 Aug 3 / Ac to M. Arago, in "The Comet" (p. 13 of translation), on coast of Africa, sun not visible until 15 or 20 degrees above horizon. "At night the sky sometimes became clear, and even the stars were visible. This last circumstance, [so] worthy of remark, I have received from M. Berard, one of the best informed officers of the French Navy." [I; 1629.1, 1629.2. Arago, François. Gold, Charles, tr. The Comet. New York: J. Winchester, 1843, 13.]


1831 Aug 9, etc. / Nothing in Jour des Debats. [I; 1630.]


1831 Aug 10 / W. Indies / Great hurricane and "innumerable fireballs" / A. J. Sci 35-174 / At Barbadoes, ac to another quotation. [I; 1631. Herrick, Edward Claudius. "Report on the Shooting Stars of the 9th and 10th of August, 1838." American Journal of Science, 35 (1838-1839): 167-174, at 173-174. Alexander, James Edward. Transatlantic Sketches. London: Richard Bentley, 1833, v. 1, 173. "The lightning flashed tremendously in their eyes, and appeared to strike the ground only a few yards from them; but such was the roar of the wind, that the thunder could not be heard. Innumerable fire-balls were seen to fall from the clouds." Reid, William. An Attempt to Develop the Law of Storms.... 1st ed. London: John Weale, 1838, 29. 3rd edition. London: John Weale, 1850, 27. "Fiery meteors were presently seen falling from the heavens; one in particular, of a globular form and a deep red hue, was observed by the writer to descend perpendicularly from a vast height. It evidently fell by its specific gravity, and was not shot or propelled by any extraneous force. On approaching the earth with accelerated motion, it assumed a dazzling whiteness and an elongated form; and dashing to the ground in Beckwith-square, opposite to the stores of Messrs. H.D. Grierson and Co., it splashed around in the same manner as melted metal would have done, and was instantly extinct."]


1831 Aug 10 / Barbados / Evening of the 10th, clouds collecting in deep masses and then flying away "with a rapidity of motion almost incredible" until 9 p.m. Then calmthen at 10:30 wind again with increasing violence until 5 a.m. of 11th (this was the hurricane). / N. Y. American, Sept. 5 / There is no volcano eruption mentioned. "Hollow subterranean noises were also heard and some imagine we were visited by an earthquake." / On 12th in St. Domingo many lives lostoceans rose and flooded towns. / American, Sept 13 / Hurricane reached New Orleans on 16th and 17th. / AmerSept 15 / Cuba on 13th. If it was all one. [I; 1632.1, 1632.2, 1632.3. “Great HurricaneBarbados in RuinsImmense Loss of Lives.” New York Evening Post, September 3, 1831, p. 2 c. 1. (New York American, September 5 & 15, 1831).]


1831 Aug 10 / Sch / night / Hurricane / Barbados / (Schomburgk, History of Barbados, page 53) / Morning, all trees blown leafless / Thunder and lightning "more like sheets of fire". Extreme redness of the sky on evening of the 9th"The whole atmosphere at one time presented the appearance of livid flame." Overpowering sulphurous odor. Then "fiery meteors were seen falling from the heavens." Next morning 12 vessels high inland. Debris and heads, hands, and feet of the dead. / No volcano. [I; 1633.1, 1633.2, 1633.3. Schomburgk, Robert Hermann. The History of Barbados. London: Longman, Brown Green and Longman, 1848, 53-60.]


1831 Aug 11 / W. Indies / q / III / and hurricane. [I; 1634. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1831 Aug 11 / Bermuda / Said sunlight been peculiar on 10th. On 11thdark from early morning. / Rept B.A., 1840-11. [I; 1635. "Extract of a Letter from Col. Reid to Sir D. Brewster." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1840, Notices and Abstracts, 10-11.]


1831 Aug 11 / from 2:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. / Hurricane / West Indies. Barbados hurricane, q and volc. eruption. 3000 persons perished. / Rept. B.A., 1854-226. [I; 1636. Mallet, 226.]


1831 Aug 11 / Blue sun at Bermuda. / Said that early in August, blue sun for some days in succession along the Atlantic Coast. / Jour F Inst 3/1/57. [I; 1637. "On a Blue Sun seen at Bermuda." Journal of the Franklin Institute, s. 3 v. 1 (1841): 57. "Early in August, 1831, though I cannot now fix the date, the sun was seen of this colour for some days in succession along the Atlantic Coast."]


1831 Aug 13 / Sun as seen at Alexandria / Va? / Niles Weekly Register, Oct 1, 1831, p. 96. [I; 1638. Hallowell, Benjamin. "The Solar Phenomena." Niles' Weekly Register, 41 (October 1, 1831): 96.]


[1831 August 27 /] 1831 July 27 / (Fr) / Besancon (Doubs) / qs and explosive sounds / BA '54 or '60. [I; 1617. Mallet, 226.]


1831 Sept-Oct / China / qs / II / BA '11. [I; 1639. A class II earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1831 Sept. 6 - Nov. 1 / Wartmann's planet / C.R. 2/307 / (3) / Planetary object observed ac. Dr W and his assistants at Geneva. [I; 1640. "Lettre de M. Wartmann, de Genève, à M. Arago, sur un astre ayant l'aspect d'une étoile et qui cependant était doué d'un mouvement propre." Comptes Rendus, 2 (1836): 307-311. Louis François Wartmann thought that he had discovered a star-like object with a proper motion, in 1831, and that the same object might have been observed by Niccolò Cacciatore, between May 11 and 14, 1835, before it was lost behind clouded skies. See: 1835 May 11 and 14, (I; 2000). If not a stationary nova nor a rapid comet, Wartmann suggested the object was another slow-moving planet beyond Uranus. "Il semblerait plus probable que ce point imperceptible est une planète, qui decrit autour du Soleil une orbite dont le rayon est considérable, ce qui expliquerait tout-à-la-fois la petitesse de l'arc parcouru, et comment la planète a pu rester rétrograde pendant 86 jours, qui ont dû s'écouler depuis le moment do son opposition, vers le 7 aout, jusqu'à l'observation du 1er novembre." Estimating its distance by the Titius-Bode Law, Wartmann thought this new planet should be twice the distance from the Sun as Uranus, (or 38.8 astronomical units), with an orbital period of 243 years.   "Two hundred and ninety-third Meeting." Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1 (1846-1848): 57-128, at 57. When Neptune was discovered, Edward C. Herrick suggested that Wartmann might have seen it in 1831, but, Sears Cook Walker could not reconcile Wartmann's observations with any orbit for Neptune. Arago, François. "Planète Le Verrier." Comptes Rendus, 23 (1846): 744-745. Arago also showed that Wartmann's planet was at least 17 degrees away from Neptune on September 6, 1831. Lequeux, James. Le Verrier: Magnificent and Detestable Astronomer. New York: Springer, 2005, 51. However, Wartmann's planet was only one degree away from the position of Uranus, at the time of his observations, thus Lequeux raises the possibility, "if one assumes a small error," that Wartmann failed to identify his object as the planet Uranus.]


1831 Sept. 9 / See May 26, '08. / Wessely, Morovia, Austria / Metite / (F). [I; 1641. Fletcher, 100. This is the Wessely meteorite. Greg, 73. (No relevant note for May 26, 1808, nor May 26, 1908.).]


1831 Sept 10 / From 10th, water in wells at Parma was troubled. / BA 54. [I; 1642. Mallet, 226-227.]


1831 Sept 11 / Italy / Parma and Modena / q / I / BA '11. [I; 1643. A class I earthquake. Milne, 704. Mallet, 226-227. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 37. Cancani mentions rumors of detonations like cannons heard during this period of quakes.]


1831 Sept 12, 13 / Other shocks / Parma to Venice / BA 54. [I; 1644. Mallet, 226-227.]


1831 Oct to Feb., 1832 / qs in Perugia, Italy / II. [I; 1645. A class II earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1831 Oct. 8 / 0 h / Venus / Inf conjunction / (Al). [I; 1646. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1831, 128.]


1831 Oct 9 / Peru / II. [I; 1647. A class II earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1831 Oct 12 / Red lights in sky long after sunset. / Oct. 13sun silvery at noon, and between 3 and 4 p.m. greenish blue. / Nature 30-32. [I; 1648. "The Remarkable Sunsets." Nature, 30 (May 8, 1884): 32. Baddeley, William. "False Alarm of Fire, Occasioned by a Singular Atmospheric Phenomenon." Mechanics' Magazine, 16 (October 1, 1831): 14-15. Baddeley says that he was called at 4:30 A.M., on September 25th, and saw a  "dense red light," which "was so completely similar to that of a large conflagration, that numbers of the firemen, hastened with their engines at full speed towards the eastern part of the metropolis," in London.]


1831 Oct 20 / Wirtemberg / Meteor / BA 60. [I; 1649. The fireball is listed in Greg's catalog, ("60"), not Mallet's, ("54"). Greg, 73.]


1831 Oct 27 until Jan 13, 1832 / (It) / Frequent concussions in Umbria. / (See 1805.) / Upon Jan 13, 1832, q and a fall of muddy water? [I; 1650. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 38. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 346-348. Muddy water did not fall but flowed out from a large crevasse that had opened between Bevagna and Cannara. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1831 Oct 27 to Jan 13, 1832 / (It) / Sounds. / Umbria / See 1816. [I; 1651. See: 1816, (I; 547), and, 1831 Oct 27 until Jan 13, 1832, (I; 1650).]


1831 Nov 12 / Mets / A. J. Sci 30-374. [I; 1652. "On the Origin of Shooting Stars." American Journal of Science, 30 (1836): 369-376, at 374. The observations were made in the morning of November 13, 1831, from 4 to 7 A.M. See: 1831 Nov. 12-13, (I; 1653). "Zodiacal Light." American Journal of Science, 27 (1834-1835): 416-419, at 419.]


1831 Nov. 12-13 / Remarkable fall of mets / Capt. Berard, off coast of Spain / Dr. Miglet in Ohio / Mag. Pop Sci (P) 3/62 / (Arago). [I; 1653. "The November-Asteroids." Magazine of Popular Science, 3 (1837): 56-62, at 62. "On the Origin of Shooting Stars." American Journal of Science, 30 (1836): 369-376, at 373-374.]


[1831 Nov. 12-13 /] 1832 Nov. 12-13 / Loc. met / Capt. Berard, at sea, off Carthagena, for at least three hours saw shooting stars at a rate of 2 per minute, many of them of extraordinary size, leaving trains of iridescent light. / It is said that same night a shower was seen in Ohio. / Mag Pop. Sci 3-62 / Greg's Cat of Meteors, BA-54, nothing for this night. [I; 1732.1, 1732.2. "The November-Asteroids." Magazine of Popular Science, 3 (1837): 56-62, at 62. Greg's catalog does include this "large" meteor and its train, on November 13, "N. of Spain"; and, Greg's catalog would be "BA-60", (not Mallet's, "BA-54"). Greg, 73. Berard's observations were made on the Mediterranean coast of Spain, (not on the coast of South America, nor north of Spain). "Questions à Résoudre Concernant la Météologie, l'Hydrographie et l'Art Nautique." Annuaire pour l'an 1836, présenté au Roi, par le Bureau des Longitudes, (1836): 252-349, at 295-296. "Meteoric Showers of November." Mechanics' Magazine, Museum, Register, Journal, and Gazette, 28, (no. 750; December 23, 1837): 201-203.]


1831 Nov 13 / Brüneck / F. ball / BA 60. [I; 1654. The fireball is listed in Greg's catalog, ("60"), not Mallet's, ("54"). Greg, 73. See: 1832 Nov 14, (I; 1736).]


1831 Nov 13 / Kioto, Japan / II. [I; 1655. A class II earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1831 Nov. 13 / N. of Spain / Large Fireball / BA 54. [I; 1656. The fireball is listed in Greg's catalog, ("60"), not Mallet's, ("54"). Greg, 73.]


1831 Nov 17 / Sweden / q in a tempest and ext. light in northern horizon and great detonation / C.R. 17-622. [I; 1657. Perrey, Alexis. "Nouvelles recherches sur les tremblements de terre ressentis en Europe et dans les parties adjacentes de l'Afrique et de l'Asie, de 1801 à juin 1843." Comptes Rendus, 17 (September 25, 1843): 608-625, at 622.]


1831 Nov 17 / Sweden / 6:15 a.m. / (q) / Swärdsjo, near Fahlun.stormdetonati[on] / light in sky / BA '54. [I; 1658. Mallet, 228.]


1831 Nov. 26 / Soge / Fireball / [BA] '60. [I; 1659. Greg, 73.]


1831 Nov. 26 / Aerolite? / See Nov. 29, 1809. [I; 1660. Fort refers to Capocci's list of aerolites falling at the end of November, in: 1809 Nov. 29, (I; 311). "Falling Stars." Athenæum, 1840 (no. 686; December 19): 1013.]


1831 Nov. 29 / Hildburghausen / Met = moon, rose in W. / BA 60. [I; 1661. Greg, 73.]


1831 Nov. 29 / Thüringerwald / Severe q and met / BA '54 / D-228. [I; 1662. The note copies information from page 228 of The Book of the Damned. Mallet, 228. "According to some accounts, a fireball, apparently as large as the moon, was seen passing towards the west."]


1831 Dec 3 / 7:50 p.m./ Trinidad / unbearable heat / violent q / followed by heavy showers of rain / BA 54. [I; 1663. Mallet, 229.]


1831 Dec 3 / Trinidad and St Christopher, W. Indies / II. [I; 1664. A class II earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1831 Dec 8 / Bath and Herefordshire / large met / daylight / BA 60. [I; 1665. Greg, 73.]


1832:


1832 Jan 2 / Bordeaux / F. ball / [BA] '60 / N.E. to S.W. [I; 1666. Greg, 73.]


1832 Jan 3. / Where Graham's Island (see July 9, 1831) had been, was playing a column of water, boiling 10 to 30 feet high. / Niles Register, March 31, 1832. [I; 1667. "Items." Niles' Weekly Register, 42 (March 31, 1832): 82. See: 1831 July 9, (I: 1605 to 1608). The Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia volcano.]


1832 ab Jan 12 / Volc / Hawaii / Am J. Sci 25-201. [I; 1668. Goodrich, Joseph. "Notice of some of the volcanoes and volcanic phenomena of Hawaii, (Owyhee,) and other islands in that group...." American Journal of Science, 25 (1834): 199-203, at 201.]


1832 Jan 13 / Foligno, etc., Italy / violent q preceded and followed by violent rain and hail / See 27th. / BA 54. [I; 1669. Mallet, 230. See: 1832 Jan 27, (I; 1673).]


1832 Jan 16 / Volc / Goetoer / Java / C.R. 70-878. [I; 1670. Backer, 880. The Guntur volcano.]


1832 Jan 22 / Central Asia / III. [I; 1671. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1832 Jan 23 / Zurich / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1672. Greg, 73.]


1832 Jan 27 / at Foligno / Another slight shock preceded by detonation in air / BA 54 / See Jan 13. [I; 1673. Mallet, 230. See 1832 Jan 13, (I; 1669).]


1832 Feb 7 / Lauenberg / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1674. Greg, 73.]


1832 Feb 16 / Vesuvius, which had been quiet since beginning of year / smoke and stones on 20thcontinuing to end of March / BA 54/230. [I; 1675. Mallet, 231. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1832 Feb 21 / N.W. India / III. [I; 1676. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1832 Feb. 21 / Naples and neighborhood / I. [I; 1677. A class I earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1832 March / Combustible yellowish substance / Kourianof, Russia / D-62. [I; 1678. The note copies information from page 62 of The Book of the Damned. "Meteoric phenomenon." Annual Register, 74 (1832): pt. 2, 447-448. "In March last, there fell, in the fields of the village of Kourianof, thirteen versts from Volokolamsk, a combustible substance of a yellowish colour, at least two inches thick, and covering a superficies of between 600 and 700 square feet. The inhabitants at first thought it was snow, but on examination it appeared to have the properties of cotton, having, on being torn, the same tenacity; but on being put into a vessel filled with water, it assumed the consistence of rosin. On being put to the fire in its primitive state, it burnt and sent forth a flame like spirits of wine; but in its resinous state it boiled on the fire without becoming inflamed, probably because it was mixed with some portion of the snow from which it had been taken. After a more minute examination, the rosin had the colour of amber, was elastic like Indian rubber, and smelt like prepared oil, mixed with wax."]


[1832 March /] 1832 Ap. 11 / Oil / Volokalamsk, Holland / (D-63). [I; 1691. The note copies information from page 63 of The Book of the Damned. "On a substance called inflammable snow." American Journal of Science, 28 (1835): 361. The name of the chemist was Rudolph Hermann, (not Herman); Volokolamsk is the administrative center of Volokolamsky District in Moscow Oblast, in Russia; and, "Ap. 11" was from a publication date, which reported this singular fall, in March, (rather than two falls in March and, another, in April). Hermann, Rudolph. "Sur la substance dite Neige Inflammable." Annales des Mines, s. 3 v. 5 (1834): 520. Hermann, Rudolph. "Untersuchungen verschiedener in Russland gefallener meteorischer Substanzen." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, s. 2 v. 28 (1833): 566-576, at 566-570. Hermann, Rudolph. "Untersuchungen verschiedener in Russland gefallener meteorischer Substanzen." Bulletin de la Société impériale des naturalistes de Moscou, 5 (1832): 44-63, at 45-52. For Holland, see: 1832 October, (I; 1691).]


1832 March 7 / Cutro, Calabria / Large, det. met. / BA 60. [I; 1679. Greg, 73.]


1832 March 7 / (It) / Met and det / on 8th, big q / Calabria / BA 54. [I; 1680. Mallet, 231.]


1832 March 7 / (It) / Cutro, Calabria / Det. Met. / B.A., '60. [I; 1681. Greg, 73.]


1832 March 8 / Cutro, Calabria, "completely destroyed" by a q. / BA 54/231. [I; 1682. Mallet, 231.]


1832 March 8 / Cotrone and Calabria, Italy / III. [I; 1683. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1832 March 8 / After 7 p.m., q, Calabria. "On the 7th a luminous meteor was observed at Potenza, which lasted nearly a minute and was followed by an explosion like that of a cannon.["] / BA 54. [I; 1684. Mallet, 231.]


1832 March 8 / (It) / Calabria / meteorshot water from fissures / sulphurous odor / See 1805. [I; 1685. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 348-349. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


[1832 Feb, to Ap, etc.] / (+) / Reciprocal volcs / mets / q's / Feb, to Ap, etc., 1832. [I; 1686.]


1832 March and April / (It) / Sounds / Calabria / Sounds like cannonading / supposed be subterranean / See 1816. [I; 1687. Cancani, Adolfo. "Rombi sismici." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 7 (1901-1902): 23-47, at 38. See: 1816, (I; 547).]


1832 March 15 / (It) / It / Meteors and flashes and qs / Parma / See 1805. / and reddish tint in sky before (avant) and during the q / See 1805. / but p. 351. [I; 1688.  Mallet, 232. A class II earthquake. Milne, 704. Galli, Ignazio. "Raccolta e classificazione di fenomeni luminosi osservati nei terremoti." Bollettino della Società Sismologica Italiana, 14 (1910): 221-448, at 351. See: 1805 July 26, (I; 146).]


1832 March 18 / [LT], 4-b / q. / Crieff / in Index / but 18th is Sunday. [I; 1689. (London Times, March 18, 1832, p. 4 c. 2; Sunday Times, possibly a wrong date; re-check the Times Index. Not in Mallet. Earthquake on March 8, reported in newspapers beginning on 10th.)]


1832 March 22 / Goethe dying / Lewes' Life of Goethe, copied in Religio-Philosophical Journal, March 16, 1872, YRAa whistling sound heard, and sounds as if of chopping woodthen loud tramping sounds. Story of a spirit that appeared, sang, vanished. [A; 95.1, 95.2. Lewes, George Henry. The Life of Goethe. None of the three editions of Lewes' biography include the sensational manifestations that are related by "N.," (via Dr. P.L. Schückling's "Die Tafelrunde" newspaper, after being told these tales when he was a schoolboy). No fearful whistlings, no sounds of wood being chopped in a locked-up woodhouse, no loud tramping noises upon a stairway, nor a door opening to reveal a singing apparition in an abandoned chamber; Johann Wolfgang von Goethe died in his armchair, apparently having fallen asleep, quietly, while being attended to by his daughter-in-law Ottilie, (according to Lewes). "Remarkable Phenomena Attending the Death of Goethe." Religio-Philosophical Journal, 11 (no. 26; March 16, 1872): 1, (c. 1-3). "YRA" is the shelfmark of the Religio-Philosophical Journal at the New York Public Library. "Remarkable Occurrence at the Death of Goethe." Spiritual Magazine, n.s., 8 (October 1873): 477-478.]


[1832 Ap. 11. Wrong dates. See: 1832 March, and 1832 October, (I; 1691).]


1832 Ap 11 / Tirkut, India / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1692. Greg, 73.]


1832 May [5] / Luminous spot on Mercury in transit / M Notices 38/338. [I; 1693. Jenkins, Benjamin George. "The Luminous Spot on Mercury in Transit." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 38 (April 12, 1878): 337-340, at 338. "In the transit of May 1832 Professor Moll observed a spot, the periphery of which was not well defined, but was always situated in the same position, a little south of the centre of the lanet, and preceding the centre." Moll, Gerrit. "Observation of the Transit of Mercury of May 5, 1832." Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 2 (December 14, 1832): 131-133. "Even with such small powers as 64 and 76 of the achromatic telescopes of Fraunhofer and Dollond, I could plainly perceive a greyish spot on the dark disc of Mercury. As soon as I had perceived it, I asked my assistants whether they saw any thing particular on Mercury. One of them instantly replied, 'Do you mean the white spot?' On applying higher powers (as 110 and 180 to the 42-inch, and 96, 144, 216, and 324 o the 6-feet), the same appearance was always visible. Its periphery was not well defined, but seemed gradually to sink from a greyish white to the dark colour of the planet's disc. It constantly appeared on the same part of the disc."]


1832 [May 5] / Lisbon / A Vulcan by Fischer / Cosmos NS 42/467 / (no more) / (3) / CR 83-719. [I; 1695. "L'histoire de Vulcain." Cosmos, s. 4 (n.s.), 42 (April 14, 1900): 466-467. “Observations of the Transit of Mercury, May 5th, 1832.” Memoirs of the Royal Astronomical Society, 5 (1831-1832): 381. The writer in Cosmos mistook this observation, (as well as observations: on November 5, 1789, by La Concha, Galiano, and Vernacci, at Montevideo; on November 9, 1802, by Keijser, at Amsterdam; and, on May 8, 1845, by Houzeau, at Brussels), on November 5, 1789, as the hypothetical planet Vulcan. Fort recognized that these observations were transits of Mercury and thought these astronomers had not recognized Mercury, (they were, in fact, taking measurements of these transits). All of these observations were used by Le Verrier to help determine the orbit of Mercury and the anomalous advance of its perihelion, (which he believed was due to perturbations caused by a planet or group of small planets within the orbit of Mercury). Le Verrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. “Theorie du Mouvement de Mercure.” Annales de l'Observatoire Impérial de Paris, 5 (1859): 1-195, at 45-48 & 102. Le Verrier, Urbain Jean Joseph. "Examen des observations qu'on a présentées, à diverses époques, comme pouvant appartenir aux passages d'une planète intra-mercurielle devant le disque du Soleil." Comptes Rendus, 83 (1876): 583-589, 621-624, 647-650, 719-723, at 719-720. “Our Astronomical Column.” Nature, 14 (October 26, 1876): 570-571. George Fisher, (1794-1873); Juan Gutiérrez de La Concha, (1760-1810); Dionisio Alcalá Galiano, (1760-1805); Juan Vernacci y Retamal, (1772?-1810); Jan Frederik Keyser, (1766-1823); and, Jean-Charles Houzeau, (1820-1888) See: 1802 Nov 9, (I; 60), and, 1845 May 8, (II: 833 & 881).]


1832 May 5 / Transit Mercury / Obs. 29/416. [I; 1696. Denning, William Frederick. "The Planets and Planetary Observation." Observatory, 29 (1906): 280-283, 308-314, 355-359, 375-380, 414-418, 458-462; 30 (1907): 92-96, 128-134, 205-208, at v. 29, 416.]


1832 May 7 / Kingston, Miss / afternoon / "Terribly destructive" tornado / Finley's Rept. [I; 1694. "Terrible destruction of property." Finley, 3.]


[1832 May 18 /] 1839 May 18 / "hannetons" / fell around a coach between de Gournay [and] Gisers in such numbers the horses stopped. / 1901/1/303, La Vie Scientifique. [II; 44. "Hannetons" are beetles, which include cockchafers and May bugs; and, Gournay is Gournay-en-Bray in the Seine-Maritime department. (La Vie Scientifique. 1901/1/303, @ BNF.) Flammarion, Camille. The Atmosphere. London: S. Low, Marston, Low, & Searle, 1873, 472. "On May 18, 1832, at 9 P.M., a legion of beetles encountered a diligence upon the route from Gournay to Gisors (as it was leaving Talmoutiers) with so much violence that the horses, blinded and frightened, were compelled to return." Giard, Alfred. "L'Isaria Densa (Link) Fries, Champignon Parasite de Hanneton Commun, (Melolontha Vulgaris L.)." Bulletin Biologique de la France et de la Belgique, 24 (1892): 1-112, at 4. Snellen van Vollenhoven, Samuel Constant. Gedaantewisseling en Levenswijze der Insecten. Haarlem: A. C. Kruseman, 1870, 291. Girard, Maurice. Les Métamorphoses des Insectes. Paris: Hachette, 1869, 99. Figuier, Louis. Les Insectes. Paris: Hachette, 1867, 537. "En 1832, le 18 mai 1832, à neuf heures du soir, une légion de Hannetons assaillit une diligence, sur la route de Gournay à Gisors, à sa sortie du village de Talmoutiers, avec une telle violence, que les chevaux aveuglés, et épouvantés, refusèrent d'avencer, et que le conducteur fut obligé de rètrograder jusqu'au village, pour y attendre la fin de cette grêle d'un nouveau genre."]


1832 May 20 / Bengal, India / Fireball / N. to S. / BA 60. [I; 1697. Greg, 73.]


1832 May 31 / Riga / Fireball / B.A., 60. [I; 1698. Greg, 73.]


1832 May and June / BO / Hosts of mice appeared in fields of Inverness-shire and Ross-shire. So many that foxes, with a great new supply of food, stopped their ordinary depredations. They were brown, with white ring around neck, and tail tipped with white. Cor to Mag of Nat. Hist 7-182 wrote that he had seen several specimens and that then he could find no mention in books. [I; 1699.1, 1699.2. "Notice of a Species of Mouse, possibly an undescribed one, which has abounded in Inverness-shire and Ross-shire." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (1834): 181-182.]


1832 June 20 / (List) / q / Mauna Loa / List in Bull Seis Soc. Amer 5-46 / A J Sci 25/201. [I; 1700. Wood, Harry Oscar. "The Seismic Prelude to the 1914 Eruption of Mauna Loa." Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 5 (1915): 39-51, at 46. Goodrich, Joseph. "Notice of some of the volcanoes and volcanic phenomena of Hawaii, (Owyhee,) and other islands in that group...." American Journal of Science, 25 (1834): 199-203, at 201. The Mauna Loa volcano.]


1832 June 23 / 3 luminous things or meteors that rose from the horizon and united. / Delhi, India / Archives des Descouvertes 1833/19 / See Nov. 13. / Rec Sci 1/136 / B. Assoc 1850-120 / (1833). [I; 1701."Météore lumineux observé dans l'Inde." Les Archives des Decouvertes et des Inventions Nouvelles, 1833, 198-199. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 120. Lowe, 136. Buist, George. "Notices of the most remarkable Meteors in India of the fall of which accounts have been published." Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 9 (1849-1850): 197-230, at 199. See: 1832 Nov. 13, (I; 1734).]


1832 June 28 / Cape Verde Islands / Fall of greyish brown ashes, with a slightly sulphuric odor. / Tasmanian Journal 1-333. [I; 1702. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On the occurrence of Atmospheric Deposits of Dust and Ashes; with Remarks on the Drift Pumice of the Coasts of New Holland." Tasmanian Journal of Natural Science, Agriculture, Statistics, &c., 1 (1842): 321-342, at 333.]


1832 June 29 / 11 p.m. / Great met. in Wiltshire, etc.illuminated like daylight / Arc. Sci., 1833-261. [I; 1703. "Great Meteor." Arcana of Science, 6 (1833): 261-263. Edmonds, Richard, Jr. "Notice of the great Meteor seen on June 29th." London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, s. 3 v. 1 (October 1832): 306-307.]


1832 June 29 / Plymouth and Brest / Meteor / BA 60. [I; 1704. Greg, 73.]


1832 July 4 / by WebbMare Crisium speckled with minute dots and streaks of light / Astro Reg 20-165 / Webb, Cel. Objs., p. 89. [I; 1705. Williams, Arthur Stanley. "Mare Crisium." Astronomical Register, 20 (July 1882): 165-166. Webb, Thomas William. Celestial Objects for Common Telescopes. 4th ed. London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1881, 89.]


1832 July 23 / Veusvius had been active since about beginning of year. Greatest eruption July 23 and continued till 29th. / Arc. Sci 1833/253. [I; 1706. "Vesuvius." Arcana of Science, 6 (1833): 253-254. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1832 July 23 / Tremendous eruption / Vesuvius / to Aug 16. / BA 54 / LT, Sept 3-3-a. [I; 1707. Mallet, 233. "Vesuvius." London Times, September 3, 1832, p. 3 c. 1. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1832 July 23 / volc and rain / Eruption, Vesuvius. On 24th, "dreadful storm and hurricane. / LT, Sept 3-3-a. [I; 1708. "Vesuvius." London Times, September 3, 1832, p. 3 c. 1. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1832 July 23-Aug 16. / again on Sept 16 / Vesuvius / 23 to 16tremendous / BA 54-233. [I; 1709. Mallet, 233. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1832 July 24 / Meerut, India / large, dazzling meteor / BA 60. [I; 1710. Greg, 73.]


1832 July 29 / Jersey / Rumbling sound and vibrations / [London Times], Aug 3-3-b. [I; 1711. "St. Helier's (Jersey), July 30." London Times, August 3, 1832, p. 3 c. 2. "Last evening a slight shock of earthquake was experienced in this island, more especially in the south-eastern quarterI allude to the parishes of St. Martin, Grouville, St. Clement's, and in the town of St. Helier's. At about half-past 8 o'clock, a noise resembling distant thunder, or, perhaps, more resembling theatrical thunder, was heard, and a rocking motion was felt in most of the houses...."]


1832 Aug / An Reg, 32-448 / That, in a time of extraordinary drought "though in a rather damp plain" by Lake Geneva fire took place in the cemetery Plain Palais, at Geneva, in high grass on the graves amid cypress trees attrib to spon. gen. [A; 96. "Spontaneous Combustion." Annual Register, 74 (1832): pt. 2, 448. "The German papers contain the following remarkable intelligence, dated from the Lake of Geneva, August 18:'The extraordinary heat which has prevailed, almost without interruption, for nine weeks, has produced phenomena in the countries bordering our lake to which there is no parallel on record. At Geneva, a spontaneous combustion took place in the churchyard of Plain Palais, though in a rather damp plain (plana palus). The high grass, on the graves, the cypress, and fir-trees took fire, and it was necessary to bring the engines to extinguish it, which was effected, but not without difficulty. A more remarkable event took place in Savoy, near the village of Magland (province of Faucigny). All at once the alarm-bell was sounded, not only in the village, but the whole surrounding country, and whole valleys, to summon the inhabitants with all speed to extinguish a dangerous fire, of a kind hitherto unheard of; for it was not houses, or trees, or earth that was burning, but the roots of the trees, two feet under the ground. This strange fire began at Seine (in the commune of Arrache): nothing appeared on the surface; the furze and bushes were untouched, till at once several trees fell, and were then consumed by the fire that burned from their roots. The people, indeed, felled the wood, that the fire might not spread, and would willingly have turned up the ground to extinguish the fire that was burning the roots; but, in the terrible drought, where were they to get water? This subterraneous fire, therefore, consumed two hundred and fifty acres of fine forest. The fear of subterraneous fire had such an effect on the inhabitants, that many villages (for instance, Colsane) were wholly deserted; and as the people were also afraid of going unto the forest, they remained exposed to the scorching rays of  the sun (generally 40 of Resumur) in the naked plain, where the wells began to dry up. This subterraneous fire is doubtless closely connected with the flames which at the same time issued from the earth in several places in Lausanne. The rain which came a few days ago, and considerably lowered the temperature, seems to have checked this fire, though many persons fear that the rain was by no means of sufficiently long continuance to penetrate so deep into the earth as to remove all danger of the fires beginning again on the return of hot and dry weather, such as seems to be setting in.'"]


1832 Aug 4 / q. / 8:30 a.m. / Cheshire / [London Times] 7-3-3. [I; 1712. "Earthquake in Cheshire." London Times, August 7, 1832, p. 3 c. 3. "At half-past eight o'clock on Saturday morning last, a very smart shock of an earthquake was felt at Waverham, Davenham, Sandiway Bank, Delamare Forest, and Tarporley."]


1832 Aug 8 / Volc / Goentoer, Java / N.M. / C.R. 70-878. [I; 1713. Backer, 880. The Guntur volcano.]


1832 Aug 8 / Volc / Goentoer, Java / C.R. 70-878. [I; 1714. Backer, 880. The Guntur volcano.]


1832 Sept 3 / [L.T.], 3-a / Vesuvius / 29-3-b / a volc island. [I; 1715. "Vesuvius." London Times, September 3, 1832, p. 3 c. 1. "Volcanic Island." London Times, September 29, 1832, p. 3 c. 2. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1832 Sept. 4 / 11:45 p.m. / Remarkable meteor / Bury St. Edmunds / Mag. Nat Hist 6-77. [I; 1716. "A remarkable Meteor observed from Bury St. Edmonds." Magazine of Natural History, 6 (1833): 77.  "About a quarter before 12 on the night of the 4th...." Bury and Norwich Post, September 12, 1832 p. 2 c. 2. "About a quarter before 12 on the night of the 4th inst. a very remarkable meteor was observed from this town. The first appearance was that of a treble flash of lightning, after which it took the form of a very large star, surrounded by a burr or halo, and having moved slowly along the sky for a considerable space, it separated in the middle, with two points, and disappeared."]


1832 Sept 16 / Vesuvius again / BA '54. [I; 1717. Mallet, 233. The Vesuvius volcano.]


[1832 October /] 1832 Ap. 11 / Oil / Wolokalamsk, Holland / (D-63). [I; 1691. The note copies information from page 63 of The Book of the Damned. "Unctuous dew." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 13 (October 1832): 368. "In the neighbourhood of Rotterdam, it has been recently observed, that the morning dews, instead of being pure and limpid, are of an inctuous consistency." The dews at Rotterdam are the only reference to "Holland" in this note. For Wolokalamsk, in Russia, see: 1832 March, (I; 1691).]


1832 Oct 6Berlin / 12 or 13Cologne / 13Ulm / 14Tyrol (sic) / 24Grünewald / [Dec.] 20Bonn / Fireballs. / B.A., 1854 / 1832 / March 15 / Berlin / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1718. Greg, 73-74. The fireball at Bonn was in December. "B.A., 1854" is Mallet's catalog of earthquakes, (which does not include these fireballs).]


1832 Oct 14 / Tyrol / met train / B.A., '60. [I; 1719. Greg, 73.]


1832 Oct 19 / England / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1720. Greg, 74.]


1832 Oct 31 / Great eruption of Etnanot cease till Dec. / Dec '54. [I; 1721. Mallet, 234. The Etna volcano.]


1832 Nov. / Formosa / III. [I; 1722. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1832 Nov. / See May 19, 1806. / Reported by a sea captain, at 0° 22' S, and 21° 15' W, concussion as if had struck a reef. [I; 1723. See: 1806 May 19, (I; 182). Daussy, Pierre. "Note sur l'existence probable d'un volcan sous-marin situé par environ 0°20' de latitude sud, et 22° de longitude ouest." Comptes Rendus, 6 (April 16, 1838): 512-516, at 515. The ship was La Seine. Mallet, Robert. "Fourth Report upon the Facts and Theory of Earthquake Phenomena." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1858, 1-136, at 20.]


1832 Nov. / All northern? Mets seen at Pernambuco. / BA 50-131. [I; 1724. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 131.]


1832 Nov. / Biela's Comet / M. Damoiseau in the "Connaissance" for 1830, and Mr. Henderson in the supplement to the Nautical Almanac for 1832, both computing from the same elements, disagreed for position on Nov. 2, 1832, by 38 degrees R.A.for Nov. 28, by 58 degrees. / LT, Oct 12-3-a, 1832 / For title of Connaissance, see Aug 30, 1905. [I; 1725.1, 1725.2. Herapath, John. "The Comet." London Times, October 12, 1832, p. 3 c. 1."A question might here very fairly be putnamely, can we depend on these calculations? and might they not be so much out, from causes which could not be measured or comprehended, as to allow of our being in the situation so much to be dreaded? In reply, it may be said that the body has already appeared, and very nearly in the placed assigned to it. This, however, it must be acknowledged, is no guarantee as to the agreement during the rest of its course. It may accord very nearly at its first appearance, and still differ widely as time advances. In proof of this, I have only to refer to its places, calculated by M. Damoiseau, in the Connaissance for 1830, and Mr. Henderson, our Astronomer Royal at the Cape, in the supplement to the Nautical Almanac for 1832both men of unimpeachable care and ability, and both professed computing from the same elements. M. Damioiseau places the comet for August 5, about noon, in 35° 46' R.A. and 28° 44' N. Dec.; and Mr. Henderson, at nearly the same period, in 36° 15' R.A., and 28° 56' N, Dec., differing but little. But November 2, at about 6 d hours A.M., Damoiseau's plan is 112° 1' R.A., with 20° 37' N. Dec.; while Henderson's November 2, at noon, is about 150° 45' R.A., and 10½° in declination. This happens not long after the comet has passed the plane of the earth's orbit. Again, November 28, at the same time in the morning, the French comet is in 124° R.A. and 8¾° N. Dec.; and the English, at noon, upwards of 182° R.A. and 13° S. Dec., that is, the two places disagree in R.A. nearly 59°, and in Dec. nearly 22°; the one placing the comet 9° above the equator, and the other 13° beneath." Damoiseau, Marie-Charles. "Sur la Comète périodique de 6ans,7." Connaissance des Temps, 1830, "Additions," 52-55, at 55. Henderson, Thomas. "Ephemeris of the Comet of 6.7 Years." Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1832, Supplement, 43-44.]


1832 Nov. 1 / Spiders / Mouth of the Plata / Darwin's ob. upon patches of web, and a vast number of little spiders / Jour of the Voyage of the Beagle, p. 187. [I; 1726. Darwin, Charles. Journal of Researches into the Geology and Natural History of the Various Countries Visited by H.M.S. Beagle..., London: H. Colburn, 1839, 187-189.]


1832 Nov 11-12 / Near Limoges / great mets / C.R. 5-563 / from 11 p.m. till 4 a.m. [I; 1727. "Étoiles filantes." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 562-563.]


1832 Nov. 12 / 8 p.m. / at Mauritius / Sky overcast to 3 a.m., 13th. Then in all parts of the sky great number of meteorsso many impossible to count them (C.R. 5-121)their trains not straight lines as ordinarily, but all kinds of curves. Maximum 4 a.m. and lasted till sunrise. No radiant mentioned except that greatest numbers were some degrees south of the zenith. [I; 1728.1, 1728.2. "Étoiles filantes de la nuit du 12 au 13 novembre." Comptes Rendus, 5 (1837): 121-122.]


1832 Nov 12 / No meteors noted by Ross for month of November. / Ross, "Second Voyage of Discovery". [I; 1729. Ross, John. Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage. London: A.W. Webster, 1835, 683-686.]


1832 Nov. 12 / About 50 meteors / Essex / Arcana of Sci 1833/268. [I; 1730. "Meteors." Arcana of Science, 6 (1833): 268-269.]


1832 Nov. 12 / in Essex / Forty-eight meteors counted in a few minutes. / Arcana of Science 1833/268. [I; 1731. "Meteors." Arcana of Science, 6 (1833): 268-269. "Royal Society." Literary Gazette, 1832 (December 15, 1832): 794.]


[1832 Nov. 12-13. Wrong date. See: 1831 Nov. 12-13, (I; 1732).]


1832 Nov. 13 / Ac to M. Arago, quoted in Mag. Pop Sci (P) 3/62, Nov. 13, 1832, tremendous flow mets at Orenburg, Russia, from between 3 [and] 4 until sunrise. [I; 1733. "The November-Asteroids." Magazine of Popular Science, 3 (1837): 56-62, at 62.]


1832 Nov. 13 / See before. / June 23 / Delhi, India / 3 balls of fire rose from horizon and united and passed away. / Bombay Geog. Soc (L) 9/199. [I; 1734. Buist, George. "Notices of the most remarkable Meteors in India of the fall of which accounts have been published." Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 9 (1849-1850): 197-230, at 199. Buist gives the date as June 23, 1832. See: 1832 June 23, (I; 1701).]


1832 Nov 13 / morning / Innumerable meteors / Bulrampore and Agra, India / Trans Bombay Geog Soc 9/199. [I; 1735. Buist, George. "Notices of the most remarkable Meteors in India of the fall of which accounts have been published." Transactions of the Bombay Geographical Society, 9 (1849-1850): 197-230, at 199-200.]


1832 Nov 14 / Bruneck, in the Tyrol / An Reg. 1832(p. 444) / Ab 6 in morningstream of light from zenith nearly to grounddrew back gradually and stretched out toward northit turned wavy and turned to white cloud that was stationary in the sky until daybreak. Weather clear. Vivid illumination. [I; 1736.1, 1736.2. "Alpine Phenomena." Annual Register, 74 (1832): pt. 2, 444-445. See: 1831 Nov 13, (I; 1654).]


[1832] [no date] / q's / time of mets. [I; 1737.]


1832 Nov. 13 / Zeiz, Saxony / a shock. / In Dessau, in evening, a thick yellowish fog with a perceptible odor. / BA 54. [I; 1738. Mallet, 234.]


1832 (Nov 13) / q and sulphurous fog / Zeiz, Saxony / a q / at Dessau / the sul-fog / Etna in eruption / BA, 54. [I; 1739. Mallet, 234. The Etna volcano.]


1832 Nov 13 / morning / Bulrampore, India / "Innumerable meteors [were] flying in all directions." / BA 50-121. [I; 1740. Powell, Baden. "On Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1850, 89-132, at 121. See: 1832 Nov 13, (I; 1735).]


1832 Nov 14 / The stream of light that descended and then became a beam at Bruneck in the Tyrol. / Also unusual number of meteors. / An Reg 1832-44. [I; 1741. "Alpine Phenomena." Annual Register, 74 (1832): pt. 2, 444-445. See: 1832 Nov 14, (I; 1736).]


1832 Nov 13 / Meteors / Upon Nov. 13, 1882, enormous display in Red Sea, off Mocha, by Capt. Hammon of "Restitution"from 1 a.m. until daylight. / Nature 53/7. [I; 1742. Denning, William Frederick. "The Star Showers of November." Nature, 53 (November 7, 1895): 7-9, at 7.]


1832 Nov 13 / Began bet 3 and 4 a.m.,at Orenburg, Russia (C.R., 2-513), a multitude of meteors from N.E. to S.W. Maximum between 5 and 6 a.m. Observation by a priest that interior of a church at times suddenly lighted by them. [I; 1743. "Étoiles filantes observées dans la nuit du 12 au 13 novembre 1832, à Oremburg." Comptes Rendus, 2 (1836): 513-514.]


1832 Nov. 14 / ab. midnight / Meteors like brilliant fireworks all over south of England, and many parts of Continenta q in Bermudaeruption of Etna. / Rev. W.B. Clarke / Mag. Nat Hist 7-293. [I; 1744. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 293.]


1832 Nov. 19 / or ab 12:30 (on 20) / at Darlington / Until 3 or 4 in morningab. 25 meteors in first half hour. From the West. / "sublime spectacle" / LT 23-1-f. [I; 1745. "A correspondent informs us...." London Times, November 23, 1832, p. 1 c. 6.]


1832 Nov / Meteoric display, in LT of Dec 19, copied from Medical Gazette, "recently" in the Orne, France, shower of fire. [I; 1746. "Shower of Fire." London Times, December 19, 1832, p. 3 c. 3. "Shower of Fire." London Medical Gazette, 11 (December 15, 1832): 361-362. "Variétés." Gazette Médicale de Paris, 3 (November 29, 1832): 806. "Un phénomène assez rare...." Le Constitutionnel (Paris), November 26, 1832, p. 3 c. 3 & p. 4 c. 1.]


1832 Nov. 20 / Op Mars / (Al). [I; 1747. Opposition of Mars. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1832, 124.]


1832 Nov. 24 / Shock on and around Etna preceded and followed by heavy rain. / BA 54. [I; 1748. Mallet, 234. A class II earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1832 Dec / Vesuvius / from Oct 31 to / Comrie / L / Ice, July 11. [I; 1749.]


1832 Dec 3 / 8:15 a.m. / Waterspout / Lake Leman, Switz / Arc. Sci 1834-267. [I; 1750. "Water Spout on the Lake of Geneva." Arcana of Science, 7 (1834): 267-268.]


1832 Dec 13 / Great met / 6 p.m. / S. Herefordshire / BA 52-182. [I; 1751. Powell, Baden. "Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors, 1851-52." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Reports on the State of Science, 178-239, at 182. Greg, 74.]


1832 Dec 16-24 / Vesuvius / BA 54/235 / Bib. Univ 54-351. [I; 1752. Mallet, 235. "Sur l'Éruption du Vésuve en Juillet et Aout 1832." Bibliothèque Universelle des Sciences, Belles-Lettres, et Arts, Sciences et Arts, 54 (1833): 350-356, at 351. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1832 Dec 19 / Fireball / England / BA 60. [I; 1753. Greg, 74-75.]


1832 Dec 19 / [LT], 3-c / Shower of fire in France. [I; 1754. "Shower of Fire." London Times, December 19, 1832, p. 3 c. 3. See: 1832 Nov, (I; 1746).]


1832 Dec 20 / Vesuvius / alarming / Niles Register, March 2, 1833. [I; 1755. "Italy." Niles' Weekly Register, 44 (March 2, 1833): 4. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1832 Dec 20 / Fireball / Bonn / BA 60. [I; 1756. Greg, 74.]


1832 Dec 28 / 11 p.m. / Dec 297 a.m. / Dec 308 a.m. / q / Swansea / LT, Jan 9, 1833, said that sound was terrific. / B Assoc '54-23. [I; 1757. "Earthquake at Swansea." London Times, January 9, 1833, p. 4 c. 1. Mallet, 235. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 102 pt. 2 (August 1832): 639-641, at 640, c.v. "Dec. 30." "We mentioned in a very brief form last week...." The Spectator, 6 (January 12, 1833): 31. ]


1832 (Dec 29 / Penllergare, Wales, 7 a.m.q) / 30th8:30q and loud noise / and at Swansea, 28, 11 p.m. / L. W. Dillwyn, Contributions towards a History of Swansea, p. 53. [I; 1758. (Lewis W. Dillwyn, Contributions towards a History of Swansea, p. 53. Not online; only sold as a reprint.)]


1832 Dec 30 / 8:20 p.m. / Swansea, Wales / q's preceded by sounds like dist. artillery / BA 54. [I; 1759. Mallet, 235.]


1832 Dec. 30 / 8:20 p.m. / 4 shocks preceded by noise like distant firing of heavy artillery / (Swansea) / Roper, p. 32 / Gentleman's Mag 102/2/640 / Spectator, Jan 12, '33. [I; 1760. Roper, 32. "Domestic Occurrences." Gentleman's Magazine, 102 pt. 2 (August 1832): 639-641, at 640, c.v. "Dec. 30." "We mentioned in a very brief form last week...." The Spectator, 6 (January 12, 1833): 31.]


1833:


1833 / Nachraschinsk, Russia / Stones with hail / Met Mag 17/151, quoting P.W. Schwedoff / See 1844. [I; 1761. Schwedoff, Theodore. "On the Origin of Hail." Symons's Meteorological Magazine, 17 (November 1882): 146-152, at 151. See: 1844, (II; 705).]


1833 / Indians of California wiped out by a plague. / N.Y. Times, 1874, Oct 22-5-5. [A; 97. "Ravages of a Pestilence." New York Times, October 22, 1874, p. 5 c. 5-6.]


1833, etc. / These quotations from Mag Nat Hist are by paper by Rev. W. B. Clarke, showing relations between qs, volcs and meteoric and meteorologic phe. [I; 1762. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 6 (July 1833): 289-308; 7 (July 1834): 289-308; 7 (December 1834): 609-630; 8 (January 1835): 1-28; 8 (March 1835): 129-161; 8 (August 1835): 417-453.]


[1833. Wrong date. See: 1833 July 28, (I; 1763).]


[1833 July 28 /] 1833 / On Danube, red rain said be due to small quantity of protoxyde of iron. / La Nat 1898/2/316. [I; 1763. Barré, L. "Pluies de Terre et d'Insectes." La Nature, 1898 pt. 2 (no. 1324; October 15): 314-315.]


1833 Jan 2 / [LT], 3-e / 9-4-1 / Swansea / 25-4-c / Carmarthen. [I; 1764. "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, January 2, 1833, p. 3 c. 5. "Earthquake at Swansea." London Times, January 9, 1833, p. 4 c. 1. "Earthquake." London Times, January 25, 1833, p. 4 c. 3. Spurrell, William. Carmarthen and Its Neighbourhood: Notes Topographical and Historical. 2nd edition. Carmarthen: William Spurrell, 1879, 145. "Dec. 30. Shock of an earthquake felt at Carmarthen."]


1833 Jan 14 / ab 10:30 a.m. / Saxony / shock and sound like dist. thunder / BA 54. [I; 1765. Mallet, 236.]


1833 Jan 15 / [LT], 4-c / Vesuvius. [I; 1766. "The following from Naples...." London Times, January 15, 1833, p. 4 c. 3. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1833 Feb 19 / Antipodes / q. at 22° N; 79° W / same time, a ship at 22° S; 79 E in a hurricane / Mag. Nat. Hist. 6-307. [I; 1767. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 6 (July 1833): 289-308, at 307.]


1833 March 18 / Detonating meteor / Madras / BA 60. [I; 1768. Greg, 74.]


1833 March 24 / 9:15 p.m. / Parma / shock preceded by a gust of wind / BA 54. [I; 1769. Mallet, 237.]


1833 April 11 / afternoon / Springfield, Ohio / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [I; 1770. Finley, 3.]


1833 Ap 12 / [LT], 2-c / Horsham / q. [I; 1771. "Extract of a letter from Horsham...." London Times, April 11, 1833, p. 2 c. 3.]


1833 Ap. 19 / Nuremberg and Prague / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1772. Greg, 74.]


1833 May / Atrocities in Rosshire. / L.T., June 6-2-e, quoting Caledonian Mercury. / Attributed to lawless ruffians. Said that 2 horses were flayed alive. [A; 98. "Horrible Atrocities in Rossshire." London Times, June 6, 1833, p. 2 c. 5. "Horrible Atrocities in Rossshire." Caledonian Mercury, June 3, 1833, p. 3 c. 3.]


1833 ab. 6 months / Baldoon, on river St. Clair, Canada / Polt / home of a farmer / Medium and Daybreak 6-551. [A; 99. "The Doings of the Devil." Medium and Daybreak, 6 no. 282 (August 27, 1875): 551.]


1833 May 2 / Sheep fold this night entered by two dogs. (near Bristol). 26 killed. / L.T. 15-3-f / 36 severely wounded. As to dogs not even said were seen"The dogs were sporting dogs." [A; 100. "Great Havoc Among Sheep." London Times, May 15, 1833, p. 3 c. 6.]


1833 May 3 / LT of /Animal / That there was excitement in the village of Coulsdon, Surrey. Two sheep had been killed and "an animal of strange and unnatural appearance["] had been seen. According to reports "it is something of the dog or wolf species, but all agree that they never saw the like before." Said that the more rational of the residents thought it something that had escaped from a menagerie. A hunt was organized Ap. 30th, but with no success. [A; 101.1, 101.2. "Some excitement has been raised...." London Times, May 3, 1833, p. 3 c. 3.]


[1833 May 5] / wld Hauser / In Niles Register, Aug 31, 1833, that on May 5th, young man ab 24, able only to stammer a few words, found near Leyden, Holland. Knees were drawn up to breast as if he had been bound in that position. One foot decayed to ankle and other quite gone. [A; 102. "Another Casper Hauser." Niles' Weekly Register, 44 (August 31, 1833): 440.]


1833 May 16 / 20 h / Venus / Inf conjunction / (Al). [I; 1773. Inferior conjunction of Venus. Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, 1833, 65.]


1833 May 16 / Futtehpoor, India / Fish, dead and dry / D-85 / See May, 1834. [I; 1774. The note copies information from page 85 of The Book of the Damned. Buist, George. "Showers of Fish." Living Age, 52 (1857): 186. "On the 16th and 17th of May, 1833, a fall of fish occurred in the zillah of Futtehpoor, about three miles north of Jumna, after a violent storm of wind and rain. The fish were from three pounds to a pound and a half in weightof the same species as those found in the tanks in the neighborhood. They were all dead and dry." "Fall of Fish." London Times, April 9, 1835, p. 3 c. 2. "Fall of Fish." Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Bengal, 3 (1834): 367. See: 1833 May 16 or 17, (I: 1878).]


[1833 May 16 or 17 /] 1834 May 16 or 17 / Bloodfish / India / D-43 / See May1833. [I; 1878. The note copies information from page 43 of The Book of the Damned. "Fall of fish." London Times, April 9, 1835, p. 3 c. 2. See: 1833 May 16, (I; 1774).]


1833 May 20 / (+) / (B.A. '60) / [London Times], May 24-4-c / Met at Chichester. [I; 1775. Greg, 74. "Monday evening last...." London Times, May 24, 1833, p. 4 c. 3.]


1833 June / Ireland / Island as if emerging from sea / Brit Assoc 1852/30. [I; 1776. M'Farland, M. "On the Fata Morgana of Ireland." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1852, Notices and Abstracts, 29-30, at 30. "Mr. M'Farland then mentioned that, in June 1833, he himself and a party of frinds, when standing on a rock at Portbalintrea, perceived a small roundish island as if in the act of emerging from the deep, at a distance of a mile from the shore; at first it appeared but as a green field, afterwards it became fringed with red, yellow and blue; whilst the forms of trees, men and cattle rose upon it slowly and successively; and these continued for about a quarter of an hour, distinct in their outlines, shape and colour; the figures, too, seemed to walk across it, or wandered among the trees, the ocean bathed it around, the sun shone upon it from above; and all was fresh, fair, and beautiful, till the sward assumed a shadowy form, and its various objects, mingling into one confused whole, passed away as strangely as they came."]


[1833 June /] (1834) / 1833 June / (Fr.) / Jouy / fall of frogs / said that drops of water that fell with them not more numerous. / Magasin Pittoresque4/371. [I; 1884. "Sur les Pluies de Crapauds." Magasin Pittoresque, 4 (November, 1836): 370-371. "Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 2 (no. 77; November 1, 1833): 353-354, at 353.]


[1833 June /] 1834 June / at Jouy, France / Letter from M. Huard to French Acad of Sci, read Oct 28 / shower of little toads, and received them on his umbrella / Leisure Hour 3-779 / quantity prodigious. [I; 1885. "Showers of Frogs and Toads." Leisure Hour, 3 (1854): 779-781. "Pluies de crapauds." L'Institut, journal universel des sciences et des sociétés savantes en France et à l'étranger, 2 (no. 77; November 1, 1833): 353-354, at 353.]


1833 June 1 / Fakenham/ See Oct., 1907. [A; 103. See: 1907 Oct., (D; 185).]


1833 June 1 / Norfolk Chronicle of, copied in Elliott O'Donnell's "Haunted Places in England", chapter 10. / Haunting of Syderstone Parsonage near Fakenham. Groanings and knockings. Other letters to the Chronicle rappings usually near the children's beds. / Fakenham / See Oct, 1907. [A; 104. O'Donnell, Elliott. Haunted Places in England. London: Sands, 1919, ch. 10, "The Syderstone Hauntings," 132-160. O'Donnell. Eliott. Ghostly Phenomena. London: T. Werner Laurie, 1910, 123-139. "A Real Ghost." Norfolk Chronicle, June 1, 1833, p. 2 c. 6-7. Spurgin, John. "Syderstone Parsonage." Norfolk Chronicle, June 8, 1833, p. 3 c. 2-3. Titlow, Samuel. "To the Editor of the Norfolk Chronicle." Norfolk Chronicle, June 8, 1833, p. 3 c. 3. Spurgin, John. "Syderstone Parsonage." Norfolk Chronicle, June 15, 1833, p. 3 c. 3. "Syderstone Parsonage." Norfolk Chronicle, June 22, 1833, p. 4 c. 1-2. Titlow, Samuel. "To the Editor of the Norfolk Chronicle." Norfolk Chronicle, June 29, 1833, p. 3 c. 3-4. Baker, John. "Ventriloquist Ghost." Norfolk Chronicle, June 29, 1833, p. 4 c. 6. "Syderstone Parsonage." Norfolk Chronicle, July 13, 1833, p. 4 c. 5-6. "Syderstone Parsonage." Norfolk Chronicle, July 20, 1833, p. 2 c. 5. Titlow, Samuel. "Syderstone Parsonage." Norfolk Chronicle, July 27, 1833, p. 3 c. 3-4. See: 1907 Oct. 13, (D; 191).]


1833 summer / "A singular insect, there before unknown, ravaged the corn fields in Spain and so poisoned the wheat that it could not be eaten." / Mag. Nat. Hist. 1834-196 (vol 7). [I; 1777. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (May 1834): 193-202, at 196.]


[1833 July 4 /] 1824 Oct 20 / mets and hail / Nakratchine, Tobolsk / aerolites and hailstones as large as goose eggs / Mag Nat Hist 7-304. [I; 1148. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 304. "An occurrence similar to that of October 20, 1824, took place on July 4, 1833...."]


1833 July 8 / Near Naples / the rain of oranges / Cosmos 3/4/696. [I; 1778. "Sur les pluies de crapauds." Cosmos, s. 3 v. 4 (June 19, 1869): 696-697. A whirlwind emptied two large baskets of oranges at Posillipo, Italy, and deposited them at a distant location, where a small girl witnessed a rain of oranges; thus, by this example, Prof. Pierre-Adolphe Daguin, at Toulouse, sought to explain rains of fishes and toads. Meunier, Victor. Les Animaux à Métamorphoses. Tours: Alfred Mame et Fils, 1867, 87.]


1833 July 13 / q and th. storm / q at Sutton Ashfield Staffordshireon 14th, "one of the most frightful thunderstorms ever known there" / Mag. Nat. Hist 7-301. [I; 1779. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 301.]


1833 July 13 / 3:05 p.m. / Mansfield, Warsop, etc. / near Nottingham? / a q / L.T., July 16/6/c. [I; 1780. "Earthquake at Mansfield." London Times, July 16, 1833, p. 6 c. 3. "At Bilsthorpe the shock was not perceived; but a noise like unto the rushing of a mighty wind among trees on the mountain-top was heard." Mansfield, Nottinghamshire.]


1833 July 16 / Metite, ac to Baumhauer, at 3:30 p.m. / BA 60 / Nachralschinsk, Tobolsk. [I; 1781. The meteorite is listed in Greg's catalog, ("60"), not Mallet's, ("54"). Greg, 74-75.]


1833 Aug [Last of] / Spon comb trees / L.T., Sep 5/3/e / Last of Aug, 1833, in a field near Frant in decayed part of a birch tree. Short time afterward a large ash burst into flames. / Sept. 7, a cor argues that doubt because of evident friction of limbs against one another in wind. [A; 105.1, 105.2. "A Tree Consumed by Spontaneous Combustion." London Times, September 5, 1833, p. 3 c. 5. "A singular occurrence took place on Wednesday week at Frant. In the field adjoining the church, occupied by Mr. C. Wickens, smoke was seen issuing from the decayed part of a beautiful beech tree, and immediately afterwards flames were observable, although noon day. With some little difficulty they were subdued. In a short time afterwards the body of another tree (a very large ash) in the same field was discovered to be on fire, and before means could be resorted to to extinguish it, the flames encircled the whole body, and defied every exertion that was made to save it until the tree broke off about six feet up. Both trees were in a most healthy condition. From what cause the fire could have originated still remains a mystery.Maidstone paper." "To the Editor of the Times." London Times, September 7, 1833, p. 3 c. 2. "Seeing an account in your paper of yesterday of the spontaneous combustion of two trees at Maidstone, allow me to observe, that in Professor Parke's rudiments of chymistry, speaking of caloric or fire, he observes, that 'instances have occurred where whole forests have been burnt down by fires kindled from the violent friction of the branches against each other by the wind.' The destruction of the trees above-named was no doubt caused by the same effect." Parkes, Samuel. The Rudiments of Chemistry. New edition. Philadelphia: Abraham Small, 1823, 33.]


1833 Aug. 4 / A globe of fire "as large as a carriage wheel" broke against a mountain in Hungary. / Mag. Nat Hist 7-299. [I; 1782. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 299. "A letter of the 8th ult, from Hungary...." London Morning Post, September 6, 1833, p. 2 c. 5. "On the 4th of August, at daybreak, the weather appeared to be clearing up, but at midday the sun became completely obscured, as if by an eclipse, and five minutes afterwards a globe of fire as large as a carriage wheel appeared in the west, and, moving in a serpentine course, broke against the mountains with a tremendous explosion. It was immediately followed by a torrent of rain that inundated the whole country."]


1833 Aug 10 / Worcestershire / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1783. Greg, 74.]


[1833 Aug.] / LT Index / 1833 / q / India / Aug. / with phe / See for Nov. meteors. [I; 1784. Palmer's Index to the Times Newspaper apparently does not list any articles for the earthquakes in India, in August, nor the meteor showers, in November.]


[1833 Aug. 11-13 /] 1833 Sept 6 / [London Times], 1-f / New phe at Vesuvius. [I; 1798. "The Notizie del Giorno of Rome...." London Times, September 6, 1833, p. 1 c. 6. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1833 Aug 12 / Vesuvius / BA 54. [I; 1785. Mallet, 238. The Vesuvius volcano.]


1833 Aug / Tuesday before Aug 30 / Violent q / Virginia / Sun1886, Sept 9-2-7+. [I; 1786. "In the first copy of The Sun...." New York Sun, September 9, 1886, p. 2 c. 7.]


1833 Aug 26 / Great q / India / Calcutta, etc. / Allahabad / BA '11. [I; 1787. A class III earthquake. Milne, 704.]


1833 Aug 29 / q and stones / Whole province of Nepal and neighboring parts of India desolated by quakes"a few days later," fall of aerolites at Candahar. / Mag Nat Hist 7-302. [I; 1788. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 302. "A few days after...," (not "later").]


[1833 Aug 29 /] 1833 end of Nov. / Fall of stones / Kandahar, Afghanistan / BA 60 / Ac to Arago, end of Ap., 1834. [I; 1850. Greg, 74-75. Greg gives the date as "end of November," 1833, and says that Arago, (who was probably using the date of the Niles' Weekly Register, which was cited in the Comptes Rendus article), says end of April, 1834. Branwhite says the Kandahar aerolites fell "a few days after" the earthquakes in Nepal and India, on "August 29, 1833." Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 302. Arago, François. Astronomie Populaire. Paris: Gide, 1857, v. 4, 202. "1834, avril. Pluie de pierres, dans la ville de Kandahar (Afghanistan)." "A heavy shower of aerolites...."  Niles' Weekly Register, 46 (April 19, 1834): 119. "A heavy shower of aerolites fell lately in the city of Kandahar; owing to the weight of the shower the roofs of many houses fell in, and others were perforated. Zelfekar Aly Khan, the son of Olimala, having (although forbidden by his parents) gone to the court yard of their house to gather some of these pebbles, which were very round and smooth, was killed by the fall of one of these fiery meteors, which struck him with such violence on the head as to fracture his skull into three pieces. The flash which accompanied the stroke was so vivid, that it dazzled the eyes of those sitting in the balcony of the house. The stone was found to weigh three seers, and many of the stones weighed upwards of two seers. This phenomenon was succeeded by so dense a fog, that the rays of the sun could not be perceived for three days that it lasted." In Afghanistan, a seer weighs approximately 7 kilograms, (or 15.5 pounds). Nearly the same article was copied from the New York Journal of Commerce. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science,  26 (1834): 132-174, at 161, (footnote). Boguslawski, Georg von. "Zehnter Nachtrag zu Chladni's Verzeichnisse der Feuermeteore und herabgefallenen Massen (Wien 1819)." Annalen der Physik und Chemie, Ergänzungsband, 4 (1854): 1-155, 353-456, at 33. "Aérolithes." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 50-51.]


[1833 Aug 29 /] 1834 early / At Kandahar, Afghanistan, fall of stones followed by dry fog which obscured the sun three days. / C.R. 3-51 / (See end of Nov., 1834.) [I; 1870. "Aérolithes." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 50-51. See: 1833 Aug 29, (I; 1850), and, neither "1833 end of Nov.," nor the "end of Nov., 1834").]


[1833 Aug 29 /] 1834 Ap. 19 / Afghanistan / stones and obscurations / D-168 / Ac to a Baltimore newspaper of Ap. 19. [I; 1871. The note copies information from page 168 of The Book of the Damned.  "A heavy shower of aerolites...."  Niles' Weekly Register, 46 (April 19, 1834): 119.]


1833 Sept. 1 / Volc / Goentoer, Java / CR 70-878. [I; 1789. Backer, 880. The Guntur volcano.]


1833 Sept 6 / Great q. / China / BA '11. [I; 1790. A class III earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1833 Sept 17 / Brighton / Column of light as if down from Milky Way in a clear sky / about 50 meteors / Mechanics Magazine 20/25. [I; 1791. Busby, C.A. "Extraordinary Phosphorescent Meteor." Mechanics' Magazine, Museum, Register, Journal, and Gazette, 20 (no. 531; October 12, 1833): 25. There is no mention of "50 meteors" in this article, rather the streak of light was visible for 50 minutes, from 9:15 to 10:05 P.M.]


1833 Sept 18 / Chichester, England / and great q, Peru. [I; 1792. Mallet, 240. A class II earthquake, in Peru. Milne, 705.]


1833 Sept 18 / Arica and Saena, Peru. / q. / said puffs of wind, that were felt inside buildings as well as outside / BA 54. [I; 1793. Mallet, 240.]


1833 Sept 18 / previous evening / "A brilliant aurora with meteors falling." / Edin N. P. 31/120. [I; 1794. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 120.]


1833 Sept. 18 / q / Chichester / preceded by sound of a rushing wind / "On the previous evening a brilliant aurora with meteors falling." / Rept BA '54/240. [I; 1795. Mallet, 240. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 120.]


1833 Sept 27 / [London Times], 3-f / Dublin / Aurora / Curious. [I; 1796. "Aurora Borealis." London Times, September 27, 1833, p. 3 c. 6.]


1833 Oct 2 / Wirtemberg / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1797. Greg, 74.]


[1833 Oct 6. Wrong date. See: 1833 Aug. 11-13, (I; 1798).]


1833 Oct 9 / "Rain of blood (?)" / Cleves and Utrecht / Mag Nat Hist 8-2. [I; 1799. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 8 (January 1835): 1-28, at 2. "9th, Rain of blood (?) in Duchy of Clèves, and at Utrecht."]


1833 Oct 12 / North Carolina / Tornado / Finley's Rept. [I; 1800. Finley, 3.]


1833 Oct 15 / volc and rain / A tremendous rain upon Etna, pouring down into the river Acellaro, which burst its confines, drowning 100 persons / Mag Nat Hist 7-298 / To be noted that the Italian papers called this rain "unexpected". [I; 1801. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 298.]


1833 Nov. 6 / q. / Oxford, Glouchester, Berks and Wiltsair "filled with a reddish vapor / Mag Nat Hist 8-2. [I; 1802. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 8 (January 1835): 1-28, at 2.]


1833 Nov 11 - 12 / At Frederikashaab and at Gothaab (Greenland), a rain of fire toward west. "Rain of fire" might be auroral. / C.R. 3-473. [I; 1803. Gaimard. "Travaux de la Commission scientifique d'Islande." Comptes Rendus, 3 (1836): 465-473, at 472-473. The suggestion is made, in Comptes Rendus, that this "pluie de feu" could have been a meteor shower.]


1833 Nov. 12 / Germany / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1804. Greg, 74.]


1833 Nov 12 / Leonids before due in 33 1/4 year period / Nov. 17, 1893. [I; 1805. See: 1893 Nov. 17, {VII; 916).]


1833 Nov 12 / Seems maximum local at about 4 a.m. / So from Leo and not earth in a stream. [I; 1806.]


1833 Nov. 12 / Localized / India / Nov 12, 1847. [I; 1807. See: 1847 Nov 12-13, (II; 1175).]


1833 (Nov 12) / Aurora and mets / Nov 12-13, 1841. [I; 1808. See: 1841 Nov 12-13, (II; 401).]


1833 (Nov 12) / Aurora and mets / Nov 12-13, 1841. [I; 1809. See: 1841 Nov 12-13, (II; 401).]


1833 Nov 12 / midnight till daybreak / not said if 12 - 13 / Great number of meteors in Cuba / C.R., 64-232. [I; 1810. "Sur une pluie d'étoiles filantes obserée à Cuba, dans la nuit du 12 novembre 1833." Comptes Rendus, 64 (1867): 232.]


1833 Nov. 12 / See Nov 11-12, 1828. [I; 1811. See: 1828 Nov 11-12, (I; 1428).]


1833 Nov 12 / See Nov 12-13, 1847. [I; 1812. See: 1847 Nov 12-13, (II: 1175 & 1177).]


1833 Nov. 12-13 / Great met fall in U.S. / Am. J. Sci. [I; 1813. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science,  26 (1834): 132-174.]


1833 Nov 12-13 / Olmsted thinks to west stormy and cloudy and mets not seen. [I; 1814.]


1833 Nov 12-13 / See Geminids plenty, Dec. 12. [I; 1815.]


1833 Nov 12 / 36 N / 61 W / considerable number but none more than 4 or 5 a minute / 26-143 A. J. Sci. [I; 1816. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science,  26 (1834): 132-174, at 143. "In lat. 36° N. lon. 61° W. 'an unusual number of meteors were seen, but comparatively few, not more than four or five in a minute.'"]


1833 Nov. 12 / At 9 o'clock, for example, Miss., Ga., S.C., N.Y. / A.J.S. 26-321 / Were attracting attention by 11 p.m. mostly from N.E. [I; 1817. Twining, Alexander C. "Investigations respecting the Meteors of Nov. 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 26 (1834): 320-352, at 321.]


1833 [Nov. 12] / Met stream / 1833, Nov. 12 / Denning, Observatory 20/129 / The display continued 7 hours. / Boston, U.S.A. / "The night appears to have been cloudy in England and nothing unusual was seen." [I; 1818. Denning, William Frederick. "The Great Meteoric Shower of November." Observatory, 20 (1897): 123-129, 163-169, 196-203, 237-244, 271-277, 304-310, 341-348, 371-377, at 128.]


1833 Nov. 12-13 / Maximum at 4 a.m. / N. Eng, Ohio, Missouri, Louisiana / A. J. Sci 26-142. [I; 1819. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science,  26 (1834): 132-174, at 142. "The maximum which was at 4 oçlock at New Haven, would have been at 3 o'clock in the western part of Ohio, and half past 2 o'clock in Missouri and Louisiana; but in each case, it is said to have been about 4 o'clock." Olmsted recognized that the meteor shower's source, "or cloud," was "nearly stationary with respect to the earth, and beyond the influence of its rotation."]


1833 Nov 12-13 / In "Arctic Land Expedition" no mention by Back of meteors. [I; 1820. Back, George. Narrative of the Arctic land expedition.... London: John Murray, 1836, at 205-206, 564. Back was at Fort Reliance in the Canadian Arctic, making regular observations of auroral phenomena, but he makes no mention of meteors; and, this night may have been overcast with clouds.]


1833 Nov 12-13 / See at least to 1837. [I; 1821.]


1833 Nov 13 / rainmetsq's. / Concurrent sinking of land (an acre and a half) near Hudson / q or trembles of earth near Lynchburg, Vaat Harvard College, a fall of rain without a cloud in the sky / Mag. Nat. Hist. 7-291, quoting Am J. Sci, vol 25. [I; 1822. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 291. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 25 (1834): 363-411, at 398. "Rain from a clear sky." American Journal of Science, 36 (1839): 178.]


1833 Nov. 13 / A. J. Sci 25-376 / Bowling Green, Missouri, at 4 a.m. / Hartford, Conn., first noticed on 12th - 13th, midnight. / New Haven, 11 p.m., 12th / N.Y. City, midnight (p. 387) / Richmond, Va., 12:45. But seems all agree maximum ab. 4 a.m. [I; 1823. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science,  25 (1834): 363-411, at 381, 387.]


1833 Nov 13 / In the north of Washington, the meteors were truer to radiant point in Leo than in south, ac to Prof. Hitchcock. / A. J. Sci 25-395. [I; 1824. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 25 (1834): 363-411, at 395. The article was by Denison Olmsted, (not by Edward Hitchcock).]


1833 Nov 13 / Ac to one cor, a star of rising and falling mag in the radiant point. / A. J. Sci 26-139. [I; 1825. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 26 (1834): 132-174, at  139-140. "There is one thing that I have not seen noticed by me had I not kept my eye on the centre or point, from whence the meteors all shot forth, for a considerable time; and that was, an appearance of a star, less at first than the stars of the constellation by which it was surrounded; but it would increase until it was much larger than the stars, then totally disappear from ten to fifteen minutes, and then appear again; but the meteors shot forth in greater numbers in the interval between the appearances above mentioned."]


1833 Nov 13 / at Emittsburg, Maryland / First at 3 a.m. / A. J. Sci 25-374. [I; 1826. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 25 (1834): 363-411, at 373-374.]


1833 Nov / Leonids / Chichester fog like that of 1833. [I; 1827. The fog at Chichester, on November 12, 1833, (not "1832"), preceded the earthquake on November 13, 1833. A sulphurous fog in Germany was attributed to Etna in November of 1832. See: 1832 Nov. 13, (I: 1738 & 1739), and, 1833 Nov. 13, (I; 1832).]


1833 Nov 13 / at Lynchburg, Va / First between 2 a.m.and 3 a.m. / A. J. Sci 25-376. [I; 1828. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 25 (1834): 363-411, at 376.]


1833 Nov. 13 / Began 3:30 a.m. in Ohio. / A.J.S. 25-376. [I; 1829. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 25 (1834): 363-411, at 377.]


1833 Nov. 13 / Augusta, Ga / Mets plentiful from 9 p.m. till the stream. / A.J.S. 25-380. [I; 1830. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 25 (1834): 363-411, at 380.]


1833 Nov 13 / Auroral lights seen. / A.J.S. 26-168. [I; 1831. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 26 (1834): 132-174, at 168.]


1833 Nov. 13 / 3:40 a.m. / Q at Chichester, Eng., in a fog said been like that which accompanied q., Lisbon, 1807 and 1816. / BA 54. / See Sept 18. [I; 1832. Mallet, 241-242. Milne, David. "Notices of Earthquake-Shocks felt in Great Britain...." Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, 31 (1841): 92-122, at 120. Milne gives the time of the first shock as "2h 40' A.M."; however, the time was reported, in 1833, as 3:40 AM. See: 1833 Nov. 13 / 3:40 a.m., (I; 1836).]


1833 Nov. 13 / 8 a.m. / Rain from a cloudless sky at Hartford, Conn. / A. J. Sci 25-398. [I; 1833. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 25 (1834): 363-411, at 398.]


1833 Nov / Leonids / Gelat substance / See June 17, 1890. [I; 1834. See: 1890 June 17, (VI: 2022 & 2024).]


1833 Nov. 13 / q and fog / Chichester, Dorsetshire / thick fog previous day / Rept BA, 54/241. [I; 1835. Mallet, 241-242.]


1833 Nov. 13 / 3:40 a.m. / Chichester / severe q. and loud rumbling sound / 5:45 a.m. / another, not so severe / L.T., Nov 15/2/d/. [I; 1836. "Chichester, Nov. 13." London Times, November 15, 1833, p. 2 c. 4. "A most severe shock of an earthquake was experienced this morning, about 20 minutes before 4 o'clock, by the inhabitants of this city, attended with a loud rumbling noise; the shock was so great that it caused the town-clock as well as many others to strike. At a quarter before 6 o'clock a second shock was felt, but not so violent as the first. This is the third shock of an earthquake which has been felt in this neighbourhood within these three months." David Milne and Fort's note gave the time of the first shock as "2:40"; but, this article gives the time as 3:40 AM. See: 1833 Nov 13 / 3:40 a.m., (I; 1832).]


1833 Nov 13 / For aurora so shifting with stars, see Feb 4, 1872. [I; 1837. See: 1872 Feb 4, (IV; 623).]


1833 Nov. 13 / 4 a.m. / q / Chichester / Mag Nat Hist 7-292. [I; 1838. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 292. On November 12 and 13, a fog was observed between Wimborne and London, which dispersed "about 8 A.M.on the 13th." Clarke considered the fog "of a singular character" rapidly rising and forming into clouds "as steam rises from linen held before a fire," and associated its appearance and dispersal with the earthquake.]


1833 Nov 13 / A witness's account in N.Y. Times, 1879, Nov. 9-2-7. [I; 1839. Campbell, J.H. "Meteoric Showers." New York Times, November 9, 1879, p. 2 c. 7.]


1833 Nov. 13 / See other mets great. [I; 1840.]


1833 Nov. 13 / Ship in Lat 51N, Long 20Wsaw nothing. / Nothingby ships Lat 2N, Long 41W. / A.J.S. 25-399 / At 36N, W.61, toward morning, 4 or 5 a minute. / Gulf of Mexicoseveral meteors; nothing unusual until 3 a.m.; then many. / Bet Lat 23N., Long. 82many after 4 a.m. [I; 1841.1, 1841.2. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 25 (1834): 363-411, at 399-400.]


1833 Nov 13 / Radiant point in Leo rises ab 11 p.m., which is U.S. corresponds with 4 a.m. Greenwich time. / A. J. Sci 2/43/78. [I; 1842. Newton, Hubert Anson. "Shooting Stars in November, 1866." American Journal of Science, s. 2 v. 43 (1867): 78-88, at 78.]


1833 Nov 14 / morning / Slight repetition of mets from Leo in Maryland / A. J. Sci 25-375. [I; 1843. Olmsted, Denison. "Observations on the Meteors of November 13th, 1833." American Journal of Science, 25 (1834): 363-411, at 375-376.]


1833 Nov / Great Lyrids / Ap. 20, 1803. [I; 1844. See: 1803 Ap. 20, (I; 76).]


1833 Nov. / Leonids / See Nov., 1872. [I; 1845. See: 1872 Nov 13, (IV; 1023).]


1833 Nov. 24 / Vesuvius in eruption / Mag. Nat Hist 7-292. [I; 1846. Clarke, William Branwhite. "On certain recent Meteoric Phenomena...." Magazine of Natural History, 7 (July 1834): 289-308, at 292.]


[1833 Nov 24 /] 1838 Nov. 24 / Volc. / Palembang, Java / A. J. Sci 29-364. [I; 2357. "Volcanic eruption." American Journal of Science, 29 (1835-1836): 364. The Kaba volcano. Backer, 880. Backer only notes an earthquake at Batavia.]


1833 Nov 25 / Blansko, Moravia, Austria / (F). [I; 1847. Fletcher, 100. This is the Blansko meteorite. Greg, 74-75.]


1833 Nov. 25 / Presburg / Aue, Hungary / 3 stones / BA 49/2 / See for other mets of Hungary. [I; 1848. Powell, Baden. "A Catalogue of Observations of Luminous Meteors." Report of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1849, 1-53, at 2 and 32. Greg, 74-75. Lowe, 136. Presburg is the German name for Bratislava, (Slovakia). This is the Blansko meteorite.]


1833 Nov 25 / (F.) / Metite / Blansko, Moravia / For description, see Athenaeum, before Jan 13, 1834. / See May 22, '08. [I; 1849. Fletcher, 100. "A Remarkable Meteor." Athenæum, 1834 (no. 324; January 11): 36. This is the Blansko meteorite.]


[1833 end of Nov. Wrong date. See: 1833 Aug 29, (I; 1850).]


1833 Dec / Formosa / II / [Medium quake / BA 1911]. [I; 1851. A class II earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1833 Dec 4 / Mexico / I. [I; 1852. A class I earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1833 Dec 7 / Japan (Sado) / and sea waves / II. [I; 1853. A class II earthquake. Milne, 705.]


1833 Dec 11 / Exceptional fall mets / Parma / L.T., 1837, Jan 4/6/2. [I; 1854. "In the night...." London Times, January 4, 1837, p. 6 c. 2. "In the night of the 11th Dec. a great number of shooting stars were seen at Parma; they are described as more numerous than those observed on November 13. From a quarter before 8 till midnight there were no less than 50, equalling in brilliancy stars of the first order, 12 of which were as bright as Jupiter. From midnight till half-past 6 in the morning, 15 resembling stars of the second magnitude, were observed, with a number of smaller size. The direction of the greater portion was from east to west. A nearly similar phenomenon was observed at Parma during the night of the 11th of December, 1833." See: 1836 Dec 11, (I; 2154).]


1833 Dec 11 / Herefordshire / Fireball / BA 60. [I; 1855. Greg, 74.]


1833 Dec 11 / Similar phe at Parma, to Dec 11, 1836 / See. [I; 1856. See: 1836 Dec 11, (I; 2154).]


1833 Dec 12 / Great meteor / Yucatan / C.R. 6/866 / Told of in a book on a voyage to Yucatan. / So in Yucatan? [I; 1857. "M. [Charles-Hippolyte] de Paravey adresse deux extraits...." Comptes Rendus, 6 (1838): 866. Waldeck, Frédéric de Waldeck. Voyage pittoresque et archéologique dans la province d'Yucatan (Amérique Centrale), pendant les années 1834 et 1836. Paris: Bellizard Dufour, 1838, 1-2. In the Yucatan, but not in Greg's Catalog.]


1833 Dec. 14 / 3rd attack on K. Hauser. [A; 106.]


1833 Dec 18 / [L.T.], 2-e / Chichester / mill blown down? [I; 1858. "Wednesday afternoon...." London Times, December 18, 1833, p. 2 c. 5. "Wednesday afternoon a post windmill at Chidham, near Chicester, having been left with the sails expanded to dry, was blown up and down by a whirlwind in a few minutes. The proprietor left the mill in the care of a lad, and on his return saw only a wreck left behind. It was insured, but some doubt exists whether he can claim the amount, it having been blown down.Lewes Advertiser."]


1833 Dec 27 or 28 / Stones at Volhynia, Russia / BA 60. [I; 1859. Greg, 74.]

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